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Editorial Results (free)

1. Former Deputy Governor, Hamilton County Mayor Dies -

CHATTANOOGA, Tenn. (AP) – Claude Ramsey, a former Tennessee lawmaker, deputy governor and Hamilton County mayor, has died. He was 75.

2. Dogtopia, Urban Air To Open in Collierville -

Carriage Crossing Market Place, on East Shelby Drive in Collierville, has signed leases with two new tenants, Dogtopia and Urban Air Adventure Park, according to landlord Jim Wilson & Associates LLC.

3. Events -

Circuit Playhouse will present the regional premiere of “Stupid F#!&ing Bird” Friday, April 20, through May 13 at 51 S. Cooper St. Visit playhouseonthesquare.org for times and tickets.

4. Pruitt Brings Fresh, Quieter Approach To Football Practice -

I find the culture shift of Tennessee football under new head coach Jeremy Pruitt this spring to be refreshing.

5. Walker Named President Of Black Swan Digital Forensics -

Jim Walker has been named president of Memphis-based Black Swan Digital Forensics, the only forensics lab in the U.S. that focuses exclusively on data recovery from digital devices such as cellphones, vehicle systems, computers and social media accounts. Walker comes to Black Swan after more than 30 years of military and public service at the federal, state and local level, including eight years as Alabama’s director of homeland security and more than 20 years in the U.S. Army, where he was an Airborne Ranger and retired as a lieutenant colonel.

6. Nomination Deadline For Dunavant Awards Feb. 1 -

Memphis is lucky to have an abundance of residents with a passion for public service and it is time once again to honor their commitment to improving this community.

Each year the Rotary Club of Memphis East recognizes the importance of public service by hosting the Dunavant Public Servant Awards.

7. Legislature Moving on Civil Rights Cold Cases -

Charlie Morris may be nearing 100 years of age, but he’s never given up on his quest for Tennessee to delve into decades-old civil rights crimes.

8. Dunavant Awards Spotlight Public Servants -

Being a public servant often is thankless job, but each year the Rotary Club of Memphis East recognizes the importance of public service to the community by hosting the Dunavant Public Servant Awards.

9. Final Goodbye: Roll Call of Some Who Died in 2017 -

They made music that inspired legions of fans. Rock 'n' roll founding fathers Chuck Berry and Fats Domino, rockers Tom Petty and Gregg Allman, grunge icon Chris Cornell, country superstar Glen Campbell and jazz great Al Jarreau were among the notable figures who died in 2017, leaving a void in virtually every genre of music.

10. Black Theater Museum Plan Gets Good Reviews at City Hall -

For about five months, Hattiloo Theatre founder Ekundayo Bandele had been working on the idea he proposed Tuesday, Dec. 19, to establish the National Black Theater Museum inside the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art building in Overton Park.

11. Retired FedEx Exec Rodriguez Becomes City of Memphis CIO -

Mike Rodriguez recently became the city of Memphis’ director of information services and chief information officer, a role he took on after retiring from a 27-year career at FedEx Corp. Rodriguez, who most recently served as FedEx’s director of information security, was nominated as city CIO by Mayor Jim Strickland and confirmed by the Memphis City Council Sept. 23.

12. UCLA’s Prolific QB Rosen Will Test Tigers D -

In Week 1, UCLA quarterback Josh Rosen rallied his team from 34 points down to defeat Texas A&M 45-44. It was the second-largest comeback win in FBS history.

Last week in the Bruins’ 56-23 victory over Hawaii, Rosen hit on 22 of 25 passes for 359 yards and five touchdowns. Excluding a one-play drive before halftime, UCLA scored on its first seven offensive possessions.

13. Last Word: The Amazon Competition, Millington Shelters and Grizz Ownership Drama -

With a social media post Thursday morning, Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland said the city is ready to compete in a very public competition for the $5-billion second North American headquarters Amazon.com announced earlier Thursday. Some context here. The $5 billion investment by Amazon in what it calls HQ2 compares to the $9 billion St. Jude is investing in its expansion including about $1 billion in capital costs and the rest research, technology and other development costs included in what is more than a physical expansion.

14. ‘Divisive Symbols’: Mississippi Case Offers Hope for Forrest Bust Removal -

State Sen. Lee Harris is encouraged by the U.S. Supreme Court’s request for the state of Mississippi to respond to a lawsuit seeking to remove the Confederate battle flag from its state flag.

15. Grizzlies’ Grind City Media Expands Into Football Coverage -

Last September, the Memphis Grizzlies launched their new in-house digital news and information platform: Grind City Media.

Now, Grind City Media is trying to drive that initiative farther down the field, as it were, by adding college football coverage.

16. State Panel Sheds New Light on Racial Atrocities -

State Rep. Johnnie Turner has seen what can happen when old wounds are never allowed to heal.

She’s seen it most recently in clashes between neo-Nazis, Ku Klux Klansmen and white supremacists and those who resisted their hatred in Charlottesville, Virginia, where a counter-protester was killed and 19 were injured when a car was intentionally driven into a group of counter protesters. Two state troopers also died in a helicopter crash that weekend.

17. The Week Ahead: Aug. 14-20 -

Hello, Memphis! School was the big opening last week, but this week it’s the majestic Crosstown Concourse, the 1.5 million-square-foot tower on Cleveland Street at North Parkway. It is hosting a six-hour extravaganza of tours, music, food and the arts. Check out the details, plus more Elvis Week events and other need-to-know happenings in The Week Ahead...

18. Last Word: Don McMinn, Frayser's Recovery and The Clean Line -

Back in the late 1970s when Beale Street was still rotting and behind chain link fences and Downtown Memphis was in recovery in every sense of the word, there was a poster of Don McMinn standing in front of the statue of W.C. Handy on Beale with his back to the camera spreading open the raincoat he was wearing in Handy’s direction. The caption was something about exposing the world to the blues. That’s not the only image that comes to mind of those times with word Sunday that McMinn has died.

19. Last Word: Don McMinn, Frayser's Recovery and The Clean Line -

Back in the late 1970s when Beale Street was still under construction and Downtown Memphis was in recovery in every sense of the word, there was a poster of Don McMinn standing in front of the statue of W.C. Handy on Beale with his back to the camera spreading open the raincoat he was wearing in Handy’s direction. The caption was something about exposing the world to the blues. That’s not the only image that comes to mind of those times with word Sunday that McMinn has died.

20. Last Word: Railgarten Redux, Raleigh Springs Mall and Forrest Author Speaks -

Railgarten II, Son of Railgarten, Railgarten, Beyond the Board of Adjustment, Railgarten, Enter The City Council … Take your pick of sequel titles. Railgarten goes back to the City Council Tuesday for at least a committee discussion in which the council considers whether it should take back the special use permit it granted the bar-restaurant. This is a follow up to the Board of Adjustment decision last month to delay any action on approving the other annexes of the business for 30 days.

21. Memphis Business Academy Showcases Project Lead The Way STEM Progress -

The Memphis Business Academy is flexing its STEM muscles.

The K-12 charter school in Frayser hosted a showcase event this month to demonstrate how it has implemented Project Lead The Way (PLTW) curriculum the past year and the overwhelmingly positive effect it is having on students of all ages.

22. Fed’s Bullard: Slow-Growth Economy Will Continue -

The economy has been in low-growth mode for years, and it’s probably unwise to assume things will change this year.

That’s according to Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis president Jim Bullard.

23. Corker To Keynote Dunavant Awards -

U.S. Sen. Bob Corker will be the keynote speaker at the Rotary Club of Memphis East’s annual Dunavant Public Servant Awards.

Co-sponsored by The Daily News, the awards luncheon is 11:30 a.m., April 18, at the Memphis Hilton, 939 Ridge Lake Blvd.

24. Local Concert Business Amping Up, Keeping Memphis Promoters Busy -

The concert business appears to be healthier in 2017, with more performers and artists on tour than in recent years – and more of them are booking shows in Memphis.

But it’s never that simple in the business of shows, where booking is a process and touring is becoming more of a necessity.

25. Strickland Calls For Review of City Hall Escort List -

Memphis Police Director Michael Rallings is reviewing a list of 81 citizens who cannot come to City Hall without a police escort to wherever they are going in the building after Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland requested the review Saturday, Feb. 18.

26. Strickland Calls For Review of City Hall Escort List -

Memphis Police Director Michael Rallings is reviewing a list of 81 citizens who cannot come to City Hall without a police escort to wherever they are going in the building after Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland requested the review Saturday, Feb. 18.

27. Strickland Calls For Review of City Hall Escort List -

Memphis Police Director Michael Rallings is reviewing a list of 81 citizens who cannot come to City Hall without a police escort to wherever they are going in the building after Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland requested the review Saturday, Feb. 18.

28. Last Word: Council Day, Strickland on Immigration and Super Bowl Ad Review -

Just when the Shelby County Commission seems to settle into a rhythm of short, concise meetings, along comes a relatively smallish grant for a free condom distribution program locally. And the commission chambers are packed.

29. New Director Wants to Raise Memphis Botanic Garden’s Profile -

The Memphis Botanic Garden long ago ceased being a place to just stop and smell the roses. While a rose garden is one of 28 specialty gardens spanning 96 acres, events and promotions have more recently provided MBG’s identity to the community, especially The Live at the Garden concert series.

30. Bridges Renames Center, Completes $20M Campaign -

Bridges celebrated the completion of a six-year, $20 million endowment campaign Tuesday, Nov. 15, that included the renaming of the nonprofit center as the Jim Boyd Bridges Center.

31. Bridges Renames Center, Completes $20M Campaign -

Bridges celebrated the completion of a six-year, $20 million endowment campaign Tuesday, Nov. 15, that included the renaming of the nonprofit center as the Jim Boyd Bridges Center.

32. Can Alan Zucker Do for Titans’ Marcus Mariota What He’s Done for Mannings & Taylor Swift? -

As an NFL quarterback, Sunday is show time for Marcus Mariota. That’s when he suits up and does everything in his power to help the Tennessee Titans win football games.

But a recent Sunday morning was a different kind of show time. Mariota spent four hours on the opposite side of the Cumberland River from Nissan Stadium on a commercial shoot. A camera crew captured footage of him jogging in downtown Nashville and posing in front of various landmarks.

33. Last Word: Candlelight Protest, International Paper Rumors and Ruby Wilson -

Graceland and Black Lives Matter meet again Monday evening, according to the announcement as the weekend began of the Coalition of Concerned Citizens.

The coalition, which includes leaders of the July 10 bridge protest as well as the July 12 protest that briefly blocked traffic on Elvis Presley Boulevard outside Graceland, isn’t too happy with how its meeting with Mayor Jim Strickland went last Thursday.

34. Rating Agencies, State Comptroller Tout Improved City of Memphis Finances -

The most outspoken critic of the city’s financial condition said Monday, July 25, that Memphis leaders have made a “remarkable achievement.”

“Just three years ago there was a serious question about whether the City Council would take the necessary steps to control its budget and determine Memphis’ future,” Tennessee Comptroller Justin Wilson wrote Monday to Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland and Memphis City Council chairman Kemp Conrad. “If you continue on this path, Memphis will reclaim its rightful place among the truly vibrant cities of the world.”

35. Last Word: Mud Island Money, Elvis Mystery and Beyond Barbecue -

It looks like the dry rub will be in order for Memphis in May's barbecue weekend with a shower or two keeping the dust down in Tom Lee Park Wednesday.

If you can see it through the smoke, Mud Island might strike a first-tme observer as a marked contrast to all of the activity in Tom Lee Park that goes right up to the bluff's edge.

36. Wilson Urges Family Philanthropic Efforts at Dunavant Awards -

When most people think of the Kemmons Wilson family, there is an image that comes to mind. It’s a black and white photo from the 1950s of the five children – three boys and two girls – of the Holiday Inn founder cutting the ribbon on the very first Holiday Inn at 4925 Summer Ave.

37. Wilson Urges Family Philanthropy at Dunavant Awards -

Families can have an impact on public service, the chairman of Kemmons Wilson Inc. said Wednesday, May 11, at the 13th annual Bobby Dunavant Public Servant Awards.

38. Dave Thomas Named CEO Of Kemmons Wilson Insurance -

Dave Thomas has joined Kemmons Wilson Insurance Group as chief executive officer. In this role, he’s responsible for overseeing day-to-day operations and also is tasked with growing the Memphis-based property and casualty insurance company. Thomas has 40 years of experience in the insurance industry, most recently serving as CEO of Louisiana Citizens Property Insurance Corp.

39. Geater Claims Dunavant Honor for Job Without a Description -

Lisa Geater likens the job of the Memphis City Council’s staff to being wallpaper. After 27 years working in the council office at City Hall, including 20 as the administrator running the office, Geater said her advice for new staff members was simple.

40. Norris Recounts Path to Majority Status, Dunavant Award -

Good government isn’t a bowl of cherries. There will be controversy even with the best of intentions and with everything done by the numbers. And that applies to those who win awards like state Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris of Collierville.

41. Norris, Geater Named Dunavant Award Recipients -

Tennessee State Senate Republican Leader Mark Norris of Collierville and Lisa Geater, chief of staff to Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland, are the recipients of the annual Bobby Dunavant Public Servant Awards to be presented in May by the Rotary Club of Memphis East.

42. This Week in Memphis History: March 25-31 -

2015: NBA legend Magic Johnson visits Memphis to announce his foundation will award $30,000 in college scholarships to students at Booker T. Washington High School.

2015: Developers Archie Willis and Henry Turley unveil their concept plan for the redevelopment of Central Station, including a boutique hotel by Kemmons Wilson Enterprises in the station building, a Malco movie theater and possibly a grocery store – totaling a $52 million private investment.

43. Sparks Fly In Nashville Over Deannexation -

The Tennessee Legislature’s debate about a proposed deannexation law isn’t a case of Memphis against the rest of the state.

It’s a debate within the Shelby County legislative delegation and with a few exceptions, most of the critics of the measure that would allow referendums to undo annexations that are in some cases 18 years old are Memphis legislators.

44. Tennessee House Approves Deannexation Bill -

The Tennessee House approved a deannexation bill Monday, March 14, in a 68-25 vote after an emotional debate and a tide of amendments that were all voted down on the floor.

Republican state Representative Mike Carter of Hamilton County also disputed Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland’s claim that the city of Memphis stands to lose approximately $80 million in sales and property tax revenues.

45. Last Word: Hedgepeth Speaks, Josh Pastner's Future and Big Box Liquor -

Where else is there to begin but the Greensward controversy.
And we start with an email from Memphis City Council member Reid Hedgepeth in what is rapidly becoming a Last Word tradition and institution – the email in full.

46. Last Word: Time and The Greensward, Crosstown High and Race and Sports -

Remember how the schools merger story of about five years ago would change by the hour at times? That story has met its equal in what is becoming the first major challenge of the new Strickland administration at City Hall – the Overton Park Greensward.
So much happened before noon Tuesday on the first day of the short work week that it required waiting for the dust to settle on several fronts.
Here is the latest on a very fluid and volatile situation that could very well change as you are reading this.
Luckily we report at a time when you can change stories on line to keep up with such changes.
Zoos and parks and protests featuring brass bands suggest to a casual observer that this is not very serious as controversies go.
And maybe that was the case about a year and a half ago when a group of high school students decided to block the gravel driveway from the zoo parking lot onto the greensward.
But consider this:
The Memphis Zoo is working toward a March 1 opening of its new exhibit, Zambezi River Hippo Camp, a $22-million attraction that from what we saw just a few months ago will likely draw big crowds to the zoo in the spring.
The zoo was preparing for that starting with the removal of 27 trees from the north end of the greensward.
The best Mayor Jim Strickland could get from both sides – the zoo and Overton Park Conservancy – at his meeting with them Tuesday was a commitment to take his proposal for mediation to their respective boards.
The zoo board has authorized its leaders to file a lawsuit in Chancery Court over the greensward and it’s very likely the zoo would go to court before the March 1 opening because of the crowds on their way.
If the work to come by the zoo in advance of the March 1 opening involves heavy machinery, the reaction is likely to draw a much bigger protest than the ones Memphis Police have so far watched from a distance without making arrests.
As in all pressing political dramas, this controversy has the accelerant of timing.

47. The Week Ahead: Jan. 11, 2016 -

How was your weekend, Memphis? Here’s our weekly rundown of local happenings you need to know about, from drones and robot research to the Grizzlies’ annual MLK symposium at the National Civil Rights Museum...

48. City Council to Vote on Idlewild Gate, Water Rate Hike -

A gate across Idlewild Street between two competing supermarket projects in Midtown tops the Memphis City Council’s next-to-last meeting of the year.

The council is to vote Tuesday, Dec. 1, on a resolution that would close Idlewild south of Union Avenue to vehicular traffic and install a gate. The reason, according to the resolution, is to prevent motorists coming from Union Avenue and the two developments from cutting through the residential area.

49. Delta Blues Announces Memphis Legends Label -

Delta Blues Winery is launching two new wines under its “Memphis Legends” label honoring The Memphis Horns.

The “Memphis Legends” label was created to honor Memphis musicians who’ve made an impact in the city and around the world. Delta Blues Winery co-owner Jim Wilson says the idea had been brewing for a few years, but only began to take shape after a chance meeting between his wife and winery co-owner Sheila Wilson and Amy Jackson, the wife of Wayne Jackson, one half of the legendary Memphis Horns.

50. Delta Blues Winery Announces Memphis Legends Wine Label -

Delta Blues Winery is launching two new wines under its “Memphis Legends” label honoring The Memphis Horns.

The “Memphis Legends” label was created to honor Memphis musicians who’ve made an impact in the city and around the world. Delta Blues Winery co-owner Jim Wilson says the idea had been brewing for a few years, but only began to take shape after a chance meeting between his wife and winery co-owner Sheila Wilson and Amy Jackson, the wife of Wayne Jackson, one half of the legendary Memphis Horns.

51. Despite Rhetoric, Florida Game Critical for Tennessee's Butch Jones -

Tennessee’s Butch Jones will coach the biggest game of his three-year tenure with the Vols – and probably the biggest of his entire coaching career – at Florida on Saturday.

Like it or not, Jones is carrying the weight of UT’s 10-game losing streak to Florida on his shoulders.

52. Public Outcry Kills Tennessee Bill to Charge for Public Records -

People of every political stripe across Tennessee are rising in protest to legislation allowing government to charge fees for inspection of public records.

Fisk University student Justin Jones said such a financial imposition would place an “undue burden” on his fellow collegians seeking information from public records as part of research papers and other assignments.

53. Wharton Reintroduces Detroit Specter as Early Voting Begins -

When the city of Memphis got an unmistakable warning in May 2013 from Tennessee comptroller Justin Wilson to get its financial house in order, Memphis mayor A C Wharton was among those quick to caution against likening the city’s problems to those of Detroit.

54. Mayoral Debate Clash Focuses on City Finances -

Memphis city government’s financial problems and how those problems happened was the flashpoint for the latest meeting of the top mayoral contenders on the Oct. 8 ballot.

The Wednesday, Aug. 19, forum sponsored by The Commercial Appeal at the University of Memphis saw incumbent Mayor A C Wharton Jr. clash with challengers and city council members Jim Strickland and Harold Collins. The fourth debate contender, Memphis Police Association president Mike Williams, argued for different city priorities and a slower move toward economic development goals.

55. Preseason Analysis: Vols Will Defeat Oklahoma, Finish 8-4 -

Tennessee’s football team has something to prove as it concludes the first week of preseason practices and moves forward to the 2015 season.

The Vols must prove they belong in the national picture in Butch Jones’ third year as coach.

56. Carriage Ride -

Carriage Crossing is experiencing strong leasing activity and rising sales numbers as it prepares for multinational clothing retailer H&M to open its first Memphis-area location this month.

In recent months, the Collierville lifestyle center landed the H&M store, which the Swedish retailer says it plans to open Aug. 13, an Off Broadway Shoe Warehouse and a Hickory Tavern restaurant.

57. Keeping the Beat -

Jody Stephens may best be known as a rock 'n' roll timekeeper, the guy whose drum kit kept the beat and provided the rhythmic foundation for the pioneering power pop group Big Star.

58. Memphis City Council’s Distrust of Wharton Boils to Surface -

If it wasn’t obvious in five previous budget seasons, Memphis City Council members made the point clearer Tuesday, June 16, just before they delayed final city budget votes for another week.

They don’t trust the numbers and explanations they are getting from Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. as they try to rearrange his $656.5 million budget that was proposed in April.

59. Small Banks Find Ways to Compete With Giants -

Nashville’s InsBank began 15 years ago, founded by a group of insurance agents. Originally, it was known as Insurors Bank of Tennessee, its target market was independent insurance agents in the state. But that has changed somewhat over the years as the bank has evolved from that particular niche.

60. Wharton Traces City’s Path in Financial Crisis -

City Hall’s budget season in this Memphis election year will be about more than the dollar figures and line items in Mayor A C Wharton Jr.’s budget proposal.

It will be about different versions of how the city got into its ongoing financial crisis.

61. 1 Million New Residents: Where Will They Live? -

At least 1 million people are expected to move to the Nashville region over the next 20 years. Already, the early arrivals have begun to dramatically change the landscape of the suburban counties surrounding the city.

62. City Debt Restructure Isn’t the End of Finance Debate -

The table was rectangular, not round. There was no green felt and nobody had a deck of cards. But when 10 Memphis City Council members, Mayor A C Wharton Jr. and Tennessee comptroller Justin Wilson gathered in the council’s committee room Tuesday, March 17, there were lots of comparisons to a poker game. And lots of money was at stake.

63. Financial Debate Looms at City Hall -

With Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. to present his budget proposal to the City Council in May, some on the council started to set the table this week for an election year challenge of Wharton’s methods for righting the city’s financial condition.

64. Council Delays Financial Votes, Approves Beale Street Authority -

Memphis City Council members approved a $4.5 million advance Tuesday, March 3, for the Memphis Area Transit Authority to get past a cash flow problem.

But the council delayed for two weeks a vote on a larger mid-fiscal year budget adjustment for city government in general.

65. Goat Milk and Smart Marketing -

Maybe it was that last Facebook post that put them over the top. Or, maybe it was the #voteforgoats hashtag.

Little Seed Farm’s goats aren’t telling, but they do look a bit smug.

The goats, along with Little Seed Farm owners James and Eileen Ray, recently pulled in a cool $25,000 by snagging the top spot in furnishing retailer west elm’s, “We Love LOCAL Small Business’’ grant contest.

66. Social Media Impact on Buying Decisions -

Research giant Gallup released its State of the American Consumer Report in June of this year with the overarching finding that few brands are winning the battle for consumer engagement. Those that are, inevitably steal share and pull away from the competitive pack.

67. Battle Lines -

The city’s operating and capital budgets are just about set for the new fiscal year next month. Hard decisions made about health insurance for city employees and retirees Tuesday, June 17, are unlikely to be revisited by the Memphis City Council.

68. Carnival Memphis Celebrates Trucking Industry -

Trucking industry representatives and employees packed the spacious Tennessee Ballroom at Hilton Memphis, the gleaming glass hotel in East Memphis, for Carnival Memphis’ salute to the trucking industry.

69. Redistricting Has Little Effect on Tenn. GOP -

While Republican lawmakers in some states may have benefited from congressional redistricting, the changes had little effect in Tennessee.

Republicans were able to give themselves a built-in advantage in House elections by doing well in the statewide elections in many states, then gerrymandering congressional districts in key states after the 2010 census. The strategy may prove to be advantageous going into the 2014 midterm elections and beyond, regardless of the political climate in November.

70. Harris Files Ford Challenge at Deadline -

Memphis City Council member Lee Harris is challenging Democratic state Sen. Ophelia Ford in the August primary for District 29, the Senate seat held by a member of the Ford family since 1975.

71. Redistricting Has Little Effect on Tennessee GOP -

While Republican lawmakers in some states may have benefited from congressional redistricting, the changes had little effect in Tennessee.

Republicans were able to give themselves a built-in advantage in House elections by doing well in the statewide elections in many states, then gerrymandering congressional districts in key states after the 2010 census. The strategy may prove to be advantageous going into the 2014 midterm elections and beyond, regardless of the political climate in November.

72. Residency Scratches Moore From Commission Ballot -

Less than a month before early voting opens for the Shelby County primary elections, former Shelby County Commissioner Edith Ann Moore is off the ballot in the Democratic primary for commission District 6.

73. City Council Continues Pension Talks -

Memphis City Council members continue their discussions Tuesday, March 18, about the city’s unfunded pension liability as well as possible changes in city employee heath care benefits.

But there is still no action on any part of the issues on the council agenda for a vote.

74. Council Looks to Pinpoint Pension Numbers -

The Tuesday, March 4, discussion Memphis City Council members had with Tennessee Comptroller Justin Wilson, Tennessee Treasurer David Lillard and consultants from four actuarial firms centered on the city’s pension liability.

75. Council Weighs Conflicting Liability Numbers, Approves Mall Plan -

Memphis City Council members cleared much of their committee calendar Tuesday, Feb. 4, to talk for four hours about specifics of the city’s pension fund liability crisis.

The discussion with Tennessee Comptroller Justin Wilson, Tennessee Treasurer David Lillard and consultants from four actuarial firms was aimed at trying to define the specifics of the problem, see if there is agreement on some of the numbers and better explain the differences.

76. Council Weighs Conflicting L:iability Numbers, Approves Mall Plan -

Memphis City Council members cleared much of their committee calendar Tuesday, Feb. 4, to talk for four hours about specifics of the city’s pension fund liability crisis.

The discussion with Tennessee Comptroller Justin Wilson, Tennessee Treasurer David Lillard and consultants from four actuarial firms was aimed at trying to define the specifics of the problem, see if there is agreement on some of the numbers and better explain the differences.

77. City Council to Dig Into Pension Liability -

The road to a specific solution to the city’s unsustainable pension liability and employee benefits begins Tuesday, March 4, in detailed, technical and complex financial discussions at City Hall that will dominate the committee schedule of the Memphis City Council.

78. Council Hires Actuary Consultant -

The Memphis City Council approved hiring its own actuary firm Tuesday, Feb. 18, to review the city’s financial state, namely city government’s unfunded pension liability. The council voted to hire Segal Consulting of Atlanta to advise it as the council prepared for a March 4 committee session in which it will meet with the administration’s actuary and others on the unsustainable trajectory the pension fund is on.

79. Council Hires Actuary Consultant -

The Memphis City Council approved hiring its own actuary firm Tuesday, Feb. 18, to review the city’s financial state, namely city government’s unfunded pension liability. The council voted to hire Segal Consulting of Atlanta to advise it as the council prepared for a March 4 committee session in which it will meet with the administration’s actuary and others on the unsustainable trajectory the pension fund is on.

80. Council Tours Pyramid, Weighs City Offices In Two Malls -

Memphis City Council members heard Tuesday, Feb. 18, that the administration of Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. wants to move some city government offices into the Soulsville Town Center in South Memphis and is weighing whether to renovate or tear down and build anew on the site of the Southbrook Mall in Whitehaven.

81. New Life -

When Rob Clark and his wife moved into their home in the historic Evergreen neighborhood in 1993, catalog and distribution operations were still active at the Sears Crosstown building.

That soon changed, and for roughly two decades the hulking property stood as a towering, painful reminder of the area’s faded glory.

82. New Life -

When Rob Clark and his wife moved into their home in the historic Evergreen neighborhood in 1993, catalog and distribution operations were still active at the Sears Crosstown building.

That soon changed, and for roughly two decades the hulking property stood as a towering, painful reminder of the area’s faded glory.

83. Debt and Liability -

There is rarely a good answer to the question “How much?” in politics.

With issues including the unfunded pension liability, overall debt, and revenue estimates and their validity, City Hall’s overall money problem begins but hardly ends with the question. It won’t be that simple.

84. Baptist CEO Set to Retire Next May -

Baptist Memorial Health Care Corp. President and CEO Stephen Reynolds will retire next May, with Jason Little, Baptist’s executive vice president and chief operating officer, taking over as the hospital system’s next president and CEO.

85. Soulful Synergy -

What happened at the corner of McLemore Avenue and College Street in the 1960s is nothing short of extraordinary.

At the crossroads of segregated neighborhoods in South Memphis, two white business partners would open the doors wide to whites and blacks alike, who congregated to write and record songs that would set off a soul explosion heard around the world.

86. Chamber Official: Transportation ‘Huge Part’ of Local Economy -

The Traffic Club of Memphis hosted its monthly luncheon on Tuesday at The Racquet Club of Memphis, welcoming Andre B. Dean, the Greater Memphis Chamber’s vice president of public policy and community affairs, as the guest speaker. The club also held its annual board member elections, with incoming President Carey Treadwell of Dynamex Inc. taking the helm for the next year.

87. City Council to Vote on Bonds, Review Land Swap -

Memphis City Council members this week take up $375 million in refunding bonds and general obligation bonds, and discuss a land swap with Church of the River for access to a boardwalk on the Harahan Bridge across the Mississippi River.

88. City Pension Crisis Meets Sanitation Overhaul -

The city’s looming pension liability crisis and the proposed solution to it intersected Tuesday, Oct. 1, with a plan to overhaul city sanitation services and, in the process, provide a pension supplement to sanitation workers.

89. Mary Carter Decorating Center to Grow, Relocate -

A venerable Memphis cake decorating and supply store is moving to a new location on Summer Avenue.

Mary Carter Decorating Center signed a 4,800-square-foot lease in Cloverleaf Shopping Center at 733 N. White Station Road.

90. Strickland, Conrad Warn of Budget Pitfalls -

When most of the 13 people on the Memphis City Council began their service in 2008, the city’s property tax rate was $3.43 and rolling back that rate was a priority of a voting majority on the body.

91. Property Tax Hike Highlights New City Budget -

Memphis City Council members raised the city property tax rate Tuesday, June 26, by 4 cents above the recertified tax rate and put the rest of a turbulent budget season to rest.

The approval of the $3.40 property tax rate and city operating and capital budgets came in a council session that ended at 12:30 a.m. Wednesday morning.

92. Research: Optimists Sell More -

Years ago psychologist Martin Seligman discovered a dramatic correlation between a salesperson's optimistic outlook and his ability to close sales. Optimists do indeed sell more than pessimists – 33 percent more. They handle rejection more easily; in fact, rejection increases persistence. Plus, they are more likely to stay motivated on their own and less likely to give up when a sales call doesn’t go well.

93. Council to Take Final Votes on Budget -

The most critical vote at last week’s budget-dominated Memphis City Council meeting may have been the vote to adjourn leaving final budget decisions pending.

It left a week for all sides in the ongoing budget drama at City Hall a wealth of time by political standards to build support for their respective positions.

94. Critical State Report Remakes City Budget -

An April report from the Tennessee Comptroller of the Treasury critical of city finances threw the budget season at City Hall into remake mode Tuesday, May 21.

The bottom line for the budget is a remediation plan that will increase the city’s long term debt, force the city to use its reserves, and take reserves below the 10 percent level considered key with bond-rating agencies.

95. Commission to Consider Residency Ballot Item -

Shelby County Commissioners take a final vote Monday, April 1, on a referendum ordinance that would do away with county government’s residency requirement for employment.

The commission meets at 1:30 p.m. at the Vasco Smith County Administration Building, 160 N. Main St.

96. Centennial on Tap for Traffic Club of Memphis -

The Traffic Club of Memphis is kick-starting its 100-year celebration with the introduction of its 2013 officers, led for the second straight year by president Mason Wilson.

The club’s activities this year will feature a series of local events, including the Traffic Club International annual conference in September.

97. Roots of Success -

The story of Holiday Inn could serve as a homegrown business case study of what makes a brand resonate with customers – and what qualities are needed for that brand to endure over time.

This month’s 60th anniversary of the opening of the first Holiday Inn is an obvious opportunity to celebrate the roots of the iconic hotel chain. And on the same day hotel representatives and representatives of its parent company re-created the first ribbon cutting at a Holiday Inn near Wolfchase Galleria mall, Kemmons Wilson Jr., one of the children of Holiday Inn founder Kemmons Wilson, reflected on the secrets to the chain’s success.

98. Grant Entity Files $20M Loan For Collierville Construction -

25 acres north
Of Shea Road

Loan Amount: $20.4 million

Loan Date: July 31, 2012

Maturity Date: Aug. 1, 2017

Borrower: Westbrook Crossing GP

Lender: Magna Bank

99. Muni Schools Questions Pass, Cohen Wins Big -

Voters in each of the six suburban towns and cities in Shelby County approved establishing municipal school districts in the unofficial results of the Thursday, Aug. 2, county general and state and federal primary elections.

100. Muni Schools, Cohen, Weirich, Johnson, Stanton, Kyle Take Early Vote -

Voters in each of the six suburban towns and cities in Shelby County were overwhelmingly approving the establishment of municipal school districts and a half cent sales tax hike to fund them in the first vote totals released Thursday, Aug. 2 by the Shelby County Election Commission.