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Editorial Results (free)

1. Speaker Harwell's Health Care Task Force Holds First Meeting -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Members of a health care task force assigned with proposing alternatives to Republican Gov. Bill Haslam's Insure Tennessee plan on Tuesday stressed their desire to include "circuit breakers" to prevent out-of-control costs.

2. FBI Says It Won't Disclose How It Accessed Locked iPhone -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The FBI said Wednesday that it will not publicly disclose the method that allowed it to access a locked iPhone used by one of the San Bernardino attackers, saying it lacks enough "technical information" about the software vulnerability that was exploited.

3. Did ‘People Back Home’ Really Sway No Votes on Bible? -

I thought about skipping church Sunday and playing golf. After listening to the House of Representatives’ debate on the Bible bill, I could probably skip church for a month and still be in good standing.

4. Last Word: The Friendly Church on the Parkway and Paxton Lynch's Mom -

He came to Memphis in the late 1950s from Chicago as the first pastor of Monumental Baptist Church, the “friendly church on the parkway” in a city that was anything but friendly to the causes of Rev. Samuel Billy Kyles.

5. Commission Approves Houston High Project -

Shelby County Commissioners approved Monday, April 25, the Germantown Municipal School District’s use of $196,521 for a repaving project at Houston High School. The county capital funding is left from HVAC renovations at Dogwood Elementary School.

6. Commission Debates Full Bill for Police Body Cameras -

Most Shelby County commissioners expressing an opinion say they favor body cameras for Memphis Police.

But the opinions begin to differ significantly when comes to who pays for the back-office system to handle the recordings and how much the whole bill will be.

7. Last Word: Memphis Gets Busy, Elections Future and Past and Dad Rock In C-Y -

While their folks are still getting settled over in the front office at The Commercial Appeal, Gannett announces Monday an $815 million offer to buy Tribune Publishing which would put The Los Angeles Times and The Chicago Tribune in the expanding USA Today family.

8. County Commission Delays Vote on Police Body Camera Positions -

Shelby County Commissioners put off a vote Monday, April 25, on funding related to police in-car and body cameras for the District Attorney General’s office.

Commissioners voted 10-1 to send the item back to committee for a discussion that will center on what the larger plan is for more than equipping Memphis Police officers with the cameras.

9. Volkswagen Appealing Ruling Allowing UAW Vote in Tennessee -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Volkswagen is appealing a ruling that allowed a union vote ultimately won by the United Auto Workers at the German automaker's lone U.S. assembly plant in Tennessee.

10. The Week Ahead -

It’s a new week that ends with Music Fest, Memphis! Here’s a roundup of other local happenings you need to know about, from some important government meetings, to corporate earnings reports and a new exhibit set to open at the Memphis Zoo.

11. Editorial: Unlocking the Real Benefits of Regionalism -

It’s easy to say regionalism should be a goal – that the leadership of all of our communities should work together for the common good of the region.

And it’s been said so often that general appeals for regionalism have become meaningless.

12. One-Time Star in Solar Energy, SunEdison Seeks Protection -

NEW YORK (AP) – SunEdison, a one-time star in the alternative energy field, filed for bankruptcy protection Thursday after years of rapid-fire acquisitions left the solar company in a desperate cash situation.

13. Tickled Pink -

MEMPHIS IN BLACK AND WHITE. AND PINK. I’m glad Billy Orgel got engaged at Justine’s because that inspired his family to save it, not because they miss the crystal and crabmeat but because the place is personal.

14. Grizzlies, NBA Preparing for Start of Jersey Sponsorship Era -

Everyone understands what corporate clutter looks like. It’s the NASCAR driver’s racing suit, cap and car, where it seems every square inch has been sold off to sponsors and the athlete becomes part Ricky Bobby.

15. Study: MLB Teams Could Do Better Hiring Minorities, Women -

Major League Baseball teams could do a better job of hiring minority candidates for managing and GM posts or women for VP and other administrative positions, according to an annual report released Wednesday.

16. Rudolph: The Hidden Story -

This column is about Rudolph, the reindeer with the red nose. Or, rather, the literature via which he was created. I heard that it all started in a department store. Could this be true?

After investigation, I can report that Rudolph indeed was the 1939 brain child of a 34-year-old Montgomery Ward copywriter.

17. Dedric Lawson May Give NBA a Look -

After coach Josh Pastner left the University of Memphis for Georgia Tech and before the Tigers had hired Tubby Smith to replace him, forward Dedric Lawson announced he would not test out his NBA Draft prospects and would return to school for his sophomore season.

18. Dedric Lawson May Give NBA a Look -

After coach Josh Pastner left the University of Memphis for Georgia Tech and before the Tigers had hired Tubby Smith to replace him, forward Dedric Lawson announced he would not test out his NBA Draft prospects and would return to school for his sophomore season.

19. Finding a Compromise on the Greensward Issue -

The current debate over the Memphis Zoo’s use of the Greensward for overflow parking is more complex than most realize. Opponents of this usage try to paint a very compelling picture of the Zoo as a massive, profit-driven enterprise which came into Overton Park like an invasive species and has recklessly expanded, gobbling up park land and taking it away from the citizens.

20. Football Tigers Readying For Friday Nights Stripes -

The University of Memphis football team spring practice seasons culminates Friday, April 22, with Friday Night Stripes at Liberty Bowl Memorial Stadium, 335 S. Hollywood St. The Tiger Lane Block Party will kick off the evening’s events, running from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.

21. Sale of Former Memphis Police Headquarters Set for May -

The tours and inspections are done for now. And City Hall’s timeline for selling the circa-1910 Memphis Police headquarters at 128 Adams Ave. is a bit behind schedule.

22. AMC U-Turns; Texting in Theaters Now on 'Cutting Room Floor' -

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Oops. The idea lasted about as long as a Snapchat text: the head of AMC Theatres mulled openly about creating texting-friendly movie theaters to appeal to smartphone-addicted youngsters. Two days later, after a backlash on social media, the company says it's leaving the idea on "the cutting room floor."

23. Lot Availability, Prices Putting Home Construction Behind Demand -

The recent uptick in the residential real estate market is devouring what’s left of lot development that lagged during the recession, and tight supply is raising home prices in the Memphis area.

24. Hamilton & Holliman Bringing Mixed Upscale Housing to South Main -

What was once Downtown’s industrial and rail district is now one of the most densely populated residential neighborhoods in Memphis. Over 2,000 units are under development in the South End, and the current population is expected to double over the next two to three years, according to the Downtown Memphis Commission.

25. This Week in Memphis History: April 15-21 -

2014: Memphis Police Director Toney Armstrong announces he will retire in 2017 and has enrolled in the city’s deferred retirement option plan. The retirement date depends on Memphis Mayor A C Wharton winning re-election in 2015 or Wharton’s successor keeping Armstrong on until retirement.
Wharton loses his re-election bid, and in November 2015, new mayor Jim Strickland names Armstrong interim police director while searching for a replacement. Armstrong left in February to become director of security for St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital.

26. Parkinson: OK to ‘Go A Little Bit Extreme’ to Get Job Done -

With U.S. Marine Corps training, Rep. Antonio Parkinson knows how to grab people’s attention.

He did that earlier this year when he sponsored legislation to kill the Achievement School District, Tennessee’s solution for turning around struggling schools.

27. Murry-Drobot Brings Hope to Domestic Violence Survivors -

For the first seven years of her life, Olliette Murry-Drobot grew up in a home where her father physically abused her mother. It’s a harrowing experience she says she still grapples with.

“Growing up, my sense of the world was that it was a very scary place,” she remembers. “I saw that other kids had a sense of safety, but I was always looking over my shoulder.”

28. Warriors Beat Grizzlies for Record 73rd Win; Now It's the Alamo -

When the Grizzlies nearly beat the Golden State Warriors at FedExForum a few nights ago, falling 100-99, there was that feeling of letting one slip away (and yes, some people believe the officials took it away).

29. Three Decades In, Africa in April Maintains Cultural Focus -

It was 30 years ago that David and Yvonne Acey answered a dilemma from an educators’ conference about levels of learning among African-American students compared to white students.

30. NCAA Tournament Deal With CBS, Turner Extended Through 2032 -

NEW YORK (AP) – With eight years left on their deal to broadcast the NCAA Tournament, CBS and Turner are tacking on another eight.

The extension announced Tuesday goes all the way through 2032. The length of the contract is not unusual for college sports these days, though with the NCAA facing legal challenges on multiple fronts, a lot can change in 16 years.

31. Redbirds Outfielder Tilson Reminds of Cardinals Past -

When Charlie Tilson speaks of the big-league players that have impacted him most, he does so with one eye trained on their past and one eye focused on his future.

“I grew up in Chicago and the guy I loved in 2005 with the White Sox was Scott Podsednik,” said Tilson, in his first year playing center field for the Memphis Redbirds, and a second-round draft pick (79th overall) by the St. Louis Cardinals back in 2011.

32. Last Word: Lipscomb's Successor, MATA School Buses and Roland's Big Breakfast -

Paul Young gets a lot more attention these days than he did when he was the first director of the city-county Office of Sustainability. The attention comes with being the city director of Housing and Community Development where virtually all of the funding comes from the federal government.
That federal funding has changed the face of public housing in the city in the last 25 years. There is only one large public housing project left in the city as a result of the federal funding and its use by Young’s predecessor, Robert Lipscomb.
And what Lipscomb did with the job combined with being the executive director of the Memphis Housing Authority is why a lot of people want to get to know Paul Young these days.
Our centerpiece story by Madeline Faber in Tuesday’s edition makes clear that Young has no desire to wield that kind of power. And it is unlikely anyone in the near future will have the kind of autonomy Lipscomb did.
But beyond that there is still the flow of a lot of federal dollars and Young has some ideas based on his experience in government and finance prior to coming to HCD – everything in government is initials.
It’s a much different experience than Lipscomb’s. Lipscomb coined the phrase “ending public housing as we know it” and at times that slogan wasn’t followed with a lot of detail about what came after public housing was demolished, especially with the first of the projects to fall.
The last public housing project, Foote Homes, will be demolished on Young’s watch which makes his tenure important if more limited than Lipscomb’s tenure.

33. Young Cherishes Role of Rebuilding Memphis Neighborhoods -

“I don’t want to be viewed as the most powerful person in Memphis,” said Paul Young, a Memphis native who became director of Housing and Community Development for the city of Memphis in January.

34. Court Strikes Down Enhanced Sentencing Law for Gang Members -

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – The state Criminal Appeals Court says a Tennessee law that allows longer sentences for gang members is unconstitutional.

The Knoxville News Sentinel reports (http://bit.ly/1WhkgLi) the Thursday ruling came in the case of Devonte Bonds, Thomas Bishop and Jason Sullivan. The three were convicted of attempted second-degree murder for beating Jonathan Dyer when they kicked him out of their gang.

35. 4 Fed Leaders Face Questions About Their Powerful Jobs -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Janet Yellen was put on the spot about whether she made a mistake in raising interest rates in December. Ben Bernanke was quizzed about what it felt like to be called a traitor by the governor of Texas.

36. Georgia Tech Hires Pastner From Memphis to Replace Gregory -

ATLANTA (AP) – Josh Pastner isn't promising a quick fix as Georgia Tech's basketball coach.

37. Grizz Guard Mike Conley Reportedly Out for Season -

Memphis Grizzlies point guard Mike Conley most likely will not return to the court this season, sources told ESPN’s Marc Stein.

38. Editorial: Memphis Police Director Search Needs Better Sense of Urgency -

Sixty-one homicides in 90 days, including a March death that was classified as a homicide by police on the other side of April.

This will likely get worse before it gets better because there is no quick fix.

39. Tigers' Josh Pastner Going to Ga. Tech Would Mean Fresh Start for All -

The sports business is the expectations business. Always. No exceptions.

Josh Pastner, while taking some heat a couple of seasons ago at the University of Memphis, said he was getting out of the expectations business.

40. Senate Refuses to Stop Airlines From Shrinking Seat Sizes -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Senate refused Thursday to come to the aid of airline passengers squeezed by the ever-shrinking size of their seats.

An amendment by Sen. Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., would have blocked airlines from further reducing the "size, width, padding, and pitch" of seats, passengers' legroom and the width of aisles. "It costs you an arm and a leg just to have room for your arms and legs," Schumer said.

41. Fed Minutes Show Officials Wary of April Rate Hike -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Federal Reserve policymakers were split at their last meeting over how to respond to a slowing global economy, with two officials supporting a rate hike in March even as an opposing group felt that even raising rates in April would be too soon.

42. Tennessee AG: Fantasy Sports Contests Are Illegal Gambling -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Tennessee's attorney general has called fantasy sports contests illegal gambling.

Attorney General Herbert Slatery wrote a formal opinion that said fantasy sports betting violates state laws against gambling because participants pay an entry fee to win a prize and a portion of that fee goes to a pot where wins are paid out.

43. Study Launches to Analyze Memphis' Creative Community -

One of the goals of Memphis’ EPIcenter entrepreneurship organization is to make sure the focus and discussions around supporting local entrepreneurs are inclusive and take time to contemplate non-traditional demographics.

44. Travel in a World of Warnings -

In the pre-dawn hours of March 22 I found myself awake and decided to check Facebook on my phone before attempting to go back to sleep.

The first update was from a friend who lives in Paris. Just four months prior, that friend declared herself safe on Facebook following the Nov. 13 terrorist attacks there.

45. Grizzlies End 6-Game Skid With Home Win Over Bulls -

If it had been a football game, you could have called it the Desperation Bowl. The Chicago Bulls and Memphis Grizzlies each badly needed a victory.

Behind 27 points and 10 rebounds from power forward Zach Randolph, the Grizzlies got one and snapped their six-game losing streak by defeating the Bulls 108-92 Tuesday, April 5, at FedExForum.

46. Grizzlies' Mike Conley Reportedly Done for the Season -

Memphis Grizzlies point guard Mike Conley most likely will not return to the court this season, sources told ESPN’s Marc Stein.

47. Memphis Baseball Trusting Young Pitchers -

University of Memphis baseball coach Daron Schoenrock looks at his freshmen pitchers and sees talent and promise, even if at times this season “the moments have been a little big for them.”

48. Last Word: Policing The Greensward, A Rural Oasis and Gene Chips -

The city of Memphis had 88 police staff and other city employees working an Overton Park detail Saturday and another 33 working Sunday on the same detail, according to the Strickland administration’s accounting on Monday.

49. Grizzlies Reeling with Desperate Bulls in Town Tuesday Night -

Guard Bryce Cotton became the 28th player to take the court for the Memphis Grizzlies this season. And if you didn’t know much about Cotton, yet another 10-day contract signee, you’re in good company.

50. Sports Notebook: Cardinals Fall in Opener, Tigers Hold First Football Scrimmage -

The next run the St. Louis Cardinals score in 2016 will be their first. Opening the season on Sunday, April 3, in Pittsburgh the Cardinals dropped a 4-0 decision to the Pirates and struck out 14 times.

51. SPORTS NOTEBOOK: Cardinals Fall in Opener; Tigers Hold First Football Scrimmage -

The next run the St. Louis Cardinals score in 2016 will be their first. Opening the season on Sunday, April 3, in Pittsburgh the Cardinals dropped a 4-0 decision to the Pirates and struck out 14 times.

52. Last Word: Basketball Intervention, Medical Inventory and Memphis in the 1960s -

Five games left for the Grizzlies to win three and then get to play more in the NBA playoffs. And what seemed to be a foregone conclusion is now not such a sure thing based on the Grizz performance in Sunday’s 119-107 loss to the Orlando Magic in Orlando.

53. Greensward Parking Goes To Metal Barricades, Uses Smaller Space Saturday -

The Memphis Zoo used a smaller portion of the Overton Park Greensward Saturday, April 2, in the first set of scheduled events on the Greensward since the Memphis City Council gave the zoo control of a larger portion of the greenspace.

54. Greensward Parking Goes To Metal Barricades, Uses Smaller Space Saturday -

The Memphis Zoo used a smaller portion of the Overton Park Greensward Saturday, April 2, in the first set of scheduled events on the Greensward since the Memphis City Council gave the zoo control of a larger portion of the greenspace.

55. This Week in Memphis History: April 1-7 -

2000: Opening day at AutoZone Park.

1964: Among the new privilege licenses listed in The Daily News: The Hippodrome Lounge at 498 Beale St., a reminder that while the current Beale Street Entertainment District stretches between Second and Fourth streets, over the decades it has taken in land east and west of those current boundaries.

56. Medicare Opens New Push on Hip, Knee Replacement -

WASHINGTON (AP) – From Akron to Tampa Bay, from New York City to San Francisco, Medicare on Friday launches an ambitious experiment changing how it pays for hip and knee replacements in an effort to raise quality and lower costs.

57. For Hobbled Grizzlies, Wins Now Precious As Gemstones -

Red diamonds, a 14th century Ming vase, William Shakespeare’s signature and, of course, the unfiltered Gregg Popovich compliment. Yes, these are among the rarest things on planet earth.

So it was notable when the San Antonio coach directed praise the Grizzlies’ way after the Spurs had defeated them by just six points within the shadow of The Alamo, and before a more thorough 101-87 beating at FedExForum a few nights later.

58. Memphis Presence Helps Turn Tide on Controversial Legislation -

The Tennessee Legislature’s de-annexation debate is over for now. But the bill’s effect on the Memphis-Capitol Hill relationship has left a larger political imprint than the proposal.

That’s saying a lot considering the proposal dealt with the possibility of territory and citizens rearranging the city’s boundaries to put them and the taxes they pay outside the city limits.

59. Last Word: The Curtain Falls in Nashville, Political Cuneiform and Ramsey Talks -

And in less than a half hour Wednesday, the de-annexation drama that should qualify as the political equivalent of a Netflix binge-watchable television series made just for Memphis was done.

60. Don’t Chew With Your Mouth Full -

I am always looking for useful proverbs, adages, mottos, and the like. Especially stuff that can be easily memorized. Like “Don’t chew with your mouth full.” And “I feel a whole lot more like I do now than I did when I got here.”

61. Basar Out in 8th District Race, Luttrell Pulls Petition, Cohen Could Have Easy Ride -

Shelby County Commissioner Steve Basar has called off his plan to run in the crowded Republican primary for the 8th Congressional District, but Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell has pulled his petition to join the same crowded field.

62. New Haslam Spending Proposed for Roads, TennCare, Schools -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Republican Gov. Bill Haslam on Monday proposed new spending on Tennessee roads, TennCare and schools.

The annual budget amendment reflects the governor's priorities for spending about $65 million in savings beyond what was originally projected for the budget year beginning July 1.

63. Tied 4-4 After Scalia's Death, High Court Gives Unions A Win -

WASHINGTON (AP) – In the clearest sign yet of the impact of Justice Antonin Scalia's death, U.S. labor unions scored a major victory Tuesday with a tie vote in a high-profile Supreme Court case they had once seemed all but certain to lose.

64. -

NEWSMAKERS
65. Grizzlies Have No Answers for Machine That Is The Spurs -

To find 31 point and 13 rebounds in the Grizzlies’ locker room, you would have had to gather two or three players together. But in the locker room of the San Antonio Spurs, all those points and rebounds were in one place, in the person of forward LaMarcus Aldridge after the Spurs had defeated the Grizzlies 101-87 on Monday, March 28 at FedExForum.

66. Last Word: Back to Nashville, Dentistry & Genomes and Living The Fable -

The Memphis traffic is again heavy on the Interstate to Nashville as the Senate state and local government committee meets Tuesday to pick up where it left off with the still-forming version the upper chamber is crafting of the de-annexation bill.

67. US Consumer Spending Posts Scant February Increase -

WASHINGTON (AP) – U.S. consumers barely increased their spending in February and spent less in January than the government had earlier estimated. The pullback led some analysts to downgrade their expectations for the economy's growth during the January-March quarter.

68. Greensward Crowd Limits Zoo Overflow Parking -

The first Saturday of the spring in Overton Park drew a crowd on the park Greensward that outnumbered the cars parked on the Greensward.

And the group of several hundred park-goers blocked the overflow zoo parking on the Greensward briefly Saturday, March 26.

69. Sports Notebook: Lynch at Gruden’s QB Camp, Memphis Defense, Cards' Leadoff Hitter -

If you want to see the whole thing, Jon Gruden’s QB Camp with former University of Memphis quarterback Paxton Lynch will air at 11 a.m. on Saturday, April 16, on ESPN. The NFL Draft is April 28-30 in Chicago.

70. Household Spending, Home Building Fuel Modest US Growth -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Consumer spending and home construction are helping sustain modest U.S. economic growth despite problems caused by a strong dollar, low oil prices and an excess of business stockpiles.

71. Born Ready? Grizz Players, Brass Given No Choice -

This is not a Grizzlies season to remember. It is a Grizzlies season impossible to forget.

For fans.

For Chris Wallace, who is living the life of “GM, The Bargain Hunter.”

72. Norvell: Build Relationships, But Lose the Headphones And Hats -

In some respects, it’s all very corny. This whole notion of a football team as a family and relationships being the foundation of everything.

So if you’re suspicious, or at least skeptical, of the talk coming from first-year University of Memphis football coach Mike Norvell as spring practice gets underway, it’s understandable.

73. Bill to Require Background Checks for Buying Guns Killed -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A House subcommittee on Wednesday shot down a bill to require background checks for all gun purchases in Tennessee.

Rep. Mike Stewart, the bill's main sponsor, showed off a military-style carbine that he had bought for $750 in cash with no background check. The Nashville Democrat argued that in-person gun sales should be governed by the same rules as buying firearms from retailers.

74. Bill to End Tennessee Motorcycle Helmet Law Fails in Senate -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A proposal to allow motorcyclists to ride Tennessee roads without safety helmets has been defeated in a Senate committee.

The Finance Committee on Tuesday voted 6-5 against the bill sponsored by Sen. Kerry Roberts. The Springfield Republican argued that ending the helmet law for insured riders who are at least 21 years old would be a boon to tourism in the state.

75. -

NEWSMAKERS
76. TSU President Concerned About Higher-Ed Changes -

I believe it is important to communicate and clarify TSU’s position on the FOCUS (Focus on College and University Success) Act, and dispel any misconceptions regarding our position.

As President of TSU, I am a proud supporter of Governor Bill Haslam’s initiatives, including Drive to 55 and Tennessee Promise. We are not opposed to the FOCUS Act. That is simply not true. However, we have raised some legitimate concerns regarding certain provisions in the FOCUS Act, and the unintended effects on TSU, including faculty, students, and community members. Republican Senator Mark Norris, who is carrying the legislation for the Governor, referred to us as pitiful for raising concerns. We disagree with his misguided statement. There is nothing pitiful about analyzing legislation from all angles to determine its effect on our university. It is pitiful that he would make such an inflammatory comment.

77. Up-Tempo Offense Will Need ‘Nasty’ O-Line -

If all goes well, the attention probably will be on the quarterback – an open competition at the moment – and the receivers and the running backs. That’s just how football works.

But ultimately the success of the University of Memphis offense next season will be about much more than the fast guys and the guy who gets the ball to them. First-year head coach Mike Norvell was offensive coordinator at Arizona State and he has brought with him Chip Long, who will serve as Norvell’s offensive coordinator, and who worked with Norvell from 2012 through 2015.

78. Opposers Fight De-Annexation Another Day -

When the state Senate’s State and Local Government Committee convenes at noon Wednesday, March 21, in Nashville, Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland and his administration will have been working Capital Hill for about a day and a half.

79. De-Annexation Bill Sent Back to Legislative Committee -

The de-annexation bill pending in the Tennessee Legislature was sent back to a Senate committee in Nashville Monday, March 21, after those favoring the bill raised numerous questions about amendments to it.

80. Millionaires: Raise Our Taxes to Address Poverty, Fix Roads -

ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) – More than 40 millionaires, including members of the Rockefeller and Disney families, are asking to have their taxes raised to help address poverty and rebuild failing infrastructure.

81. Apple Releases Small New iPhone, iPad for Business Use -

CUPERTINO, Calif. (AP) – Apple unveiled a small new iPhone, a new iPad tablet for business use and price cuts for its Apple Watch at a product event Monday. The announcements, which were largely expected, aim to keep up the company's commercial momentum in the face of mounting challenges.

82. Sports Notebook: Pastner Needs Assistant With Coaching History -

The University of Memphis decided to go into the next college basketball season with Josh Pastner returning for an eighth year as the Tigers’ coach, per the announcement released by university present M. David Rudd late last week.

83. 1866 Massacre Author Says Riot Has Important Lessons -

When historian Stephen V. Ash went looking for source material on that most difficult of events to piece back together – three days of mob violence in a 19th century Southern city – he expected a challenge.

84. Randolph gets first triple-double in a stunning win over Clippers -

Mike Conley and his sore Achilles were in street clothes on the bench. Zach Randolph, after missing seven straight games with a sore knee, was back in uniform and playing. And playing so well that late in the fourth quarter of the Grizzlies 113-102 victory over the Los Angeles Clippers on Saturday, March 19 at FedExForum, Conley had a secret to share.

85. Education Leaders Question Why Virtual School Remains Open -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – The Legislature's failure to shut down an academically troubled virtual school run by a for-profit corporation has left some education leaders wondering whether Tennessee lawmakers really want to fix schools or have sold out children to powerful special interests.

86. Harris, Towns Hope to Delay Monday De-Annexation Vote -

Memphis Democrats in the Tennessee Legislature are hoping to delay a scheduled Monday, March 21, state Senate floor vote on a deannexation bill that cleared the state House a week ago.

“This train is moving very fast,” Democratic Sen. Lee Harris said Friday, March 18. “The city of Memphis has never made a significant presentation about the city of Memphis’ finances to the relevant committees or to the Senate members,” he added. “Minimally, we need to send this back to committee so that we can have some airing out of what the facts are and what the known consequences are. … Minimally, if you are going to devastate a city, you should know exactly what that means and what you are doing.”

87. Council Working to Build Local Manufacturing for Device Industry -

The medical device industry fuels Memphis’ backbone. With a $2.6 billion local economic impact and nearly 17,000 direct and indirect jobs, original equipment manufacturers like Smith & Nephew, Wright Medical Group, Medtronic Spinal & Biologistics and Microport Orthopedics have made the Memphis area their base for products and medical devices.

88. Five to Watch -

“You can’t live in Memphis without some kind of side hustle, right?” That’s the way former WMC-TV reporter Lauren Squires Ready sees it. Her side hustle, the passion project she’s been pursuing in her free time separate from all the writing, reporting and live shots as an on-air news personality?

89. Applications for Jobless Aid Rise But Stay at Healthy Level -

WASHINGTON (AP) – More Americans applied for unemployment benefits last week, but their numbers remained at low levels consistent with a healthy job market.

THE NUMBERS: The number of people seeking jobless aid rose by 7,000 to a seasonally adjusted 265,000, the Labor Department said Thursday. The less-volatile four-week average rose by 750 to 268,000. The number of people collecting unemployment checks was 2.24 million, down nearly 7 percent from a year earlier. Weekly claims have now been below 300,000 for 54 straight weeks, longest streak since 1973.

90. Clark Butcher is Pedaling to Glory -

It’s 6 a.m. on a rainy Wednesday morning. Outside, the sun has not yet risen. But inside Victory Bicycle Studio, they’re already playing Rihanna. “We’re gonna start with some two-minute openers,” shouts Clark Butcher, over the thump of the music. “I want you at 70 percent of your max. Let’s go!”

91. Porter-Leath's Early Childhood Academy Highlights Collaboration -

The past six years have brought so many changes in kindergarten through 12th-grade education locally and statewide that it is easy to lose track of how different early childhood instruction is in its preparation of children for the next step in their journey.

92. The $10.6 Million Question: Fire Josh Pastner or Keep Him? -

The Hall-of-Fame coach was speaking on ESPN Radio’s “Mike & Mike,” his team sitting on the outside looking in on this year’s NCAA Tournament because of his university’s own imposed ban:

93. Pacific Hires Damon Stoudamire as Basketball Coach -

STOCKTON, Calif. (AP) – University of Memphis assistant coach Damon Stoudamire was hired Wednesday, March 16, as the new coach at the University of the Pacific. Stoudamire, who also played for the Memphis Grizzlies for three seasons (2005-2008) and later served as a Grizzlies assistant coach, was introduced on the Stockton, Calif., campus Wednesday by Pacific's athletic director, Ted Leland.

94. Last Word: Putt and 1969, Fred Smith on Amazon and Ramsey's Departure -

George Howard Putt died in prison sometime last year state prison officials disclosed Wednesday -- far from the brief time he spent in Memphis but never far from the carnage he left behind in the Memphis of 1969.
The bodies of the first two of the five people killed by Putt between Aug. 14 and Sept. 11, 1969 were discovered just days after the murders of actress Sharon Tate and six others in Los Angeles by the Manson family dominated national news coverage. Less than a year earlier the Boston Strangler movie was in theaters, creating a sensation about the murders committed by serial killer Albert DeSalvo in Boston just a few years earlier.
Bernalyn and Roy Dumas were strangled by Putt in their home in Cooper-Young and Putt mutilated her body in a way that police homicide detectives still wouldn’t talk about decades later. The bodies were found in separate rooms.
Even with no details other than the names of the victims, the city was quickly spooked by the double murder. So when the body of Leila Jackson was found short of two weeks later, the city’s reaction was a palpable fear in which anyone unknown was to be avoided. Memphians didn’t tarry after work. They went home and bolted the doors.
It got worse as more victims turned up with little in common other than four of the five were women. They were of varying ages. Some were strangled and some were stabbed.
Just about any magazine rack of the day include true crime magazines that by the late 1960s were beginning to look very dated in their lurid noir-like covers teasing the most sensational crime narratives of the day.
They were an intentional contrast to the cover images of youth in bright colors in natural settings in other magazines heralding a new future and youth culture.
The murders in a Southern city, whose 1969 conservatism is hard to describe nearly 50 years later, quickly grabbed the covers of the true crime magazines. And the images they offered spoke to the scenic reality where Putt roamed even as the murders continued.
Apartment buildings and boarding houses were the settings for some of the murders but not all.
Glenda Sue Harden
was last seen walking to her car parked on the Cobblestones from the insurance office she worked at nearby. Her body was found in Martin Luther King/Riverside Park hidden under a piece of plywood.
At one of the murder scenes, police found an ice pick stuck in the side of the building with a stocking tied around it.
Putt’s last victim, in an apartment building on Bellevue, screamed as she was stabbed repeatedly and others in the building gave chase with police close behind, arresting Putt near the new and unopened section of the interstate that runs west of Bellevue.
Putt tried to force his way into another apartment nearby but the women inside kept him on the other side of the door.
The killer that panicked an entire city was a skinny utterly forgettable guy in his 20s with sideburns and glasses who appeared to have rarely roamed beyond a community of neighborhood bars, boarding houses and old apartment buildings in the Midtown and Medical Center areas.
It turns out he came to Memphis after walking away from a prison farm in Mississippi and into a Memphis that was slowly but surely changing. And the world that Putt encountered would soon vanish in large part.
Overton Square’s incarnation was about a year away. A new bridge was about to be built across the Mississippi River as part of Interstate 40 which was to go through Overton Park just south of the north-south leg of the interstate where Putt was captured.
Originally sentenced to death, Putt’s sentence was commuted when the U.S. Supreme Court banned the death penalty in the early 1970s.
He was serving a 497-year sentence when he died at the Turney Center Wednesday in Only, Tennessee.
Putt never sought parole and never gave any explanation for why he killed five people in less than a month and his apparently random selection of victims.

95. Tennessee Senate Speaker Ramsey Announces He Won't Run Again -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Senate Speaker Ron Ramsey, a leading figure in the Republican takeover of all three branches of Tennessee state government, announced Wednesday that he won't run for re-election.

96. -

NEWSMAKERS
97. My Lucky Break -

During the week of St. Patrick’s Day, luck is on our minds. We may think, “When will I get my lucky break? When will it be my turn?” We may feel overlooked for things like promotions and raises.

98. Sparks Fly In Nashville Over Deannexation -

The Tennessee Legislature’s debate about a proposed deannexation law isn’t a case of Memphis against the rest of the state.

It’s a debate within the Shelby County legislative delegation and with a few exceptions, most of the critics of the measure that would allow referendums to undo annexations that are in some cases 18 years old are Memphis legislators.

99. Last Word: Deannexation, Pastner Past the Season and Chewing Gum and Walking -

The much-discussed deannexation bill in the Tennessee Legislature always had the votes Monday evening in the House with Memphis Democrats succeeding only in delaying the outcome in Nashville by about two hours.
The bill passed by a wide margin after a debate that was for the most part Memphis against the rest of the state starting just outside the city limits with Republicans in the Shelby County legislative delegation.
And there is some dispute between the bill’s sponsor from the Chattanooga area and Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland. Strickland puts the potential loss of tax revenue to the city at $80 million. Rep. Mike Carter says it is more like $27 million.

100. Tennessee House Approves Deannexation Bill -

The Tennessee House approved a deannexation bill Monday, March 14, in a 68-25 vote after an emotional debate and a tide of amendments that were all voted down on the floor.

Republican state Representative Mike Carter of Hamilton County also disputed Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland’s claim that the city of Memphis stands to lose approximately $80 million in sales and property tax revenues.