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Editorial Results (free)

1. EMS Initiative Aims to Send Right Emergency Response -

The Memphis Fire Department says its Right Response initiative, a pilot program that is working to reduce the number of ambulances sent to non-emergency calls, has provided non-emergency help to 500 residents since it launched in April.

2. Events -

The Women’s Connection Luncheon & Expo, hosted by the Bartlett Area Chamber of Commerce, will be held Friday, Aug. 18, at The Racquet Club, 5111 Sanderlin Ave. Enjoy shopping and networking from 10 to 11:30 a.m.; lunch and a speaker panel sharing insights about life, success and balance from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.; and more shopping and information from 1:30 to 3 p.m. Tickets are $25. Register at bartlettchamber.org.

3. Stronger Penalties Alone Won’t Solve State’s Opioid Crisis -

Rep. Bryan Terry deals with patients from every demographic caught up in the web of opiates.

Patients have an array of tolerance to opioids, as well, from those currently addicted to those who are recovering addicts. As a result, each patient requires an “individualized” anesthetic based on their background and the procedure or surgery they’re to have, says Terry, a Murfreesboro anesthesiologist.

4. Feeling Like Home -

During the construction phase, Shelby Farms Park executive director Jen Andrews would often look out her office window and imagine what the new Heart of the Park project would look like when it was done.

5. Downtown Partnership Looks to Breathe New Life into an Old Underpass -

There’s no denying that the railroad underpass on G.E. Patterson Avenue has seen better days. However, a proposed partnership between the Downtown Memphis Commission and the South End Improvement Alliance hopes to change that.

6. Survey Ranks Memphis 98th On Places to Retire List -

With the second-best adjusted cost of living score but a ranking of 143 in quality of life, Memphis finished 98th of 150 in a 2017 Retirement Confidence Survey from the Employee Benefit Research Institute on the best and worst places to retire.

7. Rhodes Names Wigginton Dean of Students -

Russell Wigginton is the new vice president of student life and dean of students at Rhodes College. Rhodes president Marjorie Hass announced Wiggington’s appointment Tuesday, Aug. 15, effective immediately.

8. Events -

“ELVIS: Live in Concert” is Wednesday, Aug. 16, at 8 p.m. at FedExForum, 191 Beale St. In this live concert event experience, a full symphony orchestra performs live on stage with Elvis on the big screen. The evening will feature an appearance by Priscilla Presley and surprise guests. Tickets are available through ticketmaster.com. Visit graceland.com/elvisweek/schedule for details.

9. Evolving Customer Lifecycle -

Editor’s Note: Part one in a two-part series. The B2C (business-to-consumer) customer lifecycle is used to describe the phases a customer progresses through when making a purchasing decision and is generally broken down into these five phases: awareness, consideration, purchase, service and advocacy.

10. Ken Hause Cooks Up Strategy To Enhance L’Ecole Culinaire -

L'Ecole Culinaire-Memphis has added Ken Hause its campus director. In his new role, Hause is responsible for overseeing operations of the Memphis campus, including ensuring a rich student experience that leads to employment in the culinary field, while enhancing the school’s reputation for educational excellence, compliance and operational performance.

11. Last Word: Night in the Park, Hattiloo Goes Bigger & Cohen on the Republican Soul -

A gathering in Health Science Park a little before 11:30 Monday evening by a group of protesters who Facebooked that their intent was to take down the statue of Nathan Bedford Forrest. Memphis Police showed up quickly and the police supervisor told those around the statue that the park is a private park and that no one can be in the park after 8 p.m. No arrests but the police did ask for identification from those in the park.

12. New Life for Medicaid After GOP's Health Care Debacle -

WASHINGTON (AP) – It may not equal Social Security and Medicare as a "third rail" program that politicians touch at their own risk, yet Medicaid seems to have gotten stronger after the Republican failure to pass health care legislation.

13. Countercultural Secrets of Successful Innovators -

Successful innovators may seem cavalier, but really they are vast and complex beings. As the great American poet Walt Whitman said of the prophetic role of a poet, “They contain multitudes.”

14. Ex-Chef Valerie Morris Finds Right Recipe for Marketing Firm -

Just take one fact from her life and let your mind run to easy assumptions. Once upon a time, Valerie Morris was attending Le Cordon Bleu culinary arts school in Paris, France.

15. Hattiloo Plots a Bigger Stage for Its Audience -

The founder of Hattiloo Theatre says the black theater company is ready to become more regional and professional in its approach and influence. “Now it’s time for Hattiloo to become a major regional theater,” said Ekundayo Bandele before an opening-night performance of “Ruined.”

16. Last Word: Charlottesville Reaction, Stax & Atlantic Together Again and MEMFix -

The violence in Charlottesville, Virginia over the weekend will be on a lot of minds in a lot of other places including Memphis as this week begins. And the discussion here in Memphis is already underway. The gathering point Saturday just hours after a suspected white supremacist drove his car into a group of counter protesters in Charlottesville really didn’t even need a lot of billing or explanation.

17. August 11-17, 2017: This week in Memphis history -

1937: A privilege license for The Oasis, a restaurant serving beer and owned by Nick Demapolis at 2128 Central Ave. on the corner of Central and Cooper.

18. Ex-Chef Valerie Morris Creates Right Recipe for Marketing Firm -

Just take one fact from her life and let your mind run to easy assumptions. Once upon a time, Valerie Morris was attending Le Cordon Bleu culinary arts school in Paris, France.

19. Getting Started -

Every journey of a thousand miles begins with that first single step. Every song, that first note; every long-lasting relationship can trace back to that first hello.

The countless business startups in Memphis, many maturing thanks to the city’s myriad accelerators and entrepreneurship programs, likewise all unfold the same way. They all start, no pun intended, with that first idea that leads to the creation of an enterprise – hopefully a successful, money-making one.

20. Tennessee Group Home Suspended for Building Violations -

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) – Officials have suspended new admissions of residents of a Tennessee group home for the aged after inspectors found violations of building standards.

In a statement, Tennessee Health Commissioner John Dreyzehner said Wednesday that Cummings Foster Group Home, at 1176 Englewood St. in Memphis, has been ordered not to admit any new residents based on conditions found during a life safety survey conducted at the 11-bed home on July 12.

21. Early Retirement – Can You Do It? -

Ray’s Take: Many people dream of making an early exit from the work routine, but making that dream a reality has some challenges. By retiring at, say, age 55 instead of 65, you have 10 fewer years of saving and investing for building a nest egg that has to support you through an extra 10 years of retirement. That double-whammy of fewer working years to save and more retirement years to spend is what makes early retirement tough to pull off.

22. Watches Tell Time, And Stories -

IT’S ABOUT TIME. It’s an old 700 series Rolex watch – stainless steel with a small military-style black face, hands and numbers that once glowed in the dark, a simple stainless steel band and a small brass rivet for a fastener – nothing special by Rolex standards.

23. Renee White Adds Purpose to Numbers -

At the end of her third-grade year, Renee White’s elementary school switched math books. Why does White – now chief financial officer of Oak Hall – remember a textbook being retired 20 years ago?

24. The King's Castle: Graceland, Whitehaven open 40th anniversary Elvis Week -

It begins with a trivia contest and a sock hop. Those are the first two events Friday, Aug. 11, at the top of a crowded Elvis Week itinerary that marks 40 years since Elvis Presley died at Graceland.

25. Last Word: Bakery Questions, Komen Name Change and the Price of A Run For Gov. -

City Hall opens a set of four public meetings on the Fairgrounds Thursday evening at 5 p.m. at the Salvation Army Kroc Center to start the movement again toward another master plan for Fairgrounds redevelopment. And it’s hard to tell at the outset what this will look like because there are so many possibilities. There are also so many fault lines in these discussions.

26. Memphis Runners Grind at Boston Marathon and Beyond -

For runners, the Boston Marathon is about as sacred as a pilgrimage to Mecca for Muslims, or a trip to the Vatican for Catholics. Participants are venerated as somewhat divine among their comrades, and qualifying assuages any doubts about their right to claim the title “runner” when describing themselves to outsiders.

27. Opera Memphis Hires New Music Director -

No one really needed to twist Michael Sakir’s arm to sell him on the Bluff City in advance of taking the job Aug. 1 as Opera Memphis’ new music director.

For one thing, he’d already worked a little in the city as a kind of itinerant musician, helping out as guest director for Opera Memphis programs like its 30 Days of Opera series. Those visits also introduced him to what life in Memphis might be like, should he choose to live here, with Sakir building relationships and getting introduced to civic, artistic and cultural landmarks and institutions that he found himself falling in love with.

28. Last Word: Megasite Prospect, Crosstown Opening Plans and New Chandler Numbers -

Tennessee is pursuing the new $1.6 billion assembly plant Toyota and Mazda announced just last week to turn out 300,000 vehicles a year and there is that regional megasite in nearby Haywood County that isn’t being used. Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam says he wants to add the joint facility to the state’s auto industry.

29. Vandiver Growing Customer Relationships at Agritech Firm The Seam -

The Seam, a technology firm founded by agribusiness companies that specializes in commodity trading and management systems, has added Rex Vandiver in a customer development role. Vandiver helps with customer support and project management, and he’s also taking a greater role in involvement with the peanut industry to help The Seam better serve its customers’ needs.

30. Give Rudy Gay An Assist on Origin Of ‘Grit and Grind’ -

Did Tony Allen say too much? That’s the question after The Grindfather – yes, he retains the title even if he signs elsewhere as a free agent – answered a question about the origin of “grit and grind” in an interview with MassLive.com.

31. $73M Mixed-Use Bakery Development Clears First Hurdle -

Development Services Group’s $73 million plan to breathe new life into a 10-acre swath of the Memphis Medical District has taken its first public step toward becoming a reality.

On Tuesday, Aug. 8, the Center City Revenue Finance Corp. approved the developer’s request for a 20-year tax incentive to help offset construction costs for the ambitious project.

32. Inviting a New Vision for Memphis Region -

Memphis has been blessed to give birth to the modern grocery store, rock ‘n’ roll, and such corporate category leaders as Holiday Inn, FedEx and AutoZone. These native inventions became the basis of our regional economy after the slow demise of the agrarian culture when cotton was king.

33. Collins Exiting MLGW After 10 Years -

One of the most scrutinized, criticized and well paid jobs in local government is going to be open at the end of 2017.

Jerry Collins announced Friday, Aug. 4, that he will retire as president and CEO of Memphis Light, Gas and Water Division effective Dec. 19 at the end of a five-year appointed term of office.

34. Strong: Democrats Must Reconnect With Voters -

The new chairman of the Shelby County Democratic Party says the local party has lost its voters and getting them back is the path to victory in the 2018 county elections and beyond.

Corey Strong, an attorney and special projects director for Shelby County Schools, was elected chairman of the reorganized local party Saturday, Aug. 5, following its dissolution by the Tennessee Democratic Party a year ago.

35. Last Word: School Days, MLGW Moves Off Beale and Room For Peter Pan To Fly -

The K-12 school year begins Monday for most of Shelby County including the state’s largest public school system right here. Some schools have started earlier and some start later. So remember that in your daily travels going forward even if you don’t have school age children.

36. The Week Ahead: August 7-13 -

Hello, Memphis! While many local kids head back to school, plenty of Elvis fans are flocking to the city to celebrate The King’s life and legacy. Check out what else you need to know about in The Week Ahead…

37. Ballet Memphis Begins Move Into Midtown Facility -

The new $21 million Ballet Memphis studio in Overton Square has room for Peter Pan to fly and a two-way view of a ballet company making revolutionary turns in dance.

But all of the choreography during a Thursday, Aug. 3, tour of the 38,000-square-foot set of five studios, offices, a costume shop, meeting and classroom space and a Mama Gaia corner café at Madison Avenue and North Cooper Street was among construction workers.

38. Strong is New Local Democratic Party Chairman -

The new chairman of the Shelby County Democratic Party is Corey Strong, an attorney and special projects director for Shelby County Schools.

39. Collins To Retire as Head of MLGW -

Memphis Light Gas and Water Division president Jerry Collins will retire as president and CEO of the utility company effective Dec. 19, Collins announced Friday, Aug. 4.

40. Community LIFT Offering New Empowerment Grants -

Community LIFT is now taking applications for its latest grant opportunity, an empowerment fund designed to provide financial assistance to residents and grassroots organizations involved in community improvement work.

41. Rhodes College Makes List Of Princeton Review’s ‘Best’ -

Rhodes College ranked high among the country’s top colleges and universities, according to the results of an annual survey by The Princeton Review. The education services company features Rhodes College in the newly released 2018 edition of its guide, The Best 382 Colleges.

42. Editorial: The Ultimate Sustainability At the Corrections Center -

A life is a natural resource, more valuable than the resources being conserved at the Shelby County Corrections Center to great effect. So, with inmate levels at the corrections center currently at a relatively low level, we think there is another kind of opportunity for the aging prison.

43. Problems Adrift -

David Ciarloni plants about 140 acres of soybeans on his 925-acre farm that straddles Shelby and Fayette counties. Those acres of beans are safe right now, but Ciarloni, who took over the family farm after his father recently retired, worries about a recent phenomenon that’s being called “dicamba drift.”

44. End Your Car Lease Without Getting Dinged -

Your car lease is ending soon. Looking at the dent in the driver's door, you wonder if you'll be charged for it. Or maybe you've exceeded the mileage limit and you're bracing for a big hit. But you can avoid common issues like these if you know how the game is played.

45. Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum Opening Lynn Exhibit -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – The Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum is opening an exhibit on the life and career of Hall of Famer Loretta Lynn in Nashville.

46. After Many Decades of Change, Why Haven’t Our Methods? -

Cities have to be in a constant state of problem solving in today’s world, especially when you consider that the shelf life of leading industries is shortening in dramatic fashion. Consider that it took 55 years for the automobile to spread to a quarter of the country, 35 years for the telephone, 22 years for the radio, 16 years for the personal computer, 13 years for the cellphone, and only seven years for the internet.

47. Managing Money is a Marathon, Not a Sprint -

Ray’s Take: Training to run a marathon and creating a financial plan have a lot in common if you’re going to succeed. An overall plan includes short-term and long-term goals and the ability to stick to the plan through thick and thin. No pain, no gain. Right? And that applies to money as well as running.

48. TCAT Students See the Future, Get Prepared -

Bryan Rippy, 38, chuckles when he says he’s in the prime of his life. But sharpening his skills is no laughing matter, and he understands the importance of raising his value in the job market.

49. New St. Jude Grad School Welcomes Inaugural Class -

Following years of planning, development of curriculum and recruitment of staff and faculty, the first class of a dozen students has begun studies at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital’s new Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences.

50. Next Big Leap for Apple? – Augmented Reality -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) – Apple's iPhone may be ready for its next big act – as a springboard into "augmented reality," a technology that projects life-like images into real-world settings viewed through a screen.

51. Developers Baking $73 Million Deal at Wonder Bread Plant -

A development group wants to breathe new life into the former Wonder Bread plant that used to fill the Memphis Medical District with the smell of fresh bread before it closed in 2013.

A group of investors spearheaded by Chisca Hotel Developers – Development Services Group – has submitted a $73 million plan to create 286 upscale multifamily units, a 480-space parking garage and 150,000 square feet of office and retail space.

52. Last Word: Kustoff at Rotary, Royal's Vibe and The Terms of MEMPOWER -

The investment group that renovated the Chisca resurfaced Tuesday evening with a plan for the Wonder Bread factory, vacant for the last four years. But don’t look for a return of the bread smell to the Edge area. And if you look at what has started to happen in that particular corridor since Wonder Bread shut down, the mixed-use plan has some precedent. Throw in the move to sell The Commercial Appeal property just a few blocks away and if the economy remains this good, the transformation in this area could be radical in another four years.

53. Wonder Bread Factory Rebirth Eyed by Chisca Hotel Developer -

A new plan submitted to city officials would breathe new life into the former Wonder Bread factory that used to fill the Memphis Medical District with the smell of fresh bread before it closed in 2013.

54. Flying Ace Sully Makes Case Against Privatization -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Who are you going to trust when it comes to what's best for the flying public? Members of Congress or the hero of the Miracle on the Hudson, retired Capt. Chesley "Sully" Sullenberger?

55. Using Jargon Not Always a Crime -

We tell ourselves that the use of clever, intentional phrasing designed to encapsulate thoughts as succinctly as possible is the perfect method for communicating with our audience. But are we telling ourselves the truth?

56. Advice to My Younger Self -

In the past week, two interesting things have happened. First, I was asked the question, “What advice would you give your younger self?” Then, I attended my high school reunion. Walking through the old halls of my high school brought back memories of where it all started. Needless to say, both moments made me think about the past and what advice I would give a young person today.

57. HealthChoice Promotes Henning To Director of Population Health -

Sarah Henning has been promoted to director of population health programs at HealthChoice. Henning previously served as manager of the department. In her new role, Henning is responsible for designing, implementing and managing population health and wellness initiatives and programs for the HealthChoice network.
She also collaborates with stakeholders to promote and support these programs and to ensure they meet the needs of the affected populations and adapt with the changing health care environment.

58. Last Word: Gentrification, ServiceMaster's New CEO Speaks and Gateway Resolution -

Gentrification in Binghampton? The g-word is a term that can start a real debate in Memphis these days. But those leading the hard fought redevelopment in Binghampton say a tax increment financing district there would mean an immediate capital infusion of $332,000 that would help to ward off the possibility of gentrification.

59. Tennessee Experts Spar Over Prison Terms for Juveniles -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – There is wide disagreement in Tennessee on whether the state is violating recent U.S. Supreme Court decisions banning mandatory life-without-parole sentences for offenders under 18. That's because judges and juries have a choice in sentencing, but that choice is between life in prison or life with the possibility of parole after serving 51 years – which one leading advocate calls cruel.

60. Son of Nashville Mayor Dies of Apparent Drug Overdose -

The only son of Nashville Mayor Megan Barry – whom her office described as "a kind soul full of life" – has died of an apparent drug overdose, and she asked for privacy as she and her husband face life "without his laughter and love."

61. Money is Not Enough -

Nonprofits play a critical role across the Mid-South. They represent, serve and advocate for a great diversity of individuals, families and causes. They improve the quality of life, generate innovations, and give voice to the challenges unseen and needs still unmet. They are joined in this work by foundations and corporations who provide money, resources, connections and technical assistance.

62. Former U of M Assistant Barry Odom To Try To ‘Fix’ Problems He Inherited at Missouri -

Barry Odom’s first season as coach at Missouri did not go like he envisioned. A former defensive coordinator at the University of Memphis (2012-2014), Odom’s first Missouri team led the SEC in total offense last season (500.5 yards per game) while finishing last in total defense (479.7 ypg).

63. Binghampton, Uptown Redevelopment Efforts Move Forward While Waiting for the CRA -

If Binghampton can get a proposal for tax increment financing (TIF) approved by the end of the year, it would mean an immediate $332,000 in capital and an estimated $26 million over the 30-year life of the TIF zone to sustain and further grow commercial and residential development in the area.

64. Nashville Friends Launch Medical Device Startup in Memphis -

Sinead Miller is the kind of entrepreneur that stakeholders in Memphis’ business ecosystem are hungry to see more of.

After finishing her Ph.D. in biomedical engineering at Vanderbilt University a few months ago, she decided to forgo Nashville and come to Memphis to launch a medical technology startup here. PathEX is the company she co-founded with friend Alex Wieseler. They are creating a device that can capture bacteria from blood that allows for the diagnosis and treatment of sepsis.

65. Marching Band to NFL: Vanderbilt Doctor’s Unlikely Path -

When the NFL sought a worthy selection for the first chief medical officer in league history, it turned its eyes to Vanderbilt University Medical Center.

In hiring Dr. Allen Sills earlier this year, the league brought on a whirlwind of intelligence and energy with a lengthy curriculum vitae.

66. Community LIFT Introducing New Empowerment Fund -

Community LIFT is now taking applications for its latest grant opportunity, an empowerment fund designed to provide financial assistance to residents and grassroots organizations involved in community improvement work. Its purpose is to establish a network of resident leaders who are engaged and feel empowered to advocate for neighborhood revitalization that improves quality of life in Memphis’ under-resourced neighborhoods.

67. Events -

Church Health will host a Living Life Deliberately: Mindfulness Meditation in Daily Life class Monday, July 31, at noon in the Church Health Meditation Chapel, 1350 Concourse Ave. Rob Dove from Rhodes College Counseling will discuss how to practice meditation in ways that foster the ability to live deliberately. Email slateryj@churchhealth.org with any questions.

68. Tennessee Tourism Launches New Website to Recruit Retirees -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Tennessee tourism officials are launching a website that aims to recruit retirees to settle down in the state.

A Tennessee Department of Tourist Development news release Thursday says Retire Tennessee's new website offers information on health care, experiences, shopping, retirement developments and communities, testimonials and sample housing stock. Currently, 22 Tennessee counties participate in the program.

69. Tennessee's Abortion Laws at Risk in Quirky Vote Count Case -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – The future of abortion access in Tennessee hinges on a quirky court case that's about vote counting, not women's reproductive health rights.

A 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals hearing Wednesday in Cincinnati will mark the first major action in more than a year in the case of Amendment 1, an anti-abortion measure passed by voters in 2014. The amendment says that nothing in the state constitution "secures or protects a right to abortion or requires the funding of an abortion" and empowers state lawmakers to "enact, amend, or repeal statutes regarding abortion."

70. ‘Fed Up’ Campaign Warns Of Tougher Gun Penalties -

The Memphis Shelby Crime Commission and the city of Memphis have launched a marketing campaign to warn would-be offenders about tougher state penalties and possible federal prosecution for violent criminals in possession of a gun.

71. UrbanArt Commission Will See Tighter City Guidelines -

Memphis City Council chairman Berlin Boyd put his move to abolish the UrbanArt Commission on hold Tuesday, July 25, in favor of tighter oversight of the UAC’s public art program, which totals 1 percent of city expenditures on capital projects.

72. SCO Opens FocalPoint Telemedicine Clinic -

Southern College of Optometry has opened FocalPoint, the first facility of its kind in the United States to offer completely paperless telemedicine via a service called EyecareLive.

FocalPoint’s 8,000-square-foot clinic has four doctors and offers several technological advances for eye health along with exclusive eyewear lines. The clinic also provides clinical instruction space for the college’s students.

73. Last Word: More Intermodals, 20 Years After the Oilers In Memphis and New Path -

The "skinny" repeal of Obamacare comes up short in the U.S. Senate in an after midnight Friday vote in D.C. And it appears U.S. Senators Bob Corker and Lamar Alexander of Tennessee voted for the repeal measure that came up short. Here are the basics early Friday morning from The New York Times.

74. Events -

Indie Memphis’ Indie Wednesday film series kicks off with a screening of the Slamdance Film Festival’s 2017 “Anarchy” shorts program Wednesday, Aug. 2, at MicroCinema @ Crosstown Arts, 430 N. Cleveland St. The “Anarchy” program is described as “an anti-genre form of resistance to dominant cultural paradigms.” Admission is pay-what-you-can. Visit indiememphis.com for details and a series schedule.

75. Events -

Tennessee’s sales tax holiday will take place Friday, July 28, at 12:01 a.m. through Sunday, July 30, at 11:59 p.m. Shoppers can save nearly 10 percent on clothing, school and art supplies that cost $100 or less per item and computers that cost $1,500 or less. Visit tntaxholiday.com for details and lists of tax-exempt and taxable items.

76. Finding Your Best Bank – It’s Worth It -

Ray’s Take: There’s a perception that all banks are the same and offer the same services and have the same fees. That may have been true at one time, but in today’s world, it pays to investigate a broad range of financial institutions to find the one that has the best products and services geared toward your individual needs.

77. Love in the Bones -

DNA IN THE TIMBERS, SOUL IN THE PLACE. We drive by them at the edge of fields, just there in the woods, or just here abandoned at the edge of progress, beneath the tumble of vines and what remains of a roof or a wall, the dark eyes of broken windows and missing doors, the lost welcome of sagging porches, of warmth gone cold from crumbling chimneys, reminders of a life and lives, of another time – and every time I wonder who they were, what happened there.

78. A ‘Life-Changing’ Trip To Vietnam for Midstate Vols -

Nashville’s Kyle Phillips never knew how good he had it as a University of Tennessee football player. Not until he went to Vietnam with The VOLeaders Academy for a 13-day study with numerous other student-athletes from UT. They left June 29 and returned two weeks later.

79. Charity Founded by Former Ole Miss Coach Freeze Mulls Future -

OXFORD, Miss. (AP) – A charity founded by former Mississippi coach Hugh Freeze is taking a break from fundraising and will reconsider its future after the coach resigned amid what the school called a "pattern of personal misconduct."

80. UrbanArt Commission to See Tighter City Guidelines -

Memphis City Council chairman Berlin Boyd put his move to abolish the UrbanArt Commission on hold Tuesday, July 25, in favor of tighter oversight of the UAC’s public art program, which totals 1 percent of city expenditures on capital projects.

81. SCO Opens FocalPoint Telemedicine Clinic -

Southern College of Optometry has opened FocalPoint, the first facility of its kind in the United States to offer completely paperless telemedicine via a service called EyecareLive.

FocalPoint’s 8,000-square-foot clinic has four doctors and offers several technological advances for eye health along with exclusive eyewear lines. The clinic also provides clinical instruction space for the college’s students.

82. Events -

Memphis Black Arts Alliance will present “Annie: The Musical” Thursday through Saturday, July 27-29, at the Kroc Center, 800 East Parkway S. Visit mbaafirehouse.org for details and tickets.

83. Shut Down The Rumor Mill -

My father, Joe Crowley, a very wise man, always had a response whenever anyone said they heard a rumor, and wanted to pass it on. He always stopped them short by saying, “Those who don’t know, talk. Those who know, don’t talk.”

84. U of M Grads Say Bye to Student Loan Debt -

Student loan debt looms large for most college graduates, but one local professional has created a system to knock out $150,000 in student loans in five years, and he wants to put those tools in the hands of a generation that is struggling toward financial freedom.

85. Overton Gateway Compromise Approved By Council -

Memphis City Council members approved the Overton Gateway mixed residential development Tuesday, July 25 in a pair of unanimous votes – one for the plans on the north side of Sam Cooper Boulevard at East Parkway and the other for the plans on the south side of Sam Cooper at East Parkway.

86. Overton Gateway Compromise Approved By Council -

Memphis City Council members approved the Overton Gateway mixed residential development Tuesday, July 25 in a pair of unanimous votes – one for the plans on the north side of Sam Cooper Boulevard at East Parkway and the other for the plans on the south side of Sam Cooper at East Parkway.

87. Brain Disease Seen in Most Football Players in Large Report -

CHICAGO (AP) – Research on 202 former football players found evidence of a brain disease linked to repeated head blows in nearly all of them, from athletes in the National Football League, college and even high school.

88. Events -

Talk Shoppe will meet Wednesday, July 26, from 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. in NovaCopy’s conference room, 7251 Appling Farms Parkway. The topic is The MasterMind Principle, based on the book “Think and Grow Rich” by Napoleon Hill. Cost is free. Visit talkshoppe.com.

89. Are ‘Snaplications’ The Next Trend In Recruiting? -

When most job seekers think of using social media to apply for a new job, they think of networking website LinkedIn. But McDonald’s pushed the boundaries of recruiting by partnering with Snapchat to hire new employees this summer. Previously rolled out in Australia earlier this year, they’re calling the recruiting effort “Snaplications.”

90. Milford Joins Chamber As Programming, Events Director -

Ericka Milford recently joined the Greater Memphis Chamber as director of events and programming, a job in which she’s responsible for planning and executing chamber events and programs and for increasing engagement opportunities for members and the community. Milford’s new role marks her return to the chamber, where she served as events coordinator from 2007 to 2012 before taking a job with HigherVisibility.

91. Juvenile Court Oversight Issue Spills Into Larger Criminal Justice Reform Debate -

Talking Monday, July 24, about criminal justice reform, Juvenile Court Judge Dan Michael mentioned the formal written request he, Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell and Sheriff Bill Oldham made to U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions in June to end Justice Department oversight of the court.

92. All Heart: Carpenter Art Garden Cultivates Community -

On Valentine’s Day a few years ago, a Binghampton boy named Donte Davis combined two of his great loves – art and the Memphis Grizzlies – when he painted a wooden heart featuring the face of his home team’s mascot.

93. ‘Fed Up’ Campaign Warns Of Tougher Gun Penalties -

The Memphis Shelby Crime Commission and the city of Memphis have launched a marketing campaign to warn would-be offenders about tougher state penalties and possible federal prosecution for violent criminals possessing a gun.

94. Summer Refreshers for Boards -

Calling all board members: Get ready for the flurry of fall activities that are a part of life within the nonprofit sector. Consider the following “board refreshers” as you enjoy – or hide from – the hot summer sun. Grab your board binder, put on your nonprofit sun visor, and let’s talk board engagement.

95. Last Word: ICE Raids, Who's Buying Afton Grove and Malco Powerhouse Plans -

A protest Sunday evening at the Prescott Place Apartments after federal ICE agents – Immigration and Customs Enforcement – took people into custody there and at Emerald Ridge and Corner Park apartments Sunday morning. The group of organizations protesting the federal action – Memphis Coalition of Concerned Citizens, Cosecha and SURJ Memphis -- say Memphis Police assisted in the immigration operation. Memphis Police deny they were involved in any way. No estimate from ICE on how many people were detained.

96. Developers Lay Out Latest Plans for Proposed Midtown Gated Community -

In a quiet room inside of his Midtown architecture firm, Lee Askew of ANF Architects presented the latest incarnation of his plans to turn the former Red Cross building at the corner of Central Avenue and Mansfield Street into a 12-unit luxury gated community.

97. Events -

Church Health will host a Living Life Deliberately: Mindfulness Meditation in Daily Life class Monday, July 24, at noon in the Church Health Meditation Chapel, 1350 Concourse Ave. Rob Dove from Rhodes College Counseling will discuss how to practice meditation in ways that foster the ability to live deliberately. The class will be offered again July 31 at noon. Email slateryj@churchhealth.org with any questions.

98. St. Jude Research Identifies Genetic Marker for Flu Risk -

Researchers led by St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital have discovered a new genetic marker that may help detect high-risk flu patients.

The genetic variation they’ve identified is associated with influenza severity and the supply of killer T cells that help patients fight the infection. The scientists have also linked the gene variant to a mechanism that explains the elevated risk and offers clues about the broader antiviral immune response.

99. FreezeFalling … Ole Miss Coach Exits in Disgrace -

A week before Hugh Freeze resigned his position, he stood at the podium at SEC Media Days, Ole Miss pin on his suit lapel, and delivered his last Sermon on the Mount.

100. Be Boring -

Ray’s Take: Sometimes, it’s tempting to try to beat the market through the excitement of stock picking or by choosing riskier investments with the promise of a higher return. It seems like everyone has a friend of a friend with a great investment story.