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Editorial Results (free)

1. US Home Prices Rise at Steady Pace as Sales Heat Up -

WASHINGTON (AP) – U.S. home prices extended their steady upward march in May, spurred by rising sales and a dwindling supply of available houses.

The Standard & Poor's CoreLogic Case-Shiller 20-city home price index increased 5.2 percent in May compared with a year ago. That is down from a 5.4 percent annual gain in April but still above last summer's growth rate.

2. Gannett to Restructure Commercial Appeal -

The union that covers newsroom employees at The Commercial Appeal has begun the process of formally challenging a new series of cost-cutting and efficiency measures in the works at the paper, comparing the moves to “The Hunger Games.”

3. Gannett Plans Restructure of Commercial Appeal Newsroom -

The union that covers newsroom employees at The Commercial Appeal has begun the process of formally challenging a new series of cost-cutting and efficiency measures in the works at the paper, comparing the moves to “The Hunger Games.”

4. Last Word: Baton Rouge Again, Identifying The Memphis Movement & Early Voting -

It is becoming more and more difficult to keep the danger to police officers from extremists and the danger of police training and policies that are used to justify questionable police shootings in the same frame.

5. Strickland Reviews 6 Finalists for Police Director Position -

Interim Memphis Police Director Michael Rallings is one of six finalists Mayor Jim Strickland is considering for appointment to the job on a permanent basis.

6. Last Word: Conley Makes It Official, No "Figure Heads" and Early Voting Opens -

Mike Conley signed on the dotted line about an hour before the press conference confirming that he and the Grizz front office have closed on the deal that makes him the highest paid player in NBA history… for now.

7. After The Bridge -

Four and a half hours after it began Sunday, July 10, the city's most significant and largest Black Lives Matter protest ended with police in riot gear slowly walking a group of around 100 protesters off the Hernando DeSoto Bridge and south on Front Street.

8. On the Line of Scrimmage, Color Doesn’t Matter -

HOOVER, Ala. – Politicians love to tell us that young people are our future. It’s mostly an empty cliché used to bridge one vague policy position to another, something to fill space instead of trying to offer a real solution to a real problem.

9. Early Voting Opens For The Aug. 4 Election -

Early voting opens Friday, July 15, in advance of the Aug. 4 election day in Shelby County and across Tennessee.

The first day of early voting will be at a single location, the Shelby County Office Building, 157 Poplar Ave., but expands to 21 satellite locations across Shelby County on Monday.

10. Last Word: Regrouping, Freedom Awards and The View From Another Bridge -

It will be a year come Sunday – a year since Darrius Stewart, a passenger in a car pulled over by Memphis Police in Hickory Hill was shot and killed by Officer Conner Schilling.

11. Memphis Chefs Set to Gather for Inaugural Food and Wine Bash -

Leave it to a chef to fall back on a food metaphor when talking about the more than year-long planning that’s gone into the inaugural Memphis Food & Wine Festival, a one-day culinary bash set for Oct. 15.

12. Protest at Memphis Bridge Ends Peacefully -

Four and a half hours after it began Sunday, July 10, the city’s most significant and largest Black Lives Matter protest ended with police in riot gear slowly walking a group of around 100 protesters off the Hernando DeSoto Bridge to Front Street.

13. Black Lives Matter Protest Draws Thousands In Memphis Protest Milestone -

Four and a half hours after it began Sunday, July 10, the city's most significant and largest Black Lives Matter protest ended with police in riot gear slowly walking a group of around 100 protesters off the Hernando DeSoto Bridge and south on Front Street.

14. Redbirds RBI Program Makes MLB All-Star Game -

The Memphis Redbirds RBI Program (Reviving Baseball in the Inner Cities) has been selected as one of 12 cities and national youth leagues to participate in the All-Star Youth Classic July 7-July 11 in San Diego, alongside the 87th MLB All-Star Game.

15. Strickland and Rallings Urge Peace and Calm At End of Violent Week -

Memphis Police are “doubling up” on patrol for now, Memphis Police Director Michael Rallings said Friday, July 8, and are sending more officers to respond to calls in the wake of a sniper attack in Dallas Thursday evening that killed five police officers.

16. US Gives Tentative OK to Flights to Cuba From 10 US Cities -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The U.S. government on Thursday tentatively approved scheduled commercial airline service to Havana from 10 American cities, further bridging the gulf between countries as close as 90 miles and an hour flight but long kept at a greater distance by the Cold War.

17. Redbirds RBI Program Makes MLB All-Star Game -

The Memphis Redbirds RBI Program (Reviving Baseball in the Inner Cities) has been selected as one of 12 cities and national youth leagues to participate in the All-Star Youth Classic July 7-July 11 in San Diego, alongside the 87th MLB All-Star Game.

18. Dean: Cities Need Transit Solutions for Growth -

During a busy day in Memphis last week, former Nashville Mayor Karl Dean stopped at City Hall to talk with Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland about a long-range city plan Strickland announced the following day.

19. Pop the Cork -

On Nov. 4, 2014, voters in six of Shelby County’s seven municipalities approved wine sales in food stores effective July 1, 2016. The next day, Josh Hammond, president of Buster’s Liquors & Wines, put the gears in motion to acquire the restaurant adjacent to his Highland Street spirits store.

20. Last Word: Lights, Camera, Demolition, Our Cautious Prosperity and City Hall Redux -

In south Memphis Wednesday, an old house on Mississippi Boulevard was demolished as part of a press conference to tout anti-blight measures in a city that has a lot of blight.

At times it seems like we have a different blight program for just about every blighted property.

21. Uber, Lyft Battle Governments Over Driver Fingerprint Checks -

DETROIT (AP) – Hailing a ride with a smartphone app in many U.S. cities is coming down to a fight over fingerprints.

Following incidents where Uber drivers were found to have criminal records, a number of state and local officials have proposed fingerprint background checks for ride-hailing drivers – often with the support of local taxi companies.

22. White House Clears Small, Commercial Drones for Takeoff -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Routine use of small drones by real estate agents, farmers, filmmakers and countless other commercial operators was cleared for takeoff by the Obama administration Tuesday, after years of struggling to write rules that would both protect public safety and free the benefits of a new technology.

23. This Week in Memphis History: June 17-23 -

2008: The first issue of The Memphis News features a cover story on the suburbs of Memphis. Developer Henry Turley: “It’s ‘This is not the city -- county taxes, county schools. Don’t look back.’ That’s the only reason they are built, so why should they be built well? They’re not.”
Collierville Mayor Linda Kerley: “Years ago, you thought of it as just being away from the city. And now you have so many multilevel cities that are suburbs.”
Arlington alderman Gerald McGee: “They know we’re there. But they don’t really know what we are. They just know that we’re way out there. I was the same way.”

24. SRVS' Saulsberry Honored for Her Work -

Wendy Saulsberry is one of two recipients of the 2016 Direct Support Professional of the Year for Tennessee by the American Network of Community Options and Resources. Saulsberry is a direct support professional for SRVS, a United Way agency that supports more than 1,200 children and adults with disabilities.
Saulsberry says that as a DSP, she is deeply committed to the well-being of SRVS clients, assists them with their daily activities and advocates on behalf of their interests.

25. June is Maker Month in Memphis -

This month in Memphis is all about the makers. From a gathering at the Broad Avenue retailer City & State to a “Makers Faire” in front of City Hall to a new privately funded effort to better understand the local maker economy, June will see a celebration and showcase of the city’s community of makers, artisans and the like.

26. US Home Prices Rise in March as Spring Buying Season Begins -

WASHINGTON (AP) – U.S. home prices kept climbing in March as the spring home buying season began, but so far the higher costs haven't thwarted sales.

The Standard & Poor's/Case-Shiller 20-city home price index increased 5.4 percent in March compared with a year earlier, according to a report released Tuesday. That is the same annual gain as in February.

27. Legislators Sweating the Small Stuff -

My late father kept a paper weight on his desk at home that read: “Don’t sweat the small stuff.”

Well, we’re sweating the small stuff – from the federal government down to the states – with this harangue over transgender bathrooms.

28. Last Word: $4.8 Billion of TNT, North Parkway Complications and Graceland West -

FedEx sets a date next week for its acquisition of TNT Express – a $4.8 billion deal that was approved by TNT shareholders Wednesday.

29. Poll: Americans More Upbeat About Own Finances Than Economy -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Americans are of two minds about the economy in the midst of an elec-tion race that largely hinges on the issue. They are strikingly pessimistic about the national econ-omy yet comparatively upbeat about their own financial circumstances.

30. Middle Class Shrinks in 9 of 10 US Cities as Incomes Fall -

WASHINGTON (AP) – In cities across America, the middle class is hollowing out.

A widening wealth gap is moving more households into either higher- or lower-income groups in major metro areas, with fewer remaining in the middle, according to a report released Wednesday by the Pew Research Center.

31. Last Word: BSMF Looks Up, Overton Park Respite and Slow Economic Growth -

The Beale Street Music Festival box office numbers won’t be in for a bit yet. But it looks like the three-day event that ended Sunday evening with Beck and Paul Simon weathered the weather very well, maybe better than usual.

32. Regionalism Enhances Recruiting For Cities in Metros -

When Memphis hits a dirty dozen list – whether it’s for crime, or education attainment, or poverty – those ratings are based on Memphis Metropolitan Statistical Area data.

And while Memphis, as the largest city in the MSA, has the lion’s share of economic disparity, those problems don’t just effect the city’s 600,000 citizens.

33. Last Word: Prince, Violent Crime Numbers, and a Parkside Post Script -

Prince. It’s hard to think of a musician with a more complete knowledge of music as a social and cultural force and the ability to let that force inhabit his music and what he wanted to accomplish.
It is that knowledge and its use from obscurity to the pinnacle of fame and acclaim to his own journey for personal fulfillment that, to me, defines what has been lost.
Music mattered to Prince unlike it had ever mattered before. All of the influences analyzed and synthesized by someone born in rock and roll’s first wave pushed forward in a sound that combined rock and roll and rhythm and blues and funk with purpose and confidence.
It wasn’t a denial or downplaying of any of those music categories – all were present sonically and culturally. No juggling or quick changes.
That was his talent and it’s hard to think of anyone who has been as knowledgeable, intentional and successful -- commercially and artistically – in that combination.
Prince is remembered here for not only playing the city’s largest arenas but for his legendary after shows on Beale Street that brought an entertainment insider cachet the district has rarely seen since its early 1980s reopening.
His was an intensity and sense of purpose rarely seen and possessed in such a way in the 60 years since rock and roll started in this very city, kicked off by both Rocket 88 and That’s Alright Mama.
So why couldn’t the city’s rock radio stations do more than talk about Prince into commercial breaks after another Nickelback rock block and actually play some of his music to acknowledge such a huge genre crossing artist?
Not cool.

34. Memphis’ Shrinking Population Cause for Concern -

Even as Memphis has grown larger through annexing surrounding communities, its population has steadily dwindled due to outmigration to the surrounding suburbs. Inner-city struggles will become more pronounced if this region’s wealthiest tax base continues that outward pattern, national experts say.

35. Missing Ingredient for Millennials: Down-Payment Savings -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Short of savings and burdened by debt, America's millennials are struggling to afford their first homes in the face of sharply higher prices in many of the most desirable cities.

36. Mid-South Mayors Don’t See Barriers In Regionalism -

It took the Mississippi River’s devastating flood in 2011 for Mid-South leaders to consider greater collaboration among the area’s 10 counties and three states.

Mid-South mayors came together to plot their way out of disaster, and that convening set the stage for a formal alliance, the Mid-South Mayors’ Council.

37. Horn Lake Among Top Cities for African-Americans -

Horn Lake has been named one of 2016’s 10 Best Cities for African-Americans by relocation website Livability.com.

The site’s editors, which put Horn Lake at No. 8 on the list, studied basic indicators spanning a range of topics, such as cost of living, crime, climate, health care availability and economic equality. They then looked for areas with larger-than-average African-American populations and places where they are succeeding in terms of income, homeownership and academic achievement. Other factors included desirability – areas where African-Americans are moving to at higher rates – and lifestyle and consumer data.

38. Editorial: Baseball's Impact Goes Beyond the Outfield -

Memphis is not a baseball town. And at times there are questions about the rest of the country.

But while the fields are fresh and the ballpark air is a mix of the last winter chill and a premonition of the summer heat, there is the game that beckons.

39. Horn Lake Ranked Among Top Cities for African-Americans -

Horn Lake has been named one of 2016’s 10 Best Cities for African-Americans by relocation website Livability.com.

The site’s editors, which put Horn Lake at No. 8 on the list, studied basic indicators spanning a range of topics, such as cost of living, crime, climate, health care availability and economic equality. They then looked for areas with larger-than-average African-American populations and places where they are succeeding in terms of income, homeownership and academic achievement. Other factors included desirability – areas where African-Americans are moving to at higher rates – and lifestyle and consumer data.

40. Last Word: Pastner's Georgia Tech Post-Season, Who Filed and Greensward Invitations -

Not so fast with the off-season. There is a Memphis post-season after all.

And the Grizz found it Thursday like a light at the end of a long-tunnel where a lot of people slipped and fell and can’t get up.
The light was Houston flaming out at home to Phoenix without the Grizzlies having to make a basket.
It’s all about the math. Stay in school, young people.

41. 'Fight for 15' Campaign to Target McDonald's Stores April 14 -

NEW YORK (AP) – McDonald's customers stopping in for a Big Mac on the eve of Tax Day may be greeted by demonstrators calling for pay of $15 an hour and a union.

Labor organizers say they're planning another day of strikes and protests exclusively targeting McDonald's stores in dozens of cities on April 14, following similar demonstrations outside a variety of fast-food restaurants a year ago.

42. Cleaning House -

Every neighborhood in Memphis and Shelby County has the right to be free from the negative effects of vacant, abandoned and blighted properties. That’s the battle cry of the Memphis Blight Elimination Charter, a 23-page pledge that will steer policy and programs dedicated to blight eradication.

43. Memphis Fights Back: Senate Poised To Do Real Damage via De-Annexation -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland makes a persuasive argument against de-annexation legislation now being considered by the state Legislature, providing a long list of figures to show it would devastate the Bluff City.

44. Shelby County Sees Slide in Unemployment Rate -

Shelby County’s unemployment rate in January was down a full 2 percentage points from a year ago at 5.5 percent, according to the latest data from the Tennessee Department of Labor and Workforce Development.

45. Shelby County Unemployment Rate Slides to 5.5 Percent in January -

Shelby County’s unemployment rate in January was down a full 2 percentage points from a year ago at 5.5 percent, according to the latest data from the Tennessee Department of Labor and Workforce Development.

46. Shelby County Unemployment Rate Slides to 5.5 Percent in January -

Shelby County’s unemployment rate in January was down a full 2 percentage points from a year ago at 5.5 percent, according to the latest data from the Tennessee Department of Labor and Workforce Development.

47. Study: Renters' Rise Extends Beyond Big US Cities to Suburbs -

NEW YORK (AP) – In the American imagination, suburbs are places to buy a house and put down roots. But a growing percentage of suburbanites rent, according to a new study.

About 29 percent of metropolitan-area suburbanites were renters in 2014, up from 23 percent in 2006, according to a report being released Tuesday by New York University's Furman Center real estate think tank and the bank Capital One.

48. Bill Would Open Door for Utilities to Expand Broadband -

Legislation to expand broadband access across Tennessee is evolving – by necessity.

State Rep. Kevin Brooks’ bill HB1303 to allow public utilities to provide Internet service outside their footprint is alive, he says, but it is being “argued vehemently.”

49. Council Rejects Hotel at Jackson and Front -

Memphis City Council members rejected a hotel with retail Tuesday, March 1, on the northeast corner of Jackson Avenue and Front Street, across from The Pyramid in the Pinch District, that was first proposed last year.

50. Numbers Show Memphis’ Commercial Real Estate Market Stable in 2015 -

Across all sectors, the Memphis market was stable in 2015.

That’s according to the latest data from Integra Realty Resources, a national appraisal and advisory firm. At its annual Viewpoint local market presentation Wednesday, Feb. 24, local Integra leaders spoke on the industrial sector’s banner year, multifamily’s expansion cycle, what’s next for an office market without any remaining Class A space, and growth in the retail sector.

51. Last Word: The Road To Memphis, Medical District Plans and A Greensward Update -

The Republican presidential field is coming this way in the gap between early voting, which ends Tuesday evening, and the March 1 election day
Donald Trump, John Kasich and Ben Carson are booked for this coming weekend.

52. Last Word: Presidents Day In An Election Year, Minority Business and Spring Training -

Presidents Day in a presidential election year.
Consider the political kaleidoscope of a foggy office-bound or home-bound Monday in Memphis with former President George W. Bush on the tube in the late afternoon defending his brother’s presidential campaign without once uttering the word Trump.
No further word of a Trump appearance promised for Memphis and some of Donald Trump’s own statements Monday suggested that by the time Memphis is on his schedule, he might be running as an independent.
Then there is the obsession in one corner of social media with Supreme Court history in rich detail.
And heads were turned Monday evening by the excerpt on the Grammys from the Broadway musical about Alexander Hamilton – a founding father born in the West Indies who established the nation’s financial system and the Federalist party. He never became a president, in part, because the vice president killed him. Hamilton wasn’t the only one who had been talking bad about Aaron Burr. The top of the ticket, President Thomas Jefferson, had decided to dump Burr from the ticket in the next election and Burr was trying to transition to become governor of New York.

53. Grizzlies Sign KD in Free Agency, Trade Mike Conley? No, Don’t Think So -

So there’s a national report out there saying the Memphis Grizzlies will make a strong play to sign free agent Kevin Durant after the season.

54. Strickland Wants Contract, Pay Boost for Memphis' Next Police Director -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland wants to offer the next Memphis Police Department director a multi-year contract for more than the $150,000 the city is currently paying interim police director Michael Rallings.

55. New Numbers: Memphis Industrial Market Breaks Records -

The Memphis industrial sector had a banner year in 2015. According to year-end data from Cushman & Wakefield/Commercial Advisors, last year’s absorption level came in at 8.4 million square feet, 2 million square feet higher than 2006’s pre-recession levels and a record for the market.

56. New Brass -

Just days before Toney Armstrong was off the city payroll, his successor as interim director of the Memphis Police Department, Michael Rallings, was getting used to the attention and ring kissing that comes with being the city’s top cop.

57. U of M Notebook: Wins, Attendance Not Created Equally -

Despite all the hue and cry about lousy attendance at FedExForum – and the concerns are justified because both announced attendance and actual people in the seats are on the decline – the Tigers still lead the American Athletic Conference with an average (announced) attendance of 11,534.

58. Fenced Out -

There’s a major problem in Memphis when it comes to minorities: African-Americans make up 63 percent of the population but garner less than 1 percent of total business receipts within Memphis, according to the most recent U.S. Census data.

59. 50-Year Star Trek Voyage Docks at Orpheum -

In the beginning there was Star Trek – a mid-1960s television series that didn’t make a five-year run ideal for syndication before it got cancelled. Then came a syndicated after-life anyway and five movies as well as four spin-off television series.

60. Few US Neighborhoods Affordable, Walkable With Good Schools -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Few neighborhoods can match the perks of Adams Morgan in Washington, D.C. — a reality that reflects a broader problem for the U.S. housing market.

Residents of Adams Morgan enjoy a bevy of bars, restaurants, exercise studios and shopping, just steps from their row houses and condo buildings. Home values are reasonable relative to neighborhood incomes. And in general, the area schools rate as better than average nationally.

61. Last Word: No Bern, Say No More and The Daily Mail Comes For A Visit -

Democratic presidential contender and Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders didn’t make it the city after all following the weekend’s debate among the Democratic presidential contenders.

62. OR Nurses Nationwide Donates $175,000 -

Several Memphis entities received 2015 year-end charitable gifts from OR Nurses Nationwide, which has offices in Memphis, Dallas and Houston.

Gifts of $25,000 each were given to Le Bonheur Children's Hospital, Church Health Center, Baptist College of Health Sciences School of Nursing and Youth Villages. A gift of $20,000 went to the University of Memphis' Loewenberg School of Nursing.

63. Tourism Goes Beyond Graceland, Beale Street -

This week, hundreds of investors, community builders and federal leaders gathered at the third annual Rural Opportunity Investment Conference, which ended with a discussion of spurring economic development through tourism.

64. Helping Memphis Make the Shift to Startups -

It’s been quite a year! We saw Memphis’ first joint Demo Day with Start Co. and Zeroto510, graduated 18 startups from accelerator programming and hosted several investors and startup enthusiasts from all over the country here for the Memphis in May World Championship Barbecue Cooking Contest. However, on a national scale, our startup community still has plenty of work to do.

65. OR Nurses Nationwide Donates $175,000 -

Several Memphis entities received 2015 year-end charitable gifts from OR Nurses Nationwide, which has offices in Memphis, Dallas and Houston.

Gifts of $25,000 each were given to Le Bonheur Children's Hospital, Church Health Center, Baptist College of Health Sciences School of Nursing and Youth Villages. A gift of $20,000 went to the University of Memphis' Loewenberg School of Nursing.

66. Armstrong Leaves MPD After Five Years of Change -

In five years as Memphis Police Department director, Toney Armstrong has seen more changes in law enforcement culture and how officers are perceived than most of his predecessors in the position ever saw.

67. 2016 Could Be Banner Year for Travel -

Every new year is filled with possibilities.

And in travel, a growing economy is just part of why travelers will seek new experiences.

TripAdvisor Insights surveyed more than 44,000 travelers and hoteliers about their travel plans for 2016.

68. New Laws in 2016 Show States are Diverging on Guns, Voting -

TRENTON, N.J. (AP) – Laws taking effect at the start of the new year show states diverging on some hot-button issues.

Restrictions on carrying guns will ease in Texas, for example, but will get tighter in California. It will be easier to register to vote in Oregon, but there will be another step to take at the polls in North Carolina.

69. Stewart Incident Triggers Systemic Shift -

For six months this year the Black Lives Matter movement in Memphis grew in an ebb and a flow governed largely by the growing list of fatal police encounters in other cities.

There was also an equally volatile and varied set of reactions by civic leaders in those cities as well as protestors.

70. Winter Heat Wave to Bring Threat of Tornadoes to Deep South -

ATLANTA (AP) — A heat wave that could deliver the warmest Christmas ever recorded to cities across the South may also fuel tornadoes and storms featuring golf ball-sized hail and damaging winds of up to 70 mph, forecasters say.

71. Main Event’s ‘Eat. Bowl. Play’ Opens -

Main Event Entertainment looks at dozens of metrics when deciding where to bring its sprawling family entertainment centers next – everything from an area’s growth trajectory to the mix of households with children as well as young singles.

72. Memphis to Host Back-to-Back Transportation Conferences -

On Thursday, Dec. 10, Memphis’ status as a logistics hub and its future in inner-city transportation will be debated.

The University of Memphis will be hosting two back-to-back free conferences at the FedEx Institute of Technology. The Intermodal Freight Transportation Institute will host its ninth annual conference, dubbed The State of Freight, from 7:30 a.m. to noon, and the newly established University of Memphis Design Collaborative will host the Workforce to Work Transportation Summit from noon to 4:30 p.m.

73. Memphis' Grocery Wars -

After Sprouts became one of the newest grocery chains to enter the Memphis market by opening stores in Lakeland and Germantown earlier this year, company spokesman Diego Romero described the chain’s arrival as practically a no-brainer.

74. Partners Bring Outdoor Classroom Design Challenge to Memphis Catholic -

Video game industry revenue is up. The time children spend outdoors is down. Young people’s recognition of corporate logos is up. Their ability to identify native species is down.

If that sounds like the groundwork for a nonprofit called Come Alive Outside, that’s because it is.

75. Home Values Point to a Sharp Wealth Divide Within US Cities -

WASHINGTON (AP) — It's still possible in Boston for a mail carrier, an accountant and a Harvard-trained psychiatrist — basically, the crowd from "Cheers" — to live as neighbors.

That finding by the real estate brokerage Redfin makes the capital of Massachusetts a rarity at a time when neighborhoods in most U.S. cities are increasingly isolated from each other by income and home values.

76. Ready for Launch -

Five hundred new companies in 10 years. That’s the idea that founded EPIcenter, short for Entrepreneurship-Powered Innovation Center, an organization looking to catalyze the entrepreneurial movement in Memphis.

77. Magic Light Wand Brings Wonder to Tree Lighting -

It started as a joke, an opportunity to see the happy smiles of grandchildren around the Christmas tree.

Gay Hammond’s grandsons came over for a visit and wanted to light the Christmas tree. She decided to have some fun with them, sharing a little magic of the season. She reached for a key fob she used to turn on the Christmas tree lights and as she secretly pushed the button, she also decided to wave a “magic wand,” making the children believe the lights came on magically.

78. Greenprint Summit Shows Region’s Possibilities -

Trails and bike lanes aren’t the only path to regional success, but they’re playing a growing role in partnerships among communities that sometimes find themselves competing for jobs.

To date, 19 of those communities have adopted a 25-year, green-centric plan that was introduced earlier this year and has been endorsed by more than 50 organizations.

79. Q&A: Driven by Protests, US Minimum Wage Vaults Onto Agenda -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The first question in Tuesday's GOP presidential debate — whether the minimum wage should go to $15 an hour — was the starkest evidence yet that U.S. workers have managed to thrust the issue of pay onto the presidential campaign agenda.

80. Conference Aims to Spark Positive Change, One ZIP Code at a Time -

The world can be a big place, even within one city or a single ZIP code. But the world also can be made smaller when the right kinds of lines are crossed.

Steve Nash founded nonprofit Advance Memphis in 1999, beginning an ambitious project without end. His goal: bring economic sustainability to the people living in and around the Cleaborn/Foote Homes public housing developments in South Memphis’ 38126 ZIP code, the poorest urban ZIP in Tennessee.

81. Andy Cates: Memphis in ‘Pivotal’ Time -

When more than 100 of the city’s most prominent developers and real estate professionals got together Tuesday, Nov. 3, at the Crescent Club in East Memphis, much of the focus was on a list of more than two dozen real estate projects.

82. Can We Talk? -

WE’RE SIMPLY NOT COMMUNICATING. I’ve been saying for years that our city, as a city, does not understand or value the role of marketing and branding in the city’s game plan.

83. Heading Up DMC Is Next Chapter in Terence Patterson’s Memphis Story -

“He’s impressive, and I like him.” So summed up Downtown Memphis Commission president Paul Morris about the general sentiment in electing Terence Patterson to take over the post when Morris steps down next month.

84. Memphis Bike Share on Track for Launch Next Year -

All signs are pointing to Memphis getting a bike-sharing program. Explore Bike Share has reached the end of the trail as the local initiative has sent out a request for proposals to take public bikes-for-hire to the next level.

85. Shifting Memphis Media Market, Like Every Other, In Flux -

Lauren Lee never picks up a newspaper. Which isn’t much of a surprise because she’s 33 years old, works in marketing, and has the technological savvy and finger dexterity to operate a smartphone.

86. Effectiveness Of ‘No More’ Campaign Debated -

Surveys and focus groups that are a key part of the “No More” campaign to build awareness and change attitudes on rape, sexual assault and domestic violence are and will be a baseline to gauge how well the campaign does its job.

87. Affordable Homes in an Unaffordable Market -

The gold rush of residential development throughout Middle Tennessee conceals what some in the region say is a growing crisis in affordable housing.

New homes and condos come on to the market every day, and even more are under construction or still in the planning stage, but those homes are often on the higher end of the price scale.

88. Proposal Prompts Closer Look at Tax Breaks -

In recent years, the tax incentives used to bring economic development and jobs to Memphis have been a lightning rod.

The debate’s volume grew as it became apparent that Memphis was emerging from the national recession at a slower pace than other major cities as well as some parts of rural west Tennessee and north Mississippi.

89. Problem Properties -

Memphis has a crippling issue with blight, and one nonprofit is front and center with changing the culture that led to the city’s inundation of abandoned properties and lots.

Neighborhood Preservation Inc. was founded in 2012 as a court-appointed receiver of properties taken away from neglectful owners. Over the years, it has evolved to become a robust advocate for stronger legislation and development tools to deal with problem properties.

90. Memphis Police Oversight Board Hits Another Snag -

After numerous delays and lots of stops and starts, proposed new rules for the city’s Civilian Law Enforcement Review Board hit another roadblock Tuesday, Aug. 4, but not before a vigorous Memphis City Council debate.

91. Suspect in Memphis Officer's Death Says He's No Coward -

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) – The man accused of killing a Memphis police officer had a few words for the department's director when he turned himself in, ending a manhunt that dragged on for two days.

92. Wilbourn Turns Self In To Marshals -

Memphis Police officer Sean Bolton apparently saw a car parked illegally Saturday night near South Perkins and Cottonwood roads and interrupted a minor drug deal in the car, leading to a fight with a passenger in the car who shot Bolton to death.

93. Moving Slowly, Growing Quickly -

Time was, crossing Lower Broadway safely only meant dodging woozy country music fans, speeding cabs and the occasional errant tour bus.

They’re all still there, but they’ve been joined by a wide and growing variety of small-motor or human-powered vehicles shuttling residents and tourists in and around downtown Nashville.

94. Memphis Sole -

The football field measurements are perhaps inevitable in describing just how big Nike’s Northridge distribution center in Frayser is after its $301 million expansion.

The 2.8 million-square-foot facility – the equivalent of 49 football fields – is Nike Inc.’s largest distribution center in the world.

95. Wharton Backs Moves To TBI In Stewart Shooting Probe -

Over the weekend, Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. and Memphis Police Director Toney Armstrong talked by phone about the death of Darrius Stewart.

Stewart was shot and killed Friday, July 17, by Memphis Police officer Connor Schilling after Schilling pulled over a car Stewart was in on a routine traffic violation. Stewart was put in the back of a patrol car but not handcuffed as police checked to see if he was wanted on any warrants.

96. Stewart, Goode Deaths Test Memphis, Southaven Police -

Darrius Stewart and Troy Goode died a day apart on different sides of the state line while both were in police custody.

97. Memphis Finalist for Choice Neighborhoods Grant -

Memphis is among the finalists for a federal grant worth up to $30 million that would fund the demolition and redevelopment of Foote Homes, the city’s last large public housing development.

The city got word Tuesday, July 14, from U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen that it is one of nine cities competing for the Choice Neighborhoods grant awarded by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development.

98. Tennessee’s ‘Fighting 26’ Democrats Work to Stay Relevant -

Sometimes Tennessee Democrats must feel like a tree that falls in the forest: Does anyone hear them?

When Democratic legislative leaders called for a special session this summer on Insure Tennessee, Gov. Bill Haslam’s market-based plan to use federal dollars to catch 280,000 working people in a health care coverage gap, they found themselves alone.

99. Madeline Patterson Joins Burson Campaigns -

Madeline Patterson has joined the Memphis office of Burson Campaigns, the corporate issues management unit of Burson-Marsteller, as a vice president. In her new role, Patterson will work with Burson clients on issues and crisis management, communications strategy, and integrated marketing and communications campaigns.

100. Memphis Finalist for Federal Choice Neighborhoods Grant -

The city of Memphis is among the finalists for a federal grant worth up to $30 million that would fund the demolition and redevelopment of Foote Homes, the city’s last large public housing development.