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Editorial Results (free)

1. Week Ahead: Feb.19-25 -

It seems the only thing consistent about this hot again, cold again weather is the rain. As we enter another week of the waning winter, there are plenty of events to keep you entertained. But don’t forget the umbrellas, Memphis!

2. Getting to the Top -

An attorney, a physician and a college president. Three success stories. Three women who made it. They had different challenges, yes, but they also shared obstacles that are ever the same.

Dr. Marjorie Hass, Rhodes College president, recently spoke at a breakfast on campus for female students and alumni. Her message to the young women about to set out on their careers was wrapped in truth. She was encouraging, yes, but she also was not going to make promises that life can’t keep.

3. If You Play the Games, Will They Still Come? -

The other day the NCAA released attendance figures for the 2017 college football season and for the fourth straight year FBS attendance dropped. Yes, fans still pack the giant stadiums around the SEC, which despite having a decrease in average attendance by 2,433 per game, easily had the highest average attendance in the country with 75,074 fans per four quarters of life-and-death football.

4. Details Slow Plan to Shrink UT’s Board of Trustees -

Gov. Bill Haslam’s plan to restructure the University of Tennessee board of trustees appears to be a work in progress.

Timing is critical, too, with the 2018 session of the General Assembly moving at a snail’s pace and UT President Joe DiPietro’s contract set to run out in mid-2019.

5. Tough Love -

For the Honorable Tim Dwyer, helping people who stumble get back on their feet and have a second chance is a trademark of his distinguished career. Dwyer is recipient of this year’s Bobby Dunavant Public Servant Awards for an elected official. He and the non-elected award winner, Shelby County Chief Administrative Officer Harvey Kennedy, will be honored at the 15th annual Dunavant Awards luncheon on Feb. 28 at the Holiday Inn-University of Memphis on Central Avenue.

6. Rhodes’ Hass Defends Liberal Arts Education -

The president of Rhodes College says trade schools, associate degrees and certification in specific skills can’t be the city’s only economic driver.

“I think we can all agree that we do not and cannot foresee an economy in which the trades are the only drivers,” said Rhodes president Marjorie Hass on the WKNO/Channel 10 program “Behind The Headlines.”

7. The Week Ahead: Feb. 12-18, 2018 -

Good morning, Memphis! The 50th anniversary of the historic sanitation workers’ strike is remembered this week, a Pulitzer Prize winning author visits to speak about innovation and we get to hear the first declaration of “Play Ball” this year by an umpire at FedExPark. Oh, and don’t forget the waffles.

8. How the Market's Turmoil Could Affect Fed's Rate Decisions -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Wall Street has thrown a rather sour welcoming party for Jerome Powell.

9. Serious Diversion -

ZEN FOR CYNICS. Do not walk behind me, for I may not lead. Do not walk ahead of me, for I may not follow. Do not walk beside me for the path is narrow. In fact, just buzz off and leave me alone.

10. Last Word: MLGW Rate Hike, The May Ballot So Far and Old Dominick's Taxes -

The Tobacco Corner, a Poplar Corridor landmark, is closing in April. There was once a set of Tobacco Corners that look like the one at Poplar and Mendenhall and they included “newsrooms” – places to buy magazines, sometimes adult, and newspapers -- after buying tobacco. In almost 50 years, none of those product lines are what they once were. And the legacy of a homegrown business is disapperaring, too. 

11. Commission Seeks Path For Elected County Utility Board -

Shelby County commissioners approved Monday, Feb. 5, a first step toward providing county sewer services with a resolution supporting state legislation that would allow for an elected county utility board.

12. The Day After -

There is perhaps no greater scrutiny that a brand faces than during the biggest U.S. sporting event of the year. Courageous brands bet big that their ad will win hearts and minds, but alas, only 36 percent of Super Bowl ads earned favorable ratings from our team of advertising professionals, likely making for some uncomfortable ad execs on the hot seat Monday morning.

13. The Week Ahead: Feb. 5-11, 2018 -

Good morning, Memphis! If you’re looking for a legit reason to “space out” this week, The Orpheum’s got you covered with two out-of-this-world events. Meanwhile, LeMoyne-Owen College honors Black History Month and a pair of local nonprofits celebrate the hope and heart of the city. And that’s just a taste of what’s on tap in The Week Ahead.

14. Dreamers Deferred -

You never really get to the point where you can stand at a particular moment in time and forecast with any certainty how your life is going to turn out, how things are going to look or what’s going to be different over a long time horizon. That’s certainly the way it’s been, and still is, for Mauricio Calvo and Memphians like him.

15. 5 Things: What Yellen's Fed Tenure Will Be Remembered For -

WASHINGTON (AP) – When Janet Yellen leaves the Federal Reserve this weekend after four years as chair, her legacy will include having shattered a social barrier: She is the first woman to have led the world's most powerful central bank, a position that carries enormous sway over the global economy.

16. Vrabel Will Face Vastly Improved AFC South -

In case you haven’t noticed, the stakes have been raised considerably in the AFC South for 2018.

While new Tennessee Titans coach Mike Vrabel is busy trying to put a staff together, the group he assembles will have to hit the ground running just to keep up in a division that suddenly looks much improved from past seasons.

17. In State of Union, Trump to Make His Case on Economy -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Seeking to move past the shadow of the Russia investigation, President Donald Trump intends to use his first State of the Union address to cite economic progress under his watch while pushing for bipartisanship with Democrats on issues such as rebuilding roads and bridges.

18. Lee, Boyd Pushing For Technical Education -

Bill Lee led with his master plumber’s license last week as he toured Moore Tech. “I’m running for governor, too, by the way,” the Republican primary contender from Williamson County said as he talked with those attending classes and their instructors.

19. Harris, Clemmons File Net Neutrality Bill -

In the wake of the FCC’s recent vote to end net neutrality, state Sen. Lee Harris of Memphis and Rep. John Ray Clemmons, D-Nashville, have introduced the “Tennessee Net Neutrality and Internet Consumer Protection Act” to enact and enforce net neutrality rules at the state level.

20. Back to School -

Third grade math is still all about multiplication and division, which may be learned through memorization or through applying addition and subtraction. But it is always about understanding the concept.

21. Harris, Clemmons File Net Neutrality Bill -

In the wake of the FCC’s recent vote to end net neutrality, state Sen. Lee Harris of Memphis and Rep. John Ray Clemmons, D-Nashville, have introduced the “Tennessee Net Neutrality and Internet Consumer Protection Act” to enact and enforce net neutrality rules at the state level.

22. Shelby County Joins Memphis in Landfill Moratorium -

Shelby County commissioners approved a six-month moratorium on any new construction landfills in unincorporated Shelby County on Monday, Jan. 22.

The resolution is the companion to a Memphis City Council resolution passed earlier this month that imposed a six-month moratorium on such landfills within the city of Memphis.

23. Commission Adds County Landfill Moratorium to City Ban -

Shelby County commissioners approved a six month moratorium Monday, Jan. 22, on any new construction landfills in unincorporated Shelby County. The resolution is the companion to a Memphis City Council resolution passed earlier this month that imposed a six-month moratorium on such landfills within the city of Memphis.

24. Last Word: Brunch Overload, Grade-Changing Misdemeanor and Sports Rebirth -

What happens when Memphians have been home and/or work bound for about two weeks between a national flu outbreak and snow and ice that hangs tough in below freezing temperatures and the temperature Sunday under sunny skies is almost 60? The correct answer is brunch overload.

25. Parkinson’s Grade-Changing Bill Faces Opposition From Education Association -

NASHVILLE – With a grade-changing scandal at Trezevant High rocking Shelby County Schools, Rep. Antonio Parkinson is pushing legislation designed to put a harsh “deterrent” on illicit transcript changes: criminal prosecution.

26. Sports Notebook: Z-Bo returns, Memphis FB adds four, Jeremiah Martin hurt in loss -

After the Grizzlies decided not to bring back Zach Randolph for this season, one thing was sure: When he returned to FedExForum in another uniform he would get a rousing reception.

The fans did not disappoint as Randolph came back with the Sacramento Kings last Friday night. They gave Z-Bo a standing ovation, the Grizzlies offered up a well-done video tribute, and Randolph hugged everybody from Marc Gasol and Mike Conley to arena workers.

27. SPORTS NOTEBOOK -

After the Grizzlies decided not to bring back Zach Randolph for this season, one thing was sure: When he returned to FedExForum in another uniform he would get a rousing reception.

The fans did not disappoint as Randolph came back with the Sacramento Kings last Friday night. They gave Z-Bo a standing ovation, the Grizzlies offered up a well-done video tribute, and Randolph hugged everybody from Marc Gasol and Mike Conley to arena workers.

28. Midlife Look at Insurance Needs -

Ray’s Take: Life insurance is an important part of most overall financial plans. Replacing the capital value of the significant providers is critical should they not be able to provide. Owning the right insurance for the right price at the right time in your life is a crucial element to your financial well-being.

29. Shelby County Prekindergarten Push Remains in General Terms for Now -

Nearly six years after voters defeated two ballot questions in as many years that would have provided a tax revenue steam for universal prekindergarten, the pre-K quest is back.

The return of a coordinated civic and political push for pre-K comes about five years after a combination of state and federal funding as well as a shift of county government’s early childhood Head Start contract to Shelby County Schools.

30. Tennessee House Speaker Proposes Medicaid Work Requirements -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Tennessee House Speaker Beth Harwell has filed legislation to pursue TennCare work requirements for able-bodied adults without young children.

31. Trump Suggests 2-Phase Immigration Deal for 'Dreamers' -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Seeking a bipartisan compromise to avoid a government shutdown, President Donald Trump suggested Tuesday that an immigration deal could be reached in two phases – first by addressing young immigrants and border security with what he called a "bill of love," then by making comprehensive changes that have long eluded Congress.

32. CW/CA Adds Fenton As Marketing, Research Director -

Laura Fenton has joined Cushman & Wakefield/Commercial Advisors as director of marketing and research. CW/CA’s Marketing & Research department serves as the commercial real estate firm’s in-house agency for brokers and clients, and in her role, Fenton leads strategic communication, marketing and research for business development initiatives, marketing on behalf of clients, public relations, advertising, internal communications, social media and community involvement. 

33. Getting Shovel Ready -

Candidates for various state-level offices up for grabs in the 2018 elections used the Southwest Tennessee Development District’s annual legislative luncheon in Jackson, Tennessee, last week to share their West Tennessee-centric campaign promises.

34. Blackburn, Fincher to Report Money Raised in US Senate Race -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Republican U.S. Rep. Marsha Blackburn says she raised $2 million in the last quarter of 2017 in her bid to succeed U.S. Sen. Bob Corker, while former U.S. Rep. Stephen Fincher says he raised $1.45 million in about two months.

35. Legislators Can’t Get Past Threat of Medical Weed -

Heading into the 2018 legislative session, Rep. Jeremy Faison is looking to send a message about his medical marijuana bill: Tennessee won’t open the door to recreational pot without General Assembly action.

36. Candidates in August State and Federal Primaries Start Pulling Petitions Friday -

Contenders for the May Shelby County primaries are still coming out of the political woodwork. And starting Friday, Jan. 5, candidates in the August state and federal primaries can begin pulling qualifying petitions for the second of three elections in 2018.

37. NBC Names Hoda Kotb as Lauer Replacement on 'Today' -

NEW YORK (AP) – NBC News opened the new year Tuesday by appointing Hoda Kotb as co-anchor of the "Today" show's first two hours with Savannah Guthrie, replacing Matt Lauer following his firing on sexual misconduct charges in late November.

38. Edmunds Sizes Up New Car-Safety Technology -

We are in a new era of car safety: The focus has shifted from reducing death and injury in a vehicle collision to preventing a crash from happening in the first place. Safety features designed to avoid accidents are becoming increasingly common in new cars.

39. In a Milestone Year, Gene Therapy Finds a Place in Medicine -

After decades of hope and high promise, this was the year scientists really showed they could doctor DNA to successfully treat diseases. Gene therapies to treat cancer and even pull off the biblical-sounding feat of helping the blind to see were approved by U.S. regulators, establishing gene manipulation as a new mode of medicine.

40. Final Goodbye: Roll Call of Some Who Died in 2017 -

They made music that inspired legions of fans. Rock 'n' roll founding fathers Chuck Berry and Fats Domino, rockers Tom Petty and Gregg Allman, grunge icon Chris Cornell, country superstar Glen Campbell and jazz great Al Jarreau were among the notable figures who died in 2017, leaving a void in virtually every genre of music.

41. City, County Governments on Different Paths -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland and the city council members are half way through their four-year terms of office with the new year.

42. His Way: Tubby Smith Figured Out Who He Was Long Ago and He’s Not Changing -

When his visitor was about to leave, Orlando Tubby Smith had one more story. About a time his father had given him an assignment on the family farm in Maryland. 

Tubby was one of 17 children. He had older siblings and younger siblings. He also, at age 12 or 13, already had a sense for what it was to lead and manage.

43. Congress Rushes to Avoid Shutdown, Punts Issues to January -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Conflict-weary lawmakers eyed the U.S. Capitol exits Thursday as the Republican-led Congress rushed to approve a temporary spending bill to avoid a government shutdown and then sprint home for the holidays.

44. Top Stories Of 2017 in Travel -

It’s been a big year for travel news, and that doesn’t even include the recent shutdown of Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport or American Airlines’ disaster averted with a potential pilot shortage over the holidays.

45. Council Delays MLGW Rate Hike Vote to Wednesday -

Memphis City Council members meet again Wednesday, Dec. 20, to vote on Memphis Light Gas and Water Divisions proposals to raise water, gas and electricity rates starting next month.

The council was debating the 1.05 percent water rate hike proposal at its regularly scheduled Tuesday session when chairman Berlin Boyd announced the meeting would recess until 4 p.m. Wednesday at City Hall. It came as council members had a lot of questions about possible alternatives to the rate hikes across all three sectors of the publicly-owned utility.

46. Banking Panel Kills Trump Nominee to Lead Export-Import Bank -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A GOP-controlled Senate panel rebuffed President Donald Trump on Tuesday, killing the nomination of his controversial pick to run the Export-Import Bank.

47. Is Your Expertise Coming Through? -

Inc. magazine columnist Joseph Gulfo said it best: “Expert. This is one of the most overused words you’ll ever hear.”

At the heart of that overuse are people in my profession – marketing and PR – who need to do right by their employer, idea or client and capture marketplace awareness.

48. Mackler Exits Senate Race, Clearing Side for Ex-Governor Bredesen -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Democrat James Mackler says he's dropping out of the U.S. Senate race in Tennessee to replace Sen. Bob Corker, a move that appears to clear the path to the Democratic nomination for former Gov. Phil Bredesen.

49. Robertson Reignites United Way’s Iconic Brand -

“All the women in my family are natural-born leaders,” Lori Spicer Robertson says as she leans forward in her desk chair. “To me, that was the norm – just what you did.”

50. Mayor’s Critics Have Their Own Plans for Strike Anniversary -

When the 1968 sanitation workers strike ended in April 1968, Cleophus Smith didn’t feel like the formal city recognition and a minimal pay raise he and other sanitation workers had gained was something to be celebrated.

51. Fed Set to Raise Rates As Yellen Gives Final News Conference -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Investors seem certain about this: The Federal Reserve is going to raise interest rates this week for the third time this year.

They're less sure about what the central bank might have in store for 2018, and they will look to Janet Yellen's final news conference as Fed chair Wednesday for any clues.

52. Franken Announces Resignation From Senate Amid Allegations -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Minnesota Sen. Al Franken announced Thursday he will resign from Congress in the coming weeks following a wave of sexual misconduct allegations and the collapse of support from his Democratic colleagues, a swift political fall for a once-rising Democratic star.

53. FBI Director Defends His Agency Against Trump's Attacks -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Countering strident attacks on his agency from the president who appointed him, FBI Director Christopher Wray on Thursday defended the tens of thousands of people who work with him and declared, "There is no finer institution, and no finer people, than the men and women who work there and are its very beating heart."

54. Last Word: Visions of Black Helicopters, 'Extreme Body Rot' and Mall Nostalgia -

A happy council day at City Hall to you and yours. I know this is probably a new and foreign tradition to most of you – the twice a month Memphis City Council meetings every other Tuesday. Or maybe you just don't think of the sessions in that way. This time of the year can be pretty mellow – a lull before what is really the biggest season at City Hall – budget season in the spring. But the council will be pretty busy Tuesday.

55. Q&A: $69B Aetna Bid Pushes CVS Deeper Into Consumers' Lives -

A drugstore chain that used to hawk cigarettes behind the front counter now wants to offer nutrition advice and work with your doctor to keep you healthy.

CVS Health says it wants to use its roughly $69 billion acquisition of the insurer Aetna to dive deeper into managing customer health, with its nearly 10,000 stores becoming "front doors" for care. The companies plan to expand the health services offered through CVS locations and get more involved in helping patients stay on their medicines or manage their chronic conditions.

56. Last Word: Veto Override, Vince Carter on Fizdale and Corker on Tax Reform -

Signs of life at the old Kroger store on Exeter in Germantown. The new developers for a project that was supposed to be a Trader Joe’s have pulled a $90,000 building permit to remove the façade of the building. But no word on who the new tenant may be and some interesting remarks about recruiting tenants in general who won’t have as many trucks making deliveries in a retail center that borders a residential area.

57. Mississippi State Names Penn State's Joe Moorhead Next Coach -

Mississippi State has hired Penn State offensive coordinator Joe Moorhead as its football coach, bringing in another up-and-comer who is largely in the mold of previous coach Dan Mullen.

58. Memorial Announced for Victims of Tennessee Wildfires -

GATLINBURG, Tenn. (AP) – A year after deadly wildfires broke out in Tennessee, members of the community have come together to remember the 14 people whose lives were lost.

Nicole Ogle, chairwoman of a memorial committee, announced a permanent memorial for the people who died and a tribute for the first responders.

59. Powell Casts Himself as a Figure of Stability for the Fed -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Jerome Powell says that if confirmed as the next chairman of the Federal Reserve, he expects the Fed to continue raising interest rates gradually to support its twin goals of maximum employment and stable prices.

60. Thaddeus Young Charting Own Course on the NBA Court and Off -

When Thaddeus Young returns to Memphis, he needs to make extra time. When he walks out of the tunnel to get in his pre-game shooting about an hour before tip-off, everyone from FedExForum ushers to fans to Grizzlies personnel want a moment to say hi and shake hands.

61. Wiping Slate Clean: Now Less About Who Can Afford It -

The scales of justice in Tennessee are slowly tipping back toward the poor – and not so poor – helping them regain traction lost to often-minor transgressions.

Change is taking place in court battles and in the Republican-controlled Legislature, believe it or not.

62. Officials Talk Bioscience Research Partnership -

Three major Memphis health care institutions including the University of Tennessee Health Science Center have established a formal partnership to help spur the commercialization of bioscience and technology breakthroughs.

63. Volvo to Supply Uber With Thousands of Self-Driving Cars -

HELSINKI (AP) – Volvo Cars said Monday it will sell tens of thousands of self-driving cars to Uber, which is expanding to become an operator and owner of its own car fleet.

Volvo said in a statement that it would provide the San Francisco-based ride-sharing company with its XC90 premium SUVs complete with autonomous driving technologies, from 2019 until 2021. The framework deal is non-exclusive.

64. RISE Foundation Gala Raises $125,000 -

The RISE Foundation's annual gala, "An Evening of Change," raised $125,000 to support the nonprofit in its mission of transforming the lives of low-income Memphians through financial literacy education.

65. Chamber Chairman’s Circle Expands Leadership -

As the Greater Memphis Chamber’s Chairman’s Circle continues to grow, its founding members have decided to restructure its leadership.

Original co-chairs Gary Shorb, Richard Smith, Calvin Anderson, Carolyn Hardy, Spence Wilson Jr., Duncan Williams, Leigh Shockey and Jason Hood voted to install a new leadership structure that will include addition of a chairman, vice chairman and new co-chairs.

66. Empathy Drives Growth of Andrews’ Senior-Care Business -

“My friends and I still talk about my grandmother,” Rico Andrews shares one afternoon in his office at Always Best Care Senior Services. “We’d all go over to her house after school and hang out – 17-, 18-year-old dudes hanging out with someone’s grandma.”

67. Activist Ogles Drops Bid to Succeed Corker -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Conservative activist Andy Ogles announced Wednesday that he is dropping his bid for the Republican nomination to succeed Bob Corker in the U.S. Senate.

Ogles is the former state director of Americans for Prosperity, the political arm of conservative billionaire brothers Charles and David Koch's network. He had announced his candidacy before Corker's surprise decision not to seek another term representing Tennessee in the Senate.

68. Chamber Chairman’s Circle Expands Leadership -

As the Greater Memphis Chamber’s Chairman’s Circle continues to grow, its founding members have decided to restructure its leadership.

Original co-chairs Gary Shorb, Richard Smith, Calvin Anderson, Carolyn Hardy, Spence Wilson Jr., Duncan Williams, Leigh Shockey and Jason Hood voted to install a new leadership structure that will include addition of a chairman, vice chairman and new co-chairs.

69. Five Steps to Retire From Your Business With Confidence -

As a business owner, you’ve poured your time and energy into making your company successful. But how much thought have you given to what will happen when you relinquish this role? Sooner or later, you will step down and hand the reins to someone else.

70. What Business Are We In? -

Frequent readers of this column know we are always asking questions. What you may not know is that our team members are busy asking us questions, challenging us to “think outside the box.”

71. RISE Foundation Gala Raises $125,000 -

The RISE Foundation's annual gala, "An Evening of Change," raised $125,000 to support the nonprofit in its mission of transforming the lives of low-income Memphians through financial literacy education.

72. Ignite Memphis Coming to New Ballet Memphis Digs -

If it was possible to create a mixtape of Memphis creativity, it might look like an event set to take place this week at Ballet Memphis.

The 11th edition of Ignite Memphis moves to Ballet Memphis’ new Overton Square space on Thursday, Nov. 16, bringing its signature slideshow-based presentation format to the ballet company’s Midtown digs. Organizers look for spaces like this – big enough to hold a crowd of around 300, and buzzy enough that people want to go there, be there and absorb what Ignite has to offer.

73. Tigers Easily Tamed by No. 25 Alabama in Opener -

They weren’t very good from the free-throw line (22 of 36 for 61.1 percent) and they were abysmal from 3-point range (2 of 17 for 11.8 percent). None of the players, with the exception of guard Kareem Brewton (13 points), could consistently create his own shot and they collectively finished with seven assists and 17 turnovers.

74. Bench Power -

Through games of Nov. 7, the Memphis Grizzlies were 7-4. You probably knew that. You recall the thrill of taking down the reigning NBA champion Golden State Warriors at FedExForum and beating the much-hyped Houston Rockets twice – on the road and at home.

75. Out of the Lab, Into the Marketplace -

A keynote presentation by Rachel Antalek, vice president, concept innovation, Starbucks, at the Back End of Innovation 2017 Conference.

Rachel Antalek has been at Starbucks for almost 12 years.

76. City Council Eyes Hotel-Motel Tax to Fund Pre-K -

Memphis City Council members will discuss a still-forming proposal Tuesday, Nov. 7, to fund universal prekindergarten in Memphis public schools by hiking the hotel-motel, or bed tax rate.

The 2:15 p.m. executive session discussion is around a proposal by council member Kemp Conrad that would increase the hotel-motel tax from 3.5 percent to 5 percent, which is the state’s cap on the tourism tax. The estimated $3.5 million that would generate would go toward a $7.9 million loss of funding for pre-K in 2019 when a federal pre-K grant runs out.

77. Zoo Parking Redesign Faces Public Input -

A team designing options for a reconfigured Memphis Zoo parking lot has presented three options that each include a circular road that would run along the eastern edge of the Overton Park greensward just north of Veterans Plaza.

78. Text of the Fed's Statement After its Meeting Wednesday -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Below is the statement the Fed released Wednesday after its policy meeting ended:

Information received since the Federal Open Market Committee met in September indicates that the labor market has continued to strengthen and that economic activity has been rising at a solid rate despite hurricane-related disruptions. Although the hurricanes caused a drop in payroll employment in September, the unemployment rate declined further.

79. Fed Leaves Key Rate Unchanged But Hints at Future Hikes -

WASHINGTON (AP) – With a new Federal Reserve leader about to be announced, the Fed is keeping its key interest rate unchanged. It also hints that it's preparing to resume raising rates as the economy shakes off the impact of recent hurricanes.

80. Fed Meeting to be Eclipsed By Trump's Decision on Fed Chair -

WASHINGTON (AP) – This week's Federal Reserve policy meeting is shaping up to be an afterthought next to that other imminent Fed event of the week: President Donald Trump's announcement of who will lead the central bank for the next four years.

81. Tigers in Position to Make College Football's First Playoff Rankings -

On Tuesday, Oct. 31, the College Football Playoff committee will reveal the first of six weekly rankings. It’s appropriate, of course, because on Halloween there no doubt be one or two imposters disguised as a Top 25 playoff team.

82. Last Word: Weekend Plans, Leaving Home and the Clown Show Turns a Corner -

Grizz win at the Forum 96 – 91 against the Mavericks Thursday, a night after losing to the Mavericks in Dallas. And off we go into a busy weekend starting with Friday’s University of Memphis football game at the Liberty Bowl against Tulane and into Saturday’s Race for the Cure through Downtown followed closely by day two of the River Arts Fest in South Main, which begins its three-day run Friday evening.

83. Tennessee's Corker Doubles Down on His Criticism of Trump -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Taking on a crowd of jeering union workers, standing up to a charismatic Democratic opponent on the man's home turf or lecturing upper management of one of the world's largest corporations, Tennessee Sen. Bob Corker has rarely backed down from a fight.

84. No-Sweat Market -

If the whole concept of “fair trade” seems a bit too remote in time and space, then Jackie Nerren has a recommendation that might allow you to better understand: one sip at a time. “Black Gold” is a 2006 Indie film about coffee growers in Ethiopia, where coffee accounts for 67 percent of the country’s foreign exports. In the U.S. and many other fully industrialized nations, coffee is big business. But the film details the struggle faced by some 70,000 famers receiving minimal payments for producing coffee beans – along the lines of 12 to 25 cents for every kilo picked.

85. GOP Sen. Flake Says He'll Retire, Had Tangled With Trump -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Sen. Jeff Flake, an Arizona Republican, announced Tuesday he would not run for re-election in 2018, condemning in a speech aimed at President Donald Trump the "flagrant disregard of truth and decency" that is undermining American democracy.

86. Man survives 9/11, Las Vegas shootings -

RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — Mike Dempsey never thought he would be a part of a second national tragedy.

87. Kustoff and Blackburn Map Different Incumbent’s Strategy for Republicans -

Tennessee Republicans are mapping a different incumbent’s strategy for 2018 midterm elections less than a year into Donald Trump’s presidency.

“This is our chance to get the Republican agenda done,” was how U.S. Rep. David Kustoff of Germantown put it, speaking to 200 delegates at the Tennessee Federation of Republican Women convention at the Holiday Inn University of Memphis this weekend.

88. Greenway’s Mud Island Segment Opens -

When Henry Turley was developing Harbor Town and building homes and apartments on Mud Island, he remembers marketing the view of the Wolf River.

89. Mud Island Segment of Greenway Opens -

With a ribbon of shoestrings, leaders of the Wolf River Conservancy formally opened Saturday, Oct. 21, the westernmost park of the Wolf River Greenway – a 115-acre site with a 1.2 mile long trail loop on the north end of Mud Island.

90. Big River Crossing: Observations on two wheels … and sometimes two feet -

You can’t really do the reporting on Big River Crossing and the connections to it without going at it on bike. And so here are a few observations and opinions:

I've seen the jerseys and other riding apparel. And I understand its comfort as well as its purpose. But I can't do it -- at least not the whole outfit. I feel like I will have to turn in my Frayser resident card. If this gear had been around when we had bell bottoms, before the return of straight leg jeans – maybe. But probably not.

91. The Ties That Bind -

When Big River Crossing was about to open a year ago, Doug Carpenter was asked often where the Tennessee-Arkansas state line is over the Mississippi River.

His marketing firm DCA has overseen publicity for the crossing from concept through construction, so he has learned much about the history of the Harahan Bridge and the mighty river below it. But the stateline wasn't marked

92. City Lays Out Numerous Paths to Statue Removal -

City officials laid out numerous paths forward in the Confederate monuments controversy Tuesday, Oct. 17, that include closing Health Sciences Park entirely or building a memorial to lynching victims in the park plaza where a statue of Nathan Bedford Forrest is now the centerpiece.

93. Memphis Leaders Await Final Reports for Possible Coliseum Renovation -

As Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland’s administration considers final details for a Fairgrounds redevelopment plan, he and his staff are waiting on a complete analysis of the condition of the Mid-South Coliseum.

94. City Lays Out Numerous Options in Confederate Monuments Controversy -

The city administration and Memphis City Council laid out numerous paths forward in the Confederate monuments controversy Tuesday, Oct. 17, that include closing Health Sciences Park entirely or building a memorial to lynching victims in the park plaza where a statue of Nathan Bedford Forrest is now the centerpiece.

95. Monumental Decision -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland may not even get a discussion with the Tennessee Historical Commission Friday, Oct. 13, about moving the statue of Nathan Bedford Forrest out of a city park.

96. Ryan to Feuding Trump and Corker: 'Talk It Out' -

WASHINGTON (AP) – House Speaker Paul Ryan is offering his advice in the feud between President Donald Trump and Sen. Bob Corker: "Talk it out among yourselves."

97. AP-NORC Poll: Most Don't Want Young Immigrants Deported -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Just 1 in 5 Americans want to deport young immigrants brought to the United States as children and now here illegally, the focus of a politically fraught debate between the White House and Congress.

98. Trump Lashes 'Liddle Bob Corker' as Senators Call for Calm -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Donald Trump lashed out at Sen. Bob Corker as "Liddle' Bob Corker" on Tuesday, continuing a feud with the Tennessee Republican who's dubbed the White House an "adult day care center" and charged that Trump could be setting the nation on the path toward World War III.

99. Steele Joins Southern Growth Studio’s Anthropology Team -

April Steele has joined Southern Growth Studio as a business anthropologist, responsible for collecting and analyzing data to evaluate existing and potential products and services. Steele’s hire comes as the Memphis-based innovation consulting firm grows its applied anthropology practice. Using qualitative social research methods like ethnography, the anthropology team steers the innovation process, conducting primary research to distill and communicate key insights to clients.

100. Trump Lashes Out at Corker; GOP Senator Hits Back -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A powerful Republican senator cast the president of his own party as a man-child who could set the U.S. "on the path to World War III" as the two engaged in an intense and vitriolic back-and-forth bashing, a remarkable airing of their party's profound rifts.