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Editorial Results (free)

1. Packard's Playbook Helps Women Thrive In A Corporate Business World -

Susan Packard’s premise is straightforward: Business is a team sport. Winning doesn’t just happen, but requires everything any team sport would – preparation, strategy, spirit, competitiveness, composure, focus, creativity and, yes, gamesmanship.

2. Evans Brings Precision, Experience To Chairmanship of TVA Board -

Lynn Evans is precise, a trait that comes with being a certified public accountant and the owner of her own accounting and consulting firm. It also works well with her path to becoming the new chairwoman of the Tennessee Valley Authority board.

3. Having It Their Way -

She was working for a major petroleum company and had just been transferred to Cody, Wyoming. She was relatively new to the industry and certainly to the boots-on-the-ground oil field where on Day One she got out of her SUV wearing a long skirt and flats.

4. Murrell Helps Teens Find the Right Career Path -

Erica Murrell admits to three obsessions: kids, animals and science. Fortunately, she’s got a job that connects all three. “For me, it’s about connecting people with what they’re passionate about,” she says. “I love figuring out where to put them.”

5. Puzder Withdraws Nomination to be Trump's Labor Secretary -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Donald Trump's nominee for labor secretary abruptly withdrew his nomination Wednesday after Senate Republicans balked at supporting him, in part over taxes he belatedly paid on a former housekeeper not authorized to work in the United States.

6. Finding Weekend Escape in Tuscaloosa -

When I hear Tuscaloosa, it’s almost always in the classic voice of former college football announcer Keith Jackson as he welcomes TV viewers to the campus of the University of Alabama.

7. Women in Business Took Different Paths to Leadership -

Once Lori Spicer Robertson had determined she wasn’t going into medical school, she shifted to a graduate business program at the University of Florida. She got an internship with a trade association for nurses in Washington, and then worked in public affairs and as a web master.

8. Sears May Sell Land, Cut Jobs to Save $1B -

NEW YORK (AP) – Sears may sell more locations, cut more jobs and put more of its famous brands on the block as part of its latest plan to revive the faltering retail chain.

The company, which also owns Kmart, said Friday that it is cutting costs by at least $1 billion a year. It also said that it was adding $140 million in liquidity by reworking its debt, giving the company more breathing room.

9. Strickland and Luttrell Mark Different Points in Mayoral Tenures -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland was 13 months and nine days in office when he delivered his second State of the City address last week at a Frayser church.

10. Freight Farms Revolutionizing Farm-To-Fork System -

Usually the concept of farm-to-fork is designed to keep locally-grown produce out of shipping containers, but one company is working with local farmers to do just the opposite.

The Leafy Green Machine, developed by Boston-based Freight Farms, is a virtual farm-in-a-box that converts used shipping containers into year-round hydroponic farms, which can be monitored and controlled with your smartphone.

11. Analysis: Some Super Bowl Ads Score, Others Fumble -

There is no greater scrutiny that a brand faces for its marketing prowess than during the biggest U.S. sporting event of the year. Courageous brands bet big that their ad would win hearts and minds among consumers, but alas, only 40 percent of Super Bowl ads earned favorable ratings from our team of advertising professionals.

12. The Week Ahead: February 7-13 -

There’s a lot to love this week, Memphis! The 41st annual Memphis Open tennis tournament begins Saturday at The Racquet Club of Memphis. That same morning historic Elmwood Cemetery hosts a “Love on the Rocks” walking tour featuring tragic and humorous tales of love gone wrong. And if you love the Grizzlies, they are playing the not-so-loved San Antonio Spurs and Golden State Warriors this week. 

13. With a Mind for Math, Crow Finds Fit As CPA at Reynolds, Bone & Griesbeck -

As a child, Kelly Crow thought she might be want to be a nurse. A neighbor was a nurse at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital and she always seemed to have a case that was inspiring.

14. Dixon Hughes Goodman Expects More Growth in Memphis in 2017 -

During periods of uncertainty and unexpected rule changes, business owners turn to the interpreters of those rules, practical advice givers who can help an enterprise find a clear path forward.

Given the period of regulatory upheaval of recent years – and the almost certainty of more change to come now that a new national administration has come to power – no wonder the Memphis office of accounting firm Dixon Hughes Goodman is on a tear at the moment.

15. Body Count -

A day at a time, Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland has been writing the names of those who have been murdered in a notebook he keeps with him since he became mayor in January 2016.

When five people, two of them 15 years old, died violently the weekend that much of the world’s attention was on protest marches and the new administration in Washington, Strickland was getting updates on the latest surge in violence.

16. Repeal of Health Law Could Mean Women Pay More for Less -

WASHINGTON (AP) – From a return to higher premiums based on gender, to gaps in coverage for birth control and breast pumps, experts say women could end up paying more for less if the Obama-era health care law is repealed.

17. Last Word: The Borders of Violence, Guilty Verdict and Blue Suede Security -

Whenever there is a shooting of or near school children, one of the first things that happens once the police have investigated is detailing exactly where the incident happened – specifically whether it was actually on school property or near school property.

18. Wal-Mart Dumps Its Version of Amazon Prime for New Path -

NEW YORK (AP) – Wal-Mart is replacing a program that offered free shipping but had an annual fee with one that has a lower free shipping threshold and faster delivery as it hopes to answer Amazon's powerful Prime membership success.

19. Full Text of Gov. Bill Haslam's State of the State Address -

Here is the full text of Gov. Bill Haslam's annual State of the State address as prepared for delivery to a joint convention of the Tennessee General Assembly on Monday.

Speaker Harwell, Lieutenant Governor McNally, Speakers Pro Tem Tracy and Johnson, Members of the 110th General Assembly, Justices, Constitutional Officers, General Slatery, Commissioners, Friends, Guests, fellow Tennesseans, and for the seventh year in a row, the woman voted best first lady in the land, Crissy. My kids even made it this year.

20. Finances Can Impact Your Career Path -

As you grow in your career, finding a new job can become harder and harder. One of the big reasons for this has to do with salary. If you think about it, when you first started working, you were open to just about any job and would happily take a tiny paycheck. But as you’ve progressed in your career, your requirements have evolved.

21. Last Word: Immigration Order React, State of State Preview and The Haven -

Lots of reaction from state and local leaders Sunday to President Trump’s Friday executive order on immigration that will likely dominate the action this week on Capitol Hill in Washington after a weekend of action and reaction.

22. AP-NORC Poll: Broad Worries About Potential Health Care Loss -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Though "Obamacare" still divides Americans, a majority worry that many will lose coverage if the 2010 law is repealed in the nation's long-running political standoff over health care.

23. Governor Proposes Rural Broadband Expansion for Tennessee -

NASHVILLE – State government will provide private companies with millions of dollars in grants and tax credits to extend broadband internet access while allowing electric co-ops to enter the retail broadband business under legislation Sen. Mark Norris is set to sponsor.

24. New Study: Trump to Inherit $559B Deficit, Stable Economy -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Donald Trump has inherited a stable economy but a government that faces a worsening debt and deficit picture, congressional analysts said Tuesday.

The estimates from the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office say the economy will hold relatively steady, with economic growth rising slightly to 2.3 percent this year and unemployment averaging less than 5 percent for the duration of Trump's term. It expects the budget deficit for the current year to register $559 billion, roughly the same as last year's.

25. Ernest Strickland Takes On Workforce Role at Chamber -

The Greater Memphis Chamber has promoted Ernest Strickland to senior vice president of workforce development, a newly created role. Strickland, who has worked at the chamber since 2006, previously served as vice president of international and business partnerships.
In his new position, he is responsible for creating and implementing the chamber’s workforce development strategy. His department serves as a liaison, working directly with existing and prospective businesses to ensure they are able to attract and retain a qualified workforce today and in the future.

26. Memphian One of Two Females Appointed to Key Clerk Roles in Legislature -

They don’t get much press, but they are making history for women working with the General Assembly.

Murfreesboro resident Tammy Letzler is the first female to serve as chief clerk of either house of the General Assembly, following the trailblazing path of House Speaker Beth Harwell. And Memphis native Kim Cox is serving this session as assistant chief clerk, making her the first African-American female to take that role.

27. Graves Named Director Of Downtown YMCA -

Angelic Graves has joined YMCA of Memphis & the Mid-South as executive director of the Louis T. Fogelman Downtown YMCA. Graves, a Chicago native, comes to Memphis from the YMCA of Metro Chicago, where she most recently served as executive director of the South Side YMCA.

28. Nonprofit Exercise Looks Toward, Beyond Trump -

At the end of Alvin Toffler’s 1970 futurist manifesto “Future Shock,” he wrote about a concept called “anticipatory democracy” as a cure of sorts for being overwhelmed by technological developments and other rapid fire changes.

29. Last Word: Valero Protest Arrests, Anticipating Trump's Impact & Saving Booksellers -

A busy King holiday weekend that reflects what the week as a whole will probably be like at least politically. The weather is anyone’s guess. A group of about 40 people protested at the entrance to the Valero refinery in South Memphis Monday afternoon and a dozen were arrested by Memphis police.

30. Land Use Board Makes Decision on Trio of Controversial Cases -

The Shelby County Land Use Control Board met neighborhood opposition head-on Jan. 12, approving one controversial project and voting down two others.

Of the 18 cases approved on its consent agenda, the most pertinent project was the proposed Ice House entertainment center at 2166 Central Ave.

31. Charter School Path More Complex With Local, Federal Changes -

A year into a compact between Shelby County Schools and charter school operators, the task of coming up with more-specific rules around the relationship is still ahead.

At the end of 2016, the Shelby County Schools board accepted a first set of recommendations from a charter advisory committee. The distinction between accepting the report and approving it reflects the ongoing discussion about what rules to impose where there currently aren’t any, as well as what rules the school system can impose given state government’s role in the process.

32. Ossei-Anto Lifts Up Memphis Kids -

After graduating from the University of Notre Dame, Theo Ossei-Anto knew he wanted to make a difference in education – but he says coming to Memphis was an unexpected adventure.

“It’s an amazing place,” he reflects. “I have learned so much about teaching here. I love my kids and have become very committed to them.”

33. Trump Leaving His Global Business – To Be Run By His Sons -

NEW YORK (AP) – Breaking with presidential precedent, Donald Trump said Wednesday he will continue to profit from his global business empire after he enters the White House this month.

34. View From the Hill: Taxing Online Sales Not Such an Easy Fix -

Cumberland Transit owner Allen Doty isn’t sure if a rule requiring major out-of-state retailers to collect Tennessee sales taxes will create more equity for his shop.

But Doty, who has been selling everything from bicycles to kayaks and camping gear for 34 years in Nashville, is definitely tired of people shopping in his store for hours, snapping a picture of shoes they like, then going home and buying them online “just to avoid sales tax.”

35. Adapt To Survive -

According to Charles Darwin, it’s not the strongest or the most intelligent who will survive, but those who can best manage change. In my experience, that’s a true assessment not only for human beings, but also for businesses, regardless of the focus of the business.

36. Last Word: Rallings at Rotary, The Weight of Cotton and Ugwueke's Path -

It’s becoming pretty obvious that this is going to be a big year for the issue of crime and violence in our city. It’s also becoming the year that Memphis Police Director Michael Rallings has found his voice in a job that may be the ultimate glass house for politicians.

37. McNally Voted Tennessee Senate Speaker -

Promising to maintain Tennessee’s strong fiscal standing, veteran legislator Randy McNally of Oak Ridge took the gavel Tuesday as Senate speaker, replacing Ron Ramsey, who over the last decade led a Republican majority to power in the Tennessee General Assembly.

38. Ugwueke Takes Reins as Methodist Healthcare CEO -

Michael Ugwueke’s first day on the job as CEO of Methodist Le Bonheur Healthcare, a post he assumed Jan. 1, included a round of meeting the troops.

The new chief executive of the Methodist organization visited all six of its hospitals, meeting employees and front-line staff and sharing his appreciation that they were there on New Year’s Day, a holiday for many people.

39. Blight Fight Takes Root Near Carnes Elementary -

Some of Mary Baker’s friends like to joke that she will eventually reclaim the whole city of Memphis, but just one lot at a time. “I say, what’s wrong with that?” Baker replied.

40. Last Word: The Elvis Tradition, Cordova Brewery and Parkside Path -

For about three decades now, there has been a cultural and political tradition around the birthday of Elvis Presley. It used to be a proclamation by the Shelby County Mayor and the Memphis Mayor on the steps of Graceland with a birthday cake.

41. Mortgage Rates, Home Sales and Prices Seen Rising in 2017 -

Nate Lowenstein has been shopping for a home in Los Angeles, on and off, for more than a year.

His search has been stymied by a stubbornly low roster of homes on the market and the hurdles that come with it: multiple competing bids and higher prices.

42. Here Come 'Smart Stores' With Robots, Interactive Shelves -

LAS VEGAS (AP) – Tomorrow's retail stores want to take a page from their online rivals by embracing advanced technology – everything from helpful robots to interactive mirrors to shelves embedded with sensors.

43. Herenton's First New Year's Remarks In A Decade Stir Pot -

It’s been 10 years since Willie Herenton delivered his last New Year’s Prayer Breakfast message – a political homily Herenton made an institution while serving as mayor of Memphis.

44. Last Word: A Rainbow's Tale, The Two Holiday Peaks and Crosstown High Plans -

I saw it all so clearly on a very cloudy and very rainy Monday in the city. A strong rainbow with bold colors across town from the setting sun on the river. Not some play rainbow that you create with a garden hose or some alleged double rainbow that depends on where you stand. As we were fond of saying in these parts in the 1980s and the 1990s – this was a “world class” rainbow.

45. Strickland, Herenton Seek Larger, More Focused Volunteerism Efforts -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland and former Memphis Mayor Willie Herenton pointed to a better coordinated form of volunteerism in 2017 at Strickland’s first annual New Year’s Prayer Breakfast.

46. Presidential Election Tops Busy Year for Memphis Voters -

2016 was an eventful election year in Shelby County, ending with the most popular voting cycle in Shelby County politics: the U.S. presidential general election in November. Slightly more than 60 percent of the county’s voters cast a ballot either during early voting in October or on the Nov. 8 Election Day.

47. Logistics Sector Preps for Logging Devices -

While Memphis’ distribution and logistics sectors continued to prosper in 2016, legislative changes and proposed improvements to the infrastructure of Lamar Avenue were among the year’s top local headlines for the industry.

48. Reinvent Your Career In 2017 -

Have you ever wondered if you might have picked the wrong career path? If so, you’re not alone. Ask a friend, “How did you end up in your career?” There’s a good chance they’ll say that they just happened to fall into whatever it is that they do.
Perhaps they happened to get a particular internship during college that happened to lead to a job. Or maybe their parents were connected to a certain company. Or they had a friend who contacted them about a job.

49. Long-Suffering Titans Fans Finally Have Their Team Back -

Tennessee has its NFL team back. The Titans had slipped off the national radar about eight years ago and – to a lesser extent – out of Nashville’s consciousness a few years after that, sometime around the end of the Jeff Fisher era and throughout the following years.

50. Lawsons Equip Educators with Tools for Success -

Kenda and Dominic Lawson were enemies before they were friends. Today they’re married and they run a company together. “We’re not about telling people what to do,” Kenda observes. “Our job is to find opportunities for children and empower teachers to create their own content.”

51. New Year, New You -

No matter what your personal religious, political or social views are, it seems fair to say we can all agree on one thing: 2016 has been a tough year for everyone. Friends and families were pulled apart by different political leanings. Workers went through difficult corporate layoffs and restructurings. Violence and death were reported daily in the news. It’s been rough – very rough.

52. County Commission Tries Again on Minority Business Ordinance -

Shelby County Commissioners hold their third meeting of the month Monday, Dec. 19 – and there could be a fourth, depending on what happens on one of two ordinances that would establish new programs for a larger share of county government contracts for locally owned, minority-owned and women-owned businesses.

53. Wolf River Greenway’s Epping Way Segment Moves Toward May Opening -

The only trace of Berry Brooks’ Epping Way clubhouse and recreation area is a pair of wooden gabled stone posts across the curb cut and gravel entrance at the end of a Raleigh cul de sac.

The clubhouse and its parking lot just beyond the entrance on a hilltop that is still a verdant green days away from winter is long gone. A slim border, perhaps of a swimming pool, appears intermittently. The nine tennis courts are now a duck pond near the 20-acre lake that remains the centerpiece of the property.

54. Fed Raises Key Interest Rate and Foresees 3 Hikes in 2017 -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Federal Reserve has raised a key interest rate in response to a strengthening U.S. economy and expectations of higher inflation, and it foresees three more rate hikes in 2017.

55. Brewer Named President Of Versant Supply Chain -

Buck Brewer has been promoted to president of Memphis-based Versant Supply Chain Inc. A 20-year veteran of the supply chain industry, Brewer joined Versant six years ago and had served as its chief operating officer since January 2014.
Brewer, 40, assumes the president’s position from Richard J. Peters, who will continue to serve as Versant’s chairman.
Over the past several years, Versant has expanded from a small freight brokerage into a provider of specialized labor, freight and flexible space solutions supporting large global supply chain organizations.
The company currently has 130 full-time employees and employs 3,000 full-time-equivalent associates through its partnerships with customers.
Brewer says that while most people would say his job is to oversee the day-to-day operation and overall growth strategy of the company, he believes his job is “to support the incredibly talented individuals that truly drive the company and make it what it is today.”

56. Big Business Warns Trump Against Mass Deportation -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Still grappling with Donald Trump's surprise election, the nation's business community has begun to pressure the president-elect to abandon campaign-trail pledges of mass deportation and other hard-line immigration policies that some large employers fear would hurt the economy.

57. The Week Ahead: December 12-18 -

Good morning, Memphis! The colder, wetter weather is upon us now, but that won’t stop the American Queen. LeBron James and his gang come to town Wednesday. That’s the same day that the long-awaited Ikea store in Memphis opens. Expected to be a regional draw, some may camp out in the weather to be one of the first inside. And we offer congratulations to all of the University of Memphis graduates who will convene at FedExForum Sunday for Fall 2016 commencement ceremonies. 

58. Financial Recovery Regrets -

Ray’s Take When the market went into meltdown in 2008 a lot of investments and property values went south. People are recovering from losses to the value of their homes and losses in portfolios, but some still need to dig their way out. Getting out of a hole always takes a lot longer than falling in.

59. City’s Momentum Charts Different Course, Method -

Nike community relations director Willie Gregory came to The Peabody hotel Wednesday, Dec. 7, to roll out the new MemphisWorks app for the Greater Memphis Alliance for a Competitive Workforce, which he chairs.

60. Outsourcing: Savings, But No Specifics -

The Haslam administration is forging ahead with plans to nab a statewide facilities services contractor after an outside analysis backed up a study showing estimated cost savings of more than $35 million a year at Tennessee universities.

61. Last Word: Fire Recovery, Justice Department Work Begins and Rocky Top Angst -

The death toll in the East Tennessee wildfires goes to 10 Thursday as the recovery effort moves beyond a search for those missing. The count of buildings burned in Sevier County is estimated at more than 700 – 300 just in Gatlinburg. And 47 people are injured by the latest count. The count of those who died in the fires includes confirmation that Jon and Janet Summer of Memphis are among the dead recovered so far.

62. Last Word: The Return of Stubby Clapp, Poplar & Ridgeway for Pedestrians and Mice -

The death toll in the Sevier County-Gatlinburg wildfires is at seven. Authorities believe a fire at The Chimney Tops in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park was what started the disaster and had consumed 15,563 acres as of Wednesday evening. At that point, the fire was 10 percent contained.

63. Transnetyx Thriving in Testing World for ‘the Smart People’ -

Bob Bean was an unlikely co-founder of the world’s first fully automated mouse genotyping firm. He earned an undergraduate degree in music at the University of South Carolina and then went to Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary.

64. New Overtime Wage Rules Could Face Long Delay -

Just as employers were scrambling to comply with new U.S. Department of Labor (USDOL) overtime wage regulations that were set to go into effect on Dec. 1, a federal court in Texas last week blocked its implementation.

65. Last Word: Pinch Plans, Fusion On Wheels and The Grizz Main Two -

If surface parking lots had a capitol in Memphis, it would probably be the Pinch. That’s why the general ideas and plans the city is currently exploring for the nine-blocks of the Pinch between the Pyramid and St. Jude can be a bit disorienting.

66. More Duck, Less Run: Time to Let Mariota Loose -

Note to Mike Mularkey: It’s time to let Marcus be Marcus. As we swing toward the final month of the NFL regular season with the Titans at 5-6, it makes sense to take the training wheels off Marcus Mariota. He is your greatest asset, so why not see how far he can take you?

67. Get a Competitive Advantage With a Marketing Map -

It sometimes seems like marketing campaigns are an escalating game of chase. When your closest competition takes out an advertisement in the newspaper emphasizing their clients’ successes, you might feel like you need to make your presence known with a two-page spread doing the same.

68. Editorial: CBU’s Vision Extends Beyond Physical Changes -

From East Parkway, the Christian Brothers University campus has looked the same for quite some time, but recent construction and a new master plan are changing that. At the same time, less-visible changes hold great promise for energizing students as well as the community.

69. US Homebuilder Confidence Holds Steady in November -

U.S. homebuilders' confidence held steady this month, though their expectations for sales into next year dimmed slightly.

The National Association of Home Builders/Wells Fargo builder sentiment index released Wednesday was unchanged at 63. That's two points below September's reading, which was the highest in nearly a year, and up one point from a year ago.

70. CBU Honors Salinas As Distinguished Young Alumna -

Gabriela “Gabby” Salinas has been named Christian Brothers University’s 2016 Distinguished Young Alumna. Salinas, who was among the honorees at the Bell Tower Gala on Saturday, Nov. 12, graduated from CBU’s biochemistry program in 2011 and went on to earn a microbiology degree from the University of Tennessee Health Science Center. She currently is a pursuing a Ph.D. in immunology and biochemistry at the University of Kentucky.
In addition to her studies and managing her job at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Salinas travels the country advocating the work of St. Jude. She’s also a three-time bone cancer survivor who founded Danny’s Dream Team, a fundraising team of pediatric cancer survivors who now participate in the St. Jude Half Marathon.

71. Norris, Others Take Next Step After Election -

State Senate Republican leader Mark Norris of Collierville ran for re-election this year the way just about any incumbent prefers to run – unopposed.

72. Kustoff, Cohen Win Seats in Congress And the Rest of Shelby County's Ballot -

Shelby County voters re-elected all but six incumbents seeking re-election on the Nov. 8 election ballot.

And the biggest upset on the local ballot gave Democrats a gain of one seat in the state House delegation from Shelby County.

73. Mariota, MVP Candidate Carr on Parallel Paths -

So exactly what do the Tennessee Titans have in Marcus Mariota?

Mariota’s performance in Sunday’s 43-35 loss to the San Diego Chargers was in some ways a microcosm of his efforts to date with the Titans.

74. Financial Pros Digest, Analyze Impact of Trump Win -

Money managers in Memphis were up late Tuesday night, digesting the impact of Donald Trump’s surprise election win like everybody else, and are still sorting through the impact on markets and stock sectors.

75. County Has Lowest Voter Turnout in 12 Years -

Voter turnout in Shelby County for the 2016 presidential general election was 59.7 percent, according to unofficial returns posted by the Shelby County Election Commission early Wednesday, Nov. 9. That marks the lowest showing since the 2004 presidential general election, when turnout was 57 percent.

76. Shelby County Vote Count Stalls For Third Presidential Contest -

Republican Presidential nominee Donald Trump won Tennessee’s 11 electoral votes Tuesday, Nov. 8, in unofficial statewide election returns while Democratic Presidential nominee Hillary Clinton carried Shelby County in the popular vote.

77. Transitioning Into the Civilian Workforce -

There are few groups I have more respect for than our U.S. Military. These honorable men and women are on the front lines of our country each day. In fact, they spend many of their most employable years in service.

78. The Role Of Conscious Corporations -

Denial of a human-centric world and its impact on the planet since the industrial revolution is no longer an acceptable worldview.

In March, we reached the point of no return, the point where most credible international scientists agree that damage will be unprecedented and relentless. As we have surpassed global CO2 concentrations at 400 parts per million (PPM), let’s make this alarm a time for changing the purpose of business.

79. Election Day Ends Contentious Presidential Contest -

In a contentious national campaign for president that has tested the boundaries of what is considered proper political discourse and what should be public, local Democratic and Republican partisans have mostly been spectators as the 2016 presidential campaign comes to an end Tuesday, Nov. 8.

80. Election Fallout: What a Trump Or Clinton Presidency Means for State -

Donald Trump is going to win easily in Tennessee.

Everyone, most of all the campaigns for both Trump and Hillary Clinton, accept this fact, as evidenced by the lack of campaign time spent in the state – and most of the South, for that matter – during this contentious campaign cycle.

81. Planning Can Defeat Mediocrity -

It’s a scenario many sales leaders know too well: You hire talented people with stellar track records and are left bewildered when they struggle to make their numbers week after week. You coach them. You put them on performance improvement plans. You remind your team of minimum targets and echo their bonus incentives at every sales meeting. Yet your team’s performance continues to decline and motivation nosedives as a result.

82. Wolf River Greenway Prepares to Move as River Causes Changes To Plan -

Before Thanksgiving, the Wolf River Conservancy should have a contract awarded to begin work on the trail and trail head at Kennedy Park and start work on the privately funded part of the 21-mile Wolf River Greenway.

83. All Fixed Up: Elvis Birthplace Expansion Complete -

TUPELO, Miss. (AP) – After more than four years and more than $7 million, the renovation and expansion of the Elvis Birthplace and Museum is complete.

No other plans are in the works, but executive director Dick Guyton said, "Now it's time to maintain it."

84. Self-Trust Boosts Integrity And Sales Performance -

I’ve always contended that there are few business professions as challenging as a career in sales, so it’s not surprising that more than 45 percent of salespeople don’t meet their annual quota, according to a CSO Insights 2015 Sales Compensation and Performance Management Study. The reasons are varied and often involve sales discipline. In the sales world, discipline is often defined as setting an activity schedule and sticking to it.

85. Have Plenty Of Questions To Ask -

Sometimes, the devil really is in the details. This is especially true when it comes to the questions you ask when you’re looking for a job. Asking the wrong question, or not asking the right question, can get you into trouble when you least expect it. And it can be tricky to know when to ask which questions.

86. Last Word: The Day After Big River, Freedom Awards Shift and Tubby & Fiz -

Once the ribbons were cut, the speeches made and all of the players on both sides of the river were thanked, Sunday was the day those who put the Big River Crossing project in motion waited for to see what the public’s verdict would be on the boardwalk crossing the Mississippi River.

87. City, Southwest Collaborate On Police Officer Program -

A new program announced Tuesday, Oct. 18, will offer no less than 100 graduating high-school seniors full-time employment with the Memphis Police Department beginning in June 2017.

Mayor Jim Strickland, MPD Director Michael Rallings and Southwest Tennessee Community College President Dr. Tracy Hall said the “Blue Path” program is a way for young people to develop into well-rounded, community-focused police officers in the city of Memphis.

88. Clayborn Reborn Effort Charts Different Pre-vitalization Path -

The hope has been that the redevelopment of Central Station in the South Main area would cause a ripple in development to the east and link up with the sprawling South City development that encompasses the Foote Homes public housing development, the area south of FedExForum, and go south of Crump Boulevard.

89. Resetting the Bar -

David Fizdale is a first-time NBA head coach. Tubby Smith is a college coach with a Hall-of-Fame resume.

In Memphis, on the eve of the 2016-2017 NBA and college basketball seasons, they also share this in common: They are leaders that are worlds apart from their most immediate predecessors. Their mere presence, before the season even tips off, has changed the hopes, dreams and expectations for the city’s hoops fans.

90. Cleveland Indians, ‘Major League’ Come to World Series -

The Chicago Cubs have the charm and the brand. Lovable losers. The Friendly Confines of Wrigley Field.

And they are fighting 108 years of history. The Goat Curse. The Gatorade on Leon Durham’s glove. Steve Bartman.

91. United Way Mid-South is Building a Network of Agencies to Fight Poverty -

Memphis has a poverty problem, a problem that exists despite thousands of human service agencies at work in the region, and United Way Mid-South having interaction with some 650,000 people last year.

92. Last Word: Early Voting Arrives, Airbnbs and Red Tape and Clayborn Reborn -

Here comes early voting. It starts here at 21 locations across Shelby County at 10 a.m. Wednesday. For the last 16 years or so, Presidential general elections have really been low key affairs in a city where our politics is spicy. That’s not to say emotions haven’t been running high between and among our Clinton and Trump partisans.

93. City, Southwest Collaborate On Police Officer Program -

A new program announced Tuesday, Oct. 18, will offer no less than 100 graduating high-school seniors full-time employment with the Memphis Police Department beginning in June 2017.

Mayor Jim Strickland, MPD Director Michael Rallings and Southwest Tennessee Community College President Dr. Tracy Hall said the “Blue Path” program is a way for young people to develop into well-rounded, community-focused police officers in the city of Memphis.

94. Board of Regents Vice Chancellor Talks Of Second TCAT Center for Memphis -

The leader of the statewide system of Tennessee Colleges of Applied Technology wants another one of the centers in Shelby County.

James King, the vice chancellor of the Tennessee Board of Regents, said in Bartlett Monday, Oct. 17, that he hopes a machine tool technology work room TCATP is a part of at Bartlett High School is the start of a broadening of the system.

95. New Clay & Land President Reflects On Insurance Career, Industry -

Todd Dyson’s career in the insurance business has followed a simply trajectory. Treat clients well, pay attention to the relationship aspect of the business and look for opportunities to stand apart from the competition.

96. Cervantes Helps Latino Memphians Stay Connected -

Fabiola Cervantes is proud of her Mexican heritage. At the same time, the public relations and digital content manager at Latino Memphis loves calling the Bluff City home. Her dual heritage makes her a perfect fit to connect and empower Memphis’s 81,000 Latino residents.

97. Green Spaces Valuable Assets for Memphis, Citizens -

Shelby Farms Park’s biggest project – Heart of the Park – is open. The Wolf River Greenway is on track for completion no later than 2020. Overton Park has come through the greensward controversy and is moving ahead with park enhancements.

98. Even the SEC Has to Bow to Hurricane -

Sports writers covering SEC football have done a historically bad job at the league’s summer Media Days of predicting the conference champion. But it’s an exercise that does not put lives at risk.

99. Green Renaissance -

As director of Shelby Farms Park Conservancy, Jen Andrews has been on the front lines of what can fairly be called a green revival in Memphis. And she is amazed at how much change has occurred over the last decade, a rebirth that spans not just across the miles but now seems embedded in the city’s psyche.

100. 12 Crucial Social Media Metrics -

Most businesses of any size are at least experimenting with social media marketing these days, though most remain unsure if that notable time investment is really paying off. How do you know if you should continue down the social media path, invest more time and money, or shift your investment to another marketing channel entirely?