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Editorial Results (free)

1. Senate votes to extend flood insurance program -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate voted Tuesday to extend for four months the program that provides flood insurance for nearly 5 million homeowners and business owners.

The bill's passage by an 86-12 vote averts a scenario in which people living in coastal communities would have been unable to renew their flood insurance policies or purchase new ones during the peak of hurricane season.

2. US Launches National Security Probe Into Uranium Imports -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Commerce Department has started an investigation into the impact of uranium imports on U.S. national security, a move that could limit future imports and add another front to the Trump administration's trade fight.

3. The Daily Memphian to Launch in Fall as Memphis' Definitive News Source -

A new seven-days-a-week news outlet called The Daily Memphian will make its debut this fall, with many of the biggest names in Memphis journalism and a unique not-for-profit funding model. The ambitious effort’s goal is to become the city’s definitive news source with reporting of, by and for Memphis.

4. Trump Claims Germany 'Controlled' by Russia, Merkel Differs -

BRUSSELS (AP) — President Donald Trump barreled into a NATO summit Wednesday with claims that a natural gas pipeline deal has left Germany "totally controlled" and "captive to Russia" as he lobbed fresh complaints about allies' "delinquent" defense spending during the opening of what was expected to be a fraught two-day meeting.

5. Memphis Surgeon Kelly Honored By Pediatric Orthopaedic Society -

Dr. Derek M. Kelly, a pediatric orthopedic surgeon at Campbell Clinic Orthopaedics and Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital, has been awarded the Special Effort and Excellence Award from the Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America.

6. Why Wall Street's Worried About Tesla -

Elon Musk's track record for technological feats as chief of SpaceX has turned skeptics into believers in everything from his quest to open space travel to Mars to his desire to build a tunnel for high-speed travel between New York and Washington. As Tesla's CEO, his ambitious vision for electric cars has also earned him a faithful following.

7. Sunday Wine, Liquor Sales Passes in Tenn. Senate -

NASHVILLE – Buoyed by Bible verses and compromise giving liquor stores a head start on Sunday sales, legislation allowing grocery stores to sell wine on Sundays passed the Senate Wednesday on a 17-11 vote.

8. Tenn.'s Road, Infrastructure Systems Problem Shared Across State -

Though we often complain about our government, we count on it every day, in large ways and small.

An example of a small way … potholes. Which don’t seem like a small issue after they cause your tire(s) to blow out.

9. Trump to 'Pause' Looming Metal Tariffs for Some Countries -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The European Union, Australia, Argentina, Brazil and South Korea are among the nations that will get an initial exemption from looming steel and aluminum tariffs from the Trump administration, U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer said Thursday.

10. Last Word: Tubby's Meeting, Moral Monday and Strickland and Overton Square Plans -

Tigers coach Tubby Smith meets with the university administration Tuesday now that its official that the basketball team will not be going to the NCAA or NIT tournaments for a fourth consecutive season. So we could know something about the coaching situation at the U of M Tuesday and probably with some rumors in the interim because this is Tigers basketball.

11. White House to Release Infrastructure Principles on Monday -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Donald Trump is expected to release Monday his $1.5 trillion infrastructure plan, a top administration priority in 2018 that will rely heavily on state and local governments, as well as private investors.

12. Airbus, Rolls-Royce, Siemens Developing Hybrid Plane -

FRANKFURT, Germany (AP) – Airbus, Siemens and Rolls-Royce are teaming up to develop a hybrid passenger plane that would use a single electric turbofan along with three conventional jet engines running on aviation fuel.

13. Hall Joins Arc Mid-South As a Case Manager -

De’Borah Hall recently joined The Arc Mid-South as a case manager, bringing with her nearly 15 years of experience in human resources. In her new role, Hall visits The Arc’s clients, who have intellectual and developmental disabilities, in their homes to determine if the organization’s direct support professionals are providing appropriate services, such as bathing, feeding and light housekeeping. The visits also help her evaluate staff members and determine if additional training or disciplinary measures are needed.

14. Mayor Stands By Decision On Sewer Connections -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland says if he had it to do over again, he would probably give more advance notice that the city was ending city sewer connections for developments outside the limits of Memphis.

15. Don’t Give Me That Data-tude -

Humans are a limited species. We cannot with any certainty, given the dynamic nature of life, predict the future.

In some cases you have better odds when running models and scenarios based on judging the future by analyzing past behaviors and patterns, such as insurance actuary tables or credit scores; however, most predictions are wrong.

16. Dean: Economic Development More Difficult in Memphis -

It’s a story that former Nashville Mayor Karl Dean tells just about every place in the state he goes in his campaign to be the state’s next governor.

17. Raising The Ceiling -

Here’s the thing about expectations: You either embrace them, turning them into some divine combination of daily bread and rocket fuel, or they crush you.

There is no middle ground. Not when the statistical mid-point – a .500 season – would be an undisputed failure.

18. A Million Reasons Not to Jump Into the Tennessee Governor’s Race -

Republican gubernatorial candidate Mae Beavers is banking on the idea wealthy candidates won’t be able to buy voters in 2018.

19. US to Create Independent Military Cyber Command -

WASHINGTON (AP) – After months of delay, the Trump administration is finalizing plans to revamp the nation's military command for defensive and offensive cyber operations in hopes of intensifying America's ability to wage cyberwar against the Islamic State group and other foes, according to U.S. officials.

20. Need For Speed -

Access to high-speed broadband is a growing issue in Tennessee as technological advances in business and education become more digitally based. For the rural areas around Memphis and across the state, it is becoming a matter of disparity both on the workforce-training front and in classrooms. And the two are inextricably linked.

21. TVA’s Nearly $1B Natural Gas Plant 70 Percent Complete -

The view is breathtaking. The Memphis skyline glints and gleams in the midday sun. The Pyramid casts its own unique light across the distance, and the Hernando DeSoto Bridge superstructure is an elegant silver set of curves to the west, filtered through bare trees. It’s a view you need a hard hat to see from the top of the massive heat recovery steam generator at the Tennessee Valley Authority’s Allen Steam Plant, under construction in southwest Memphis.

22. Memphis Baseball Academy Bets on HitTrax Technology -

It wasn’t that long ago that Ryan Huber, 26, was still a small-college baseball player and stepping in the batter’s box for one-on-one showdowns with pitchers.

23. Memphis Economists: Trump Tweets Turn the Page on GOP Playbook -

It’s long been a cornerstone of Republican political orthodoxy that government should “get out of the way” of businesses, and that the fewer mandates and regulations, well, the better.

24. Memphis Bioworks Surpasses Goals of Labor Department Job-Training Grant -

The Memphis Bioworks Foundation is serious about workforce development and job training, along with the other high-profile work for which it’s known, like investing in companies related to bioscience and sustainability.

25. Habitat Memphis Receives $160,000 Grant -

Habitat for Humanity of Greater Memphis has received a $160,000 Priority Market Program grant from the Wells Fargo Housing Foundation toward work in the Bearwater Park neighborhood, just north of Uptown.

26. Trustmark Bank Expands Into Huntsville Market -

The parent company of Trustmark Bank has announced a $25.6 million merger with RB Bancorporation, the holding company for Reliance Bank, which has seven offices that serve the Huntsville, Alabama, metro area.

27. Trustmark Bank Expands Into Huntsville Market -

The parent company of Trustmark Bank has announced a $25.6 million merger with RB Bancorporation, the holding company for Reliance Bank, which has seven offices that serve the Huntsville, Alabama, metro area.

28. 50 Years Later, Black Panthers Look Back at Party's Founding -

OAKLAND, Calif. (AP) — The Black Panthers emerged from this gritty Northern California city 50 years ago, declaring to a nation in turmoil a new party dedicated to defending African-Americans against police brutality and protecting the right of a downtrodden people to determine their own future.

29. Open and Shut -

The office of the future hacks down cubicle walls in favor of modular furniture that encourages collaboration. As many business sectors, from banking to legal services, move to a tech-first approach, companies are turning away from traditional office configurations to attract the next generation of talent.

30. Matching Donations Available for Transportation Projects -

Two Memphis-based transportation projects have been selected in a nationwide search to qualify for a $100,000 donation match through the TransitCenter.

The projects take a fresh look at how public transportation is funded and motivated by the community’s needs.

31. Memphis Baby Boomers Seek Support Of Local Organizations to Age in Their Homes -

Advancements in technology and medicine have contributed to an increased lifespan and adults are living well beyond retirement years.

As baby boomers reach retirement age, AARP predicts that the population of adults older than 65 will surpass 70 million people by 2030. Memphis is experiencing the growth firsthand – the only age group with significant growth in Memphis since the 2010 census is the 65+ age group, which saw an 18 percent increase in just five years.

32. Yellen Says Uncertainties Justify Cautious Approach -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen said Tuesday that the U.S. economy faces a number of uncertainties that require the Fed to proceed cautiously in raising interest rates.

33. Financial Stress to Financial Yes -

Every year Americans make $46 billion worth of payday loan transactions, with more than 40 percent of these loans processed online. Payday loans allow borrowers to withdraw cash anywhere from a few days to a couple of weeks prior to receiving their paycheck, with the intent to pay it back with interest and fees when they receive their next paycheck.

34. May 20-26: This Week in Memphis History -

2006: Shelby County’s reliance on manufacturing jobs is dropping, according to state labor figures, which show that 14 manufacturing companies have closed or cut back their workforces in Shelby County since January 2003. The closings and cutbacks account for the loss of 1,240 jobs.
The losses include 98 jobs at Coors Brewing Co., 5151 East Raines Road; 112 workers at Memphis Hardwood Flooring Co., 1551 Thomas St.; and 327 employees at Great Dane LP at 1095 Harbor Ave.

35. Mild Weather Cuts TVA’s Bottom Line by Half -

The Tennessee Valley Authority reported net income of $281 million between Oct. 1 and March 31, the first half of its fiscal year.

TVA, which reported earnings on Tuesday, May 3, said net income was $296 million less than the same period last year, primarily due to the extremely mild winter experienced in TVA’s service territory compared to record-setting cold temperatures in 2015.

36. Finding a Compromise on the Greensward Issue -

The current debate over the Memphis Zoo’s use of the Greensward for overflow parking is more complex than most realize. Opponents of this usage try to paint a very compelling picture of the Zoo as a massive, profit-driven enterprise which came into Overton Park like an invasive species and has recklessly expanded, gobbling up park land and taking it away from the citizens.

37. Trade Secrets and the Inevitable Disclosure Doctrine -

Trade secrets are some of a company’s most valuable assets. They’re like a good employee – you don’t want either to walk out the door.

But what if a longtime employee who has knowledge of your trade secrets leaves your company to work for a competitor? You wind up with an inevitable ‘pit in your stomach’ because down deep you know he or she is going to share your trade secrets with that competitor.

38. Automakers Post Healthy February US Sales Gains -

DETROIT (AP) – Automakers posted big U.S. sales gains last month as consumers – giddy from Super Bowl ads – returned to showrooms after a snowy January.

Ford's sales rose 20 percent over last February, boosted in part by higher sales to rental car fleets. Honda's sales were up 13 percent and Fiat Chrysler's rose 12 percent. Nissan's sales rose nearly 11 percent and Toyota's were up 4 percent. Hyundai's sales rose 1 percent.

39. Zuckerberg to Press On With Internet Access Despite Setback -

BARCELONA, Spain (AP) – Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg vowed Monday to press on with his 3-year-old effort to bring the developing world online, even after Indian regulators banned one of the pillars of the campaign.

40. Q&A About the Market Turmoil in China and Beyond -

BEIJING (AP) — After the Chinese stock market started 2016 with a plunge that unnerved investors globally, here are some questions and answers about the turmoil.

___

WHY DID THE CHINESE MARKET DROP SO MUCH?

41. Amazon Planes May Not be Imminent Threat to FedEx, UPS -

While it relies today on outside vendors like UPS, FedEx and the USPS to deliver customer orders, Amazon has been making moves that signal it wants to increasingly cut out those companies and become something of a package delivery giant in its own right.

42. Juvenile Court Reforms Changing System Slowly, Leaders Say -

Two years into reforms of the local juvenile justice system, three leaders in those reforms say there has to be more contact with teenagers before and after they go through Juvenile Court.

And those leaders warn against a reliance on programs once a child is in custody as a total solution to juvenile crime.

43. Payments Company Payscape Expands to Memphis -

The financial technology company Payscape has landed in Memphis, opening an office here with plans to ramp up quickly as it works to introduce the community to its merchant services and payment processing capabilities.

44. Overlooking the Obvious: Why Innovation Fails -

This column was based on a presentation by Scott Jenkins, SVP of Innovation and Product Development of Deckers.

45. WEVL Celebrates Independence, Good Music in Memphis -

Downloadable podcasts, iTunes, YouTube, Spotify, Pandora – digital services like these and others have played a big part in replacing what a younger generation thinks of radio.

Which is one of many reasons why the story of WEVL 89.9 FM – an independent radio station that’s operated out of digs in the South Main Historic Arts District since 1990 – is an improbable one.

46. Ratings Agencies Give Strong Marks to Tennessee -

Tennessee has once again received top grades from two bond ratings agencies, and an improved outlook from the third.

Moody’s and Fitch gave the state their top rating of AAA with a stable outlook. Standard and Poor’s rated the state at AA-plus with a positive outlook — up from the stable rating last year.

47. Colorado-Based Summit Wealth Group Expands to Memphis -

Randy Morris' Colorado-based independent wealth management firm Summit Wealth Group has grown at a steady clip over the last several years, and its new entry into the Memphis market shows that trend isn't slowing.

48. Supreme Court Upholds Use of Controversial Execution Drug -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Trading sharp words, a deeply divided Supreme Court upheld the use of a controversial drug in lethal-injection executions Monday, even as two dissenting justices said for the first time they think it's "highly likely" the death penalty itself is unconstitutional.

49. Graceland Hotel Developers File $84 Million Construction Loan -

3600 Elvis Presley Blvd.
Memphis, TN 38116
Loan Amount: $84 million

50. Graceland Hotel Developers File $84 Million Construction Loan -

The developers behind a massive hotel near Graceland are ready to shake, rattle and roll on the project.

Guest House at Graceland LLC, formed to develop the hotel, has filed an $84 million construction loan for the 450-room resort-style hotel at 3600 Elvis Presley Blvd.

51. Proton’s Weaver Wizard of Tech Innovation -

On any given day, business executives, scientists and chemical engineers from across the U.S. and around the world come to East Tennessee to see for themselves the renewable energy technology developed by Lenoir City-based Proton Power Inc.

52. Tesla CEO Plugs Into New Market With Home Battery System -

FOSTER CITY, Calif. (AP) – Never lacking daring ideas, billionaire entrepreneur Elon Musk is determined to jolt the electricity market.

The CEO of electric car maker Tesla Motors hopes to park hundreds of millions of large, solar panel-connected batteries in homes and businesses so the world can disconnect from power plants – and he can profit. On Thursday night, before an adoring crowd and a party-like atmosphere, Musk unveiled how he intends to do it.

53. Finding the Right Work-From-Home Job -

Finding a work-from-home job (or WFH job as they’re sometimes called) can seem to be an impossible proposition. It’s like finding a unicorn. You’ve heard they exist, but you’ve never actually seen one.

54. City Council Approves Debt Restructuring -

Memphis City Council members voted 8-4 Tuesday, March 17, to approve a proposed restructuring of city debt payments.

Council members approved Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr.’s proposal after a day of questions for financial consulting firm PFM and Tennessee Comptroller Justin Wilson.

55. Carson Departs, Problems Remain For Local Democrats -

With about a month left in his term as chairman of the Shelby County Democratic Party, Bryan Carson resigned Saturday, Feb. 21, after a confrontation behind closed doors with the party’s executive committee over his handling of the party’s bank accounts.

56. Trucking Industry in ‘Desperate’ Need of Drivers -

With demand on the upswing thanks to improving economic growth and lower fuel prices, a scarcity of truck drivers could put the brakes on the trucking industry and cripple a critical piece of global supply chains.

57. UAW ‘Considers Itself a Partner’ With GM -

General Motors’ Spring Hill plant is firmly entrenched with the United Auto Workers.

In fact, it might not have retooled and started assembling vehicles again without the union’s efforts.

58. Serving Families -

Brennan Simkins is 12 years old and he’s had four bone marrow transplants. His mother and father each have been donors.

But he also has two brothers. And while Brennan was being treated at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Nat, now 15, and Christopher, now 11, needed to be in Memphis with their family but also needed to move ahead with their own lives. So their parents pulled them out of Catholic school back in North Augusta, S.C., and enrolled them in the Maria Montessori School on Mud Island.

59. Shrinking Foreign Oil Bill Sends US Trade Deficit Lower -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The U.S. trade deficit fell in November to the lowest level in almost a year, thanks to the country's swiftly shrinking thirst for foreign oil.

The deficit – imports minus exports – narrowed to $39 billion during the month, down 7.7 percent from a revised October deficit of $42.2 billion, the Commerce Department reported Wednesday.

60. Editorial: Pursuit of Authentic Memphis is a Winding Road -

Last year at this time, we talked about city finances and our pursuit of economic development. The year before, it was federal government shutdown.

This year, we will offer a change of pace from that and follow the lead of our cover story, which features suggestions about the city’s promise and its challenges in the year ahead and the year now in the books.

61. Fed Proposing Big US Banks Boost Capital Buffers -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Federal regulators are proposing that the eight biggest U.S. banks be required to further increase the amount of capital they set aside to cushion against unexpected losses.

62. Tech Support -

As FedEx evolved, it developed its own technologies for moving packages around the globe, such as handheld devices that scan packages. When those devices experienced problems, FedEx technicians repaired them.

63. Why are Tennesseans So Afraid of an Income Tax? -

The odds of an income tax becoming a reality in Tennessee – one of the nation’s lowest-taxed states – are slim to none.

And, yet there is an amendment on the Nov. 4 ballot that would change Tennessee’s constitution by giving the Legislature authority to prohibit passage of an income tax or payroll tax in the state.

64. China Economy Grows at Slowest Pace in 5 Years -

BEIJING (AP) — China's economic growth waned to a five-year low of 7.3 percent last quarter, raising concerns of a spillover effect on the global economy but falling roughly in line with Chinese leaders' plans for a controlled slowdown.

65. Wealthy Giving Less to Charity; Utah Tops States -

NEW YORK (AP) – Even as the income gap widens, the wealthiest Americans are giving a smaller share of their income to charity, while poor and middle-income people are donating a larger share, according to an extensive analysis of IRS data conducted by the Chronicle of Philanthropy.

66. Legal Issues Await Mob Attack Investigation -

Memphis police could make more arrests in the Poplar Plaza mob attack, but investigators believe they have the teenagers who started the riot on the parking lot of the Kroger supermarket Saturday, Sept. 6, that injured three people.

67. In GOP South, Pushback Against Obama Climate Rules -

ATLANTA (AP) — In the Republican-heavy Southeast, critics said Tuesday that a plan by President Barack Obama's administration to cut pollution would raise electricity prices, result in job losses and may not significantly curtail the carbon emissions blamed for global warming.

68. Elon Musk Unveils Spacecraft to Ferry Astronauts -

HAWTHORNE, Calif. (AP) – A company that has flown unmanned capsules to the Space Station unveiled a spacecraft designed to ferry up to seven astronauts to low-Earth orbit that SpaceX founder Elon Musk says will lower the cost of going to space.

69. Cleaner Air Could Mean Higher Electric Bills -

NEW YORK (AP) – Electricity prices are probably on their way up across much of the U.S. as coal-fired plants, the dominant source of cheap power, shut down in response to environmental regulations and economic forces.

70. Yellen Says Fed Seeks to Avoid Undue Regulations -

WASHINGTON (AP) – As the Federal Reserve works to ensure that the nation's largest banks pose no undue threats to the financial system, it will avoid imposing unnecessary rules on small banks, Fed Chair Janet Yellen said Thursday.

71. Apple Offering Free Recycling of All Used Products -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) – Apple is offering free recycling of all its used products and vowing to power all of its stores, offices and data centers with renewable energy to reduce the pollution caused by its devices and online services.

72. Second Rape Kit Lawsuit Names More Officials -

The second federal lawsuit since December over the Memphis Police Department’s backlog of 12,000 untested rape kits casts a wider net of defendants than the first lawsuit, including the current and former Memphis police directors and the current and former district attorneys general.

73. Second Lawsuit Filed Over Rape Kit Backlog -

Three women allegedly raped by Anthony Alliano during a string of rapes in the Cordova area covering a decade have filed suit in Memphis Federal Court over the delay in testing their rape kits.

It is the second federal lawsuit filed against the city of Memphis since December over the backlog of more than 12,000 untested rape kits police acknowledged in November after initially putting the backlog of rape kits at 2,000 in August.

74. Tigers Look to Ace Next Tourney Test -

Memphis made the Final Four. Seriously, you can stop worrying about the first game this Friday against George Washington University.

The Tigers joined American, Michigan and national champion Dayton in the annual Academic Performance Tournament’s Final Four, as played out by Inside Higher Ed. In this tournament, the winners are based on the Academic Progress Rate, the NCAA’s multiyear measure of a team’s classroom performance.

75. Staging Success -

When the Live at the Garden summer concert series at Memphis Botanic Garden launches its 14th season in June, it will feature a new permanent stage and several other amenities.

Besides the new stage, the $6.1 million project now under construction includes a food court, box offices and a below-grade “pit” in front of the stage that can hold around 125 people.

76. Kerry Mocks Those Who Deny Climate Change -

JAKARTA, Indonesia (AP) — U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry on Sunday called climate change perhaps the world's "most fearsome" destructive weapon and mocked those who deny its existence or question its causes, comparing them to people who insist the Earth is flat.

77. Sharp’s Exit From Solar Part of Industry Trend -

Sharp Corp.’s announcement last week that it would end solar panel production at its Memphis plant is the latest indication of how volatile the solar energy industry has become.

78. Legal Ease -

Earlier this year, Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz PC renewed its lease at the First Tennessee Building Downtown.

The city’s largest law firm decided to expand its lease, taking over a quarter of the space at the 415,658-square-foot Madison Avenue office tower.

79. Community Oasis -

A visitor walking the winding, sun-dappled paths of Memphis Botanic Garden past stands of maple trees and beds of hydrangeas might never guess that there was a time when a black cloud hung low over the East Memphis attraction.

80. Buying Yellen -

President Obama recently made it official that Janet Yellen will succeed Ben Bernanke as the head of the Federal Reserve. Janet has spent much of her career as a dedicated and vocal advocate for the unemployed. With participation rates low, and the unemployment rate high, the markets anticipate that Janet will continue, if not augment, Ben Bernanke’s expansionary monetary policies. A renewed enthusiasm for monetary stimulus has had observable market impact.

81. Twitter Dishes Tantalizing Tidbits in IPO Treatise -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) – Twitter, a privately held company built on blurbs, has finally laid itself bare in documents that read more like a treatise than a tweet.

The roughly 800-page filing Twitter Inc. released late Thursday on its way to an eagerly anticipated IPO contains tantalizing tidbits about its growth and its attempts to make money from its influential short messaging service.

82. African-American Philanthropy and Museums, Part 3 -

Part three of a three-part series The African-American and African Diaspora museums and cultural institutions that have emerged across the United States are a testimony to perseverance. At the same time they, like many other cultural institutions, face many challenges. Nonprofit CEO, capacity building consultant, master strategist and cultural arts worker Grace C. Stanislaus recently shared her perspectives on African-American and African Diaspora giving, philanthropy, and the role of cultural and arts institutions.

83. Career Shift Lands Fish in Financial Planning -

To hear the way she speaks of Memphis, and to know the many ways in which she works to better her community, one would never guess that Kathy Fish was not born and raised right here.

84. Conservancy Wants Guarantees on Shelby Farms Parkway -

The Shelby Farms Park Conservancy wants to see more work toward agreements about a proposed Shelby Farms parkway, including no big-rig truck traffic, that are its conditions for agreeing to the long-discussed road.

85. Museum Expands Civil Rights Exhibits -

From the hold of a slave ship to a segregated classroom to “freedom song karaoke,” the new elements of the renovated National Civil Rights Museum are taking shape.

Officials of the 22-year-old museum updated the first renovation in the history of the museum built on the site of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s assassination in 1968. They told a group of 20 at an annex building next to the construction site Thursday, June 20, to expect more video elements, updated technology and an “immersion” into the civil rights movement.

86. Cox: Airport Could See More Competition -

Airports that once served as major hubs won’t likely regain their previous level of flight service, and if they do, it could take decades, Larry Cox, president and CEO of the Memphis-Shelby County Airport Authority told members of the board and airport officials.

87. Halting Medicaid Expansion, Cutting Taxes Drive Casada -

State Rep. Glen Casada, R-Franklin, the Republican caucus chairman of the state House, is part friend and part cajoler to the 70 representatives with whom he serves.

“I help members with their legislation,” he said. “And I help the caucus rally around a few positions.”

88. Inherent Dangers of Do-It-Yourself Marketing -

When you own or operate a small or mid-sized company, you likely have an innate sense of self-reliance. It’s that desire to get things done on your own that probably got you to where you are today. That same drive to maintain unencumbered control, however, may be inhibiting your growth when it comes to the development and execution of your marketing strategy. While seemingly counterintuitive, here’s why this is often the case.

89. Bankruptcy Filings Drop 4 Percent -

Bankruptcies filed across all categories in Shelby County in the third quarter of 2012 dropped 4 percent from the third quarter of 2011, according to The Daily News Online, www.memphisdailynews.com.

90. Soda Industry: Vending Machines Will Show Calories -

NEW YORK (AP) – As criticism of sugary sodas intensifies, Coke, Pepsi and Dr Pepper are rolling out new vending machines that will put calorie counts right at your fingertips.

The move comes ahead of a regulation that would require restaurant chains and vending machines to post the information as early as next year, although the specifics for complying with the requirement are still being worked out.

91. Difference of Opinion -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr.’s administration and a group of neighborhood leaders in the Vance Avenue area agree on highlighting the significant history of the area south of FedExForum.

Some kind of trail linking up more than a dozen sights is a feature both groups are planning for the area.

92. Changes In Buyer Behavior Critical To Biz Survival -

A significant shift in buyer behavior has occurred over the last several years – a shift that has not only changed the very essence of the role of salesperson but how we market to consumers as well. The origin of this shift is three-fold – the role the Internet plays in informing buyers, a new paradigm in group decision-making, and an increasing expectation for a heightened customer buying “experience.”

93. Kodak to Stop Making Cameras, Digital Frames -

ROCHESTER, New York (AP) – Eastman Kodak Co. said Thursday that it will stop making digital cameras, pocket video cameras and digital picture frames, marking the end of an era for the company that brought photography to the masses more than a century ago.

94. Bartlett Explores Own School District -

If Bartlett moves forward with its own municipal school district, the city’s school board would have to immediately begin making plans for a new high school.

And it would need to forge a cooperative agreement with the countywide school system or another municipal school system that would include Arlington High School and Bon Lin Elementary School and other territory outside the city that Bartlett students now attend.

95. Feds Move Closer to Approving New Nuclear Reactor -

ATLANTA (AP) – Federal regulators are leaning toward approving a nuclear reactor designed by Westinghouse Electric Co. that could power the first nuclear plants built from scratch in a generation.

96. Feet on the Street: The Original Social Media -

I don’t think there is a small business today that could not find more business by plain old cold-call canvassing of a ZIP code. That used to be the only way of doing it, aside from phoning someone. That is, until email, voice mail texting, smartphones, social media and all the rest removed the person from the process.

97. Casada Weighs In on Anti-Bias Legislation -

Editor’s Note: This is an occasional series that profiles Tennessee’s state legislators. Credit his friends – and the inspiration of Ronald Reagan – with starting state Rep. Glen Casada on the road to public service.

98. Bank of America to Charge $5 Debit Card Fee -

NEW YORK (AP) – Bank of America plans to start charging customers a $5 monthly fee for using their debit card to make purchases. The fee will be rolled out starting early next year.

A number of banks have already either rolled out or are testing such fees. But Bank of America's announcement carries added weight because it is the largest U.S. bank by deposits.

99. Project Homeless Connect Gives One-Stop Help -

The joint city-county effort to end homelessness in the next 10 years goes to the streets Friday, Sept. 16, for its kickoff.

Project Homeless Connect is a different kind of canvassing effort than the annual homeless census count or attempts to get the homeless to seek different kinds of services.

100. Building Reactor at TVA Bellefonte Plant on Agenda -

CHATTANOOGA (AP) – The Tennessee Valley Authority has a message for opponents of it finishing a long-shuttered, 37-year-old nuclear plant in northeast Alabama: No costumes.

A month after zombie-costumed protesters paraded in Chattanooga to oppose TVA reviving what they described as a "corpse of a power plant," the nation's largest public utility has posted a new ban on costumes at its board meeting Thursday.