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Editorial Results (free)

1. US Asks Judge to Approve Seizure of 'Pharma Bro' Assets -

NEW YORK (AP) — "Pharma Bro" Martin Shkreli appeared in court Friday for the first time since a judge locked him up for his online antics, hearing the government argue that he's on the hook for more than $7 million for his securities fraud conviction.

2. Editorial: How to Bridge Memphis’ Medical Need and Promise -

When Dr. Scott Morris, the founder of Church Health, says, “Health is about more than the absence of disease,” he cuts through much of the jargon that can obscure what is really important in Memphis.

3. The Church Health Way -

One of the easiest ways to tell that Scott Morris is not your typical prescription-writing family doctor – and that the health care organization he founded, Church Health, is no ordinary medical practice – is when he starts talking about softer concepts like joy and happiness and spirituality.

4. Revisiting Your Will -

Ray’s Take: The start of a new year is a great time to get out your will and really read it. If you don’t have one, call your attorney today and get one. I do not recommend that you try and do this yourself or through an online program. Most people do not have financial situations that are so specific that you won’t need a lawyer. And oftentimes self-prepared wills are not executed correctly. I have lived through too many disasters of flawed wills to go there.

5. Godspeed, Helen. We Were There -

A HAPPY DAY AT A FUNERAL. Her name was Helen Larkin. She was a couple of years younger than me when she started at the University of Tennessee and pledged the same sorority my wife did a few years earlier. Two of her three older brothers were in my fraternity there and one of her two sisters was in my high school class. Spring quarter of her freshman year, Helen would become a Little Sister of that fraternity.

6. The Invisible Problem -

If we are serious about addressing violence in our community, then we must be courageous enough to acknowledge a pervasive reality that most of us would prefer not to see: Violence often starts inside the home.

7. Woodruff Settles into Dream Job With Vols -

Knoxville native Chris Woodruff was at a crossroads in life when he retired from professional tennis in 2002.

8. Last Word: Plans and More Plans, Badu and Byrne and Gun Bills In Nashville -

Plans, plans, plans. I’ve seen so many overhead views and schematics in the last 24-hours that I had to go for a walk in the rain Wednesday to avoid vertigo. I saw a lot of green Save the Greensward t-shirts Wednesday evening at the Pink Palace that looked like they hadn’t been out of the bottom drawer in a while and even a couple of banners.

9. Rev. Billy Graham, Known as 'America's Pastor,' Dies at 99 -

MONTREAT, N.C. (AP) – The Rev. Billy Graham, the magnetic, movie-star-handsome preacher who became a singular force in postwar American religious life, a confidant of presidents and the most widely heard Christian evangelist in history, died Wednesday at 99.

10. Consensus on Gun Legislation? Not on Your Life -

That burning smell emanating from the General Assembly isn’t coming from the flame of bipartisanship. More likely it’s the result of scorched-earth politics.

Even though a weapons measure called the “carry-like-a-cop” bill died recently in a House committee, the gap between Republicans and Democrats on gun legislation is, for the most part, about as wide as the range of a Barrett .50-caliber rifle, more than 2.5 miles.

11. Success Requires Aligning Your Life -

Balance. It’s a tricky word, a word not really rooted in a stable foundation when used to describe what working women with families are trying to do.

“You have to put your life in alignment,” said Dr. Marjorie Hass, president of Rhodes College. “It’s never balance, but alignment. For example, I’ve always lived close to where I work. Walking distance. This is the first job I’ve had that I have to drive a car and I live a mile and a half away and could walk it in a pinch.

12. Turner Construction Co. Expands Memphis Office -

Turner Construction Co. has added three new managers in its Memphis office.

Jeremy Harville has joined the company as a project manager, Mary Bright will serve as community & citizenship manager and Elly Olmstead has been named environmental health & safety manager.

13. The Reality Of Change -

Growth. Transformation. Change. Innovation. Continuous improvements. Accountability. Transparency. Leadership. We know the words. We try to live them. We may think we are living them. But are we? What does it really take to live into individual and organizational aspirations? And what is the timeframe?

14. Bill Banning Sterilization In Sentencing Moves On -

A proposal by State Sen. Brian Kelsey (R-Germantown) and State Rep. Raumesh Akbari (D-Memphis) to prohibit Tennessee judges from offering defendants reduced jail time in exchange for sterilization passed the Senate Judiciary Committee unanimously on Wednesday, Feb. 14.

15. Last Word: Post Parkland, May County Primary Ballot and Friedman on the Mid East -

In the wake of the Parkland, Florida school massacre, local school systems here are talking about their preparations for such instances. And for those who don’t have a child in schools currently, it is something of a commentary about the times many of our children live in. The Shelby County Schools statement Thursday includes the following safety measures already in place:

16. This Week In Memphis History: February 16-22, 2018 -

1978: A group of 50 local restaurant owners mail menus to the White House, along with letters opposing plans by President Jimmy Carter to limit business meal deductions in the federal tax code. It is part of a national “menu mail-in” protest by the National Restaurant Association. “If enough people respond, we can convince the president that business luncheons rarely exceed $5, much less the $55 mentioned during the discussion of the ‘three-martini lunch,’” says Herbert Anderton, president of the Memphis Restaurant Association. Meanwhile, Paul and Marti Savarin open Blues Alley Restaurant at 60 S. Front St. The Cotton Row nightspot becomes a home and outpost for such blues all-stars as Little Laura Dukes and Prince Gabe and the Millionaires in the years before the new Beale Street Entertainment District opens.

17. More Companies Providing Some Parental Leave Pay -

The federal Family and Medical Leave Act ensures that employees with over a year of employment get 12 weeks unpaid time off from their jobs, and the Tennessee Maternity Leave Act allows certain female employees four months of unpaid leave for pregnancy, childbirth, care of a newborn and adoption.

18. Getting to the Top -

An attorney, a physician and a college president. Three success stories. Three women who made it. They had different challenges, yes, but they also shared obstacles that are ever the same.

Dr. Marjorie Hass, Rhodes College president, recently spoke at a breakfast on campus for female students and alumni. Her message to the young women about to set out on their careers was wrapped in truth. She was encouraging, yes, but she also was not going to make promises that life can’t keep.

19. Bill Prohibiting Sterilization In Sentencing Moves Ahead -

A proposal by State Sen. Brian Kelsey (R-Germantown) and State Rep. Raumesh Akbari (D-Memphis) to prohibit Tennessee judges from offering defendants reduced jail time in exchange for sterilization passed the Senate Judiciary Committee unanimously on Wednesday, Feb. 14.

20. Living By Giving -

Ray’s Take: “We make a living by what we get. We make a life by what we give.” This was the wisdom of Winston S. Churchill, but living a life of generosity is beneficial for you, your family and your community. Some of the most successful and powerful people in the world have tapped into the power of giving.

21. If You Play the Games, Will They Still Come? -

The other day the NCAA released attendance figures for the 2017 college football season and for the fourth straight year FBS attendance dropped. Yes, fans still pack the giant stadiums around the SEC, which despite having a decrease in average attendance by 2,433 per game, easily had the highest average attendance in the country with 75,074 fans per four quarters of life-and-death football.

22. DCA Planning to Add Community Amenities To Downtown HQ -

Creative communications consulting firm DCA has submitted plans to the Downtown Memphis Commission for some upgrades and new community-oriented amenities at its South Main headquarters.

DCA founder Doug Carpenter bought the 100-year-old former Nabisco warehouse at 11 W. Huling Ave. last April and relocated the firm there in December.

23. Details Slow Plan to Shrink UT’s Board of Trustees -

Gov. Bill Haslam’s plan to restructure the University of Tennessee board of trustees appears to be a work in progress.

Timing is critical, too, with the 2018 session of the General Assembly moving at a snail’s pace and UT President Joe DiPietro’s contract set to run out in mid-2019.

24. Two Residential Infill Projects Get Green Light -

Two residential infill projects in South Main and Midtown that will add density to the city’s core were approved for financial incentives Tuesday afternoon, Feb. 13.

A new mixed-use development slated for South Main will be headlined by a long-time Blue Monkey employee.

25. DCA Unveils New-Look Downtown HQ -

Creative communications consulting firm DCA has submitted plans to the Downtown Memphis Commission for some upgrades and new community-oriented amenities at its South Main headquarters.

DCA founder Doug Carpenter bought the 100-year-old former Nabisco warehouse at 11 W. Huling Ave. last April and relocated the firm there in December.

26. Last Word: Corker & The Senate Poll, Memphis BBQ in Texas and Chandler Numbers -

The new owner of the city’s tallest building has bought two parcels next to the 100 North Main Building as the other part of the plan to bring the 37-story tall building back to life as a combo apartment-hotel building with the Loew’s hotel brand. The row of older buildings on the south side of 100 North Main all the way up to Jefferson would give way to a 34-story tall office tower.

27. Long-Time Blue Monkey Employee Opening Deli Downtown -

A new mixed-use development slated for South Main will be headlined by a long-time Blue Monkey employee.

Michael Johnson of Blue Monkey Enterprises told the Center City Revenue Finance Corp. on Tuesday, Feb. 13, that 18-year employee Brandon Moss will be running a deli on the bottom floor of a new three-story, 7,500-square-foot building that will be located at 529 S. Front St.

28. Love at Center of Pancreatic Cancer Battle -

This Valentine’s Day, Bartlett residents Kathryn and Tom Craig want to share their story of love and support as encouragement to those who are battling cancer with a loved one.

29. Citing Fraud, LL Bean Imposes Limits on Its Return Policy -

FREEPORT, Maine (AP) – L.L. Bean's generous return policy is going to be a little less forgiving: The company, which has touted its 100 percent satisfaction guarantee for more than a century, is imposing a one-year limit on most returns to reduce growing abuse and fraud.

30. Around Memphis: Feb. 12, 2018 -

The Daily News offers a weekly roundup of Memphis-related headlines from around the web, adding context and new perspectives to the original content we produce on a daily basis. Here are some recent stories worth checking out...

31. Hotel Indigo, Trader Joe’s Move Ahead -

22 N B.B. King Blvd., Memphis, TN 38103: Atlanta-based Three P Partners has filed a $5 million building permit application with the Office of Construction Code Enforcement to construct a 118-room Hotel Indigo at the corner of North B.B. King Boulevard and Court Avenue.

32. Josh Pastner Refutes Sexual Assault Accusation -

Former University of Memphis basketball coach Josh Pastner on Thursday night, Feb. 8, vehemently denied a woman’s allegations of sexual misconduct. Pastner, who is in his second season as coach at Georgia Tech, responded to a question during his post-game press conference after his team played at Louisville.

33. Events -

The Home Show of the Mid-South takes place Friday through Sunday, Feb. 9-11, at Agricenter International, 7777 Walnut Grove Road. Exhibitors will showcase home decor, lighting, pools, patios, services and more. Matt Blashaw, host of DIY Network’s “Yard Crashers,” will hold seminars/meet-and-greets Saturday and Sunday at 11 a.m. and 3 p.m. Visit memphishomeshow.com for show hours, tickets and other details.

34. Events -

Home Show of the Mid-South will be held Friday through Sunday, Feb. 9-11, at Agricenter International, 7777 Walnut Grove Road. Exhibitors will showcase home decor, lighting, pools, patios, services and more. Matt Blashaw, host of DIY Network’s “Yard Crashers,” will hold seminars/meet-and-greets Saturday and Sunday at 11 a.m. and 3 p.m. Visit memphishomeshow.com for show hours, tickets and other details.

35. Serious Diversion -

ZEN FOR CYNICS. Do not walk behind me, for I may not lead. Do not walk ahead of me, for I may not follow. Do not walk beside me for the path is narrow. In fact, just buzz off and leave me alone.

36. Through Community Service, Gorman Makes Memphis Home -

It’s difficult to pinpoint the exact moment when Teddy Gorman, director of sales and marketing for Gorham/Schaffler Inc., became a born-again Memphian.

37. DMC to Review Plans For New Downtown Mixed-Use Building, Midtown Apartments -

A local investment group is seeking a nine-year tax break from the Downtown Memphis Commission to construct a new mixed-use building where the Downtown Blue Monkey once stood at 529 S. Front St.

38. Hidden King -

The LeMoyne-Owen College concert choir reprised the song Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. requested 50 years ago in one of his last conversations just before he was killed on the balcony of the Lorraine Motel.

39. Luttrell Calls For ‘High-Wage Job Growth’ in Final State of the County -

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell said at his last State of the County address this week that what Shelby County struggles with is “economic diversification and high-wage job growth.”

40. Insulin Quality Questions Have Diabetes Experts Scrambling -

TRENTON, N.J. (AP) – Preliminary research suggesting that some diabetes patients may be injecting medicine that has partially disintegrated is causing concern even as serious questions are raised about the research itself.

41. Dunkin' Donuts to Stop Using Foam Cups by 2020 -

NEW YORK (AP) – Foam cups at Dunkin' Donuts will soon be history, removing what the company estimates will be a billion of them each year from the waste stream.

Dunkin' said Wednesday that the polystyrene foam cups will be completely phased out from its stores globally by 2020.

42. New Apartments Planned for Overton Square -

PMT Investments LLC, a newly formed business partnership between Aaron Petree, Cliff McLemore and Ed Thomas III, is seeking an 11-year tax abatement to construct a 16-unit apartment building on the periphery of Overton Square.

43. Trader Joe’s Seeking First Official Approval from Germantown -

The saga of Trader Joe’s in Germantown has had more than its fair share of ups and downs over the last several years, but those all appear to be in the rear view mirror, as the first tangible plans listing the highly-sought after grocer have surfaced.

44. Council Takes Up MLGW Rate Hikes Again, Votes On Third Ballot Question -

With the 1 percent hike in the Memphis Light, Gas and Water Division water rates taking effect this month, the Memphis City Council again takes up proposed hikes in the gas and electric rates on Tuesday, Feb. 6.

45. Governor’s Race Mixes Political Culture With Nuts-and-Bolts Policy -

As most of the other major contenders for Tennessee governor were on the same stage in Nashville last week, Republican Diane Black was in East Memphis meeting with a group of 15 local homebuilders. It was one in a set of meetings with small groups of potential supporters Black held in and around Memphis.

46. Last Word: Super Bowl From A Distance, More School Plans and DACA -

Eagles over Patriots 41-33. Also at the Super Bowl – no Prince hologram in the JT halftime show but plenty of choreography and a nightclub beneath the stage … the NFL catch rule has its last hurrah – probably … Patriots-haters have the offseason to become Eagles-haters. And Philadelphia Police use hydraulic fluid to stop Eagles fans from climbing utility poles. Irony lives.

47. Around Memphis | Feb. 5, 2018 -

The Daily News offers a weekly roundup of Memphis-related headlines from around the web, adding context and new perspectives to the original content we produce on a daily basis. Here are some recent featires worth checking out...

48. Here are Seven Memphis Charter Schools in Danger of Closing -

Seven Memphis charter schools could close in 2020 if they don’t improve, based on Shelby County Schools’ first report card comparing its schools.

The district’s newly released school performance scorecard rated seven of its 51 charters below 2 on a scale of 1 to 5, with 5 being the top score. Under a new accountability system for charter schools, those that fall below 2 automatically begin a review process and must improve within two years or face revocation of their charters by the school board.

49. Last Word: Closing the Loophole, Skeleton Hotel Update and Jubilee Conversion -

The state legislator who sponsored the most recent version of the law making it much more difficult to remove Confederate monuments acknowledges that the city of Memphis found a legitimate loophole in the 2016 law he crafted. Republican Steve McDaniel, of Parkers Crossroads, tells our Nashville correspondent Sam Stockard that he has a bill in the House to close the loophole. But it won't undo what happened here. Although there is still a court fight over that taking shape.

50. Gilded Orpheum -

Artist Martha Kelly, who illustrates local life for The Memphis News each month, depicts scenes from the recent production of “Finding Neverland” at The Orpheum in Downtown Memphis. On tap are productions like Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater and “The Color Purple.” 

...

51. Events -

Astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson returns to Memphis to present “Ten Things You Should Know About the Universe” Wednesday, Feb. 7, at 7 p.m. at the Orpheum Theatre, 203 S. Main St. Tyson is returning by popular demand following a sold-out lecture at the Orpheum last year. Tickets start at $39. Visit orpheum-memphis.com.

52. Dreamers Deferred -

You never really get to the point where you can stand at a particular moment in time and forecast with any certainty how your life is going to turn out, how things are going to look or what’s going to be different over a long time horizon. That’s certainly the way it’s been, and still is, for Mauricio Calvo and Memphians like him.

53. Top Career US Diplomat to Step Down in Blow to State Dept. -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The top career U.S. diplomat announced Thursday he will step down, dealing a blow to the State Department as the Trump administration confronts numerous international challenges.

54. Events -

The Broad Avenue Arts District hosts First Friday: Sweet Street, a special night to shop and sample sweets, on Friday, Feb. 2, from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Pick up a $5 punch card from any participating shop, enjoy sweet treats while shopping at each store, then drop the punch card into a drawing for a basket of Broad Avenue goodies. Visit broadavearts.com for details.

55. In the Snow -

SNOW IN A WARM CITY. I looked out the window as the snowfall of a few weeks ago ended. The tires that brought the paper made the only marks on the street. The quiet, the way snow muffles everything, blankets the morning as surely as the snow.

56. Grizzlies About to Lose Evans, But Memphis Super Bowl Victory Just Hours Away -

Thanks, Tyreke. That’s all we can really say. As of this writing, the Grizzlies had not yet traded Tyreke Evans. But it was not a question of if, only a matter of when.

In fact, when the Grizzlies played at Indiana Wednesday, Jan. 31, Evans warmed up but did not play. Reportedly, he didn’t even stick around to watch the game. This is how it goes in the NBA as the Feb. 8 trade deadline draws near. Protect the asset you intend to move. Don’t take any chances.

57. Speed & Patience -

He wasn’t the biggest and he wasn’t the strongest. He didn’t hit the ball the farthest. But, oh, did little Carlos Williams run the fastest. “Tee-ball,” said his mother, Takisha Kemp. “Blink of an eye.”

58. Resiliency Concept Goes Broader With Master Plan -

With three projects about to start moving dirt and $60 million in federal funding to do them, the concept of resiliency in Shelby County is moving, even though it’s in the shadows of other plans such as the Mid-South Greenprint and the development of the Wolf River Greenway.

59. Apple to Respond to US Probes Into Slowdown of Old iPhones -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) – Apple is cooperating with U.S. government inquiries into its secret slowdown of older iPhones, further complicating its efforts to move past an issue that irked customers whose devices bogged down.

60. Events -

Memphis Jewish Community Center kicks off the Morris and Mollye Fogelman International Jewish Film Festival with a screening of “Children of Chance” Thursday, Feb. 1, at 7:30 p.m. at Malco Paradiso, 584 S. Mendenhall Road. The festival will feature nine award-winning Jewish-themed films throughout February. Each film is $5 for MJCC members and $7 for the community. Visit jccmemphis.org/film for tickets and a schedule.

61. Rotating Forrest Bust Out of Capitol Gains Momentum -

Confederate Lt. Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest’s days in the State Capitol could be numbered. Lt. Gov. Randy McNally, an Oak Ridge Republican, says he could support a move to rotate Forrest’s bust out of the Capitol and make sure Capitol displays are “more reflective of the entire history of Tennessee.”

62. Last Word: Wiretaps in the Wright Case, Target Layoffs and SCS Looks To Move -

Democratic Congressman Steve Cohen of Memphis among those boycotting the State of the Union address Tuesday evening by President Donald Trump. “The president is unworthy of the podium, the position and the power.” Republican Congressman David Kustoff of Germantown among those not boycotting SOTU. “Just one year after president Trump took the oath of office, our economy is the strongest it has been in decades. … We passed historic tax reform and we bolstered our military and support our veterans. Last year, the president kept his promises and tonight, he told the American people that he is not done.”

63. Events -

NAWBO Memphis will host a reception honoring Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland Wednesday, Jan. 31, from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. at Hattiloo Theatre, 37 Cooper St. The chapter is recognizing Strickland and the city for the progress being made in increasing business and spending with women- and minority-owned businesses. Tickets are $15. Visit nawbomemphis.org.

64. Ford Outlines Budget Process As Memphis’ New CFO -

Shirley Ford has been named chief financial officer for the city of Memphis. Ford, who was selected to be CFO by Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland and confirmed by the City Council, has served as the city’s comptroller since 2014. She has more than 30 years of financial, accounting and managerial experience. In addition, she is a certified public accountant and a certified municipal finance officer as designated by the state comptroller.

65. People Hire People -

If you’re looking for a job, there’s a good chance you’re applying online. And chances are good that applying online is your go-to option. It makes sense.

The last time you reached out to a HR person at a job fair or on LinkedIn (or anywhere else), they said, “Apply online. If you’re a good fit, we’ll call you!” They may even have said, “Don’t reach out to us. We review every application carefully.”

66. Dunavant Set Gold Standard As Public Servant -

For the late Bobby Dunavant, who worked as Shelby County Probate Court Clerk for 40 years from 1954 to 1994, qualities like being honest, accessible, generous, empathetic and highly attentive to detail made him beloved by friends and colleagues throughout his life.

67. Embody The Problems -

Much of the work of innovation takes place trying to deeply understanding the unmet needs of a particular market. As one innovation school of thought calls it, what are the “jobs to be done”? Discerning these needs, these undone jobs, takes more empathy than data, more heart than head, and it takes an investment of time and attention.

68. Lee, Boyd Pushing For Technical Education -

Bill Lee led with his master plumber’s license last week as he toured Moore Tech. “I’m running for governor, too, by the way,” the Republican primary contender from Williamson County said as he talked with those attending classes and their instructors.

69. Distillers Struggle to Comply With Water Quality Regulations -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – As the whiskey industry continues to grow, Tennessee's two largest distilleries struggled to comply with water quality regulations last year.

Jack Daniels and George Dickel exceeded their limits for chlorine and other pollutants that can harm aquatic wildlife. After investigating the violations, the distilleries traced the problems to broken or inadequate machinery and faulty testing. State officials say the companies have fixed the problems and are now back in compliance.

70. Sports Executives Enjoying ‘Glory Years’ of Memphis Sports -

With sports clicking on all cylinders in Memphis and a new professional team on the horizon, these days could really be seen as the glory years of Memphis sports.

That was the observation of Jason Wexler, president of business operations for the Memphis Grizzlies, who was one of four panelist Thursday, Jan. 25, at Newmakers: Memphis Sports, part of The Daily News’ Seminar Series.

71. Atlanta Development Proposal Just Happens to be Amazon-Sized -

ATLANTA (AP) – As Atlanta vies for Amazon's second headquarters, a developer just happens to be proposing a $5 billion downtown project with 9.3 million square feet (87 million square meters) of office space – more than three times the amount in the Empire State Building.

72. What Mentoring Taught Me -

Right now, millions of American teenagers are struggling with their emotions and behavior. They’re at odds with their parents, guardians or peers. They feel like they have no one to talk to, no one that understands or listens to them. They feel angry, dejected and hopeless. Why am I bringing this to your attention? Because in a few short years, these at-risk teens will become adults.

73. Job Hopping and Your Retirement Plans -

Ray’s Take: There was a time when you worked your entire career at one company and retired with a pension and a gold watch after 40 or so years of service. But, like so many things, that picture has changed over the years. Job hopping – once a red flag on your resume – is now the norm.

74. Rookie Recognizes It’s About More Than Recognition -

First, you have to love the name of the event: the 2018 Rising Stars Challenge. And that the Memphis Grizzlies will be represented at the NBA All-Star weekend in Los Angeles.

Rookie forward Dillon Brooks, a native of Ontario, Canada, will play for the World team against the United States on Feb. 16. Among the other players chosen for the game that features rookies and sophomores: Philadelphia’s Joel Embiid and Ben Simmons, Utah’s Donovan Mitchell, Boston’s Jayson Tatum, the Lakers’ Lonzo Ball and Kyle Kuzma, and Chicago’s Lauri Markkanen.

75. SEC Looking Into $15 Billion Hit Taken by General Electric -

BOSTON (AP) – General Electric is being investigated by federal regulators for a $15 billion hit it took to cover miscalculations made by an insurance unit.

The company revealed last week that it would take a $6.2 billion charge in its fourth quarter after a subsidiary, North American Life & Health, underestimated how much it would cost to pay for the care of people who lived longer than projected.

76. Humane Society Names Davis 2018 Board President -

Ted Davis has been named 2018 president of the board of directors for the Humane Society of Memphis and Shelby County. Davis, who is a wealth adviser for Regions Bank, joined the humane society board in December 2015. His first priority was a campaign inspiring adopters to become donors, which led him to being the Paw Prints Gala committee chair in 2017.

77. Anti-Abortion ‘Heartbeat Bill’ Revived Despite Like-Minded Opposition -

An East Tennessee lawmaker is trying breathe life into his “heartbeat bill” this session of the General Assembly despite an odd mix of opposition from pro-life forces and Democrats.

State Rep. Micah Van Huss delayed the measure in a House committee until a Senate sponsor can be placed on it, but he confirmed he will present the bill as soon as the clerk’s office prepares it.

78. The Value Of Unstructured Free Time -

I want to dedicate a column to the next generation. For me, this means addressing Uncle Leo and Ellery, my youngest son and grandson, respectively. May they have the space to explore in the vast treasures of childhood and lose sense of time while playing. There seems to be an unconscious conspiracy against people having free time to relax, create and simply enjoy life.

79. Medicaid Expansion Splits Tenn. Governor Hopefuls in Health Forum -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A health care forum Friday illustrated the partisan split in the Tennessee governor's race over Medicaid expansion, with Democrats ranking it their top priority and Republicans opposing it or espousing other priorities.

80. Zealous and Growing Fan Base Heralds Soccer’s Return to Memphis -

They can be heard down the hall, or down the block. Roaring. Cheering. Chanting, often nonsensically, at the top of their lungs at whatever hour their beloved teams are playing on TV. Always in uniform – with the proper hats, jerseys – and scarves. Do not forget the scarves.

81. New Trump Office Would Protect Conscience Rights of Doctors -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Reinforcing its strong connection with social conservatives, the Trump administration announced Thursday a new federal office to protect medical providers refusing to participate in abortion, assisted suicide or other procedures on moral or religious grounds.

82. Midlife Look at Insurance Needs -

Ray’s Take: Life insurance is an important part of most overall financial plans. Replacing the capital value of the significant providers is critical should they not be able to provide. Owning the right insurance for the right price at the right time in your life is a crucial element to your financial well-being.

83. Using Kids as Chips -

THIS ISN’T A GAME, KIDS AREN’T CHIPS. As I write this, 9 million low-income kids in America are at risk of losing their insurance, primarily because they aren’t the kids of Congress.

84. From Intern to Executive, Meeks Builds Bold Team -

For most of us, our first big financial move as young adults might have been an apartment security deposit, say, or the down payment on a used car. When Jim Meeks was 17 years old, fresh out of high school in Paducah, Kentucky, he said to himself, “I want to buy some life insurance.”

85. Pruitt’s SEC-Heavy Staff a Recruiting Coup -

It was early December, 2012, and Butch Jones stood in front of a podium after being named Tennessee’s 24th football coach.

“I can assure you,” Jones said at his introductory press conference. “We will put together the best football staff in the country. Not just in the Southeastern Conference, but the entire country.”

86. Container Apartments, Warehouse Moving Ahead -

Plans for a southeast Memphis textiles distribution facility and a Medical District apartment development made of shipping containers both took steps forward Wednesday, Jan. 17, with approvals from local boards.

87. Winter Weather Hits Lifeblood Donations -

One of the less obvious consequences of the winter weather that has hit Memphis in recent days is that donations to Lifeblood, the area’s blood service provider, have also taken a hit.

When sleet and the prospect of dangerous winter weather force the organization to temporarily close its local donor centers and cancel blood drives, as it had to do in recent days, it slows Lifeblood’s intake of donated blood. The bad weather, meanwhile, is also coming at an especially tough time, since widespread flu has already reduced blood donations locally.

88. Orpheum CEO Batterson Honored For Excellence in Performing Arts -

Brett Batterson, president and CEO of the Orpheum Theatre Group, has been named the North American Performing Arts Managers and Agents’ 2017 Presenter of the Year. The award honors individuals in the performing arts field for their excellence in exemplifying mentoring; setting an example of best practices, achievement and leadership in their discipline; and cultivating diversity, practicing inclusion, and creating equity for underserved members of the community.

89. Events -

The National Civil Rights Museum will remember Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s life and legacy Monday, Jan. 15, at its King Day Celebration, with the theme “Where Do We Go From Here?” Museum admission is $5 from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m., with optional $3 admission for visitors who bring a canned good donation for Mid-South Food Bank or free admission with a blood donation to Lifeblood. An entertainment stage, health pavilion and children’s activity tent (10 a.m. to 4 p.m.) will be set up outside. Visit civilrightsmuseum.org/king-day for details.

90. Q&A: What Facebook's Shift Could Mean to Users, Businesses -

NEW YORK (AP) – In coming days, Facebook users will see fewer posts from publishers, businesses and celebs they follow. Instead, Facebook wants people to see more stuff from friends, family and other people they are likely to have "meaningful" conversations with – something the company laments has been lost in the sea of videos, news stories (real and fake), and viral quizzes on which "Big Bang Theory" character you are.

91. 'Mississippi Burning' KKK Leader Killen Dies in Prison at 92 -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) – Edgar Ray Killen, a 1960s Ku Klux Klan leader who was convicted decades later in the "Mississippi Burning" slayings of three civil rights workers, has died in prison at the age of 92, the state's corrections department announced Friday.

92. Stumble Bravely Into Innovation -

I met many people who have been put in charge of their organization’s innovation program because of their past performance record. They were product managers, engineers, database architects, IT professionals, HR specialists or marketers by training. Suffice to say, they have proven to be capable and trustworthy in the past with a given initiative. 

93. How to Support Nonprofit Volunteers -

Editor’s note: Part two of a three-part series. Sometimes volunteers within a nonprofit don’t measure up. That’s not unusual. It’s part of life. For all of us, there are times when we don’t hit the mark. And most know what it’s like when others don’t meet our expectations. 

94. Lifestyle Brand Unveils New Name and Mission -

The Memphis-based lifestyle brand formerly known as Ultimate Foods has rebranded itself as Soli, with a new name, look and mission for 2018.

The enterprise is new owner Brown Dudley’s reimagining of the local meal-preparation company, inspired by his personal current battle with a rare form of cancer.

95. Window World Makes $1M Donation to St. Jude -

Exterior remodeling company Window World has made a $1 million donation to St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital.

The donation commemorates Window World’s 10th anniversary of giving to St. Jude. Over the course of the decade-long relationship, Window World has contributed more than $8 million to St. Jude.

96. Events -

The National Civil Rights Museum will remember Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s life and legacy Monday, Jan. 15, at its King Day Celebration, with the theme “Where Do We Go From Here?” Museum admission is $5 from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m., with optional $3 admission for visitors who bring a canned good donation for Mid-South Food Bank or free admission with a blood donation to Lifeblood. An entertainment stage, health pavilion and children’s activity tent (10 a.m. to 4 p.m.) will be set up outside. Visit civilrightsmuseum.org/king-day for details.

97. Crosstown High Preps For August Opening -

The first class of freshmen students has been selected for the fall semester of Crosstown High, a new public charter school opening this August. The school, which will welcome 600 students by 2021, will be located on the first, fourth and fifth floors of the new community-driven, mixed-use Crosstown Concourse redevelopment.

98. Mariota Finds His Swagger, Giving Titans Fans Hope for 2nd-Round Playoff Win -

About a month ago, following a Dec. 10 loss at Arizona, Marcus Mariota showed a seldom-seen side of his personality.

Clearly dejected, he seemed flustered and distraught while answering questions in his post-game press conference, even answering that he was “pissed off” about his performance when asked why he seemed more bothered than usual following the Titans’ 12-7 loss to the struggling Cardinals.

99. New East Memphis OB/GYN Practice Launching Feb. 2 -

A new OB/GYN practice is launching in East Memphis Feb. 2, the result of a trio of doctors leaving their current office to hang out their own shingle and offer a full range of obstetrics and gynecology services.

100. Legislature Moving on Civil Rights Cold Cases -

Charlie Morris may be nearing 100 years of age, but he’s never given up on his quest for Tennessee to delve into decades-old civil rights crimes.