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Editorial Results (free)

1. New Lynching Memorial Evokes Terror of Victims -

MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP) – Visitors to the new National Memorial for Peace and Justice first glimpse them, eerily, in the distance: Brown rectangular slabs, 800 in all, inscribed with the names of more than 4,000 souls who lost their lives in lynchings between 1877 and 1950.

2. Police: Waffle House Suspect Was Armed When Arrested -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – The mentally unstable gunman suspected of opening fire at a Waffle House restaurant in the middle of the night was arrested not far from his apartment Monday after hiding from police for more than a day following the attack that killed four people, authorities said.

3. Board Members Must Set Goals -

When joining a board, whether you are a new or established board member, we suggest you take the time to define for yourself what you want to accomplish through your service.

Time will pass. Crises will arise. There will be leadership changes, budget shortfalls, unexpected windfalls, mergers, resignations and more. You and your fellow board members will have to respond and react.

4. Duran Case Moves To Federal Court In Louisiana -

Memphis Police director Michael Rallings says his department isn’t working with federal immigration agencies that are becoming more aggressive in how undocumented immigrants are dealt with.

But critics of the police department’s aggressive reaction to protests say police brass is cooperating.

5. Hardaway's First Memphis Recruiting Class a Winner -

The latest recruiting rankings from 247sports.com for the college basketball Class of 2018 has the University of Memphis ranked No. 27 and first among American Athletic Conference teams, 23 spots ahead of No. 50 Wichita State.

6. Opioid Litigation, FedExForum NonCompete Top Local Law Developments -

Here are some of the legal issues making news in recent months.

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Tennessee Attorney General Herbert Slatery says lawsuits by local prosecutors over the opioid epidemic are complicating his efforts to reach a multistate settlement with drug companies. In response, the prosecutors, who represent about half of Tennessee's counties, say local communities lose out when lawsuits like theirs are rolled into one settlement.

7. Regional Win -

In an increasingly interconnected world, having a cohesive economic regionalism strategy is becoming more of a must-have for successful metropolitan areas.

To facilitate this, the Urban Land Institute held Memphis’ first RegionSmart Summit in 2016 to gather all of the area’s government, economic development and community leaders in one place to collectively address some of the region’s most pressing planning and development issues.

8. Richards Focused on Customers and Employees -

Chris Richards knows the value of a chance encounter.

As a 20-year-old sophomore at the University of Iowa, Richards traveled with her college roommate to Memphis, intending to stay for the summer and explore a new city.

9. New Chef Takes Over at The Brass Door -

A new chef is moving into the kitchen at Downtown’s The Brass Door, taking over for Patrick Reilly, who’s spent the past six months helping to breathe new life into the re-opened Irish pub.

10. Events -

Circuit Playhouse will present the regional premiere of “Stupid F#!&ing Bird” Friday, April 20, through May 13 at 51 S. Cooper St. Visit playhouseonthesquare.org for times and tickets.

11. Excavator Blamed for Island-Wide Blackout in Puerto Rico -

SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico (AP) — An island-wide blackout hit Puerto Rico on Wednesday as the U.S. territory struggles to repair an increasingly unstable power grid nearly seven months after Hurricane Maria. Officials said an excavator accidentally downed a transmission line.

12. George W. Bush Says His Mother Didn't Fear Death -

HOUSTON (AP) — Former President George W. Bush said Wednesday that his mother, Barbara Bush, didn't fear death because she believed in an afterlife and that she would be "wonderfully received in the arms of a loving God."

13. Events -

Memphis Botanic Garden hosts 30 Thursdays: Nature at Night Thursday, April 19, at 6 p.m. at 750 Cherry Road. Join an MBG staff member on an evening guided tour of the gardens. Free with garden admission. Visit memphisbotanicgarden.com/30thursdays for details.

14. Civil Rights Cold Case Bill Nears Passage -

Years of work behind her, state Rep. Johnnie Turner is making the final push for creation of a state body designed to initiate investigations into civil rights cold cases, potentially solving decades-old murders or giving people the opportunity to put a heinous act behind them.

15. GoFundMe Page Seeks to Reimburse Memphis for State Money Withdrawal -

NASHVILLE – A GoFundMe page has been started on Facebook to raise funds to make up a $250,000 budget cut the Tennessee Legislature levied against the city of Memphis for removing Confederate monuments from two city parks late last year.

16. Bill Prohibiting Sterilization Incentives Passes State House -

A proposal by State Sen. Brian Kelsey, R-Germantown, and state Rep. Raumesh Akbari, D-Memphis, to prohibit Tennessee judges from offering defendants reduced jail time in exchange for sterilization passed the state House of Representatives by a vote of 70-23 Tuesday, April 17. The legislation now awaits the signature of Gov. Bill Haslam.

17. Events -

The Africa in April International Entrepreneurs’ Business Luncheon is Wednesday, April 18, from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Holiday Inn University of Memphis, 3700 Central Ave. Tickets are $75. Visit facebook.com/africainaprilfestival for details.

18. Commercial and Critical Darling Kendrick Lamar Wins Pulitzer -

NEW YORK (AP) — Kendrick Lamar has won the Pulitzer Prize for music, making history as the first non-classical or jazz artist to win the prestigious prize.

19. Trolleys Return to Main Street at End of April -

The Main Street trolley returns to service April 30, the Memphis Area Transit Authority announced Monday, April 16.

Three restored trolley cars will go into service at the end of April almost four years after MATA stopped all trolley service on all three lines – Main, Riverfront and Madison following a pair of fires on two trolleys while they were carrying passengers.

20. Arkansas, Oklahoma Divided on Opioid Withdrawal Alternative -

FORT SMITH, Ark. (AP) — Legislation on an alternative substance that some say could help mitigate the effects of opioid withdrawals is divided along state lines.

Kratom, a tropical tree from Southeast Asia with leaves that produce stimulant and sedative effects, has been used in the Fort Smith region to both treat chronic pain and mitigate the effects of opioid painkiller withdrawals. Though it is sold legally through alternative medicine stores throughout Oklahoma, it is listed as a banned substance in Arkansas.

21. Surveyors Confirm 11 Tornadoes in Arkansas From Storms -

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — Survey teams with the National Weather Service have confirmed 11 tornadoes so far from the severe storms that hit Arkansas on Friday and Saturday.

The two strongest tornadoes were both rated EF2. One hit Mountainburg in northwest Arkansas while the other struck Montrose in the southern part of the state. EF1 tornadoes were confirmed in Lavaca, Ozone, Gamaliel, Umpire, Crossett and southwest Ashley County. An EF0 tornado was confirmed in Oppelo in Conway County.

22. Another Conscious Company: Which Wich -

Editor’s note: Columnist Michael Graber interviewed Jeff Sinelli, founder and “chief vibe officer” at Which Wich, about the sandwich chain’s focus on conscious capitalism. 

23. What Statewide Candidates Say About Opioid Crisis, Public Safety -

The spread of opioid abuse claimed over 1,600 lives in Tennessee in 2016, and it is getting worse. Methamphetamine abuse, while not getting the headlines, has increased. Gun violence and murder is increasing. What proposals do our candidates have to help Tennesseans address these public safety issues?

24. Lawmakers Urge That Ex-President James Polk Be Exhumed Again -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Nearly 170 years after President James K. Polk died, the Tennessee Legislature is urging that his remains be exhumed and taken to a fourth resting place – but it might take a while longer before the shovels hit the ground.

25. How Much Are You Worth? -

Ray’s Take: What do Mike Tyson, Curt Schilling, Marvin Gaye, Francis Ford Coppola and Meat Loaf all have in common?

26. A Memphis Parable -

HOWARD AND BILL. One of my first columns was this very Memphis story. It’s time to tell it again. 

In the ’60s, Howard Robertson was a black postal carrier moonlighting as a waiter at the capital of white money dining in Memphis, Justine’s, housed in an antebellum mansion. Bill Loeb was a successful white businessman, owner of ubiquitous laundry branches about town, and the brother of Henry Loeb, mayor during the 1968 sanitation strike. Loeb lived in a home literally bordering the Memphis Country Club. Robertson lived in the other Memphis those of us who grew up white then never really acknowledged.

27. Third Annual RegionSmart Summit to Be Held April 26 -

More than 300 government, economic development and community leaders will gather at the third annual RegionSmart Summit this month to discuss some of the Mid-South’s biggest planning issues.

Hosted by the Mid-South Mayors’ Council and the Urban Land Institute’s local affiliate, ULI Memphis, the April 26 summit at the Halloran Centre for Performing Arts & Education will tackle topics such as the future of workforce development, transportation and land use.

28. ‘Food as Medicine’: Church Health grows robust nutrition services at Crosstown -

Health care patients often need as much care and coaching on their nutrition, fitness, or mental health as they may need in dealing with a chronic disease or injury.

Church Health integrates all of those things into its model of care and now trains medical students, residents and practitioners in culinary medicine.

29. Trump Says All Calm at White House, Vents About Russia Probe -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Donald Trump insisted that all was "very calm and calculated" at the White House, even as he vented Wednesday about the Russia probe, complained about Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein and served noticed that "nice and new and 'smart'" missiles will be coming down on Syria.

30. House Committee Revives Bill That Would Charge Local Officials -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A Tennessee bill that would allow local officials to be charged with a felony for passing sanctuary city ordinances or measures that would illegally remove Confederate statues has gotten new life.

31. Own Your Next Interview -

“Your work is going to fill a large part of your life,” Steve Jobs once said, “and the only way to be truly satisfied is to do what you believe is great work. And the only way to do great work is to love what you do.”

32. ‘I'm Sorry’: Zuckerberg Opens Senate Hearing With an Apology -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg began a two-day congressional inquisition Tuesday with a public apology for a privacy scandal that has roiled the social media giant he founded more than a decade ago.

33. Effort to Move Former President Polk's Body is Resurrected -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – The body of former president James K. Polk has been moved three times since he died of cholera in 1849, and now an effort to move it again has taken on a life of its own in the Tennessee Legislature.

34. Jones Named Managing Partner of Fisher Phillips’ Memphis Office -

Fisher Phillips has appointed David S. Jones regional managing partner of its Memphis office. Jones, who has 18 years’ law experience, represents clients exclusively in immigration-related employment and compliance matters, and that will continue to be his primary focus as regional managing partner. In addition, he will oversee development of the office, attorneys and staff, and will play a greater role in the management of Fisher Phillips as a whole as a member of the operations group. Jones takes the reins from Jeff Weintraub, who served in the role for six years, as part of a routine leadership rotation.

35. Annual WFGM Awards Celebrate Contributions of Local Women -

Three Memphis women who have dedicated their lives to improving life in the city they call home will be honored for their contributions this week.

The Rev. Sonia Louden Walker, Anita S. Vaughn and Fredrika “Freddi” Felt will be the recipients at this year’s Legends Awards sponsored by the Women’s Foundation for a Greater Memphis (WFGM).

36. Poo as Good Business -

Talk about nothing wasted. Behold the founding story, which reads more like a creation myth, of Poo-Pourri.

Suzy Batiz, a 40-year-old woman from Jonesboro, Arkansas, declares her second bankruptcy conventional “rules” of success did not work for her life. To heal, she renounces the world of commerce and takes a two-year spiritual quest, experimenting with alternative healing methods that included the lost art of tapping and shamanic training in Peru.

37. 10 Ways to Energize Volunteer Leaders -

A special column for executive directors and college presidents. “I guess I’ll have to do it myself. I can’t depend on anyone. People say they want to help, but...”

38. Religious Leaders Recount Catechism of 1968 Memphis -

Rev. James Lawson, the architect of nonviolent resistance who counseled Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. on it, walked in a circle last week around the new “I Am A Man” bronze and stainless steel sculpture. As he walked with his head down, still and video photographers scrambled for the best angle to capture the seminal strategist of the civil rights era, seemingly deep in thought.

39. Activist Lawson Presented Honorary Humanities Degree from Rhodes -

Rhodes College on April 5 awarded longtime civil rights activist Rev. James Lawson an honorary Doctor of Humanities degree.

40. Statewide Clinical Trials Effort Launches Out of UTHSC -

When Dr. Steven Goodman, vice chancellor for research at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center, arrived at the college more than two years ago, his ambition was to launch a statewide clinical trials network.

41. Week Ahead: April 9-15 -

Good morning, Memphis! We’ve seen in recent national elections how important every vote can be, much less on the local level where far fewer votes are cast than in a national presidential election, for example. It’s one of your basic rights and a great opportunity for you to be an influence in the local community.

42. Did Cambridge Analytica Get Your Data? You'll Know Soon -

NEW YORK (AP) – Anyone who's been wondering if their private Facebook data might have been swept up in the Cambridge Analytica scandal will soon get their first clues.

Starting Monday, all 2.2 billion Facebook users will receive a notice on their feeds, titled "Protecting Your Information," with a link to see what apps they use and what information they have shared with those apps. If they want, they can shut off apps individually or turn off third-party access to their apps completely.

43. Transplant Foundation's Blue and Green Day April 13 -

The Mid-South Transplant Foundation is calling on businesses, households, churches and other supporters to light up the city in blue and green Friday, April 13, for National Donate Life Blue and Green Day, a day set aside to support organ and tissue donation.

44. Events -

Art by Design, a designer showcase benefiting ArtsMemphis, is underway through Sunday, April 8, in the Pipkin Building at the Mid-South Fairgrounds. More than a dozen interior design team have created custom “vignettes” within a chic gallery showroom, with special presentations each day. Single-day tickets are $20.  Visit artsmemphis.org for details and hours.

45. Editorial: Universal Life a Blueprint For Building Black Wealth -

While many of us were thinking about and remembering the turbulent events of 1968, this week brought another significant nod to the past with a commitment to the future.

The Universal Life Insurance Co. building isn’t a Pyramid, though its architecture has an Egyptian theme. It’s not the tallest building in the city, but then again, the tallest building in the city is boarded up these days.

46. State of Flux -

Anyone paying attention to recent news headlines alone should have a pretty good indication that health care in the U.S. – really anywhere you look, on local, state or national levels – remains a byzantine, expensive proposition. Health care keeps getting more expensive. It involves navigating a lot of paperwork with bureaucratic legalese that bears the fingerprints of a tangle of stakeholders, including insurers, doctors and lawmakers.

47. Last Word: I Am A Man Plaza, Graceland Clears EDGE and Filing Deadline Action -

Sometimes the simplest concepts say more than an elaborate explanation can – even when the history it depicts is complex. A plaza dedicated to the 1,300 city sanitation workers who went on strike in 1968 formally opened Thursday on what had been a vacant lot just across Pontotoc from the south side of Clayborn Temple. And the occasion included more of the small moments that have made this week so compelling. Watching civil rights icon Rev. James Lawson walk around the plaza and discover it includes one of his quotes from the 1968 strike.

48. Opioid Crisis: Top Doctor Urges Access to Overdose Antidote -

ATLANTA (AP) – The nation's chief doctor wants more Americans to start carrying the overdose antidote naloxone to help combat the nation's opioid crisis and save lives.

Speaking at the National Rx Drug Abuse & Heroin Summit in Atlanta on Thursday morning, U.S. Surgeon General Dr. Jerome Adams issued his office's first national public health advisory in 13 years.

49. A Dream Remembered -

With the world honoring the memory of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. this week, Memphis artist Martha Kelly depicts the National Civil Rights Museum at the Lorraine Motel, where King was assassinated 50 years ago. Kelly, who illustrates local life and culture each month for The Daily News, can be reached at marthakellyart.com. (Martha Kelly)

...

50. Bouki Fait Gombo -

THE OWNED PERSPECTIVE. From 1936 to 1938, as part of the WPA and the Federal Writers’ Project, more than 2,000 interviews were conducted with former slaves resulting in “Slave Narratives: A Folk History in the United States.” Those former slaves were very old by then, but their memories of dark childhoods were clear.

51. Events -

Art by Design, a designer showcase benefiting ArtsMemphis, is underway through Sunday, April 8, in the Pipkin Building at the Mid-South Fairgrounds. More than a dozen interior design team have created custom “vignettes” within a chic gallery showroom, with special presentations each day. Single-day tickets are $20. Visit artsmemphis.org for details and hours.

52. Last Word: MLK50s Big Day, Hotel Changes and Murica on Capitol Hill -

The peak of the MLK50 events came Wednesday with a chill but some sunshine and lots to consider. Understand -- this isn’t over. There are still a few more events to go through the weekend and even into next week. If nothing else, a lot more Memphians and visitors got a good look at most of South Main in the best way possible – on foot. And if the Beale Street District ever expands east to Danny Thomas, the intersection there makes a really good place for a party.

53. AP Was There: The Assassination of Martin Luther King Jr. -

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) – In the spring of 1968, the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. had won victories on desegregation and voting rights and had been planning his Poor People's Campaign when he turned his attention to Memphis, the gritty city by the Mississippi River. In his support for striking sanitation workers, King wanted to lead marches and show that nonviolent protest still worked.

54. AP Journalists Recall Covering MLK Assassination -

Nancy Shipley was working in a news office in Nashville, Tennessee, when the call came 50 years ago. Gene Herrick was in Chicago routing photos to newspapers when his phone rang. Jack Thornell got the call in New Orleans; Kathryn Johnson heard the news in Atlanta.

55. Events -

The city of Memphis dedicates I Am A Man Plaza with a ceremony and open house Thursday, April 5, from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the plaza, which is adjacent to Clayborn Temple at Hernando Street and Pontotoc Avenue. The city plaza is dedicated to the 1,300 city sanitation workers that went on strike in 1968 and includes a wall with the names of the strikers. Thursday’s event will also feature food trucks and live performances. Cost is free. Visit iammemphis.org.

56. Universal Life Insurance Building Reopens With New Hope for Black Economic Growth -

There is still some build-out to be done on the Universal Life Insurance building at Danny Thomas Boulevard and Martin Luther King Jr. Avenue. But Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland and other dignitaries cut the ribbon Tuesday, April 3, on the formal reopening on the 1920s Egyptian-themed landmark in black business enterprise.

57. A Place to be Heard -

On a recent weekday afternoon at AngelStreet in North Memphis, dozens of girls age 8-18 are practicing a song, “We Are the World.” Their voices seem to blend together naturally. It takes but a few seconds to hear the talent that’s in the room.

58. Last Word: Mason Temple 50 Years Later, Medical Pot Dies in Nashville and Fire -

Mason Temple still looks pretty much the same as it did in 1968 when Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. came there to give what would be his last speech – the Mountaintop speech – the night before his assassination. Tuesday evening, 50 years to the day that King gave that speech, the Church of God In Christ sanctuary was awash and aglow in multi-colored lights as a capacity invitation-only crowd gathered to mark the occasion.

59. Midlife 'Wealth Shock' May Lead to Death, Study Suggests -

A big financial loss may shorten your life, a new study suggests.

Middle-aged Americans who experienced a sudden, large economic blow were more likely to die during the following years than those who didn't. The heightened danger of death after a devastating loss, which researchers called a "wealth shock," crossed socio-economic lines, affecting people no matter how much money they had to start.

60. CDC: Drug-Resistant 'Nightmare Bacteria' Pose Growing Threat -

"Nightmare bacteria" with unusual resistance to antibiotics of last resort were found more than 200 times in the United States last year in a first-of-a-kind hunt to see how much of a threat these rare cases are becoming, health officials said Tuesday.

61. Transplant Foundation Marks Blue and Green Day April 13 -

The Mid-South Transplant Foundation is calling on businesses, households, churches and other supporters to light up the city in blue and green Friday, April 13, for National Donate Life Blue and Green Day, a day set aside to support organ and tissue donation.

62. Data Back Up AP Poll: Little Progress on Civil Rights Issues -

Fifty years after the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr., American perceptions of progress toward racial equality remain largely divided along racial lines, a recent AP-NORC poll shows.

The majority of African-Americans surveyed saw little to no progress toward equal treatment in key areas that the civil rights movement sought to address. White respondents frequently portrayed a rosier picture. A review by the Associated Press shows that the available data more often align with African-Americans' less optimistic reflection of their reality.

63. Transparency Helps Build A Diverse Workforce -

Diversity is one of the most important issues companies are focused on today. LinkedIn recently found that more than half of companies say they are very or extremely focused on diversity. This is good news, especially when you consider the World Economic Forum recently estimated it will take 217 years for women to reach complete equality in pay and employment opportunities.

64. ‘Revolutionary Times’ -

The youngest child of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. hopes to prove him wrong in only one respect. The Rev. Bernice King has been talking about the quote from one of her father’s now institutionalized speeches for at least the last two years.

65. Last Word: Holder in Memphis for MLK 50, EDGE Sets a Date and South City Moves -

The week of MLK50 commemorations began Monday with a speech by former U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder and the arrival Monday afternoon of Rev. Bernice King, the youngest child of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Meanwhile, Monday's day of free admission to the museum, underwritten by FedEx drew a long line. It also drew some remote trepidation that tends to make the situation seem worse than it is once you actually go there for yourself.

66. Universal Life Building To Reopen Tuesday -

Memphis government and business leaders are preparing to reopen the Universal Life Insurance Co. building, 480 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd., following its renovation through a public-private partnership with the city of Memphis.

67. Analysis: Blacks Largely Left Out of High-Paying Jobs -

BOSTON (AP) – Jonathan Garland's fascination with architecture started early: He spent much of his childhood designing Lego houses and gazing at Boston buildings on rides with his father away from their largely minority neighborhood.

68. Commitment to King's Unfinished Work Remains 50 Years Later -

ATLANTA (AP) – Tyrone Brooks was 22 years old and 400 miles away, seeking clues to an unsolved lynching as old as he was, when he got the news that Martin Luther King Jr. was dead. Stunned, Brooks dropped everything and drove to Memphis, crying all the way.

69. Philanthropic Investments in the Black Community -

As Memphis and the world marks the anniversary of the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., there is much to reflect on and much to look forward to. Our reflections can be a source of inspiration for what we can accomplish together moving forward into the future. We can embrace the “fierce urgency of now” that King spoke of.

70. Lenoir: County Tax Decrease Was ‘Smoke and Mirrors’ -

With the estimate last month of an $18 million to $25 million county budget surplus for the fiscal year that ends June 30, taxes are about to become an even bigger issue in the Republican primary for Shelby County mayor.

71. Rebranded Shoemaker Insurance Expands -

Shoemaker Financial president and CEO Jim Shoemaker isn’t sure there is ever a perfect time for expansion and rebranding, but with the economy strong and his company well positioned for a transition of leadership, he could not hold off growing Shoemaker’s insurance line any longer.

72. Holder: After King, Political System is 'Far From Fair' -

Former U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder told a University of Memphis and National Civil Rights Museum symposium Monday, April 2, that Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. helped create “a new country” in 39 years of life but that “it is necessary to be indignant and be impatient” 50 years after King’s death.

73. Heritage Trail Loops Open Amidst MLK50 Preparations -

As city crews were moving the Mountaintop sculpture into place at the new MLK Reflection Park and the nearby I Am A Man Plaza was getting one last patch of cement Friday, March 30, a tour bus came through as preparations were being made for the city’s MLK50 observances.

74. AP-NORC Poll: 50 Years After MLK, Civil Rights Goals Unmet -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Fifty years after the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr., only 1 in 10 African Americans think the United States has achieved all or most of the goals of the civil rights movement he led, according to a new poll by the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research.

75. The Aftermath: Memphis' Political Journey Since 1968 -

For 50 years and counting, April 4 has been an important day in the life of Memphis.

To some Memphians, it is a holy day; to others, it’s a day of reflection, or perhaps one of action and service.

76. MLK50 Events: A Roundup of Memphis Happenings -

Here's a selection of events in Memphis marking the 50th anniversary of the 1968 sanitation workers' strike and the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. April 3 is the 50th anniversary of King’s last speech – the “Mountaintop” speech at Mason Temple, while April 4 is the 50th anniversary of his assassination on the balcony of the Lorraine Motel.

77. Akbari’s Expungement Bill Moves Toward Passage -

NASHVILLE – Buoyed by the support of Gov. Bill Haslam, legislation making it less expensive for non-violent felons to clear their records is rolling through the General Assembly.

House bill 1862, sponsored by Rep. Raumesh Akbari, is set to be heard April 2 in the full House after clearing the Finance, Ways & Means Committee this week with no debate or opposition.

78. March 30-April 5, 2018: This week in Memphis history -

1968: “I looked down at Martin’s face. His eyes wobbled, then for an instant focused on me. ‘Martin, It’s all right. Don’t worry. This is Ralph. This is Ralph.’ His eyes grew calm and he moved his lips. I was certain he understood and was trying to say something. Then in the next instant, I saw the understanding drain from his eyes and leave them absolutely empty.”

79. Community LIFT Looking to Build $5 Million Loan Pool Amid Growth -

An organization that pursues sources of financial, human and intellectual capital to strategically revitalize neighborhoods wants to build a $5 million loan pool for investing in Memphis communities and leaders.

80. Editorial: 50 Years After King's Death, What Have We Learned? -

When sanitation workers Echol Cole and Robert Walker were crushed by a garbage truck compactor on Feb. 1, 1968, it sparked a 64-day strike that reverberated throughout Memphis and beyond.

81. MLK 50 Years Later -

Bernard Lafayette remembers being in Memphis April 3, 1968, and a dejected Martin Luther King Jr. being roused from his room at the Lorraine Motel to speak at Mason Temple on a rainy night.

82. City Tells Developers to Be Flexible On Sewer Flow in Fletcher Creek Area -

Developers in the Fletcher Creek basin area should consider temporary storage of wastewater from their developments as they plan for construction, the city public works director told a group of 50 developers Thursday, March 29.

83. Arkansas High Court: Some Execution Drug Info Can Be Secret -

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) – The Arkansas Supreme Court ruled Thursday that the state prison system must continue to identify the manufacturers of its execution drugs but can conceal information that could be used to identify those who obtain the drugs for the state.

84. Events -

Abundant Grace Fellowship hosts performances of “The Gospel According to Soul” Friday and Sunday, March 30-31, from 7 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. and Sunday, April 1, from 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at 1574 E. Shelby Drive. Produced by Stage 88, the production combines the gospel story of Jesus with the stirring sounds of soul music from the 1960s and ’70s. Tickets are $25. Visit stage88.com.

85. MarShon Brooks Makes Most Of Call in Debut From China -

Every day at Camp Grizzlies, school is in session. So many young players. And many of them are now getting minutes in NBA games that they haven’t earned so much as had handed to them in the name of development in an otherwise lost season.

86. Visiting Memphis 50 Years After King's Assassination -

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) – Fifty years ago, the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. was killed while standing on the balcony of the Lorraine Motel in Memphis, Tennessee. The civil rights leader's shocking murder on April 4, 1968, marked one of the most significant moments in U.S. history.

87. Events -

Abundant Grace Fellowship hosts performances of “The Gospel According to Soul” Friday and Sunday, March 30-31, from 7 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. and Sunday, April 1, from 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at 1574 E. Shelby Drive. Produced by Stage 88, the production combines the gospel story of Jesus with the stirring sounds of soul music from the 1960s and ’70s. Tickets are $25. Visit stage88.com.

88. Davy Crockett’s Fine, But Let’s Not Get Carried Away -

The Tennessee General Assembly is making some monumental decisions these days – literally.

Not only is the Legislature prepared to put a statue of Tennessee folk hero Davy Crockett in front of the State Capitol, replacing obscure Nashville politician Edward Carmack, it’s also likely to erect a monument, or memorial, to unborn children in the ongoing battle against abortion.

89. Buy/Sell Agreements Provide Protection -

Whether you call them buy/sell agreements, buyout agreements, or business prenuptials, every business needs to have an exit strategy. When there’s no plan, an owner’s departure can lead to uncertainty and litigation.

90. Two New Food Concepts Coming to Crosstown Concourse -

Crosstown Concourse is set to add a pair of new food concepts to its tenant mix this summer. Global Cafe, an international food hall where a mix of cuisines will be prepared by three immigrant food entrepreneurs and their staff, and Lucy J’s Bakery, which specializes in custom event cakes and fresh baked goods, will open in part of the space now occupied by Curb Market.

91. Memphis Genotyping Company Acquired by Private Equity Firm -

Transnetyx, a Memphis-based automated genotyping company that serves biomedical researchers around the world, has been acquired by a St. Louis-based private equity firm.

Thompson Street Capital Partners has struck a deal to acquire YX Genomics Holding Corp., the holding company of Transnetyx whose other wholly owned subsidiaries include YX Services and RobotYX. A Transnetyx spokesman said the purchase price is not being disclosed.

92. Eyes on Retirement? Consider These Steps First -

It’s the beginning of a new year and the thought of retirement is becoming more realistic to you. The idea of working a 9 to 5 may not give you the same thrill as when you were a spring chicken entering the workforce.

93. G League Memphis Hustle Finish First Season -

How successful was the first year of the Memphis Grizzlies’ G League team, the Memphis Hustle? Truth is, it may be a while before that judgment can be made.

By record, the Hustle went 21-29. They finished strong, though, winning four of their last five games.

94. McCann Launches Nonprofit Eating Disorders Association -

Teri Hardister McCann, founder and executive director of Fairhaven Treatment Center for Eating Disorders, has launched the Mid-South Eating Disorders Association, a nonprofit organization for treatment providers seeking to build community, access educational opportunities, and build awareness of treatment options for eating disorders. McCann serves as the founding president of MSEDA.

95. Questions for Feds Delay TennCare Work Requirement Bill -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Tennessee lawmakers have temporarily hit pause on their push to make many able-bodied adults either work, volunteer, or take classes if they don't have children younger than 6, in order to keep their TennCare health coverage.

96. Potter Says 100 North Main Building Has Made Progress But Needs More -

A month into his retirement, General Sessions Environmental Court Judge Larry Potter wishes he could have seen more evidence of a turn-around at the city’s tallest building.

97. Redbirds Announce Dates for ‘Fun Cup’ -

The Memphis Redbirds will become the “Memphis Musica” three times during the 2018 season as part of Minor League Baseball’s “Copa de la Diversion,” or “Fun Cup.”

98. The Week Ahead: March 26-April 1 -

Happy Easter Week, Memphis! The anniversary of an event at the Lorraine Motel that forever changed the civil rights movement and the world is quickly approaching. Events preceding the 50th anniversary of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s assassination April 4 are gearing up around town. Details on some of those and other Memphis happenings are below.

99. US Postal Service Unveils Mister Rogers Postage Stamp -

PITTSBURGH (AP) — It was a beautiful day to honor Mister Rogers with a postage stamp.

The U.S. Postal Service on Friday released a stamp featuring Fred Rogers, the gentle TV host who entertained and educated generations of preschoolers on "Mister Rogers' Neighborhood."

100. St. Jude Named Title Partner Of Annual Seattle Marathon -

St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital has been named the new title partner for the 2018 Rock ‘n’ Roll Seattle Marathon And 1/2 Marathon.

The event, scheduled for June 9-10, is expected to draw 19,000 participants, including St. Jude Heroes who have committed to fundraising for the hospital while they train. Along with the marathon and half-marathon, the weekend will include a 5K and a health and fitness expo.