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Editorial Results (free)

1. Navy Chief Orders Probe into Pacific Fleet After Collisions -

SINGAPORE (AP) — The U.S. Navy ordered a broad investigation Monday into the performance and readiness of the Pacific-based 7th Fleet after an early morning collision between the USS John S. McCain and an oil tanker in Southeast Asian waters left 10 U.S. sailors missing and others injured.

2. West Virginia Governor Has No Plans to Remove Jackson Statue -

CHARLESTON, W.Va. (AP) — West Virginia Gov. Jim Justice is denouncing violence by white supremacists and neo-Nazis in neighboring Virginia but indicates he has no immediate plans to act on requests to remove a statue of Confederate Gen. Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson from the Capitol grounds in Charleston.

3. Avison Young’s Memphis Office Uses Diversified Approach -

Eighteen months ago, real estate brokers Shane Soefker and Jacob Biddle decided they wanted to do things a little differently, so they left their jobs at a local brokerage firm and set off on their own.

4. A Season for Rethinking Options Makes Sense at This Point -

After another first-round playoff exit this spring, a very direct question was put to All-Star center Marc Gasol:

Was he still dedicated to the Grizzlies, to seeing this franchise become the best it can be?

5. Charges Vary In Forrest Statue Arrests as Issue Moves to City Hall -

Only two of the six people arrested on misdemeanor charges Saturday, Aug. 19, during demonstrations at the Nathan Bedford Forrest statue in Health Sciences Park were charged with trying to wrap a banner around the monument and only one of the two was charged with “desecration of a venerated object.”

6. Trump Ousts Bannon, His Influential, Divisive Strategist -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Steve Bannon, the blunt-spoken and divisive strategist who rose from Donald Trump's conservative campaign to a top White House post, was pushed out by the president Friday, capping a turbulent seven months marked by the departure of much of Trump's original senior staff.

7. Comedian, Civil Rights Activist Dick Gregory Dies at 84 -

LOS ANGELES (AP) – Dick Gregory, the comedian and activist and who broke racial barriers in the 1960s and used his humor to spread messages of social justice and nutritional health, has died. He was 84.

8. Former Tiger Joe Jackson Faces Gun, Drug Charges -

Joe Jackson, who played four years for the University of Memphis basketball team after being a standout player for White Station High School, was booked into the Shelby County Jail on Wednesday, Aug. 16, on gun and drug charges.

9. Avison Young’s Memphis Office Finds Strength In Diversified Approach -

Eighteen months ago, real estate brokers Jacob Biddle and Shane Soefker decided they wanted to do things a little differently, so they left their jobs at a local brokerage firm and set off on their own.

10. Memphis Football Extends Ticket Offers to Alumni -

The University of Memphis Athletic Department has announced it will continue a free football season tickets promotion for first-year graduates and has added a new discount ticket program for anyone who graduated from the university in the last four years.

11. Former Tiger Star Joe Jackson Faces Gun and Drug Charges -

Joe Jackson, who played four years for the University of Memphis basketball team after being a standout player for White Station High School, was booked into the Shelby County Jail on Wednesday, Aug. 16, on gun and drug charges.

12. Wolf, Offense Look To Prove Predictions Wrong -

It’s championship or bust for Tennessee senior tight end Ethan Wolf.

Bowl victories are nice. So are nine-win seasons. But Wolf wants a lot more in his final season with the Vols.

“Our goal here at Tennessee every single year is to win a championship, and that’s going to remain the goal,” Wolf says. “Yeah, there may have been a little bit of excitement the first year, maybe the second year winning the bowl game. It’s always exciting, but that’s the bare minimum right now.”

13. Report: Higher Premiums If Trump Halts 'Obamacare' Subsidies -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Premiums for a popular type of individual health care plan would rise sharply, and more people would be left with no insurance options if President Donald Trump makes good on his threat to stop "Obamacare" payments to insurers, the Congressional Budget Office says.

14. Express Scripts to Limit Opioids; Doctors Concerned -

ST. LOUIS (AP) – The nation's largest pharmacy benefit manager will soon limit the number and strength of opioid drugs prescribed to first-time users as part of a wide-ranging effort to curb an epidemic affecting millions of Americans.

15. Mayor's Office Says Confederate Monument Protesters Asking City To Break Law -

Jefferson Davis was surrounded this week, first by a group of more than 100 citizens seeking to remove his statue from Memphis Park and then by police after the Tuesday, Aug. 15, protest.

The gathering, heavy with religious leaders, was coordinated by several groups that have been active about various community issues the past year and a half and pursuing the removal of Confederate monuments.

16. Prayer Circle Demands Removal of Confederate Statues, Vows to Continue Protests -

More than 100 citizens including local religious leaders called Tuesday, Aug. 15, for the city and state to remove statues of Confederate leader Jefferson Davis and Confederate general, slave trader and Ku Klux Klan Grand Wizard Nathan Bedford Forest from city parks.

17. Biz Leaders Quit Trump Panel After Charlottesville Comments -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A fourth business leader resigned Tuesday from President Donald Trump's White House jobs panel – the latest sign that corporate America's romance with Trump is faltering after his initial half-hearted response to violence by white supremacists in Charlottesville, Virginia.

18. Interest High in Fairgrounds Fast Track -

The shorter, more compressed drive to a Fairgrounds redevelopment plan feels, at the outset, more certain and much less tentative than versions that surfaced during the administrations of previous mayors Willie Herenton and A C Wharton.

19. Last Word: Night in the Park, Hattiloo Goes Bigger & Cohen on the Republican Soul -

A gathering in Health Science Park a little before 11:30 Monday evening by a group of protesters who Facebooked that their intent was to take down the statue of Nathan Bedford Forrest. Memphis Police showed up quickly and the police supervisor told those around the statue that the park is a private park and that no one can be in the park after 8 p.m. No arrests but the police did ask for identification from those in the park.

20. New Life for Medicaid After GOP's Health Care Debacle -

WASHINGTON (AP) – It may not equal Social Security and Medicare as a "third rail" program that politicians touch at their own risk, yet Medicaid seems to have gotten stronger after the Republican failure to pass health care legislation.

21. Trump Names Hate Groups, Denouncing Charlottesville Violence -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Under relentless pressure, President Donald Trump on Monday named and condemned "repugnant" hate groups and declared that "racism is evil" in a far more forceful statement than he'd made earlier after deadly, race-fueled weekend clashes in Charlottesville, Virginia.

22. Number of Tenn. Seniors Hospitalized Due to Opioids Triples -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Federal data shows the number of senior citizens in Tennessee who are hospitalized due to painkillers has more than tripled over the last decade.

The Tennessean reports the U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality data showed that in 2005, 467 seniors out of every 100,000 spent time in the hospital due to opioids. In 2015, the rate had increased to 1,505.

23. Memphis Lands National Cyclocross Race -

USA Cycling has chosen Memphis to be a part of its national Cyclocross racing series for the 2017-18 season.

On Saturday, Sept. 30 and Sunday, Oct. 1, Shelby Farms Park will host the Tri-Star CX race, part of the American Cyclocross Calendar, where competitive cyclists from across the nation will take their wheels to a new pro-level course.

24. Airline Worker Tracks Down Cancer Patient's Bag, Delivers It -

PITTSBURGH (AP) – A cancer patient says a Southwest Airlines employee went above and beyond to help track down her missing luggage that contained important medication. 

Stacy Hurt says she called customer service July 23 at Pittsburgh International Airport after her luggage failed to arrive on a flight from Nashville. The bag contained medication that helps her with the side effects of chemo for her colon cancer. It also had sentimental items like a rosary and a lucky T-shirt.

25. Getting Started -

Every journey of a thousand miles begins with that first single step. Every song, that first note; every long-lasting relationship can trace back to that first hello.

The countless business startups in Memphis, many maturing thanks to the city’s myriad accelerators and entrepreneurship programs, likewise all unfold the same way. They all start, no pun intended, with that first idea that leads to the creation of an enterprise – hopefully a successful, money-making one.

26. Postal Service: More Red Ink, Missed Payments as Mail Slumps -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The U.S. Postal Service warned Thursday that it will likely default on up to $6.9 billion in payments for future retiree health benefits for the fifth straight year, citing a coming cash crunch that could disrupt day-to-day mail delivery.

27. It's Not Delivery. It's DiGiorno Pizza ... Spilled on I-30 -

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) – Arkansas highway officials shut down westbound lanes of a cross-country interstate for four hours so crews could pick up pizza.

An 18-wheeler containing DiGiorno and Tombstone frozen pizzas scraped a bridge support and sliced open its trailer Wednesday, spilling the pies across Interstate 30 in front of the Arkansas Department of Transportation office just south of Little Rock.

28. Prosecutor: Police Justified in Shooting of Arkansas Teen -

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) – A black teenager pointed a BB gun that looked like a handgun at police before he was fatally shot by officers outside an emergency youth center in eastern Arkansas, a prosecutor said in announcing no charges would be filed against the officers.

29. Kelly, Legacy Teammates Ready for Final Season With Vols -

Todd Kelly Jr. can’t believe it’s his last hoorah. The senior safety from Webb School of Knoxville enters his final season at Tennessee with thoughts of how it all started in fall of 2014.

30. Under First-Year Manager Stubby Clapp, Redbirds Maximize Winning Formula -

Over the last quarter-century in the game, Stubby Clapp has learned many things. One is that the baseball gods do not believe in championships as entitlements.

“It doesn’t matter what level,” said Clapp, 44, and in his first year as manager of the Memphis Redbirds, “it’s a special achievement.”

31. The King's Castle: Graceland, Whitehaven open 40th anniversary Elvis Week -

It begins with a trivia contest and a sock hop. Those are the first two events Friday, Aug. 11, at the top of a crowded Elvis Week itinerary that marks 40 years since Elvis Presley died at Graceland.

32. Last Word: Bakery Questions, Komen Name Change and the Price of A Run For Gov. -

City Hall opens a set of four public meetings on the Fairgrounds Thursday evening at 5 p.m. at the Salvation Army Kroc Center to start the movement again toward another master plan for Fairgrounds redevelopment. And it’s hard to tell at the outset what this will look like because there are so many possibilities. There are also so many fault lines in these discussions.

33. Postal Service May Get More Freedom To Raise Stamp Prices -

WASHINGTON (AP) – It may be time to stock up on Forever stamps.

Regulators appear likely to accept the financially beleaguered Postal Service's request for more freedom to raise the price of mailing letters. It would be the biggest change in the Postal Service's pricing system in nearly a half-century, allowing stamp prices to rise beyond the rate of inflation.

34. A Million Reasons Not to Jump Into the Tennessee Governor’s Race -

Republican gubernatorial candidate Mae Beavers is banking on the idea wealthy candidates won’t be able to buy voters in 2018.

35. Memphis Runners Grind at Boston Marathon and Beyond -

For runners, the Boston Marathon is about as sacred as a pilgrimage to Mecca for Muslims, or a trip to the Vatican for Catholics. Participants are venerated as somewhat divine among their comrades, and qualifying assuages any doubts about their right to claim the title “runner” when describing themselves to outsiders.

36. Arkansas Farmers Optimistic Despite Floods -

JONESBORO, Ark. (AP) – While spring floods left many rice farmers with fewer acres of rice than they originally planned, they're hopeful a rising market can offset at least some of the lost acreage.

37. Tensions of Density -

With hundreds of units already announced and all signs indicating there are more to come, the Midtown apartment market is primed to explode.

But when it comes to development, it’s no secret that Midtown residents can be fiercely protective.

38. Hacker Who Helped Stop Global Cyberattack Arrested in US -

LAS VEGAS (AP) – Marcus Hutchins, a young British researcher credited with derailing a global cyberattack in May, was arrested for allegedly creating and distributing malicious software designed to collect bank-account passwords, U.S. authorities said Thursday.

39. Jobless Rate Raises Question: How Much Better Can It Get? -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A drop in the unemployment rate to a 16-year low raises a tantalizing question about the job market: How much better can it get?

Earlier this year, economists worried that the low unemployment rate meant businesses would struggle to find workers and that would drag down the pace of hiring. Those fears were heightened by a tiny job gain in March and modest hiring in May.

40. Bill Lee Names Former GOP Chair to Run Tennessee Gov Bid -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Businessman Bill Lee has hired former Tennessee Republican Party Chairman Chris Devaney to run his gubernatorial campaign.

Lee also announced that Tony Niknejad will serve as policy director, Caroline Davidson will join the campaign's finance team and that Majority Strategies will run the campaign's direct mail efforts.

41. 2 Quarterbacks Are Seldom Better Than 1 -

The old adage holds that if you have two quarterbacks you really have none. Are you listening, Butch Jones?

Jones continues to send signals that Tennessee may proceed with a plan to use both junior Quinten Dormady and redshirt freshman Jarrett Guarantano in the opener against Georgia Tech. If the two-quarterback system is successful, the Vols could continue to play both in subsequent games.

42. Prolific Memphis Offense From 2016 Could Be Even Better in 2017 -

Wide receiver Anthony Miller is holding a football, says he just picked it up in the equipment room. Which is a little surprising because the usual way a football gets in Miller’s hands is for quarterback Riley Ferguson to throw it to him.

43. Cordova Apartment Community Sells for $27.9M -

The Charleston, a 284-unit apartment community on the east side of Houston Levee Road just south of U.S. 64, has sold for $27.9 million, marking a new chapter for a property that was built just last year.

44. Strickland Reopens Fairgrounds Redevelopment Planning -

By the end of the year, the administration of Mayor Jim Strickland plans to have a specific enough plan for Fairgrounds redevelopment to take an application for a Tourism Development Zone to state officials for approval.

45. TCAT Students See the Future, Get Prepared -

Bryan Rippy, 38, chuckles when he says he’s in the prime of his life. But sharpening his skills is no laughing matter, and he understands the importance of raising his value in the job market.

46. Kustoff: Window for Congressional Tax Reform Narrow -

When the House and Senate return to Washington from the August recess, the clock will be ticking on a tax-reform proposal that is a Republican priority.

And U.S. Rep. David Kustoff of Germantown says time is of the essence with 53 legislative days left in the year, as midterm election considerations in 2018 will make a tax-cut bill he and other Republicans favor more unlikely.

47. Leftover Opioids are a Common Dilemma for Surgery Patients -

CHICAGO (AP) – Surgery patients often end up with leftover opioid painkillers and store the remaining pills improperly at home, a study suggests.

The research raises concerns about overprescribing addictive medicine that could end in the wrong hands.

48. 3 of 4 Charged in Arkansas Day Care Van Death Enter Pleas -

MARION, Ark. (AP) – Three of four women charged with manslaughter in the death of a 5-year-old boy who was left in a day care van in Arkansas have pleaded not guilty.

Online court records show Felicia Phillips, Wanda Taylor and Kendra Washington pleaded not guilty on Monday in Crittenden County Circuit Court in Marion.

49. US Rep. Duncan Says He Won't Run for Re-Election Next Year -

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Longtime U.S. Rep. John Duncan said Monday that he will not run for re-election next year because he wants to spend more time with his family.

50. Tennessee Experts Spar Over Prison Terms for Juveniles -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – There is wide disagreement in Tennessee on whether the state is violating recent U.S. Supreme Court decisions banning mandatory life-without-parole sentences for offenders under 18. That's because judges and juries have a choice in sentencing, but that choice is between life in prison or life with the possibility of parole after serving 51 years – which one leading advocate calls cruel.

51. Marching Band to NFL: Vanderbilt Doctor’s Unlikely Path -

When the NFL sought a worthy selection for the first chief medical officer in league history, it turned its eyes to Vanderbilt University Medical Center.

In hiring Dr. Allen Sills earlier this year, the league brought on a whirlwind of intelligence and energy with a lengthy curriculum vitae.

52. City Council Members Express Uncertainty, Doubt Over Instant Runoff Voting -

Memphis City Council chairman Berlin Boyd questions why there should be runoff elections for the seven single-member district seats of the council.

Boyd made the comment as he and other council members continued to react to plans by the Shelby County Election Commission to implement Instant Runoff Voting, or Ranked Choice Voting (RCV), starting with the 2019 city elections.

53. Alexander, Corker Look Beyond ‘Skinny Repeal’; Cohen Rant Goes Viral -

Tennessee’s two U.S. senators see the failure of the “skinny repeal” health care bill in the Senate as a missed opportunity.

Lamar Alexander and Bob Corker both supported the measure, along with all but three of the rest of the Republican majority in the Senate. But the bill that would have repealed Obamacare without an immediate replacement and which Republicans senators didn’t want the House to approve and send to President Donald Trump fell short of passage with only 49 votes.

54. Alexander, Corker Look Beyond ‘Skinny Repeal’; Cohen Rant Goes Viral -

Tennessee’s two U.S. senators see the failure of the “skinny repeal” health care bill in the Senate as a missed opportunity.

Lamar Alexander and Bob Corker both supported the measure, along with all but three of the rest of the Republican majority in the Senate. But the bill that would have repealed Obamacare without an immediate replacement and which Republicans senators didn’t want the House to approve and send to President Donald Trump fell short of passage with only 49 votes.

55. A ‘Life-Changing’ Trip To Vietnam for Midstate Vols -

Nashville’s Kyle Phillips never knew how good he had it as a University of Tennessee football player. Not until he went to Vietnam with The VOLeaders Academy for a 13-day study with numerous other student-athletes from UT. They left June 29 and returned two weeks later.

56. Memphian Donald Gray’s Journey To Being MSU’s No. 1 Receiver -

When Donald Gray was just a boy, not yet 10 years old, he played in a church basketball league. His father, Donald Gray Sr., remembers that his son had a good time playing with the other kids. It was fun, something to do.

57. Redbirds Revitalization: Fun at the Old Ballpark and the Winning is Easy -

Bottom of the seventh inning and another night at AutoZone Park is unfolding the way so many have this season. The Memphis Redbirds have a nice lead. Their starting pitcher has been putting up zeros and the team has been banging out timely hits and playing crisp defense.

58. Gillette Out, ServiceMaster to Spin Off Unit -

To Memphians, Rob Gillette is the ServiceMaster Global Holdings Inc. leader who moved the company’s headquarters from East Memphis to Downtown and put the old Peabody Place Mall back in use.

59. Brain Disease Seen in Most Football Players in Large Report -

CHICAGO (AP) – Research on 202 former football players found evidence of a brain disease linked to repeated head blows in nearly all of them, from athletes in the National Football League, college and even high school.

60. Jailed Volkswagen Exec to Plead Guilty in US Diesel Scandal -

DETROIT (AP) – A German Volkswagen executive who has been in a Michigan jail for months plans to plead guilty in the company's U.S. emissions scandal, a court spokesman said Tuesday.

Oliver Schmidt, former manager of a VW engineering office in suburban Detroit, will appear in federal court on Aug. 4. His lawyers disclosed the plan during a brief conference with a judge, spokesman David Ashenfelter said.

61. Juvenile Court Oversight Issue Spills Into Larger Criminal Justice Reform Debate -

Talking Monday, July 24, about criminal justice reform, Juvenile Court Judge Dan Michael mentioned the formal written request he, Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell and Sheriff Bill Oldham made to U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions in June to end Justice Department oversight of the court.

62. Promising 'A Better Deal,' Democrats Try to Rebrand Party -

BERRYVILLE, Va. (AP) – Promising "A Better Deal" for American workers, Democratic Party leaders rolled out a new agenda with a populist pitch on Monday as they sought to bounce back from their losses in November and look ahead to the 2018 midterms.

63. Binghampton, Frayser Retail Projects Look To Lift Communities -

They say retail is a numbers game, and for some communities, when those numbers don’t add up they can get left behind by developers.

That’s why the Binghampton Gateway and Frayser Gateway – a pair of retail projects in different areas and stages of development – hope to send a message that overlooked communities have more to offer than just numbers.

64. Task Force Experiences Beale Crowd Late Saturday -

Among the thousands of people on Beale Street Saturday night after 11 p.m. were three Memphis City Council members and six Beale Street Task Force members.

The nine took in some of the late night revelry, stopping at several nightspots. But for the most part, they paid close attention to the entertainment district’s recently modified cover charge and the five checkpoints to enter and exit Beale Street on Saturday evenings in the spring and summer.

65. Michael Calls Out Juvenile Court Critics -

Memphis-Shelby County Juvenile Court Judge Dan Michael acknowledged Monday, July 24, that the court still has a problem with disproportionate minority contact. That is African-American youth who not only show up in the court more often than white youth, but get disproportionately harsher punishments and are more likely to be transferred for trial as adults than white children charged with the same offenses.

66. Michael Talks About Move to End Federal Oversight of Juvenile Court -

Memphis-Shelby County Juvenile Court Judge Dan Michael acknowledged Monday, July 24, that the court still has a problem with disproportionate minority contact. That is African-American youth who not only show up in the court more often than white youth, but get disproportionately harsher punishments and are more likely to be transferred for trial as adults than white children charged with the same offenses.

67. New Local Democratic Party Council Features Lots of New Faces -

Shelby County Democrats selected 102 citizens Saturday, July 22, to the local party’s new Democratic Grass Roots Council and 26 of those 102 to the local party’s executive committee in a local party convention at Mississippi Boulevard Christian Church.

68. Spicer Abruptly Resigns as Trump Press Secretary -

WASHINGTON (AP) — White House press secretary Sean Spicer abruptly resigned his position Friday, ending a rocky six-month tenure that made his news briefings defending President Donald Trump must-see TV. He said Trump's White House "could benefit from a clean slate."

69. FreezeFalling … Ole Miss Coach Exits in Disgrace -

A week before Hugh Freeze resigned his position, he stood at the podium at SEC Media Days, Ole Miss pin on his suit lapel, and delivered his last Sermon on the Mount.

70. Binghampton, Frayser Retail Projects Could Lift Respective Neighborhoods -

They say retail is a numbers game, and for some communities, when those numbers don’t add up they can get left behind by developers.

That’s why the Binghampton Gateway and Frayser Gateway – a pair of retail projects in different areas and stages of development – hope to send a message that overlooked communities have more to offer than just numbers.

71. Venezuela Strike Erupts Into Sporadic Violence -

CARACAS, Venezuela (AP) — A nationwide strike against plans to rewrite the constitution shut down much of Venezuelan's capital Thursday before erupting into sporadic violence when protesters clashed with riot police and burned a post office near the headquarters of the main state-run broadcaster.

72. Vols Roster Gets Little Respect from SEC Media -

It was no surprise last week when Tennessee’s football team was picked to finish third by the media in the East Division at 2017 SEC Media Days.

Almost every national publication is picking the Vols third in the East behind Georgia and Florida, although not necessarily in that order.

73. Jeremiah Martin: No Rest for The Memphis Tigers’ Weary Point Guard -

Forget the ugly recent past. Forget the final 19-13 record and surely forget those last two games of the season – the 103-62 humiliation at SMU and the 84-54 beat down from UCF at the American Athletic Conference Tournament.

74. Mock Election In ‘19 Could Test Ranked Choice Voting -

The Shelby County Election Commission could hold a public mock election of what is called Ranked Choice Voting in 2019, ahead of city of Memphis elections that year.

But the earliest the election commission could move to new machines that would provide such an option is the 2022 elections, says Shelby County Elections Administrator Linda Phillips. And that’s provided the state certifies the use of a voting system that includes the option, which it currently doesn’t.

75. Political Differences Endure After $4.11 Shelby County Tax Rate Compromise -

Shelby County commissioners were still calculating Monday, July 17, after they passed a compromised, $4.11 county property tax rate that appears will stay put long enough for the commission to take a final vote Wednesday at a special meeting.

76. Blight More Than Out-of-State LLCs -

The prominent role investors play in buying single-family homes in Memphis to rent them out is part of the city’s significant problem with blight.

But there are some property owners who live here who don’t even know that their loved one who died recently made them a property owner.

77. ‘Fifth Wave’ of Federal Judicial Appointments Comes with Political Undercurrents -

The White House called it the “fifth wave” of federal judicial nominees. Among the 11 nominees announced by President Donald Trump Thursday, July 13, were two for the Memphis federal court bench. And the wave comes with a few political undercurrents.

78. Tennessee Comptroller's Office Website Briefly Hacked -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – The website of the Tennessee comptroller's office was hacked into and a message was put up by a group claiming to be the Moroccan Islamic Union-Mail.

According to WSMV-TV , the comptroller's office said its website was defaced at 9:30 a.m. Friday for about a half-hour. The comptroller's office has temporarily pulled its website offline and nothing was compromised.

79. Tennessee Democrat Mackler Raises $451K in US Senate Bid -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Nashville attorney and former Army helicopter pilot James Mackler says he has raised $451,000 in his Democratic bid for the U.S. Senate.

Mackler's campaign says the total accounts for all fundraising since launching his 2018 campaign for Sen. Bob Corker's seat on April 17.

80. Toxins in Water Under Memphis Power Plant Causing Alarm -

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) – Memphis residents are as proud of their sweet-tasting water as their barbecue and blues. The water – drawn from the Memphis Sand aquifer beneath this Tennessee city – is so revered that a city utility called it a "community treasure" in an online report on its cleanliness.

81. On National Summer Learning Day, Memphis Takes Stock of Programs for Kids -

When it comes to summer learning, it’s been a better year for Memphis, where a range of new programs have helped to stem learning loss that hits hard in communities with a high number of low-income students.

82. Audit: Memphis AD Had Conflict in Pastner Deal -

A state audit notes that Memphis athletic director Tom Bowen had a conflict of interest while renegotiating former basketball coach Josh Pastner’s contract in 2013 because they had the same agent at the time.

83. Summer in the City -

Saturday night on Beale Street is more than a catch phrase for businesses there.

It is chapters in old, out-of-print books like Lt. George W. Lee’s “Where The Blues Began” that you can only see in the Memphis-Shelby County Room of the Central Library. You can’t check the book out because of its rarity and age. But you can also find references to the lore of Saturday nights on Beale Street on plaques in the entertainment district that current patrons walk past without even noticing.

84. Life is Where You Live -

In our USAToday, we woke up here. We’ve all heard former Speaker Tip O’Neill’s grammatically flawed truism, “All politics is local.”

So is life, Mr. Speaker, and it deserves to be covered locally.

85. National Title is Success for Alabama, Not Other SEC Teams -

HOOVER, Ala. – They play in the same conference, but in different worlds. Alabama defines success as winning a national championship.

The rest of the Southeastern Conference?

If they’re honest, those teams now define success as how close they can come to Nick Saban and the Crimson Tide. They define success with the knowledge that there is the preeminent program in college football – winners of four national titles since 2009 and only a play away in 2016 – and then there are the other 13 teams in the SEC.

86. Visa Looking to Help Small Businesses Go Cashless -

NEW YORK (AP) – Visa is looking to push more small businesses into updating their digital payment technology, offering up to $10,000 each to 50 U.S.-based small business owners that are committed to going cashless.

87. Legislature Losing Some Powerful, Familiar Members -

A shakeup in leadership is looming for the state Legislature, though it may portend more of a change in personalities than party strength.

In the House, longtime Rep. Craig Fitzhugh, the affable Democrat from Ripley in West Tennessee, is preparing for a 2018 gubernatorial run, a move that would knock him out of his House seat, at least temporarily, and the position as Democratic Caucus leader.

88. Yellen Tells Congress to Expect More Rate Hikes -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen told Congress on Wednesday that the central bank expects to keep raising a key interest rate at a gradual pace and also plans to start trimming its massive bond holdings this year.

89. Audit: Memphis AD Had Conflict During Pastner Negotiation -

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) – A state audit notes that Memphis athletic director Tom Bowen had a conflict of interest while renegotiating former basketball coach Josh Pastner's contract in 2013 because they had the same agent at the time.

90. Bielema Sees Progress on Targeting Rule; Open Door at Tennessee for Fulmer -

HOOVER, ALA. – Arkansas coach Bret Bielema understands as well as anyone that football and the risk of severe injury can’t be separated. Running back Rawleigh Williams gained more than 1,300 yards last year. But he suffered a second neck injury in this year’s spring game and decided, after consulting with doctors, to retire from the game.

91. Interim Leadership: Blessing or Curse? -

One of the biggest changes within the life of a nonprofit is the change in leadership. In most cases, this will be accompanied by a period of transition with an interim leader.

The position is short-term and in most cases temporary. We have seen interims who serve as placeholders or caretakers. Others are innovators. Some are turn-around leaders. Others are brought in explicitly to “clean house.”

92. Peaceful Bridge Anniversary Protests Draw Moving Police Presence -

A heavy but moving and shifting Memphis Police presence responded Sunday, July 9, to a set of peaceful protests and gatherings on the first anniversary of the protest that shut down the Hernando DeSoto Bridge across the Mississippi River.

93. Patterson Resignation Comes as Council Examines DMC’s Role -

Terence Patterson exited the Downtown Memphis Commission last week as the Memphis City Council is about to discuss replacing or restructuring not only the DMC, but the Riverfront Development Corp.

94. McCalla Keeps Police Surveillance Lawsuit -

A Memphis federal judge has dropped four citizens as plaintiffs in a lawsuit alleging the city violated a 1978 federal consent decree barring police from conducting surveillance of protesters, saying the citizens don’t have standing.

95. McCalla Keeps Police Surveillance Lawsuit, Drops Protester Plaintiffs -

A Memphis Federal Judge has dropped four citizens from a lawsuit alleging the city violated a 1978 federal consent decree barring police from conducting surveillance of protesters saying they don’t have standing.

96. Fed Debating When to Unwind $4.5 Trillion in Bond Holdings -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Federal Reserve is figuring out when to start unloading much of its $4.5 trillion in bond holdings – a major turning point for an economy still healing from the 2008 financial crisis.

97. Micromanaging Nashville is Job 1 for Legislature -

Metro Nashville is used to getting hammered by the Legislature’s Republicans.

Nearly every time the Metro Council tries to come up with a solution to growing problems, conservatives in the General Assembly swoop in and save the rest of the state from Music City’s attempts to better handle its success.

98. Morris Recalls Brother’s Violent Death and Rage -

“Actually, the truth has never been told,” Charlie Morris said this week as he talked about the violent death of his brother 78 years ago in Arlington. Morris, now 96 years old, had family and friends gathered around him at the Memphis Branch NAACP headquarters Monday, July 3, as he marked the new state law that could reopen the investigation into the death of Jessie Lee Bond and other cold cases from the long arc of the civil rights movement.

99. When You Thought It Wasn’t Personal -

A reader recently wrote to me with a unique situation. They landed an impressive contract position. Everything was going along great for 11 months until one day, they were let go. The company laid off a large number of people all at the same time. After soliciting feedback, the reader was given a good review and sent on their way.

100. Memphis 3.0 Effort Gets to Basic Facts -

Putting together the city’s first long-term comprehensive development plan since the 1980s is proving to be about covering a lot of the same material at public meetings.

Before a standing-room-only crowd Thursday, June 29, at the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art, Ashley Cash, the comprehensive planning administrator for the city, dutifully covered how the city is going about putting together the Memphis 3.0 plan that will debut in 2019. The emphasis is on letting those at the meeting know the city wants input from them and people they know. And the appeal can’t be made too often.