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Editorial Results (free)

1. Last Word: A New Council Member, Law Without Signature and Corker Down Under -

The Memphis City Council should be back up to full strength by the time Tuesday becomes Wednesday. Filling the Super District 9 seat left vacant by the resignation earlier this month of Philip Spinosa to join the leadership of the Greater Memphis Chamber is on the council’s agenda Tuesday afternoon – the last item on the agenda. But the council usually skips around.

2. Former Liverpool CEO Ayre Hired by MLS' Nashville Expansion -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Former Liverpool chief executive Ian Ayre has been hired for the same role with Major League Soccer's expansion franchise in Nashville.

The 55-year-old became Liverpool's managing director in March 2011 following the club's purchase by Fenway Sports Group and was promoted to CEO in May 2014.

3. Local Links Chapter Celebrates 25th Anniversary -

Friendship and service to the community and each other were celebrated Saturday, May 19, as the River City (TN) Chapter of The Links Inc. marked its 25th anniversary with a special event at the National Civil Rights Museum.

4. Tougher Payday Loan Rules to Remain in Place, For Now -

NEW YORK (AP) – Tougher rules governing the payday lending industry, finalized during the last weeks of an Obama-era appointee who led the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, will remain in place for now after Congress allowed a deadline to overrule them pass without action.

5. Teaching Your Kids About Money -

Ray’s Take: Did you know that only 17 states require high school students to take a course in personal finance? Unfortunately, financial literacy is often left out of the American education system and it’s up to parents and guardians to teach kids everything they need to know about finances.

6. A Better Ride -

The final phase of construction on the innovative Hampline will begin this summer, with a goal of completion by the end of the year. The protected bike path completes the missing link in the Greenline between Overton Park and Tillman Street, and has been an ongoing project since 2010.

7. Three Projects Get Green Light from EDGE Board -

The Economic Development Growth Engine for Memphis and Shelby County approved a trio of projects that could create as many as 255 new jobs and retain nearly 300 more during a busy Wednesday, May 16, agenda. 

8. Macy's Sees Robust Mobile, Online Sales as Profits Soar -

NEW YORK (AP) – With shoppers in a mood to spend, particularly on clothing, Macy's surpassed profit and revenue expectations for the first quarter of the year and raised its outlook.

The company reported its second straight quarter of higher sales at existing stores after a three-year funk. Its shares surged nearly 9 percent Wednesday, and the stocks of other department store chains rose as well. The rosy performance bodes well for J.C. Penney and Nordstrom, both set to report their quarterly results on Thursday. All are working to appeal to shoppers who are spending more online rather than at department stores.

9. Tennessee Candidate: Florida Students Used as Anti-Gun Props -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Republican candidate for Tennessee governor Bill Lee is claiming that the "liberal media," teachers unions and the "far-left lobby" have used students who survived the deadly Florida school shooting as "props to push their anti-gun agenda," saying he's sickened by it.

10. Two Shots Didn’t Phase Lawmakers in Jack Daniel’s Case -

When Van Halen front man David Lee Roth opened a bottle of Jack Daniel’s on stage back in the ’80s, the last thing he thought about was taxes and court appeals when he took a big swig of whiskey.

11. Last Word: Mimeo Move, Food Fight and Sundquist for Blackburn -

There aren’t any renderings just yet of what a second convention center hotel with the 100 North Main Building as its centerpiece would look like. That’s probably a good thing for now because some of the specs and the footprint are still in flux. The developers of the proposed convention center hotel said as the weekend began that they plan a 600 room hotel and a complex that includes two 30-story towers in addition to the 37-story tall 100 North Main Building – the tallest building in the city. And the foot print will likely jump Second Street to take in the vacant Jefferson Plaza building. Here is the update and some perspective on how we got to this point.

12. Starbucks Tells Employees: Let Anyone Use the Restroom -

NEW YORK (AP) – Starbucks has told employees to let anyone use the restroom, even if they haven't bought anything, as it reviews its policies and tries to restore its reputation after the arrest of two black men at a coffee shop in Philadelphia.

13. Three Companies Seeking Tax Abatements for Expansion Projects -

Three companies will be seeking tax incentive packages from the Economic Development Growth Engine for Memphis and Shelby County during its Wednesday, May 16 meeting.

The largest of the three, online managed content distribution and printing company Mimeo.com, is seeking a 15-year Expansion PILOT (payment in lieu of taxes) for a $13.4 million project at 3350 Miac Cove.

14. Memphis Tigers Basketball Signs 6-Foot-7 Wing Player -

University of Memphis basketball coach Penny Hardaway has added another piece to his first recruiting class.

15. What Do Statewide Candidates Say About Rural Tennessee? -

Like most of America, Tennessee’s metropolitan areas have prospered during the last eight years, while the rural areas have lagged in almost every measure. The state has 19 of its 95 counties classified as “distressed.” What can and should we do to give every Tennessean a chance to succeed?

16. Teamsters Leaders Facing Probe for Accepting Gifts -

ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) – An independent investigator has ratcheted up his probe into whether top Teamsters leaders accepted undisclosed gifts from a business that brokered health benefits for the union.

17. Parts Shortage That Hit Ford Spreads to More Companies -

DETROIT (AP) – A fire that damaged a Michigan auto parts supply factory is causing production problems at Ford, Fiat Chrysler, BMW and General Motors, but it's too soon to tell yet whether dealers will run short of vehicles.

18. Memphis Tigers Basketball Signs 6-Foot-7 Wing Player -

University of Memphis basketball coach Penny Hardaway has added another piece to his first recruiting class.

19. Fizdale: Lessons Learned in Memphis Will Help in New Job With Knicks -

It seems like a long time ago now — or maybe it doesn’t — but back in the middle of David Fizdale’s rookie season as an NBA head coach he had the Grizzlies 11 games over .500 (36-25). Back then, it seemed logical and likely that he would put down roots here.

20. From Enduring to Thriving -

By fall 1967, Memphis had a diverse group of people of faith working on a plan to better the community. Diversity, back then, mainly meant black and white, and Christians and Jews. The notion of them working together was considered bold.

21. Trump Announces US Will Exit Nuclear Accord With Iran -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Donald Trump announced Tuesday the U.S. will pull out of the landmark nuclear accord with Iran, declaring he was making the world safer but dealing a profound blow to allies and deepening the president's isolation on the world stage.

22. US Job Openings Equal Unemployed for 1st Time in 2 Decades -

WASHINGTON (AP) – If you're looking for a job right now, this may be about as good as it gets: There are roughly as many open jobs in the United States as there are unemployed people.

In March, employers advertised 6.55 million open jobs, the most on records dating to December 2000, the Labor Department said Tuesday . At the same time, there were 6.59 million unemployed people.

23. Tigers Face South Alabama in Tennis Friday as NCAA Tournament Begins -

Getting to the NCAA Tournament has become no big deal for the University of Memphis tennis squad. Coach Paul Goebel’s Tigers (18-5) will open tournament play for the sixth time in seven years Friday in Starkville, Mississippi, with a first-round match against South Alabama (14-9). That kind of consistency is what new Tigers basketball coach Penny Hardaway and his squad can only dream about, for now.

24. Pro- and Anti-Gun Bills Fail in Tennessee Legislature -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – An election-year Tennessee legislative session tinged by national attention on a deadly school shooting in Florida saw many high-profile gun bills fail – both Republican efforts to ease gun laws and Democratic pushes to put more restrictions in place.

25. Conscious Capitalism: Conversation with Raj Sisodia, Part Two -

Raj Sisodia is the professor of global business at Babson College and co-founder and co-chairman of Conscious Capitalism Inc. Raj has written 10 books and more than 100 academic articles.

26. No Easy Path Forward for Fred’s -

Memphis-based discount retailer Fred’s Inc. operates 584 company-owned stores that each stock more than 14,000 items and saw average sales of more than $3 million in 2017.

That’s one picture of the company, laid out in Fred’s just-released annual report. Another picture, though, can be found in Fred’s dismal financial performance of late – and in the fact that Wall Street has basically lost faith in the company’s prospects, which led to the price of Fred’s shares sinking 60 percent since January.

27. Last Word: BSMF Notes, Political Dominoes and The Teacher Pipeline -

Yes, it rained. There was even hail for a brief period. None of that appeared to make a dent in the run of the Beale Street Music Festival. We are still waiting on exact box office numbers. The park was sold out – Ticketfly and at the gate -- early Sunday evening. It wasn’t a sellout Friday and Saturday but ticket supplies were tight for Tom Lee Park with the festival estimating there were thousands more people Saturday than there were Friday. Much to be said for a lineup this year that managed to strike a balance between hipster, cutting edge nobody-knows-about-this-yet new and used-to-be-big-not-so-long-ago nostalgia.

28. Spinosa Takes Chamber Job, Resigns from City Council -

Philip Spinosa Jr. has resigned from the Memphis City Council and been named the new senior vice president of the Greater Memphis Chamber’s Chairman’s Circle.

Spinosa will replace Shea Flinn, who announced he would be vacating his position in March. Much like Spinosa, Flinn left his post on the City Council in 2015 to join the chamber.

29. Drug Epidemic Ensnares 25-Year-Old Pill for Nerve Pain -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The story line sounds familiar: a popular pain drug becomes a new way to get high as prescribing by doctors soars.

But the latest drug raising red flags is not part of the opioid family at the center of the nation's drug epidemic. It's a 25-year-old generic pill long seen as a low risk way to treat seizures, nerve pain and other ailments.

30. Just Right: Fed Official Says US Living 'Goldilocks' Economy -

WASHINGTON (AP) – With steady growth, low unemployment and tame inflation, the U.S. is experiencing a "Goldilocks" economy: Not too hot. Not too cold. But just right.

So says a top Federal Reserve official, who on Friday suggested that the unemployment rate could fall further to 3.5 percent with inflation modestly overshooting the Fed's target for a time without raising concerns.

31. Why Wall Street's Worried About Tesla -

Elon Musk's track record for technological feats as chief of SpaceX has turned skeptics into believers in everything from his quest to open space travel to Mars to his desire to build a tunnel for high-speed travel between New York and Washington. As Tesla's CEO, his ambitious vision for electric cars has also earned him a faithful following.

32. 2nd-Longest US Expansion on Record Keeps Churning Out Jobs -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The U.S. economy has delivered steady if only modest gains for most Americans since the Great Recession ended in 2009. It's been a frustration for many.

Yet the very sluggishness of the economic expansion helps explain why it's now the second-longest on record and why more of the country might soon benefit from higher pay.

33. Fred’s CEO Resigns, Replaced By CFO -

The CEO of Memphis-based discount retailer Fred’s Inc. has left the company, less than two years into his run as the top executive and on the heels of a particularly volatile period for Fred’s that has seen other management shuffles, an uncertain turnaround strategy and a plummeting stock price.

34. Spinosa Takes Job With Chamber, Resigns from Council -

Philip Spinosa, Jr. has resigned from the Memphis City Council and was named the new senior vice president of the Greater Memphis Chamber’s Chairman’s Circle.

Spinosa will be taking over for Shea Flinn, who announced he would be vacating his position in March. Much like Spinosa, Flinn left his post on the council in 2015 to join the chamber.

35. Robot Fast-Food Chefs: Hype or a Sign of Industry Change? -

BOSTON (AP) – Robots can't yet bake a souffle or fold a burrito, but they can cook up vegetables and grains and spout them into a bowl – and are doing just that at a new fast casual restaurant in Boston.

36. Saving Beyond Your 401(k) -

Ray’s Take: Buried treasure may sound like something from a fairy tale, but in 2013 a California couple discovered the largest buried treasure in U.S. history. The Saddle Ridge Hoard, as it became known, was made up of 1,411 gold coins minted in the 1800s and worth more than $10 million.

37. WH Hires Lawyer Who Represented Clinton in Impeachment -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Facing critical decisions in the Russia investigation, President Donald Trump has hired Emmet Flood, a veteran attorney who represented Bill Clinton during his impeachment process.

38. East Meets West as 2 Legislators Run Out of Time -

It wasn’t quite a constitutional crisis, but when Reps. Micah Van Huss and Joe Towns start teaming up, something is amiss.

39. 2 Top Aides Leave EPA Amid Ethics Investigations -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The top security official for embattled Environmental Protection Agency head Scott Pruitt abruptly left office ahead of his scheduled questioning before a congressional panel, one of two top aides whose departures were announced Tuesday amid a series of federal ethics investigations of the agency.

40. Zuckerberg Kicks Off Facebook Conference, Offers No Apology -

SAN JOSE, Calif. (AP) – Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg kicked off his company's annual developer conference acknowledging that 2018 has been an "intense year" so far, but offered no apology for the company's big privacy scandal.

41. First Primaries Kick Off Busy Election Year -

Shelby County voters go to the polls Tuesday, May 1, in the first of three elections this year that will take in county, state and federal offices by the time the last vote is counted in November.

The primary elections Tuesday for 23 Shelby County government offices are being watched closely by local Republican and Democratic leaders. They are watching the turnout and what the results say about the political temperament and activism of a county Hillary Clinton carried with 60 percent of the vote in the November 2016 presidential general election won by Republican Donald Trump.

42. Fred’s CEO Resigns, Replaced By CFO -

The CEO of Memphis-based discount retailer Fred’s Inc. has left the company, less than two years into his run as the top executive and on the heels of a particularly volatile period for Fred’s that has seen other management shuffles, an uncertain turnaround strategy and a plummeting stock price.

43. E. Coli Outbreak Linked to Romaine Lettuce Grows to 84 Cases -

PHOENIX (AP) – The E. coli outbreak linked to tainted romaine lettuce has grown and sickened 84 people from 19 states, U.S. health officials said Wednesday.

At least another 31 cases are believed to be tied to romaine lettuce grown in Yuma, Arizona, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control said.

44. Bill Cosby Convicted of Drugging and Molesting a Woman -

NORRISTOWN, Pa. (AP) – Bill Cosby was convicted Thursday of drugging and molesting a woman in the first big celebrity trial of the #MeToo era, completing the spectacular late-life downfall of a comedian who broke racial barriers in Hollywood on his way to TV superstardom as America's Dad.

45. Lawmakers Honor Man Hailed as Hero in Waffle House Attack -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – The man who snatched an AR-15 rifle away from a gunman at a Tennessee restaurant told Tennessee lawmakers Tuesday he faced "the true test of a man," drawing a standing ovation during his brief address.

46. Talk To Strangers -

If you’re like me, the adults in your life taught you early on, “Don’t talk to strangers.” You may have even heard the phrase, “stranger danger.” The idea is that strangers can harm you in some way. Staying away from strangers kept you safe from kidnapping or something else bad.

47. US Brands Suffer Collateral Damage in Chinese Corporate War -

SHANGHAI (AP) – The rivalry is so notorious it's been called the "great cat-and-dog war." On one side towers Alibaba Group Holding Ltd., China's e-commerce market leader, embodied by the black cat mascot of its Tmall platform. On the other is JD.com Inc., a fast-growing upstart represented by its white dog logo.

48. Duran Case Moves To Federal Court In Louisiana -

Memphis Police director Michael Rallings says his department isn’t working with federal immigration agencies that are becoming more aggressive in how undocumented immigrants are dealt with.

But critics of the police department’s aggressive reaction to protests say police brass is cooperating.

49. State and Federal Corruption Charges Against Two Cops Prompt Review of Their Cases -

The District Attorney General’s office is reviewing arrests and criminal cases in which two former Memphis Police officers played a major role. The review comes after officers Terrion Bryson and Kevin Coleman were indicted by the Shelby County grand jury and a federal grand jury on state and federal drug conspiracy, robbery and corruption charges.

50. Hardaway's First Memphis Recruiting Class a Winner -

The latest recruiting rankings from 247sports.com for the college basketball Class of 2018 has the University of Memphis ranked No. 27 and first among American Athletic Conference teams, 23 spots ahead of No. 50 Wichita State.

51. No Walkouts at Closed Columbine on Shooting Anniversary -

DENVER (AP) — Students at some Colorado schools are participating in the latest student wave of walkouts to protest gun violence on the 19th anniversary of the Columbine shooting but not students at the suburban Denver school.

52. Tennessee Inmate Arrested in Little Rock Concert Shooting -

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — An inmate in Tennessee is the third person suspected of firing shots in a Little Rock nightclub last year, according to authorities.

The Little Rock Police Department said Thursday that Cordero Kadeem Ragland faces charges in connection with the July 1 shooting at Power Ultra Lounge that left more than two dozen people injured. Online records show Ragland has been held in a Tennessee jail since November on separate charges.

53. Opioid Litigation, FedExForum NonCompete Top Local Law Developments -

Here are some of the legal issues making news in recent months.

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Tennessee Attorney General Herbert Slatery says lawsuits by local prosecutors over the opioid epidemic are complicating his efforts to reach a multistate settlement with drug companies. In response, the prosecutors, who represent about half of Tennessee's counties, say local communities lose out when lawsuits like theirs are rolled into one settlement.

54. Day of Service, No Walkout at Columbine on 19th Anniversary -

DENVER (AP) — A planned national high school walkout for gun control on the 19th anniversary of the Columbine shooting Friday won't include student protests at the Colorado school that changed the way the nation viewed shootings.

55. Richards Focused on Customers and Employees -

Chris Richards knows the value of a chance encounter.

As a 20-year-old sophomore at the University of Iowa, Richards traveled with her college roommate to Memphis, intending to stay for the summer and explore a new city.

56. One-Year Turnaround? Grizzlies Vow It Can Be Done -

Mike Conley had no doubt: “With health, we’re a completely different team.” This was a day after the season ended, a 22-60 record next to the Memphis Grizzlies’ name and forever the shorthand explanation of their 2017-2018 NBA journey.

57. Lee, Boyd, Black Talk Confederate Monuments, Oppose Pre-K Expansion -

Three of the four major contenders for governor in the Aug. 2 Republican primary disagree with the removal of Confederate monuments from city parks but also disagree with the state legislature’s decision to cut $250,000 of city funding in retaliation.

58. Civil Rights Cold Case Bill Nears Passage -

Years of work behind her, state Rep. Johnnie Turner is making the final push for creation of a state body designed to initiate investigations into civil rights cold cases, potentially solving decades-old murders or giving people the opportunity to put a heinous act behind them.

59. One Dead After Jetliner Apparently Blows an Engine in Flight -

PHILADELPHIA (AP) — A Southwest Airlines jet apparently blew an engine at 30,000 feet and got hit by shrapnel that smashed a window and damaged the fuselage Tuesday, killing a passenger and injuring seven others, authorities said.

60. NYC Removes Statue of Doctor Who Experimented on Slaves -

NEW YORK (AP) — A bronze statue of a 19th century doctor who did experimental surgery without anesthesia on enslaved African-American women was removed from Central Park on Tuesday.

New York City's Public Design Commission voted Monday to accept a mayoral panel's recommendation to remove the statue of Dr. J. Marion Sims for relocation to Brooklyn's Green-Wood Cemetery, where Sims is buried, accompanied by signage with historical context.

61. Bill Prohibiting Sterilization Incentives Passes State House -

A proposal by State Sen. Brian Kelsey, R-Germantown, and state Rep. Raumesh Akbari, D-Memphis, to prohibit Tennessee judges from offering defendants reduced jail time in exchange for sterilization passed the state House of Representatives by a vote of 70-23 Tuesday, April 17. The legislation now awaits the signature of Gov. Bill Haslam.

62. Running Away Money -

I recently had the privilege of interviewing Margaret Heffernan. Margaret is incredibly impressive, with a career that includes running five companies in the United States and the United Kingdom, being a college professor, authoring five books, and giving multiple TED Talks. Originally from Texas, Margaret has lived all over, including in the U.K.

63. Hardaway and Tigers Get Two More Signees -

University of Memphis coach Penny Hardaway has added two more players to his roster. Shooting guard Antwann Jones signed with the Tigers after being released from his national letter of intent with Texas A&M. Isaiah Maurice signed after playing one season at Kansas State and one season at South Plains junior college.

64. Trolley Restoration Meant Rebuilding the System -

Nearly four years after two trolleys caught fire in the span of six months in late 2013, Memphis Area Transit Authority officials announced that three restored trolley cars would go into service on April 30.

65. Chemical Weapons Team in Syria Kept From Alleged Attack Site -

DOUMA, Syria (AP) — Syrian and Russian authorities prevented independent investigators from going to the scene of a suspected chemical attack, the head of the chemical watchdog group said Monday, blocking international efforts to establish what happened and who was to blame.

66. Past Tigers Will Coach At Friday Night Stripes -

Former Tiger football greats DeAngelo Williams and Jake Elliott will serve as coaches at the annual Friday Night Stripes on April 13 at the Liberty Bowl.

Elliott won this year’s Super Bowl with the Philadelphia Eagles, perhaps clinching the game with a 46-yard field goal with 1:10 left that put his team ahead of the New England Patriots 41-33.

67. What Statewide Candidates Say About Opioid Crisis, Public Safety -

The spread of opioid abuse claimed over 1,600 lives in Tennessee in 2016, and it is getting worse. Methamphetamine abuse, while not getting the headlines, has increased. Gun violence and murder is increasing. What proposals do our candidates have to help Tennesseans address these public safety issues?

68. Volkswagen Replaces CEO Mueller, Announces New Structure -

FRANKFURT, Germany (AP) – Volkswagen replaced CEO Matthias Mueller with core brand head Herbert Diess on Thursday and said it is creating a new management structure to enable faster decision-making as autonomous and electric cars transform the industry.

69. Lawmakers Urge That Ex-President James Polk Be Exhumed Again -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Nearly 170 years after President James K. Polk died, the Tennessee Legislature is urging that his remains be exhumed and taken to a fourth resting place – but it might take a while longer before the shovels hit the ground.

70. Past Tigers Will Coach At Friday Night Stripes -

Former Tiger football greats DeAngelo Williams and Jake Elliott will serve as coaches at the annual Friday Night Stripes on April 13 at the Liberty Bowl.

Elliott won this year’s Super Bowl with the Philadelphia Eagles, perhaps clinching the game with a 46-yard field goal with 1:10 left that put his team ahead of the New England Patriots 41-33.

71. Pruitt Brings Fresh, Quieter Approach To Football Practice -

I find the culture shift of Tennessee football under new head coach Jeremy Pruitt this spring to be refreshing.

72. One City, One Team: When a Memphis sports entity succeeds, everyone wins -

On the occasion of the home opener for the reigning Pacific Coast League champion Memphis Redbirds at AutoZone Park, new Memphis basketball coach Penny Hardaway was given the honor of throwing out the first pitch. Predictably, he received a standing ovation just for walking out to the pitching mound.

73. Trump Says All Calm at White House, Vents About Russia Probe -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Donald Trump insisted that all was "very calm and calculated" at the White House, even as he vented Wednesday about the Russia probe, complained about Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein and served noticed that "nice and new and 'smart'" missiles will be coming down on Syria.

74. Study: South Should Spend on Schools, Train Homegrown Talent -

DURHAM, N.C. (AP) – As teachers in multiple states protest for better pay, a new study warns that the fast-growing South region must invest more in public schools and higher education to ensure its homegrown talent shares in its economic prosperity.

75. Drug Distributor to Donate 80,000 Doses of Overdose Antidote -

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) – An Ohio-based drug distributor facing lawsuits linked to the opioid crisis is donating more than 80,000 doses of an overdose antidote for use by emergency responders in several states, including Tennessee.

76. Last Word: Pera's Move, The Catechism of 1968 and Whitehaven's ER -

A day ahead of the last game of the season for the Grizz on the road, the team’s majority owner, Robert Pera, acted Monday to clear up questions about the ownership of the team going forward. Pera emailed season ticket holders Monday evening that he will not be exercising a buy-sell agreement with his partners who have minority shares of the franchise.

77. At the EEOC, Harassment Cases Can Languish for Years -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The federal agency handling workplace harassment complaints has become a crowded waystation in an overwhelmed bureaucracy, with wait times often stretching years. And as the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission takes on renewed significance in light of the growing #MeToo movement, lawyers worry the increased caseload will lead to even longer delays.

78. Report: Airlines Getting Better in Key Areas Except Delays -

U.S. airlines are getting better at many things except getting you to your destination on time.

They are losing fewer bags. Complaints are down.

And on the anniversary of a man getting dragged off a plane because a crew member needed his seat, airlines are bumping fewer passengers.

79. Corker Marks Time in Senate -

U.S. Sen. Bob Corker is watching his time in the Senate closely as he wraps up the second of two terms there.

At the Memphis Rotary Club last week, Corker heard from at least one person who wished he wasn’t leaving the Senate and would run for re-election.

80. Religious Leaders Recount Catechism of 1968 Memphis -

Rev. James Lawson, the architect of nonviolent resistance who counseled Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. on it, walked in a circle last week around the new “I Am A Man” bronze and stainless steel sculpture. As he walked with his head down, still and video photographers scrambled for the best angle to capture the seminal strategist of the civil rights era, seemingly deep in thought.

81. Grizzlies Win Home Finale Over Pistons -

The Memphis Grizzlies saved their best for last. Playing their final game at FedExForum of the season, the Grizzlies set several season highs in a 130-117 victory over the Detroit Pistons on Sunday afternoon.

82. Duran Arrest Highlights Uncertain Immigration Nexus -

Nine people were arrested by Memphis Police last week during MLK50 protests. One of those arrests has focused new attention on the nexus between federal immigration policies and local law enforcement.

83. Strickland Jeered Over Duran Arrest During MLK50 Event -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland was jeered Saturday, April 7, and called a “coward” and “liar” at a rally as part of a “Cathedral to City Hall” MLK50 event outside City Hall.

84. Workers Benefit as US Businesses Struggle to Fill Jobs -

WASHINGTON (AP) – U.S. workers are increasingly benefiting as employers struggle to fill millions of open jobs.

More people who had given up looking for work are renewing their job hunts, more employees are confident enough to quit to look for other jobs and pay is gradually picking up.

85. April 6-12, 2018: This week in Memphis history -

2008: The University of Memphis Tigers play Kansas at the Alamodome in San Antonio, Texas, for the NCAA men’s basketball championship. The Tigers, led by coach John Calipari and Derrick Rose in his one and only year of college basketball, lose 75-68 in overtime. It marks the first time the Tigers have played in the NCAA championship since the 1973 finals won by UCLA, and it is Calipari’s first time back at the championship since his University of Massachusetts team won in 1996.
The NCAA stripped UMass of that title after star player Marcus Camby admitted he took money and other gifts from an agent during the season. The Tigers’ entire 2008 season was vacated by the NCAA after its investigation concluded Rose had someone else take his SAT to attend the University of Memphis. By then, Calipari had left Memphis to become Kentucky’s head basketball coach.

86. Memphis Lawmakers Helped Advance Medical Marijuana Bill in House -

NASHVILLE – Three Shelby County lawmakers played key roles in helping a medical marijuana bill move through the Legislature, supporting its passage in the House Criminal Justice Committee before the bill was pulled Tuesday, April 3, by its Senate sponsor, Democratic state Sen. Steve Dickerson of Nashville.

87. Medical Pot Bill Dies in Committee, But Senate Sponsor Promises Return -

Legislation decriminalizing medical marijuana in Tennessee is effectively dead for the year after its Senate sponsor, Nashville Republican Sen. Steve Dickerson, withdrew the bill from a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing Tuesday, April 3.

88. State of Flux -

Anyone paying attention to recent news headlines alone should have a pretty good indication that health care in the U.S. – really anywhere you look, on local, state or national levels – remains a byzantine, expensive proposition. Health care keeps getting more expensive. It involves navigating a lot of paperwork with bureaucratic legalese that bears the fingerprints of a tangle of stakeholders, including insurers, doctors and lawmakers.

89. Who Starts on Defense? You’ll Have to Wait -

Jeremy Pruitt hasn’t been afraid to change things around during his first spring practice as Tennessee’s head football coach.

90. Under Hardaway, Memphis Again Can Have Hometown Heroes -

Headline from the future: “Alex Lomax Leads Memphis Tigers into the Sweet 16.”

A certainty? Of course not. But it’s a possibility because Lomax has committed to Penny Hardaway and the University of Memphis. You know, as opposed to staying with his earlier choice of Gregg Marshall and Wichita State.

91. MLK50 Observances Come With Appeals, Memories -

The way National Civil Rights Museum president Terri Lee Freeman described it as the MLK50 commemorations began this week, the church bells would cascade when they rang Wednesday, April 4, starting at 6:01 p.m. – the moment Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was shot 50 years ago.

92. Last Word: MLK50s Big Day, Hotel Changes and Murica on Capitol Hill -

The peak of the MLK50 events came Wednesday with a chill but some sunshine and lots to consider. Understand -- this isn’t over. There are still a few more events to go through the weekend and even into next week. If nothing else, a lot more Memphians and visitors got a good look at most of South Main in the best way possible – on foot. And if the Beale Street District ever expands east to Danny Thomas, the intersection there makes a really good place for a party.

93. Medical Marijuana Bill Dies in Tenn. Legislature -

Legislation decriminalizing medical marijuana in Tennessee is effectively dead for the year after its Senate sponsor, Nashville Republican Sen. Steve Dickerson, withdrew the bill from a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing Tuesday, April 3.

94. AP Was There: The Assassination of Martin Luther King Jr. -

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) – In the spring of 1968, the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. had won victories on desegregation and voting rights and had been planning his Poor People's Campaign when he turned his attention to Memphis, the gritty city by the Mississippi River. In his support for striking sanitation workers, King wanted to lead marches and show that nonviolent protest still worked.

95. AP Journalists Recall Covering MLK Assassination -

Nancy Shipley was working in a news office in Nashville, Tennessee, when the call came 50 years ago. Gene Herrick was in Chicago routing photos to newspapers when his phone rang. Jack Thornell got the call in New Orleans; Kathryn Johnson heard the news in Atlanta.

96. Lawmakers See Conspiracy In UT Board Alterations -

It’s not that hard to light a fire under some state lawmakers, but the University of Tennessee FOCUS Act raised blood pressure considerably in the House of Representatives before barely passing with 51 votes.

97. Anniversary of King's Assassination Marked With Marches, Rallies -

Several thousand people marching under the banners of unions and civil rights organizations marched peacefully Wednesday, April 4, from the headquarters of the American Federal of State County and Municipal Employees at Beale Street and Danny Thomas Boulevard to Mason Temple Church of God in Christ.

98. Analysis: Blacks Largely Left Out of High-Paying Jobs -

BOSTON (AP) – Jonathan Garland's fascination with architecture started early: He spent much of his childhood designing Lego houses and gazing at Boston buildings on rides with his father away from their largely minority neighborhood.

99. 'This Was Like A War': Witnesses Remember Day MLK Was Shot -

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) – Clara Ester's eyes were fixed on the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. as he stood on the concrete balcony of the Lorraine Motel.

100. Baseball's Back and NCAA Not Ready to Pay Players -

Babe Ruth and Shohei Ohtani. In the same sentence. In baseball’s record book.

On Sunday, April 1, Ohtani became the first Major League player to start as a position player on opening day (albeit, as a designated hitter) and then start as a pitcher within his team’s first 10 games since Ruth with the Boston Red Sox in 1919.