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Editorial Results (free)

1. Federal Grant to Aid SCS Head Start Program -

Shelby County Schools is getting an $11.6 million grant from the federal Department of Health and Human Services for the development of the Shelby County Head Start program, U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen announced.

2. U of M, FedEx Partner On IT Command Center -

FedEx and UMRF Ventures, a wholly owned subsidiary of the University of Memphis Research Foundation, have partnered to open a student-operated IT Command Center at the FedEx Institute of Technology on campus in an effort to grow the regional data analytics workforce.

3. New evidence that viruses may play a role in Alzheimer's -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Viruses that sneak into the brain just might play a role in Alzheimer's, scientists reported Thursday in a provocative study that promises to re-ignite some long-debated theories about what triggers the mind-robbing disease.

4. Historic Emmett Till marker in Mississippi to be rededicated -

GLENDORA, Miss. (AP) — A historic marker describing the lynching of Emmett Till is being rededicated.

The Greenwood Commonwealth reports that speakers will include Till's cousin Wheeler Parker, now 79. Parker was an eyewitness to Till's 1955 abduction.

5. US stocks rise as trade fears ebb and tech companies lead -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks are rising Wednesday, led by technology and media companies, as global markets let go of some of their fears about the growing trade dispute between the U.S. and China. Still, investors are favoring the companies they think are less vulnerable to tariffs. Twenty-First Century Fox is jumping after Disney agreed to buy Fox's entertainment businesses for more than $71.3 billion, topping an offer from Comcast. Investors are hoping that will be followed by other deals.

6. Meat 2.0? Clean Meat? Spat Shows the Power of Food Wording -

That question has yet to be decided by regulators, but for the moment it's pitting animal rights advocates and others against cattle ranchers in a war of words.

Supporters of the science are embracing "clean meat" to describe meat grown by replicating animal cells. Many in the conventional meat industry are irritated by the term and want to stamp it out before it takes hold.

7. A Look at How ‘Cultured’ Meat Works -

A new term is causing heartburn for beef, chicken and pork producers: "Clean meat."

The term is being used by supporters of the emerging science of meat grown in labs without slaughtering cows and chickens. But many in the conventional meat industry don't want it to become the accepted moniker, saying it implies that the meat they produce isn't clean.

8. U of M, FedEx Partner on IT Command Center -

FedEx and UMRF Ventures, a wholly owned subsidiary of the University of Memphis Research Foundation, have partnered to open a student-operated IT Command Center at the FedEx Institute of Technology on campus in an effort to grow the regional data analytics workforce.

9. Experts Say Auto Tariffs Would Raise Prices, Cost Jobs -

DETROIT (AP) – Every workday, about 7,400 trucks mostly loaded with automotive parts rumble across the Ambassador Bridge connecting Detroit and Canada, at times snarling traffic along the busy corridor.

10. Federal Grant to Aid SCS Head Start Program -

Shelby County Schools is getting an $11.6 million grant from the federal Department of Health and Human Services for the development of the Shelby County Head Start program, U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen announced.

11. What Do Statewide Candidates Say About Health Care in Tennessee? -

According to Think Tennessee’s State of Our State dashboard, the state ranks near the bottom in the number of adults with heart disease, obesity and diabetes. It also ranks near the bottom of all states for the health of senior citizens, infant mortality, number of adults who smoke, and at the absolute bottom in childhood obesity. Tennesseans are, on the whole, not healthy. What can and should our next political leaders do about it?

12. NIH Ends Alcohol Study, Citing Funding, Credibility Problems -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The U.S. government is shutting down a study that was supposed to show if a single drink a day could prevent heart attacks, saying ethical problems with how the research was planned and funded undermine its credibility.

13. Why Many Americans Aren't Benefiting From Robust US Economy -

WASHINGTON (AP) – "The economy," Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell declared this week, "is doing very well."

And it is. Steady hiring has shrunk unemployment to 3.8 percent – the lowest since the 1960's. Consumers are spending. Taxes are down. Inflation is tame. Factories are busy. Demand for homes is strong. Household wealth is up.

14. UTHSC Names Khan Chair Of Family Medicine Dept. -

Dr. Muneeza Khan has been named chair of the Department of Family Medicine in the University of Tennessee Health Science Center’s College of Medicine. She previously served as interim chair.

15. Hamilton Eye Institute Hosting ‘Cataract-A-Thon’ -

The Hamilton Eye Institute at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center is hosting the second annual Ivan Marais Cataract-A-Thon Friday and Saturday, June 15-16.

More than 50 patients from Tennessee, Mississippi, Arkansas and surrounding areas who are uninsured or otherwise unable to access proper ophthalmic care will receive cataract surgery at no cost during the two-day community service outreach. Patients were identified through the HEI clinics, the Mid-South Lions Sight and Hearing Service, and Church Health. The value of the services is more than $150,000.

16. FedEx Institute Hosting Women’s Hackathon in July -

The FedEx Institute of Technology at the University of Memphis will host a women’s hackathon July 20-21.

The event, ATHENAtechne, is intended to cultivate a positive environment for women in technology and hopes to draw from across the region.

17. FedEx Institute Hosting Women’s Hackathon in July -

The FedEx Institute of Technology at the University of Memphis will host a women’s hackathon July 20-21.

The event, ATHENAtechne, is intended to cultivate a positive environment for women in technology and hopes to draw from across the region.

18. Eye-opening internship leads lawyer back to St. Jude -

Kaleigh Davis always knew she wanted to make a difference, but it took some divine intervention to change her course. “I’ve always wanted to do the cliché of ‘helping people’ and not just work to make money but to make a difference, however that may be,” she says. As Associate Counsel at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Davis is tasked with duties typical of any attorney, but her client is more than unique.

19. Hamilton Eye Institute Hosting ‘Cataract-A-Thon’ -

The Hamilton Eye Institute at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center is hosting the second annual Ivan Marais Cataract-A-Thon Friday and Saturday, June 15-16.

More than 50 patients from Tennessee, Mississippi, Arkansas and surrounding areas who are uninsured or otherwise unable to access proper ophthalmic care will receive cataract surgery at no cost during the two-day community service outreach. Patients were identified through the HEI clinics, the Mid-South Lions Sight and Hearing Service, and Church Health. The value of the services is more than $150,000.

20. Your Internet Use Could Change as 'Net Neutrality' Ends -

NEW YORK (AP) – Your ability to watch and use your favorite apps and services could start to change – though not right away – following the official demise Monday of Obama-era internet protections.

21. Poll: Americans Want More of What Journalists Want to Report -

NEW YORK (AP) – There's substantial agreement on what Americans want from the news media and what journalists want to report, according to a pair of studies that also reveal a troubling caveat: a nagging feeling among both the ideal isn't being met.

22. UTHSC Names Khan Chair Of Family Medicine Dept. -

Dr. Muneeza Khan has been named chair of the Department of Family Medicine in the University of Tennessee Health Science Center’s College of Medicine. She previously served as interim chair.

23. U of M Professors Awarded $1.9 Million NIH Grant -

Two University of Memphis professors have received a $1.9 million grant for a collaborative brain imaging and big data project. The grant was awarded by the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, part of the National Institutes of Health.

24. Blackburn’s Scattershot Hits Surprise Targets -

Republican U.S. Rep. Marsha Blackburn is doubling down against Democratic opponent Phil Bredesen in the race for an open U.S. Senate seat, hammering him as a liberal in the vein of Obama, Clinton, Schumer and Pelosi.

25. Conservative Icon David Koch Leaving Business, Politics -

NEW YORK (AP) – Billionaire conservative icon David Koch is stepping down from the Koch brothers' network of business and political activities.

26. Study Finds Rare Gain for Tough-to-Treat Pancreatic Cancer -

CHICAGO (AP) – Patients with pancreatic cancer that hadn't spread lived substantially longer on a four-drug combo than on a single standard cancer drug, a rare advance for a tough-to-treat disease, researchers reported Monday.

27. Medical Students to Serve Rural Arkansas in Mobile Clinic -

JONESBORO, Ark. (AP) – An $828,748 federal grant will pay for a mobile medical clinic aimed at delivering health care to rural areas of the Delta region, New York Institute of Technology College of Osteopathic Medicine at Arkansas State University administrators said recently.

28. Trump Orders 'Immediate Steps' to Boost Coal, Nuclear Plants -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Donald Trump on Friday directed Energy Secretary Rick Perry to take "immediate steps" to bolster struggling coal-fired and nuclear power plants to keep them open, calling it a matter of national and economic security.

29. Experts: Starbucks Training a First Step in Confronting Bias -

Starbucks, trying to put to rest an outcry over the arrest of two black men at one of its stores, was set to close more than 8,000 stores Tuesday for an afternoon of anti-bias training, a strategy some believe can keep racism at bay.

30. Paraham Joins DCA As PR, Social Media Coordinator -

Wesley Paraham has joined Memphis-based creative communications consulting firm as PR and social media coordinator. In this role, Paraham supports DCA’s public relations and social media strategies for clients including Explore Bike Share, Memphis Greenspace, Memphis Public Libraries and Big River Crossing, with a special emphasis on research and content development.

31. Businesses Need Purpose -

A talk from Haley Rushing, chief purposologist, The Purpose Institute, from the 2018 Conscious Capitalism Annual Conference.

Why purpose? Humans need purpose and meaning in life. For every venture there are both extrinsic and intrinsic aspirations. Purpose is an intrinsic aspiration. Years of research has shown that those who have only extrinsic goals suffer from anxiety and depression. Yet, those who have intrinsic goals have very low levels of depression and anxiety.

32. St. Jude: $100M for Children With Cancer Global Outreach -

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) – St. Jude Children's Research Hospital has helped with the treatment of thousands of cancer-stricken children around the world. Striving to reach so many more, the Memphis, Tennessee-based hospital announced a $100 million plan Thursday to expand its global outreach.

33. Beale Street Bucks Comeback Recommended as Lawsuit Dismissed -

Almost a year after all cover charges to get in the Beale Street Entertainment District were dropped, the cover charge program known as Beale Street Bucks could be making a comeback.

The suggestion is sure to renew a vocal debate about whether charging a cover after 10 p.m. on Saturdays during the summer is an effective security measure or selective crowd control on the street that gave birth to the blues, where Saturday night crowds are a part of its history. 

34. FDA Warns Teething Medicines Unsafe, Wants Them Off Shelves -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Federal health officials warned parents Wednesday about the dangers of teething remedies that contain a popular numbing ingredient and asked manufacturers to stop selling their products intended for babies and toddlers.

35. Judge: President Can't Block Critics on Twitter -

NEW YORK (AP) – President Donald Trump violates the First Amendment when he blocks critics on Twitter for political speech, a judge ruled Wednesday.

U.S. District Judge Naomi Reice Buchwald in Manhattan stopped short in her written decision of ordering Trump or a subordinate to stop the practice of blocking critics from viewing his Twitter account, saying it was enough to point out that it was unconstitutional to continue to do so.

36. Middle Tennessee State, Chinese Group Eye Ginseng Institute -

MURFREESBORO, Tenn. (AP) – Middle Tennessee State University says it has struck an agreement with its research partner in China to for a joint ginseng institute.

An MTSU news release Tuesday says the institute will study, develop and promote Tennessee-grown herbal products to sell in Asia and other emerging markets.

37. Last Word: A New Council Member, Law Without Signature and Corker Down Under -

The Memphis City Council should be back up to full strength by the time Tuesday becomes Wednesday. Filling the Super District 9 seat left vacant by the resignation earlier this month of Philip Spinosa to join the leadership of the Greater Memphis Chamber is on the council’s agenda Tuesday afternoon – the last item on the agenda. But the council usually skips around.

38. Clocks May Go a Little Cuckoo With Power Grid Change -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Running late for work or just miss that bus? You could have a good excuse: Your electric clock might be running a bit cuckoo.

Because of a change in federal energy regulations, some scientists say your trusty, older plug-in clock may be losing or gaining a few ticks over time.

39. Westberg Institute’s Faith Community Nursing a Natural Fit With Church Health -

Recently, more than 200 hundred international parish nurses came to Memphis for the Westberg Symposium and three days of workshops, collaboration and training. Also here was Rev. Dr. Helen Wadsworth, international faith community nurse specialist based in the United Kingdom and overseeing Church Health’s faith community nursing outreach program.

40. UT/West Institute’s Hayes Plays Critical Role in The Cancer Genome Atlas -

The Cancer Genome Atlas, a comprehensive map of the key genomic changes in 33 types of cancer, wrapped up a decade-long, $300 million national science project in April, with Dr. D. Neil Hayes, scientific director of the University of Tennessee/West Institute for Cancer Research, playing one of only a handful of leadership roles. 

41. Tennessee State Sets Up Program in Honor of Pioneer Surgeon -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Tennessee State University is establishing an endowed scholarship fund in honor of a renowned heart surgeon and alumnus of the school.

The university said in a news release it's using a half-million-dollar gift from the family of the late Dr. Levi Watkins Jr. to set up the fund in his honor to help pre-med majors.

42. Few Teeth in Trump's Prescription to Reduce Drug Prices -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Donald Trump's long-promised plan to bring down drug prices, unveiled Friday, would mostly spare the pharmaceutical industry he previously accused of "getting away with murder." Instead he focuses on private competition and more openness to reduce America's prescription pain.

43. UTHSC Gets $717,765 Research Grant -

The National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute of the National Institutes of Health announced a $717,765 grant Wednesday, May 9, to the University of Tennessee Health Science Center.

The grant is to advance research on angiotensins and prostaglandins-adrenergic interactions. U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen of Memphis said the grant advances the “important work they are doing.”

44. UTHSC Gets $717,765 Research Grant -

The National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute of the National Institutes of Health announced a $717,765 grant Wednesday, May 9, to the University of Tennessee Health Science Center.

The grant is to advance research on angiotensins and prostaglandins-adrenergic interactions. U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen of Memphis said the grant advances the “important work they are doing.”

45. US Panel Leaves Prostate Screening Up to Men, Their Doctors -

CHICAGO (AP) – Whether to get screened for prostate cancer is a question that men aged 55 to 69 should decide themselves in consultation with their doctors, according to finalized guidance issued Tuesday by an influential panel of health care experts.

46. Keeping What's Yours: Fund Investing Has Never Been Cheaper -

NEW YORK (AP) – Being cheap pays off when it comes to fund investing, and more investors are heeding the call.

Investing is full of uncertainties, as the gyrations of the past few months attest, and keeping costs low is one of the few things that investors have within their control. Plus, having low fees is a pretty good predictor of a fund's future success, researchers say. That's why it's encouraging that a pair of recent reports show that investors paid less in expenses last year across their stock, bond and other types of funds.

47. Drug Epidemic Ensnares 25-Year-Old Pill for Nerve Pain -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The story line sounds familiar: a popular pain drug becomes a new way to get high as prescribing by doctors soars.

But the latest drug raising red flags is not part of the opioid family at the center of the nation's drug epidemic. It's a 25-year-old generic pill long seen as a low risk way to treat seizures, nerve pain and other ailments.

48. Inner Fortitude -

Amid a teacher shortage attributed partly to economic opportunities luring away candidates, local educators are creating urban teaching programs and adopting new recruitment strategies.

Rhodes College is launching a master’s program in urban education in June and is offering a $10,000 scholarship to each student. If the student receives a Stafford federal loan of $15,000 and commits to teaching at a “high-need” school, the degree essentially will be free.

49. Bill Gates Pumps $158 Million Into Push to Combat US Poverty -

SEATTLE (AP) – Bill Gates launched a new fight against systemic poverty in the U.S., with his private foundation on Thursday announcing millions of dollars toward initiatives ranging from data projects to funding for community activists.

50. Robot Fast-Food Chefs: Hype or a Sign of Industry Change? -

BOSTON (AP) – Robots can't yet bake a souffle or fold a burrito, but they can cook up vegetables and grains and spout them into a bowl – and are doing just that at a new fast casual restaurant in Boston.

51. US Delays Decision on Tariffs for EU, Prolonging Uncertainty -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The U.S. government will take another 30 days to decide whether to impose tariffs on imports of steel and aluminum from the European Union, Canada and Mexico, extending a period of uncertainty for businesses in those regions.

52. Bartholomew Named St. Mary’s Athletic Director -

St. Mary’s Episcopal School has promoted John Bartholomew to athletic director. Bartholomew has been coaching lacrosse at St. Mary’s since 2014, and the following year, he joined the school full-time as assistant athletic director and lacrosse coordinator. He has been serving as St. Mary’s interim athletic director since last fall.

53. Last Word: Trolleys Roll, Primary Election Day and The Rise of South City -

MATA CEO Gary Rosenfeld likes to joke that the new trolleys are quieter since the transit authority decided to change from using square wheels. Transit humor. They really are quieter. And that may be because MATA wasn’t doing much of anything in the way of maintenance on them four years ago and even less in the way of record keeping when a second trolley car burst into flames causing MATA to shut down everything it ran on rails. So the trolley that rolled out of the MATA barn on North Main Street Monday morning and into service was symbolic of more than getting a trolley or three ready for service. It was about building a new system around the operation of the trolleys.

54. Supreme Court to Hear Google Class Action Settlement Case -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Supreme Court has agreed to review the settlement of a class action lawsuit involving Google, where the settlement agreement largely directed money to organizations rather than search engine users.

55. CDC Chief Asks For, And Gets, Cut to His Record $375K Pay -

NEW YORK (AP) – The new head of the top U.S. public health agency has asked for – and will receive – a cut to his record-setting pay, federal officials said Monday.

Dr. Robert Redfield Jr.'s new salary was not revealed.

56. UTHSC Program to Help Students, Faculty Pursue Global Mission Work -

Janyn Quiz, a first-year medical student at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center, wants to pursue surgical mission work outside the United States.

A native of the Philippines who moved to the United States two years ago with her family, she’s part of a group of students and faculty that have built and launched a formal program around that same interest they share. It’s UTHSC’s newly formed Global Surgery Institute in the College of Medicine’s Department of Surgery. The institute’s mission is to help surgical residents and students interested in mission work take the next step in pursuit of that interest.

57. Student Loan Company Tells 16,500 Borrowers of Data Breach -

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) – A student loan services company recently notified 16,500 borrowers that files containing personal data were released to a business that wasn't authorized to receive them.

58. U of M Licenses Speech Intellectual Property -

Research conducted at the University of Memphis is helping medical professionals assess speech understanding in Spanish-speaking children.

The U of M’s Office of Technology Transfer recently licensed intellectual property related to research conducted by Dr. Lisa Lucks Mendel and her students in the Speech Perception Assessment Laboratory to St. Louis-based Auditec Inc., which offers auditory test materials for audiologists, psychologists, speech-language pathologists, hearing professionals and other trained medical professionals.

59. Last Word: Graceland Offensive, Mural Lawsuit, and a TNReady Encore -

It’s on in The Haven. Graceland’s managing partner, Joel Weinshanker, is looking to turn out Whitehaven residents in support of Graceland’s plans for a 5,000 to 6,000 seat arena and in the process a showdown over just what the city and county noncompete for FedExForum means. During a townhall meeting at Guest House Thursday evening, Weinshanker made his case to about 150 Whitehaven residents and around eight or nine candidates in this election year. And he said the chief problem is Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland won’t talk to him about projects he says will open up Whitehaven for future economic development and prosperity.

60. Opioid Treatment Gap in Medicare: Methadone Clinics -

One in three older Americans with Medicare drug coverage is prescribed opioid painkillers, but for those who develop a dangerous addiction there is one treatment Medicare won't cover: methadone.

Methadone is the oldest, and experts say, the most effective of the three approved medications used to treat opioid addiction. It eases cravings without an intense high, allowing patients to work with counselors to rebuild their lives.

61. Last Word: Last Day of Early Voting, Senate Poll and Legislature Goes to Overtime -

The last day of early voting before the May 1 election day is Thursday. And the turnout count through Wednesday has eclipsed the total early voting turnout in this same set of elections in 2010 and 2014. You can find a list of early voting locations and the hours at www.shelbyvote.com, the website of the Shelby County Election Commission. The winners on election night next Tuesday advance to the August county general election.

62. Leading Memphis Transplant Surgeon: Almost Everyone Can Donate Something -

Earlier this month, a flag-raising ceremony was held in front of Methodist University Hospital to recognize National Donate Life Month in April and raise awareness about organ and tissue donation.

Dr. James Eason, in a sense, raises that flag every day of every month – he and the team of surgeons and doctors around him at the Transplant Institute at Methodist University Hospital.

63. Last Word: The City's Windfall, Chandler Parsons' Knees and Keith Sykes on Flying -

When you think of economic engines that drive the Memphis economy there are a lot of corporate names past and present that come to mind. One further down the list is the Memphis Defense Depot in southeast Memphis more than 20 years after the Army closed up shop. Along the stretch of Airways near Memphis International Airport are the blue collar neighborhoods built by the hub for Army supplies that located here in the early 1940s on 4.2 million square feet of land.

64. Agency Warns Retailers Not to Sell Juul E-Cigarette to Kids -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Federal health officials on Tuesday announced a nationwide crackdown on underage use of a popular e-cigarette brand following months of complaints from parents, politicians and school administrators.

65. RegionSmart Summit To Focus On Fourth Bluff -

Since its inception, Memphis and The Fourth Chickasaw Bluff on the Mississippi River have been bound together.

So as Memphis is going through its latest growth spurt, so too is the Fourth Bluff as it was selected to be a part of a $40 million national initiative known as Reimagining the Civic Commons.

66. University of Memphis Licenses Speech-Related Intellectual Property -

Research conducted at the University of Memphis is helping medical professionals assess speech understanding in Spanish-speaking children.

The U of M’s Office of Technology Transfer recently licensed intellectual property related to research conducted by Dr. Lisa Lucks Mendel and her students in the Speech Perception Assessment Laboratory to St. Louis-based Auditec Inc., which offers auditory test materials for audiologists, psychologists, speech-language pathologists, hearing professionals and other trained medical professionals.

67. Last Word: Reading Early Voting Tea Leaves, Corker Qualifies and New Carrot -

This should be the week that the Tennessee Legislature adjourns and state Senators and state Representatives return to their districts to begin campaigning in earnest for the August primaries and the November general election beyond that. The only hold-up to adjournment this week would be any more tremors surrounding education policy, specifically the TNReady test debacle of last week.

68. Opioid Scripts Slow Down Considerably in Tennessee -

A new report published by the IQVIA Institute for Human Data Science shows that Tennesseans filled 6.7 million opioid prescriptions at retail pharmacies in 2017, a nearly 9 percent decrease from the previous year and a 21.3 percent drop from 2013.

69. Major Violent Crime Drops In Latest Crime Stats -

Major violent crime for the first quarter of 2018 was down 5.1 percent in Memphis compared to a year ago and down 4.9 percent countywide over the same period.

The crime statistics from the Memphis-Shelby Crime Commission and the University of Memphis Public Safety Institute released Tuesday, April 17, show major property crime was up 2.8 percent in the city and increased 4.5 percent countywide from the first three months of 2017.

70. Regional Win -

In an increasingly interconnected world, having a cohesive economic regionalism strategy is becoming more of a must-have for successful metropolitan areas.

To facilitate this, the Urban Land Institute held Memphis’ first RegionSmart Summit in 2016 to gather all of the area’s government, economic development and community leaders in one place to collectively address some of the region’s most pressing planning and development issues.

71. Last Word: TNReady Blinks Again, Gov. Debate Thoughts and Mud Island's Museum -

There was a point Thursday morning during the troubled TNReady testing at some Tennessee school districts when there was a “brief” slow down in the online testing, according to the Tennessee Education commissioner’s office. By noon that had been resolved and more than 250,000 completed tests had been submitted since testing began Monday. One can only imagine what some of the thoughts were in the office during the slow down and the gap between how long the slow down seemed and how long it actually was.

72. Mississippi University Tuition to Rise 4 Percent, on Average -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — Mississippi's eight public universities plan to raise tuition by an average of 4 percent next fall, saying lingering effects from state budget cuts two years ago require them to get more revenue from students.

73. History Upgrade -

Mud Island’s Mississippi River Museum will have a shorter season than the rest of the river park.

The park on the southern half of Mud Island opened for the season April 14 during a changing of the guard at the Riverfront Development Corp., which runs the park for the city.

74. Major Violent Crime Drops In Latest Crime Stats -

Major violent crime for the first quarter of 2018 was down 5.1 percent in Memphis compared to a year ago and down 4.9 percent countywide over the same period.

The crime statistics from the Memphis-Shelby Crime Commission and the University of Memphis Public Safety Institute released Tuesday, April 17, show major property crime was up 2.8 percent in the city and increased 4.5 percent countywide from the first three months of 2017.

75. Amanda Dunham Talks Changes At East Memphis’ Grove Grill -

Twenty years after The Grove Grill opened in Laurelwood Shopping Center, the restaurant is reinventing itself with modernized decor and the recently launched Third Thursday monthly tasting series. Helping drive the changes are chef Chip Dunham – the son of Grove Grill owners Jeff and Tracey Dunham – and his wife, beverage director Amanda Dunham, who both joined the restaurant after moving to Memphis last July.

76. Major Violent Crime Drops In Latest Crime Stats -

Major violent crime for the first quarter of 2018 was down 5.1 percent in Memphis compared to a year ago and down 4.9 percent countywide over the same period.

The crime statistics from the Memphis-Shelby Crime Commission and the University of Memphis Public Safety Institute released Tuesday, April 17, show major property crime was up 2.8 percent in the city and increased 4.5 percent countywide from the first three months of 2017.

77. UTHSC Addiction Center To Host Opioid Forums -

The Center for Addiction Science at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center and the Memphis Area Prevention Coalition will present forums April 18 and 19 to educate health care providers, first responders and the public on recognizing and treating opioid use disorder.

78. Last Word: Mud Island Changes, Zoo Parking and Capitol Hill Revolt On UT Board -

This could be your last chance to see the Mississippi River Museum at Mud Island River Park as it has been for about the last 30 years. The park on the southern half of Mud Island opens for the season Saturday. The museum will be open only through July 4 is what is billed as a “limited run” followed by a public engagement process for “reimagining how we tell the story of the Mississippi River in a 21st century way,” according to park general manager Trey Giuntini in a Thursday press release.

79. What Statewide Candidates Say About Opioid Crisis, Public Safety -

The spread of opioid abuse claimed over 1,600 lives in Tennessee in 2016, and it is getting worse. Methamphetamine abuse, while not getting the headlines, has increased. Gun violence and murder is increasing. What proposals do our candidates have to help Tennesseans address these public safety issues?

80. April 13-19, 2018: This week in Memphis history -

1968: Striking Memphis sanitation workers vote to accept a pay raise of 15 cents an hour from the city, ending their strike after 64 days. Ten cents of the raise will go into effect in May, with the other 5 cents being added on Sept. 1.
The amount has come up before in the negotiations, which are being watched closely by The White House and federal labor officials following the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. on April 4. Memphis Mayor Henry Loeb balks at the proposal presented by his team, saying he would agree to a raise effective with the new fiscal year beginning July 1 and not before. He also says the raise will be less than 15 cents an hour. Philanthropist Abe Plough secretly agrees to pay the difference needed for the entire pay raise starting May 1, contributing a total of $60,000 to cover the cost. Plough’s role remains a secret until his death in 1984.

81. IRS Head Sees Huge Task Ahead to Administer New Tax Law -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The acting head of the IRS says the current tax-filing season has gone well, while acknowledging the tough challenge the cash-strapped agency faces of administering the new tax law that will affect 2019 returns.

82. Third Annual RegionSmart Summit to Be Held April 26 -

More than 300 government, economic development and community leaders will gather at the third annual RegionSmart Summit this month to discuss some of the Mid-South’s biggest planning issues.

Hosted by the Mid-South Mayors’ Council and the Urban Land Institute’s local affiliate, ULI Memphis, the April 26 summit at the Halloran Centre for Performing Arts & Education will tackle topics such as the future of workforce development, transportation and land use.

83. Ryan Bowing Out, Sending Ripples of Uncertainty Through GOP -

WASHINGTON (AP) – House Speaker Paul Ryan announced Wednesday he will retire rather than seek another term in Congress as the steady if reluctant wingman for President Donald Trump, sending ripples through a Washington already on edge and spreading new uncertainty through a party bracing for a rough election year.

84. Insurers Look to Pass Drug Price Breaks Straight to Consumer -

Some major health insurers plan to take a little sting out of prescription drug prices by giving customers rebates at the pharmacy counter.

Aetna and UnitedHealthcare both say they will begin passing rebates they get from drugmakers along to some customers starting next year. They could spark a trend: The idea has been championed by President Donald Trump, and it's something other bill-payers like major employers might consider.

85. UTHSC Addiction Center To Host Opioid Forums -

The Center for Addiction Science at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center and the Memphis Area Prevention Coalition will present forums April 18 and 19 to educate health care providers, first responders and the public on recognizing and treating opioid use disorder.

86. Study: Stop-Smoking Drugs Chantix, Zyban Pose No Heart Risks -

CHICAGO (AP) – Two popular stop-smoking drugs are as safe for the heart as nicotine patches and dummy pills, according to research requested by U.S. and European regulators.

The results come from an extension of a big study of Chantix and Zyban that earlier found no increased risks for severe psychiatric problems including suicidal behavior. Those findings were reported in 2016.

87. State of Flux -

Anyone paying attention to recent news headlines alone should have a pretty good indication that health care in the U.S. – really anywhere you look, on local, state or national levels – remains a byzantine, expensive proposition. Health care keeps getting more expensive. It involves navigating a lot of paperwork with bureaucratic legalese that bears the fingerprints of a tangle of stakeholders, including insurers, doctors and lawmakers.

88. Tracing Civil Rights Struggle Through Travel -

Attention is on Memphis this year with the MLK50 commemoration to honor Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. on the 50th anniversary of his assassination on April 4, 1968. Keeping this focused on travel, I believe it’s a good time to point out some of the newer civil rights sites across the U.S., along with a few that have been around for a while – all opportunities to honor King’s legacy while trying to better understand the struggle.

89. Midlife 'Wealth Shock' May Lead to Death, Study Suggests -

A big financial loss may shorten your life, a new study suggests.

Middle-aged Americans who experienced a sudden, large economic blow were more likely to die during the following years than those who didn't. The heightened danger of death after a devastating loss, which researchers called a "wealth shock," crossed socio-economic lines, affecting people no matter how much money they had to start.

90. CDC: Drug-Resistant 'Nightmare Bacteria' Pose Growing Threat -

"Nightmare bacteria" with unusual resistance to antibiotics of last resort were found more than 200 times in the United States last year in a first-of-a-kind hunt to see how much of a threat these rare cases are becoming, health officials said Tuesday.

91. Data Back Up AP Poll: Little Progress on Civil Rights Issues -

Fifty years after the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr., American perceptions of progress toward racial equality remain largely divided along racial lines, a recent AP-NORC poll shows.

The majority of African-Americans surveyed saw little to no progress toward equal treatment in key areas that the civil rights movement sought to address. White respondents frequently portrayed a rosier picture. A review by the Associated Press shows that the available data more often align with African-Americans' less optimistic reflection of their reality.

92. Perry Leading Fire Museum Forward as Executive Director -

Shannon Perry became executive director of the Fire Museum of Memphis earlier this year, a role that brings her back to the institution she helped launch in the 1990s, when she served as its first curator. As executive director, Perry is the Fire Museum’s only full-time employee, and she handles a range of functions – including its collection, exhibits and facilities, budgets, fundraising, public relations, special events, staff and volunteers – while also working directly with the museum’s board.

93. Studies Link Legal Marijuana With Fewer Opioid Prescriptions -

NEW YORK (AP) – Can legalizing marijuana fight the problem of opioid addiction and fatal overdoses? Two new studies in the debate suggest it may.

Pot can relieve chronic pain in adults, so advocates for liberalizing marijuana laws have proposed it as a lower-risk alternative to opioids. But some research suggests marijuana may encourage opioid use, and so might make the epidemic worse.

94. Selfie Medicine: Phone Apps Push People to Take Their Pills -

SEATTLE (AP) – Take two tablets and a selfie? Your doctor's orders may one day include a smartphone video to make sure you took your medicine.

Smartphone apps that monitor pill-taking are now available, and researchers are testing how well they work when medication matters. Experts praise the efficiency, but some say the technology raises privacy and data security concerns.

95. Experts To Weigh In On Health Care Landscape -

Eight years after the Affordable Care Act was signed into law, the cost of health insurance premiums bought in marketplace exchanges locally has seen a big spike so far in 2018.

That’s according to a new report out from the Urban Institute, which notes among other things an average 32 percent jump nationwide between 2017 and 2018 for the exchanges’ lowest-priced “silver” plans.

96. Last Word: Graceland Responds, The Hustle's First Season and Memphis Rent -

Sun Studio getting a fresh coat of paint Tuesday as city road crews were redoing some lines on Downtown streets including turning arrows in the left curb lane that always need pointing out to visitors baffled by the Memphis enigma that is one-way streets.

97. Lawsuit Challenges FDA Delay of E-Cigarette Review -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Several anti-smoking groups are suing the Food and Drug Administration over a decision by Trump administration officials to delay the review of e-cigarettes.

The lawsuit filed Tuesday in federal court argues that the FDA didn't follow proper requirements last year when it decided to push back the deadline for makers of e-cigarettes to submit their products for review. The groups say the delay poses a threat to children's health.

98. UTHSC Adds Infectious Disease Institute -

Dr. Colleen Jonsson, director of the Regional Biocontainment Laboratory at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center, will be taking her work in infectious disease research to a new level as director of a new institute at UTHSC.

99. Dentist Group Puts Teeth in Push to Curb Opioid Painkillers -

CHICAGO (AP) – The American Dental Association wants dentists to drastically cut back on prescribing opioid painkillers.

The association announced a new policy Monday that "essentially says eliminate opioids from your arsenal if at all possible," said Dr. Joseph Crowley, the group's president. The Chicago-based group represents around 161,000 dentists.

100. Nearly $240,000 Grant Headed to St. Jude -

The National Cancer Institute has awarded a grant of almost $240,000 to St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital.

The money will be used for research into pediatric cancer survivorship outcomes and interventions.