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Editorial Results (free)

1. Monsanto Pays $80 Million to Settle Accounting Charges -

Monsanto will pay an $80 million penalty and several executives will pay smaller amounts to settle federal allegations that the agribusiness giant misstated its earnings by not properly disclosing the costs of a rebate program for its Roundup weed-killer.

2. Murphy Joins Paragon’s Aircraft Lending -

Ronald Murphy has joined Paragon Bank as vice president, aircraft lending. Murphy – who worked at Paragon from 2005 to 2008 as senior vice president, aircraft lending – will originate and service aircraft loans for the bank by developing relationships with dealers, brokers and end users of business aircraft.

3. Early Voting Opens in Tennessee Presidential Primaries -

Tennesseans can begin casting their ballots in the presidential primaries on Wednesday, Feb. 10, the day after the votes were counted in New Hampshire on the political road to the summer conventions.

4. McQueen Defends TNReady Tests Following Delays -

When school systems across the state began logging onto the state of Tennessee’s site for the first wave of TNReady math and language arts achievement tests Monday, Feb. 8, the network that connected all of those local servers was “saturated” doing other things, according to state education officials.

5. Last Word: TN(not)Ready, Hatiloo Expands and Tax Season Advice -

So what do you do when the test-makers fail the test?

You go back to the old test in the case of the Tennessee Education Department and the TNReady tests.
These were the new tests for the new statewide student achievement standards that replaced Common Core standards.
They can only be taken online.
But the system crashed Monday, which was the day that all of the preparation in the last year was geared toward. That included two tests locally of the on-line capacity and other technical standards necessary to make this go smoothly.
Here is a good account of what happened statewide and locally with a few other stops across the state to take in the scope of how big a failure this was and what failed.

6. University of Memphis Notebook: Burrell Rebounds From Suspension, Hearn Sets Record -

No one much enjoyed the Tigers’ 20-point loss to Connecticut last Thursday, Feb. 4, at FedExForum. Senior Trahson Burrell perhaps suffered even more.

Suspended for what University of Memphis coach Josh Pastner has described as an “internal matter,” Burrell sat out the entire game after being left in the locker room for the second half of the game at SMU.

7. Workforce Effort Leaders Talk About Skills Gap -

Before Olympus Corp. announced last month its plan to locate a service and distribution center in Bartlett, a bigger medical device manufacturing company was on the hook for the town.

8. Last Word: Leaving Warren and Tulane, New Police Brass and Losing Housing -

Post Super Bowl edition of Last Word: Broncos 24 – Panthers 10 – Lady Gaga’s National Anthem kudos – Coldplay/Bruno Mars/Beyonce ambitious halftime extravaganza got lost in spots by bad sound.

9. LinkedIn Shares Plunge Almost 44 Percent -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Investors have given LinkedIn a poor job review in the form of a dramatic sell-off that wiped out nearly $10 billion in the professional networking service's market value after it issued a surprise forecast for slower growth this year.

10. Twitter Moves to Actively Seek Out Terrorist Supporters -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Twitter is now using spam-fighting technology to seek out accounts that might be promoting terrorist activity and is examining other accounts related to those flagged for possible removal, the company announced Friday.

11. Midtown Neighborhood Starts 2016 Off With a Bang -

Touted as Midtown’s first working-class neighborhood, established in 1890, the Mount Arlington subdivision in the Cooper-Young district contains 856 properties with an average year built of 1927.

12. Oak Court Mall, United Way To Offer Free Tax Services -

Oak Court Mall is teaming up with United Way of the Mid-South to offer free income tax preparation services on several upcoming Saturday afternoons, starting this weekend.

United Way volunteers will be at the mall Saturday, Feb. 6, from noon to 6 p.m. to offer tax help at no cost to taxpayers with a household income of $54,000 or less. The volunteers, who are IRS-certified, are trained to help tax filers claim qualifying credits and will provide information about community services and other beneficial financial resources.

13. 2 Memphis Nonprofits Among ‘Listen for Good’ Grantees -

Memphis nonprofits A Step Ahead and SRVS are among 19 organizations selected by the Fund for Shared Insight for the inaugural cohort of “Listen for Good” grantees.

Listen for Good, a collaborative effort among several funders – including the Memphis-based Plough Foundation – is dedicated to building the practice of listening to the people nonprofits and foundations seek to help. In its first year, the initiative will develop simple, systematic ways of obtaining feedback from nonprofits that receive foundation funding, as well as help nonprofits obtain input from the people they directly serve.

14. Accounting Firm Celebrates Centennial With Service -

The accounting firm of Reynolds, Bone & Griesbeck is celebrating its 100th anniversary this year by giving back.

Managing partner John Griesbeck said the firm had the community in mind when planning its centennial celebration. As a result, firm employees will volunteer and give back to several local organizations for 100 days straight starting this spring.

15. Memphis Symphony Receives $50K Grant -

The Memphis Symphony Orchestra has been awarded a grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation for planning a musician diversity fellowship program.

The foundation, which invests in the arts and cultural heritage, has been a strong supporter of MSO innovation and community engagement work in the past.

16. Equality of Partners a Problem for Titan Owners -

It’s the question that won’t go away – will the Tennessee Titans be sold. On the day the Titans formally introduced Jon Robinson as general manager and Mike Mularkey as head coach, team president Steve Underwood admitted that the NFL is not happy with the team’s ownership structure, which is split evenly among Bud Adams’ heirs.

17. Cannon Wright Blount Senior Tax Manager Answers Questions -

The busy time of the year is fast approaching for Dan Walker, senior tax manager with Cannon Wright Blount.

18. Editorial | Help Wanted: Top Cop With View Beyond the Ranks -

Finding the city’s next top cop is the most important police director selection in a generation.

And we believe the next Memphis Police Department director must be more than a leader of the ranks.

19. New Brass -

Just days before Toney Armstrong was off the city payroll, his successor as interim director of the Memphis Police Department, Michael Rallings, was getting used to the attention and ring kissing that comes with being the city’s top cop.

20. Last Word: EW&F, Midtown Rent Rise and A Closer Look At The Pyramid Deal -

One seemingly ordinary winter’s night in Downtown Memphis, I was going from event to event focused on work – specifically trying to stay on a schedule in which several things I wanted to cover were happening at the same time.
That is usually when you miss the experience that is Memphis on an everyday but definitely not ordinary basis.
So I get in a parking garage elevator and on the next floor David Porter – of Stax Records fame – gets on and he introduces me to his friend, Maurice White – the founder of Earth Wind and Fire. They too are trying to be in several places at the same time.
As they went their way and I went mine, I remember thinking this is quite a special place.
The encounter slowed my stride a bit and took some of the edge off the schedule – noticing for the first time how many people were out on a winter’s night in our city having nothing but a good time made better by all of us going our different ways.
White, who was from Memphis, died Thursday with his band’s music stronger and more relevant than ever.
If you grew up listening to EWF when the songs were new, you know that the bright and funky sound and the positive, affirming, and diverse identity of this music was quite intentional at a time when there was plenty going on that could have pushed it the other way.
If your parents or grandparents grew up listening to EWF, this music is a part of your family’s tradition that calls to mind special occasions and even your own mild surprise the first time you found yourself dancing to it with your children.
And if your folks’ vinyl record collection from back in the day included Earth Wind and Fire, that was one of the ones you listened to when they weren’t around and one of the ones you took with you when you got a place of your own.

21. Bill Seeks Private Transportation Partnerships in Tennessee -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — A bipartisan legislative proposal would clear the way for public-private partnerships on transportation projects in Tennessee.

Republican Sen. Bill Ketron of Murfreesboro said at a press conference at the state Capitol on Wednesday that the bill would allow state and local governments to enter into agreements with private vendors to build and operate light rail and roads to help alleviate traffic congestion.

22. 2 Memphis Nonprofits Among ‘Listen for Good’ Grantees -

Memphis nonprofits A Step Ahead and SRVS are among 19 organizations selected by the Fund for Shared Insight for the inaugural cohort of “Listen for Good” grantees.

Listen for Good, a collaborative effort among several funders – including the Memphis-based Plough Foundation – is dedicated to building the practice of listening to the people nonprofits and foundations seek to help. In its first year, the initiative will develop simple, systematic ways of obtaining feedback from nonprofits that receive foundation funding, as well as help nonprofits obtain input from the people they directly serve.

23. Accounting Firm Celebrates Centennial With Service -

The accounting firm of Reynolds, Bone & Griesbeck is celebrating its 100th anniversary this year by giving back.

Managing partner John Griesbeck said the firm had the community in mind when planning its centennial celebration. As a result, firm employees will volunteer and give back to several local organizations for 100 days straight starting this spring.

24. Memphis Symphony Receives $50K Grant -

The Memphis Symphony Orchestra has been awarded a grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation for planning a musician diversity fellowship program.

The foundation, which invests in the arts and cultural heritage, has been a strong supporter of MSO innovation and community engagement work in the past.

25. Mike Norvell Era Starts with Optimism And a Raise-the-Bar Recruiting Class -

In a few minutes, first-year coach Mike Norvell would be standing behind a lectern providing assembled media a summary of his first recruiting class at the University of Memphis.

“Not a good class,” he would say, “a great class, a home-run-hitting class.”

26. Last Word: History As Geology, Beyond the Greensward and City Hall's HR Director -

History can be like geology once you get it in something that isn’t in the form of a book.
There are layers on top of layers that you may not ever see or miss until a site is wiped clean for the next present that used to be the future and will eventually become the past.
That’s the case with the city’s historic Medical Center where much has come and gone several times over as our city’s considerable investment in medicine and health approaches the end of its second century.
Health Sciences Park used to be the site of a hospital. You would think something as massive as the tower of Baptist Memorial Hospital’s central campus on Union Avenue would be missed. Yet even those of us who grew up with its presence drive past it every day without a thought of what was once there.
The same with the site of Russwood Park on the north side of Madison Avenue and the old bus barns where Beale used to run further east than it does now.
In recent years, new facilities have arisen as the medical center makes itself over in a kind of economic regeneration without a comprehensive plan.
There is now an effort to come up with a comprehensive plan for the area that is more than different ventures buying or leasing land and making plans for their needs.
Eight of the institutions in the area have hired a consulting firm to develop a master plan that includes not just facilities but residential and retail areas.
It’s a significant step for an area that remains intriguing for those of us trying to remember what was where and how long some of the survivors have been holding out in much different streetscapes than were there when they arrived.
The Masonic lodge at the dead end of Dunlap into Union Avenue is a survivor. It’s where the funerals were held for some of those killed in the 1925 river disaster in which Tom Lee rescued so many others.
The lodge at one time had an earth-shaking pipe organ that I had the rare privilege of hearing at a concert following its restoration in the 1980s – the ancient 1980s.
And I still wonder about the tiny medical textbook storefront and how it endures at a time when students rent books and others use digital versions.
There are still remnants of the porous border between the medical center and the Union Avenue auto row that used to exist and arose around the old Ford plant.

27. Harwell: Durham Scandal Won't Affect Gubernatorial Decision -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — House Speaker Beth Harwell said Tuesday that the scandal surrounding a Republican lawmaker who has gone on hiatus amid sexual harassment allegations shouldn't damage her prospects as a serious gubernatorial candidate in Tennessee.

28. Boyd: Tennessee Shifting to ‘Product Development’ Site Selection -

Elected officials are going to say it if they talk long enough about economic development.

They will talk about how quality of life plays a role in business growth, specifically the move or expansion of corporations into a city or region they weren’t in previously.

29. Minority Leader Harris Confident Even on Wrong Side of Supermajority -

Lee Harris says he ran for state Senate because he felt Memphis could do better on Capitol Hill, defeating Ophelia Ford in 2014.

30. Details of Bass Pro-St. Jude Pinch Plan Near -

St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital and Bass Pro Shops have agreed on a tentative and general plan for future development of the Pinch District, according to Memphis City Council member Berlin Boyd.

31. Packed Overton Park Traffic Town Hall Seeks View Beyond Greensward -

Architect and urban planner Steve Auterman stood before a standing-room-only crowd at the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art Tuesday, Feb. 2, and made the case for a broader vision of Overton Park.

To Auterman, of Looney Ricks Kiss, it’s a still-developing plan that’s larger than the volatile issue of the Memphis Zoo’s overflow parking on the greensward.

32. Last Word: Rallings Meets the Council, Million Dollar Auditions & A Pinch Plan Emerges -

His second day on the job, the new Memphis Police Director, Michael Rallings, met the Memphis City Council and discovered just what a huge issue police body cameras are – if he didn’t know that already.
His answers to some pointed questions about when police can turn off those cameras and why made this an uneven first encounter.
Council members told him they got an earful from constituents over the weekend in the wake of the fatal police shooting of Johnathan Bratcher in South Memphis. And some of the reaction they got was to reports that a police dispatcher ordered police trying out the body cameras to turn them off as they arrived at the scene of the shooting.
There are three cameras being tested. And one of the officers with them showed up after the shooting, according to police.
Meanwhile, Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland still didn’t have a timetable for the roll-out of the cameras but did offer some specifics including hiring by the MPD of 10 new personnel to deal with the handling of what the camera records.
And Strickland’s intention is to pay for it out of the existing MPD budget.

33. Plan to Spin Off Air Traffic Control Generates Turbulence -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The air traffic control system that choreographs the roughly 7,000 aircraft in U.S. skies at any given moment is the most complex, but also one of the safest, in the world — and rarely a thought in the minds of the millions of travelers who rely on it.

34. Oak Court Mall, United Way To Offer Free Tax Services -

Oak Court Mall is teaming up with United Way of the Mid-South to offer free income tax preparation services on several upcoming Saturday afternoons, starting this weekend.

United Way volunteers will be at the mall Saturday, Feb. 6, from noon to 6 p.m. to offer tax help at no cost to taxpayers with a household income of $54,000 or less. The volunteers, who are IRS-certified, are trained to help tax filers claim qualifying credits and will provide information about community services and other beneficial financial resources.

35. Pet Rehab, Fitness Practice Launches in East Memphis -

The young, injured patients often in need of rehabilitation and physical therapy who are brought to Dr. Roxana Caraballo’s new East Memphis center can’t speak for themselves or necessarily demonstrate where and why they hurt.

36. Council Probes Police Body Camera Delay -

Memphis City Council members talk Tuesday, Feb. 2, about when police body cameras might be ready for action.

And there will probably be questions at the 11 a.m. executive session about whether a limited test use of the cameras recorded any of last week’s fatal police shooting of Johnathan Bratcher in South Memphis.

37. Abbott to Buy Medical Test Provider Alere -

NEW YORK (AP) — Abbott Laboratories will buy Alere for $4.8 billion as it tries to expand its medical-testing business.

The deal is worth $5.8 billion when restricted stock, stock options and preferred shares are included, the company said Monday.

38. Last Word: Groundhog Day's Long Shadow, Minority Percentage & The Value of Sports -

After the January into February weekend we had with its outbreak of spring fever, you might wonder if groundhogs are allowed to change their minds or if shadows that are the result of television lights count as a prediction on the winter’s length.
Or maybe it would be appropriate to have a weather map that includes the Groundhog Day immunity zones – areas where the long shadow of the groundhog does not venture.
Note to television meteorologists: This would in no way interfere with your right to declare large parts of your viewing areas as places of "potentially severe weather" far into the future. But you will need a different color for the Groundhog Immunity Zones.

39. Q&A: U of M’s Dan Pallme Points to Shipping Changes, Challenges in 2016 -

Dan Pallme is heavily involved in the University of Memphis’ logistics industry departments. He runs the Freight Transportation Leadership Academy, a program that consists of technical tours, sessions with industry experts, and overviews of historic and current trends to encourage leadership in Memphis’ primary modes: rail, river, road and runway.
He is also the senior associate director and freight industry liaison for the U of M’s Intermodal Freight Transportation Institute and the private-sector coordinator for the Southeast Transportation Workforce Center. He has worked with air, rail and trucking companies over the past 25 years.

40. Fenced Out -

There’s a major problem in Memphis when it comes to minorities: African-Americans make up 63 percent of the population but garner less than 1 percent of total business receipts within Memphis, according to the most recent U.S. Census data.

41. Black-Owned Business Revenue Drops in Memphis -

Bad has turned to worse, according to the latest data from the U.S. Census Bureau's Survey of Business Owners.

Memphis’ population is majority African-American, but black-owned establishments earn only 0.83 percent of business revenue citywide.

42. Ford's 2015 Pretax Profit Jumps on Stronger sales -

DEARBORN, Mich. (AP) — Higher sales in most of the world helped Ford Motor Co. achieve a record pretax profit in 2015, but investors remain skittish that the good news won't keep coming.

43. Wal-Mart's Shutdown Creates New Food Deserts -

FAIRFIELD, Ala. (AP) — Wal-Mart's decision to shutter 154 stores across the country means that, starting Thursday, residents without cars in a neighborhood near a historically black college outside Birmingham, Alabama, will have to cross dangerous roadways on foot to get fresh produce and meat. Come Friday, folks in Coal Hill, Arkansas, will need to drive 15 miles to get to the nearest supermarket and pharmacy. Low-income neighbors of Wichita State University in Kansas, too, will be losing quick access to fresh groceries.

44. Medical Startup Trades Texas for Germantown -

David Leon’s medical device startup is the latest addition to a rapidly expanding health care, biotech and life sciences landscape in the Memphis area.

45. SCS Board Authorizes More Discussions On Crosstown High -

Shelby County Schools board members have authorized superintendent Dorsey Hopson to continue discussions about a Crosstown High School.

The board approved a resolution Tuesday, Jan. 26, that also sets some parameters for the talks with the developers of Crosstown Concourse and Christian Brothers University about the collaboration.

46. US Home Prices Rise in November; All-Time Highs in 4 Cities -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. home prices increased at a faster clip in November, the gains fueled by solid hiring growth, historically low mortgage rates and a shortage of houses on the market.

47. Verso Files For Bankruptcy Reorganization -

Verso Corp. filed Tuesday, Jan. 26, for Chapter 11 federal bankruptcy reorganization.

David J. Paterson, the president and CEO of the North American producer of printing, specialty papers and pulp, described the decision to file for reorganization as “difficult.”

48. U of M Notebook: ‘Bad Loss,’ Says Josh Pastner -

A two-game losing streak in a college basketball season isn’t that unusual. But for the University of Memphis, the current two-game skid has set off alarms.

The Tigers’ strength this season has been their defense. But at Cincinnati last Thursday the Bearcats shot 50 percent in beating Memphis 76-72. A dreadful East Carolina team scored its first American Athletic Conference victory on Sunday, Jan. 23, in an 84-83 win over Memphis at FedExForum and shot 61.5 percent in the first half. Guard B.J. Tyson hit 6 of 10 shots from long range and finished with 26 points.

49. Last Word: The Big Fizzle, John Jay Hooker's Exit And "A Great Sports Town" -

Everybody talks about the weather but nobody does anything about it – isn’t that how the saying goes?
In our case, it might be better to say everybody talks about the television weather coverage but nobody does anything about it.
As we all know now, Memphis dodged the “blizzard” warning artfully and passive-aggressively teased by several television stations who shall go un-named here because they know who they are and you do too.
That’s because they spent much of the day of "the blizzard that wasn’t" whining about the reaction from viewers who complained about the hype and then the promos the stations ran the day of the big fizzle.
We didn’t get much in the way of snow in Memphis, but we got a couple of feet of hype.

50. Nearly 7,000 Weekend Flights Canceled, and More on the Way -

Airlines canceled nearly 7,000 weekend flights and started to cut Monday service as the ripple effects of driving snow and ice that brought many East Coast airports to a standstill drifted into the next work week.

51. The Week Ahead: Jan. 25, 2016 -

We hope everyone survived Snow Terror ‘16 and is looking forward to a fun, productive week ahead that’s free of milk and bread runs. (Saturday’s high temp is 60 degrees – woohoo!) Here’s your weekly rundown of events and happenings worth paying attention to…

52. Le Bonheur CEO Talks Big Development Projects on Tap -

It’s something of an understatement to say that Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital has big plans for 2016 and beyond.

Walking through several of the big-budget development projects on tap for the hospital over the short and long term, Le Bonheur president and CEO Meri Armour describes this as a consequential moment for the 2,300-employee health care organization. Expansions of service, facilities, treatment and more are all on the way for a hospital built around the fact that inside the 100 mile-radius around Memphis, according to Armour, there are about 1.6 million children.

53. Blight Authority of Memphis Convenes to Tackle Problem Properties -

“This is historic,” attorney Steve Barlow said at the inaugural meeting of the Blight Authority of Memphis, held Thursday, Jan. 21, at the Downtown Memphis Commission’s office.

54. SCS Optional Applications Available Jan. 25 -

Parents enrolling their children in Shelby County Schools’ optional program for the 2016-2017 school year can begin picking up applications Monday, Jan. 25, at the school system’s Division of Optional Schools and Advanced Academics, 160 N. Hollywood St.

55. Triumph Bank Names Chief Banking Officer -

Triumph Bank has tapped Britin “Brit” Boatright as executive vice president and chief banking officer.

56. In the Game -

Way back in the 1990s, perhaps before the Grizzlies and FedExForum were even a twinkle in anyone’s eye, Chris Wallace came to Memphis and The Pyramid for a preseason NBA game featuring Michael Jordan and the Chicago Bulls.

57. Impatient Clemmons Anxious for Minority Voice to Be Heard -

Democratic state Rep. John Ray Clemmons is only halfway through his first two-year term representing District 55 in Nashville. But he’s not willing to wait years to speak out or push for change.

58. Last Word: Winter Pre-Game Show, The Zoo Goes To Court And Hotel Fever -

You wouldn’t call this the eye of the storm, would you? We’ll go with calling this the pre-game show for the winter storm that is supposed to show up in Memphis at around 7 a.m. Friday morning. Think Super Bowl pre-game.
There is so much that’s been said in advance of this that whatever happens, it might be hard to live up to the preparation.
Much of the rest of this is like an arms race of sorts.
Consider the equipment list from Memphis International Airport.
10 snow brooms, 12 plow trucks, four de-icing trucks each with 40,000 gallons of deicer, four 2-ton salt spreaders and four tractors to keep the runways clear.
The city of Memphis Public Works division has eight snow plows ready to roll on major thoroughfares if the snow gets within the three-inch mark. A set of 16 salt trucks were to load up at 11 p.m. Thursday evening to begin applying salt and sand when needed, with continual inspections of road conditions. And that includes some pre-treated priority areas.
And then there was this truly unusual announcement from Shelby County Schools: the optional school parent camp-out was suspended Thursday evening because of the weather.
This is the camp out the school system tries its best to discourage each and every year at this time. That includes bar-coded applications and repeatedly emphasizing that 99.9 percent of those with the bar-coded applications get their first choice of optional schools, making the camp-out unnecessary. The applications are handed out over several days and are then time-stamped when they are turned in for consideration.
Nevertheless, the tents go up each year and voices are raised in the debate about whether this is parents who care more or parents who are carried away.
This year, the school system, while emphasizing that it “does not authorize or direct” the camp-out, says the line will resume Sunday at 7 a.m.
The school system also adds: “The current process being managed by parents will be recognized due to potential health and safety risks related to forecasted inclement weather.”
But is there a line to get back in line? And when does that start?

59. Strickland Names Interim Memphis Police Director -

Mayor Jim Strickland has chosen an interim Memphis Police director from inside the ranks, naming his pick two weeks to the day after current director Toney Armstrong announced he’s retiring from the role.

60. Who’s In Charge? -

IT MIGHT BE RIGHT, BUT IT’S FLAT WRONG. A week or so ago, 27 trees disappeared from Overton Park’s greensward – a fancy word for yours and my yard since Overton Park belongs to us.

61. Butch Jones Builds for Championship Run With Staff Tweaks -

Tennessee football coach Butch Jones got serious about taking the next step with his football program not long after his team’s 45-6 victory over Northwestern in the Jan. 1 Outback Bowl.

Jones fired defensive coordinator John Jancek on Jan. 6, and three days later hired his top candidate for the opening, Bob Shoop of Penn State.

62. Last Word: The View Across The Harbor, Crosstown Undercurrents and Bonnaroo -

The fishing puns are overpowering as Bass Pro Shops expresses its interest in redeveloping Mud Island River Park, on the other side of the city harbor from the Pyramid Bass Pro Shops opened at just this past May.
Bass Pro Shops is one of five companies to express interest in Mud Island as part of the process by the Riverfront Development Corporation to go a different way with the park.
The RDC released the names of the companies Thursday.
Earlier this month, we outlined the RVC Outdoor Destinations proposal.
We don’t know nearly as much about what Bass Pro Shops has in mind or the other three firms.
All five now head for what amounts to a second round in which they submit specific plans to a search committee of the RDC including how they will pay for their plans.

63. The Persecution of Jeremy Durham -

Inhumane and unfair: That’s the only way to describe the “liberal media’s” treatment of state Rep. Jeremy Durham over the last month.

64. On Deadline -

What do the following phrases have in common: Due date, Editor’s concern, End point, Freelancer’s problem, Time limit, and Zero hour?

Answer: They have all been used as clues in crossword puzzles for the answer DEADLINE.

65. Morris Marketing Group Built on Strong Relationships -

In some respects, Valerie Morris’ career prepared her to open a PR and marketing agency, even if it didn’t always seem so obvious.

66. Crosstown High School Plans Emerge -

As more details emerged this week of a new high school in the mammoth Crosstown Concourse redevelopment, there remained many other details to work out before the August 2017 planned opening.

Crosstown High School, which would use the University of Memphis’ Campus School as a model, has been talked about behind the scenes since Gestalt Community Services pulled out of Concourse last year. SCS board members got their first look at the plan Tuesday, Jan. 19.

67. Xedo Launches Memphis Distribution Center -

After setting up its U.S. headquarters and a 240,000-square-foot distribution facility in Memphis, as well as lining up a local tax incentive package in late 2014, a tuxedo company with an online rental platform has started taking its first orders.

68. Last Word: Time and The Greensward, Crosstown High and Race and Sports -

Remember how the schools merger story of about five years ago would change by the hour at times? That story has met its equal in what is becoming the first major challenge of the new Strickland administration at City Hall – the Overton Park Greensward.
So much happened before noon Tuesday on the first day of the short work week that it required waiting for the dust to settle on several fronts.
Here is the latest on a very fluid and volatile situation that could very well change as you are reading this.
Luckily we report at a time when you can change stories on line to keep up with such changes.
Zoos and parks and protests featuring brass bands suggest to a casual observer that this is not very serious as controversies go.
And maybe that was the case about a year and a half ago when a group of high school students decided to block the gravel driveway from the zoo parking lot onto the greensward.
But consider this:
The Memphis Zoo is working toward a March 1 opening of its new exhibit, Zambezi River Hippo Camp, a $22-million attraction that from what we saw just a few months ago will likely draw big crowds to the zoo in the spring.
The zoo was preparing for that starting with the removal of 27 trees from the north end of the greensward.
The best Mayor Jim Strickland could get from both sides – the zoo and Overton Park Conservancy – at his meeting with them Tuesday was a commitment to take his proposal for mediation to their respective boards.
The zoo board has authorized its leaders to file a lawsuit in Chancery Court over the greensward and it’s very likely the zoo would go to court before the March 1 opening because of the crowds on their way.
If the work to come by the zoo in advance of the March 1 opening involves heavy machinery, the reaction is likely to draw a much bigger protest than the ones Memphis Police have so far watched from a distance without making arrests.
As in all pressing political dramas, this controversy has the accelerant of timing.

69. Crosstown High School Draft Proposal Unveiled -

Tentative plans for a Crosstown High School surfaced Tuesday, Jan. 19, after months of behind-the-scenes discussions.

A 450-student high school at Crosstown Concourse would be a part of the Shelby County Schools system but would have its own nonprofit board similar to the University of Memphis campus school. And it would be a partnership with Christian Brothers University, with CBU president John Smarrelli heading the school’s board.

70. Optional Schools Applications Available Jan. 25 -

Parents enrolling their children in Shelby County Schools’ optional program for the 2016-2017 school year can begin picking up applications Monday, Jan. 25, at the school system’s Division of Optional Schools and Advanced Academics, 160 N. Hollywood St.

71. Triumph Bank Names Chief Banking Officer -

Triumph Bank has tapped Britin “Brit” Boatright as executive vice president and chief banking officer.

72. Sledge Joins Paragon Private Banking Team -

Julia Sledge has joined Paragon Bank as portfolio manager in private banking. Sledge has more than 30 years of experience in the banking industry, holding leadership positions at both Union Planters Bank and Cadence Bank. In her new role, she’ll provide service and support to Paragon’s private banking team.

73. First Horizon CEO: 2015 Was a ‘Very Good Year’ -

The top brass at First Tennessee Bank’s parent company kicked off their first quarterly earnings presentation to analysts in 2016 with frequent allusion to some favorite themes.

74. Bend and a Beer: Yoga Classes and Craft Breweries Team Up -

MIAMI (AP) — Call it detox and retox: Around the country, yogis are jumping up from savasana and hopping onto a barstool as yoga classes are making their way into breweries.

While the teaching is traditional, the classes tend to attract newbies, especially men, says Beth Cosi, found of Bendy Brewski in Charleston, South Carolina and Memphis.

75. Last Word: Tri-State's Deal With First Tennessee, Matt Barnes' Fine and The Grind -

It sounds strange to refer to this as a holiday weekend – the anniversary of the birth of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.
Holidays suggest something different than the rededication to purpose so many of us stress as our definition of this day honoring the memory of a leader whose life made it difficult to imagine what our society would be like without his presence.
That we feel compelled to express the meaning of the day through actions and a recommitment to principles buffeted by reality reflects a hope that we wish to retain as first-hand memories of King’s life fade and his legacy endures.

76. Allegiant Chief Operating Officer to Step Down -

LAS VEGAS (AP) – The chief operating officer of Allegiant Air is resigning.

KTNV-TV reports (http://bit.ly/238oYOb) that 52-year-old Steve Harfts is leaving after serving in the position for about a year.

77. The Week Ahead: Jan. 18, 2016 -

How was your weekend Memphis? Here are some local events to keep on your radar this week, from a full slate of MLK activities to a David Bowie tribute to a Marco Rubio fundraiser…

78. Four Beale Street Proposals Feature Different Backgrounds -

Jeff Sanford fielded inquiries from 17 or 18 companies, local and out of town, expressing some level of interest in the contract to manage the Beale Street entertainment district.

79. Thousands Expected For MLK Day Memphis Cleanup -

Three local organizations are observing Martin Luther King Jr. Day with a citywide cleanup expected to draw thousands of Memphians.

80. OR Nurses Nationwide Donates $175,000 -

Several Memphis entities received 2015 year-end charitable gifts from OR Nurses Nationwide, which has offices in Memphis, Dallas and Houston.

Gifts of $25,000 each were given to Le Bonheur Children's Hospital, Church Health Center, Baptist College of Health Sciences School of Nursing and Youth Villages. A gift of $20,000 went to the University of Memphis' Loewenberg School of Nursing.

81. First Tennessee Invests in Tri-State Bank -

As of Dec. 31, Tri-State Bank of Memphis has secured almost $5 million in new capital, an investment fueled in part by an “unprecedented transaction” between it and First Tennessee Bank.

82. Council Members Settle In To New Assignments -

Memphis City Council members file the last of the paperwork Tuesday, Jan. 19, from the 2015 elections to put City Hall’s power transition on record.

Meanwhile, the six new members are learning on the job as they chair several committees following assignments by council chairman Kemp Conrad: Martavius Jones is chairman of the council audit committee; Patrice Robinson chairs the Memphis Light Gas and Water Division committee; Jamita Swearengen is chairwoman of the parks and neighborhoods committee; council member Philip Spinosa leads the personnel committee, usually the first committee session of the council day; Frank Colvett chairs the planning and zoning committee, which is the last session of the day before executive session; and Worth Morgan is chairman of the public safety committee.

83. It’s Time for Manning to Call it a Career -

No amount of film study has prepared Peyton Manning for this. He enters the NFL postseason uncertain about his football future. After 18 years as a pro and at the age of 39, his body is breaking down and his skills are slipping. Passes he once made with ease now wobble and sail off target.

84. 4 Applicants Up for Beale Street Gig -

A Fortune 500 corporation, the Memphis-based company behind the Delta Fair, a Memphis real estate management firm with office experience, and a newly formed group of Memphians with experience in real estate, entertainment and restaurants as well as commercial development and financing. Those are the four companies that have applied to manage the Beale Street entertainment district.

85. Are You Part of a Sandwich? -

Ray’s Take Being a member of the sandwich generation – adults who simultaneously care for children and aging parents – is becoming an increasingly familiar challenge.

It’s tough trying to make financial decisions to take care of loved ones today that may have a negative impact on your own future.

86. Fed Official: Low Oil Prices Affecting Central Bank Action -

A key Fed official assured Memphis business leaders during a breakfast address Thursday, Jan. 14, that interest rates won’t climb dramatically this year.

Jim Bullard, the president and CEO of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, told the Economic Club of Memphis that rates today are “crazy low compared to the historical experience in the U.S.” and will “remain accommodative well into the future.”

87. Haslam: No Gas Tax Push, For Now -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam confirmed Thursday, Jan. 14, that there won’t be a state gas tax hike proposal in this year’s session of the Tennessee Legislature.

But Haslam, who previously said he wasn’t necessarily pushing for such a tax hike as a solution to funding road projects, said that is the most likely future option.

88. Last Word: Overton Park's Restless Winter, Across The Harahan and Higher Ed -

It may be chilly outside, but it might as well be July on the Overton Park greensward with all of the political heat that is building.
The thermometer spiked when more than two dozen trees donated to the Overton Park Conservancy in 2012 were removed this week by the Memphis Zoo which is preparing for large crowds in March.
That’s when its new Zambezi Hippo River Camp exhibit opens to much anticipation and much fanfare.
That and the New Year’s Eve legal opinion favoring the zoo’s position on its use of the greensward for overflow parking set the stage for a dispute the administration of Mayor Jim Strickland has had to mediate at less than two weeks in office.

89. Memphis Zoo Removes Trees From Overton Park Greensward -

When the Overton Park Conservancy’s staff noticed 27 trees had been removed from the north end of the park’s greensward Monday, they immediately called Memphis Police.

The conservancy then began calling the other institutions in the park and found the Memphis Zoo had removed the trees donated to and planted by the conservancy four years ago.

90. Memphis Zoo Removes Trees From Overton Park Greensward -

When the Overton Park Conservancy’s staff noticed 27 trees had been removed from the north end of the park’s greensward Monday, they immediately called Memphis Police.

The conservancy then began calling the other institutions in the park and found the Memphis Zoo had removed the trees donated to and planted by the conservancy four years ago.

91. Laminack Takes Winding Journey To Creating Pyramid Stone -

Chuck Laminack was exhausted. He faced a long flight from China back to the U.S. and all he could think about was sleep.

So he approached the boarding agent in an attempt to upgrade his seat to first class and one that would allow him to really get comfortable on the flight. But his credit card was declined for the $3,600 charge, which was odd considering he always made sure the balance remained at zero.

92. Crime-Ridden, Neglected Apartments Come Under Fire -

Several Memphis apartment complexes with long records of neglect and crime issues are the targets of a renewed political and bureaucratic push to improve conditions.

The efforts are a new front in the recent city movement to tackle Memphis’ blight problem. And it’s a front that invites skepticism.

93. Stocks Sink in Late Trading; Consumer Stocks Take a Beating -

Stocks fell sharply in late afternoon trading Wednesday as a dismal start to the new year got even worse. The selling was concentrated on some of the biggest winners from last year such as Netflix and Amazon, both of which doubled in value in 2015.

94. Last Word: SOTU React, OPEB Comeback and NFL Nostalgia -

The day after the last State of the Union address by President Barack Obama here's a breakdown of the reaction from our delegation to Washington.
Democratic U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen emphasized Obama's references to criminal justice reform.
"I know he is also committed to criminal justice reform and I hope my colleagues will work together to put meaningful reform on his desk," Cohen said.
Republican U.S. Rep. Stephen Fincher tweeted, "We need a plan to keep America safe and make America strong. I did not hear that from the President tonight."
Republican U.S. Sen. Lamar Alexander: "If Pres. Obama focuses on what he agrees on with Congress instead of what we disagree on, there's quite a bit we could get done in 2016."
Republican U.S. Senator Bob Corker urged the "swift release" of U.S sailors being held overnight by Iran in a border dispute just before the speech.

95. Thousands Expected For MLK Day Memphis Cleanup -

Three local organizations are observing Martin Luther King Jr. Day with a citywide cleanup expected to draw thousands of Memphians.

96. What Are the Odds? -

I am writing this article as the Powerball lottery jackpot prepares to pay out $1.3 billion to some lucky fool – I mean lucky winner.

I’m always amazed at the long lines and hype surrounding these potential payouts from the lottery. It seems Americans just can’t pass up the possibility that, “I might win it.” So they stand in line, buy a ticket (or several) and hope.

97. Shelby County Mortgage Activity Solid in 2015 -

The Shelby County mortgage market had a strong 2015, and lenders expect the momentum to continue for the foreseeable future.

Among loans made at the time of purchase, banks and mortgage lenders made 9,368 mortgages in Shelby County during 2015, up 11 percent from the 8,470 mortgages during 2014, according to the latest data from real estate information company Chandler Reports, chandlerreports.com.

98. County Commission Approves Hacks Cross Contract, New Health Director -

Shelby County Commissioners approved Monday, Jan. 11, a $223,600 contract for engineering and environmental work on the Hacks Cross Road widening.

The contract with Powers Hill Design LLC is to make Hacks Cross a seven-lane road from Shelby Drive south to Stateline Road, a span of 1.8 miles.

99. US Stocks Veer Lower Following Another Drop in Price of Oil -

A slump in crude oil prices and other commodities weighed on stocks in afternoon trading Monday. Energy companies were among the biggest decliners as the price of crude oil sank to the lowest level in more than a decade. Investors also weighed the implications of another drop in China's stock market.

100. With SUV Look, Tech Touches, Chrysler Aims to Revive Minivan -

DETROIT (AP) — Thirty-three years ago, Chrysler invented the minivan. Now, it's reinventing it — with styling reminiscent of an SUV, high-tech features and a first-ever hybrid version that Chrysler hopes will make minivans popular again.