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Editorial Results (free)

1. Major Violent Crime Drops In Latest Crime Stats -

Major violent crime for the first quarter of 2018 was down 5.1 percent in Memphis compared to a year ago and down 4.9 percent countywide over the same period.

The crime statistics from the Memphis-Shelby Crime Commission and the University of Memphis Public Safety Institute released Tuesday, April 17, show major property crime was up 2.8 percent in the city and increased 4.5 percent countywide from the first three months of 2017.

2. Regional Win -

In an increasingly interconnected world, having a cohesive economic regionalism strategy is becoming more of a must-have for successful metropolitan areas.

To facilitate this, the Urban Land Institute held Memphis’ first RegionSmart Summit in 2016 to gather all of the area’s government, economic development and community leaders in one place to collectively address some of the region’s most pressing planning and development issues.

3. Last Word: TNReady Blinks Again, Gov. Debate Thoughts and Mud Island's Museum -

There was a point Thursday morning during the troubled TNReady testing at some Tennessee school districts when there was a “brief” slow down in the online testing, according to the Tennessee Education commissioner’s office. By noon that had been resolved and more than 250,000 completed tests had been submitted since testing began Monday. One can only imagine what some of the thoughts were in the office during the slow down and the gap between how long the slow down seemed and how long it actually was.

4. Mississippi University Tuition to Rise 4 Percent, on Average -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — Mississippi's eight public universities plan to raise tuition by an average of 4 percent next fall, saying lingering effects from state budget cuts two years ago require them to get more revenue from students.

5. History Upgrade -

Mud Island’s Mississippi River Museum will have a shorter season than the rest of the river park.

The park on the southern half of Mud Island opened for the season April 14 during a changing of the guard at the Riverfront Development Corp., which runs the park for the city.

6. Major Violent Crime Drops In Latest Crime Stats -

Major violent crime for the first quarter of 2018 was down 5.1 percent in Memphis compared to a year ago and down 4.9 percent countywide over the same period.

The crime statistics from the Memphis-Shelby Crime Commission and the University of Memphis Public Safety Institute released Tuesday, April 17, show major property crime was up 2.8 percent in the city and increased 4.5 percent countywide from the first three months of 2017.

7. Amanda Dunham Talks Changes At East Memphis’ Grove Grill -

Twenty years after The Grove Grill opened in Laurelwood Shopping Center, the restaurant is reinventing itself with modernized decor and the recently launched Third Thursday monthly tasting series. Helping drive the changes are chef Chip Dunham – the son of Grove Grill owners Jeff and Tracey Dunham – and his wife, beverage director Amanda Dunham, who both joined the restaurant after moving to Memphis last July.

8. Major Violent Crime Drops In Latest Crime Stats -

Major violent crime for the first quarter of 2018 was down 5.1 percent in Memphis compared to a year ago and down 4.9 percent countywide over the same period.

The crime statistics from the Memphis-Shelby Crime Commission and the University of Memphis Public Safety Institute released Tuesday, April 17, show major property crime was up 2.8 percent in the city and increased 4.5 percent countywide from the first three months of 2017.

9. UTHSC Addiction Center To Host Opioid Forums -

The Center for Addiction Science at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center and the Memphis Area Prevention Coalition will present forums April 18 and 19 to educate health care providers, first responders and the public on recognizing and treating opioid use disorder.

10. Last Word: Mud Island Changes, Zoo Parking and Capitol Hill Revolt On UT Board -

This could be your last chance to see the Mississippi River Museum at Mud Island River Park as it has been for about the last 30 years. The park on the southern half of Mud Island opens for the season Saturday. The museum will be open only through July 4 is what is billed as a “limited run” followed by a public engagement process for “reimagining how we tell the story of the Mississippi River in a 21st century way,” according to park general manager Trey Giuntini in a Thursday press release.

11. What Statewide Candidates Say About Opioid Crisis, Public Safety -

The spread of opioid abuse claimed over 1,600 lives in Tennessee in 2016, and it is getting worse. Methamphetamine abuse, while not getting the headlines, has increased. Gun violence and murder is increasing. What proposals do our candidates have to help Tennesseans address these public safety issues?

12. April 13-19, 2018: This week in Memphis history -

1968: Striking Memphis sanitation workers vote to accept a pay raise of 15 cents an hour from the city, ending their strike after 64 days. Ten cents of the raise will go into effect in May, with the other 5 cents being added on Sept. 1.
The amount has come up before in the negotiations, which are being watched closely by The White House and federal labor officials following the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. on April 4. Memphis Mayor Henry Loeb balks at the proposal presented by his team, saying he would agree to a raise effective with the new fiscal year beginning July 1 and not before. He also says the raise will be less than 15 cents an hour. Philanthropist Abe Plough secretly agrees to pay the difference needed for the entire pay raise starting May 1, contributing a total of $60,000 to cover the cost. Plough’s role remains a secret until his death in 1984.

13. IRS Head Sees Huge Task Ahead to Administer New Tax Law -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The acting head of the IRS says the current tax-filing season has gone well, while acknowledging the tough challenge the cash-strapped agency faces of administering the new tax law that will affect 2019 returns.

14. Third Annual RegionSmart Summit to Be Held April 26 -

More than 300 government, economic development and community leaders will gather at the third annual RegionSmart Summit this month to discuss some of the Mid-South’s biggest planning issues.

Hosted by the Mid-South Mayors’ Council and the Urban Land Institute’s local affiliate, ULI Memphis, the April 26 summit at the Halloran Centre for Performing Arts & Education will tackle topics such as the future of workforce development, transportation and land use.

15. Ryan Bowing Out, Sending Ripples of Uncertainty Through GOP -

WASHINGTON (AP) – House Speaker Paul Ryan announced Wednesday he will retire rather than seek another term in Congress as the steady if reluctant wingman for President Donald Trump, sending ripples through a Washington already on edge and spreading new uncertainty through a party bracing for a rough election year.

16. Insurers Look to Pass Drug Price Breaks Straight to Consumer -

Some major health insurers plan to take a little sting out of prescription drug prices by giving customers rebates at the pharmacy counter.

Aetna and UnitedHealthcare both say they will begin passing rebates they get from drugmakers along to some customers starting next year. They could spark a trend: The idea has been championed by President Donald Trump, and it's something other bill-payers like major employers might consider.

17. UTHSC Addiction Center To Host Opioid Forums -

The Center for Addiction Science at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center and the Memphis Area Prevention Coalition will present forums April 18 and 19 to educate health care providers, first responders and the public on recognizing and treating opioid use disorder.

18. Study: Stop-Smoking Drugs Chantix, Zyban Pose No Heart Risks -

CHICAGO (AP) – Two popular stop-smoking drugs are as safe for the heart as nicotine patches and dummy pills, according to research requested by U.S. and European regulators.

The results come from an extension of a big study of Chantix and Zyban that earlier found no increased risks for severe psychiatric problems including suicidal behavior. Those findings were reported in 2016.

19. State of Flux -

Anyone paying attention to recent news headlines alone should have a pretty good indication that health care in the U.S. – really anywhere you look, on local, state or national levels – remains a byzantine, expensive proposition. Health care keeps getting more expensive. It involves navigating a lot of paperwork with bureaucratic legalese that bears the fingerprints of a tangle of stakeholders, including insurers, doctors and lawmakers.

20. Tracing Civil Rights Struggle Through Travel -

Attention is on Memphis this year with the MLK50 commemoration to honor Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. on the 50th anniversary of his assassination on April 4, 1968. Keeping this focused on travel, I believe it’s a good time to point out some of the newer civil rights sites across the U.S., along with a few that have been around for a while – all opportunities to honor King’s legacy while trying to better understand the struggle.

21. Midlife 'Wealth Shock' May Lead to Death, Study Suggests -

A big financial loss may shorten your life, a new study suggests.

Middle-aged Americans who experienced a sudden, large economic blow were more likely to die during the following years than those who didn't. The heightened danger of death after a devastating loss, which researchers called a "wealth shock," crossed socio-economic lines, affecting people no matter how much money they had to start.

22. CDC: Drug-Resistant 'Nightmare Bacteria' Pose Growing Threat -

"Nightmare bacteria" with unusual resistance to antibiotics of last resort were found more than 200 times in the United States last year in a first-of-a-kind hunt to see how much of a threat these rare cases are becoming, health officials said Tuesday.

23. Data Back Up AP Poll: Little Progress on Civil Rights Issues -

Fifty years after the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr., American perceptions of progress toward racial equality remain largely divided along racial lines, a recent AP-NORC poll shows.

The majority of African-Americans surveyed saw little to no progress toward equal treatment in key areas that the civil rights movement sought to address. White respondents frequently portrayed a rosier picture. A review by the Associated Press shows that the available data more often align with African-Americans' less optimistic reflection of their reality.

24. Perry Leading Fire Museum Forward as Executive Director -

Shannon Perry became executive director of the Fire Museum of Memphis earlier this year, a role that brings her back to the institution she helped launch in the 1990s, when she served as its first curator. As executive director, Perry is the Fire Museum’s only full-time employee, and she handles a range of functions – including its collection, exhibits and facilities, budgets, fundraising, public relations, special events, staff and volunteers – while also working directly with the museum’s board.

25. Studies Link Legal Marijuana With Fewer Opioid Prescriptions -

NEW YORK (AP) – Can legalizing marijuana fight the problem of opioid addiction and fatal overdoses? Two new studies in the debate suggest it may.

Pot can relieve chronic pain in adults, so advocates for liberalizing marijuana laws have proposed it as a lower-risk alternative to opioids. But some research suggests marijuana may encourage opioid use, and so might make the epidemic worse.

26. Selfie Medicine: Phone Apps Push People to Take Their Pills -

SEATTLE (AP) – Take two tablets and a selfie? Your doctor's orders may one day include a smartphone video to make sure you took your medicine.

Smartphone apps that monitor pill-taking are now available, and researchers are testing how well they work when medication matters. Experts praise the efficiency, but some say the technology raises privacy and data security concerns.

27. Experts To Weigh In On Health Care Landscape -

Eight years after the Affordable Care Act was signed into law, the cost of health insurance premiums bought in marketplace exchanges locally has seen a big spike so far in 2018.

That’s according to a new report out from the Urban Institute, which notes among other things an average 32 percent jump nationwide between 2017 and 2018 for the exchanges’ lowest-priced “silver” plans.

28. Last Word: Graceland Responds, The Hustle's First Season and Memphis Rent -

Sun Studio getting a fresh coat of paint Tuesday as city road crews were redoing some lines on Downtown streets including turning arrows in the left curb lane that always need pointing out to visitors baffled by the Memphis enigma that is one-way streets.

29. Lawsuit Challenges FDA Delay of E-Cigarette Review -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Several anti-smoking groups are suing the Food and Drug Administration over a decision by Trump administration officials to delay the review of e-cigarettes.

The lawsuit filed Tuesday in federal court argues that the FDA didn't follow proper requirements last year when it decided to push back the deadline for makers of e-cigarettes to submit their products for review. The groups say the delay poses a threat to children's health.

30. UTHSC Adds Infectious Disease Institute -

Dr. Colleen Jonsson, director of the Regional Biocontainment Laboratory at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center, will be taking her work in infectious disease research to a new level as director of a new institute at UTHSC.

31. Dentist Group Puts Teeth in Push to Curb Opioid Painkillers -

CHICAGO (AP) – The American Dental Association wants dentists to drastically cut back on prescribing opioid painkillers.

The association announced a new policy Monday that "essentially says eliminate opioids from your arsenal if at all possible," said Dr. Joseph Crowley, the group's president. The Chicago-based group represents around 161,000 dentists.

32. Nearly $240,000 Grant Headed to St. Jude -

The National Cancer Institute has awarded a grant of almost $240,000 to St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital.

The money will be used for research into pediatric cancer survivorship outcomes and interventions.

33. Rhodes College Senior Named Watson Fellow -

Jennifer Bitterly, a senior English and philosophy major at Rhodes College, has been named a Watson Fellow, a prestigious designation that includes a stipend to be used for travel and study abroad for 2018-2019.

34. Prescription for Tragedy -

He has his own GPS, an internal shield that keeps him from driving anywhere near 637 Poplar Ave. Home to the Memphis morgue. That’s where they showed Jerry Davidson his 22-year-old son, Oliver, his eyes closed and his lips purple.

35. Rhodes College Senior Named One of 40 US Watson Fellows -

Jennifer Bitterly, a senior English and philosophy major at Rhodes College, has been named a Watson Fellow, a prestigious designation that includes a stipend to be used for travel and study abroad for 2018-2019.

36. Last Word: SCS Plans For $15, IRIS Matinees and The Hard Hit Fund -

“From a financial standpoint, we need our fans back and we need them back now.” University of Memphis president David Rudd breaking the university’s silence on the basketball coaching change that was made formal Tuesday with the announcement that Penny Hardaway is indeed the new coach. And Hardaway had a lot to say that Tigers fans and Memphians wanted to hear.

37. Events -

The Project Management Institute Memphis Chapter will meet Wednesday, March 21, at 6 p.m. at the Crescent Club, 6075 Poplar Ave., suite 909. Author and life coach Jasmin Nuhic will present “Create your development plan; no one else should.” Reel 2 Reel Photography will be on hand offering optional professional headshots for $20, so arrive early and dress professionally. Register at pmimemphis.org.

38. MERI Rebrands With Genesis Legacy Donor Program -

Following years of significant growth for its whole-body donor program, the Medical Education and Research Institute (MERI) and Genesis Legacy of Life are rolling out a comprehensive rebrand of their services and spaces.

39. Nearly $240,000 Grant Headed to St. Jude -

The National Cancer Institute has awarded a grant of almost $240,000 to St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital.

The money will be used for research into pediatric cancer survivorship outcomes and interventions.

40. Events -

Memphis Brooks Museum of Art hosts its final community engagement session to gather feedback on its Downtown relocation Tuesday, March 20, from 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. at Memphis fire headquarters (the site of Brooks’ future home), 65 S. Front St. Museum officials are seeking input as they begin the process of selecting an architect and creating a vision for the new space. Free and open to the public, but RSVPs requested via the Facebook event. See facebook.com/brooksmuseum for details.

41. Olford Ministries Continues to Influence the World -

The man who reportedly most influenced the Rev. Billy Graham’s ministry left a legacy in Memphis that still impacts people from all over the world.

42. For Some Defrauded Students, Only Partial Loan Forgiveness -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Department of Education has begun notifying some former Corinthian Colleges students that it will forgive only one-half or less of their federal student loans, even though the students were defrauded by the now-defunct schools, The Associated Press has learned.

43. Events -

The Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development brings its apprenticeship listening tour to Memphis Monday, March 19, from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. in Southwest Tennessee Community College’s Bert Bornblum Library art gallery, 5983 Macon Cove. The goal of the tour is to determine the current state and future of area apprenticeship programs. Visit tn.gov/ecd/apprenticeship-tour.html for details and to RSVP.

44. Feds Award $570K For Civil Rights History Projects -

The U.S. Department of the Interior and the National Park Service announced $570,000 in funding Monday, March 12, for three projects that focus on the history of the civil rights movement in Memphis.

45. Federal Grant of Almost $400K Headed to UTHSC -

The National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases has awarded a grant of $392,494 to the University of Tennessee Health Science Center for developmental research on treatments for osteoporosis.

46. Events -

Memphis Brooks Museum of Art hosts its final community engagement session to gather feedback on its Downtown relocation Tuesday, March 20, from 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. at Memphis fire headquarters (the site of Brooks’ future home), 65 S. Front St. Museum officials are seeking input on several topics as they begin the process of selecting an architect and creating a vision for the new space. Free and open to the public, but RSVPs requested via the Facebook event. See facebook.com/brooksmuseum for details.

47. Federal Grant of Almost $400K Headed to UTHSC -

The National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases has awarded a grant of $392,494 to the University of Tennessee Health Science Center for developmental research on treatments for osteoporosis.

48. Events -

Circuit Playhouse will present “James and the Giant Peach” Friday, March 16, through April 8 at 51 S. Cooper St. Visit playhouseonthesquare.org for times and tickets.

49. Tariffs Lift Hopes for Jobs in American Mill Towns -

In the heart of America's diminished steel country, support for President Donald Trump's tariffs on imports is broad and bipartisan. It is tempered, though, by a strong streak of realism.

Trump's tariffs are expected to raise U.S. prices for steel and aluminum. That would help domestic producers and create several hundred new steelworker jobs.

50. Feds Award $570K For Civil Rights History Projects -

The U.S. Department of the Interior and the National Park Service announced $570,000 in funding Monday, March 12, for three projects that focus on the history of the civil rights movement in Memphis.

51. MERI, Genesis Foundation Announce Rebrand -

Memphis-based Medical Education and Research Institute and Genesis Legacy of Life have announced a rebrand of their services and spaces.

Serving medical professionals across the country, MERI is a nonprofit educational bioskills lab and service provider. Genesis Legacy of Life (genesislegacy.org) is MERI’s willed whole-body donor program and will now be known as the Genesis Legacy Whole Body Donation Foundation.

52. Digest -

Memphis Grizzlies Suffer 15th Consecutive Loss

The Grizzlies lost their 15th straight game, 119-110 at Chicago, on Wednesday, March 7.

The team has not won since defeating the Phoenix Suns at FedExForum on Jan. 29.

53. Study Finds False Stories Travel Way Faster Than the Truth -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Twitter loves lies. A new study finds that false information on the social media network travels six times faster than the truth and reaches far more people.

And you can't blame bots; it's us, say the authors of the largest study of online misinformation.

54. MERI, Genesis Foundation Announce Rebrand -

Memphis-based Medical Education and Research Institute and Genesis Legacy of Life have announced a rebrand of their services and spaces.

55. UnitedHealthcare to Pass Drug Rebates On to Some Customers -

The nation's biggest health insurer will pass drugmaker rebates along to some customers starting next year, giving a potential break to those taking expensive prescriptions.

UnitedHealthcare said Tuesday it will let people covered by certain employer-sponsored health plans collect rebates when they fill prescriptions or at the point of sale. Those rebates could amount to a few bucks or several hundred dollars, depending on the drug.

56. Trey Carter Honored Among Top 35 Millennial Influencers -

Patrick “Trey” Carter III has been named one of the Top 35 Millennial Influencers in the Country by the Next Big Thing Movement, a global network of more than 20,000 young professionals and creatives. Carter, president of Olympic Career Training Institute and an active community volunteer, is the only Tennessean to be included on the list. He will be honored Saturday, March 10, at NBTM’s Forward Conference in New York City alongside other influencers, including “The Daily Show” host Trevor Noah, Teen Vogue editor Elaine Welteroth and YouTube vlogger Tyler Oakley.

57. Members of Congress Lay Wreath at Site of King Assassination -

MEMPHIS – About a dozen Democrats and Republicans prayed and sang "Amazing Grace" during a solemn ceremony Friday at the site where the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated nearly 50 years ago, marking the start of a three-day congressional "pilgrimage" to sites with ties to the civil rights era in the South.

58. Trump to Impose Tariffs on Imports of Steel and Aluminum -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Determined to protect vital American industries, President Donald Trump declared Thursday that he will impose tariffs on steel and aluminum imports, dramatically raising the possibility of a trade showdown with China and other key trading partners.

59. May Primaries Feature More Candidates, Women -

The May 1 Shelby County primary ballot is set, with 33 Republicans and 50 Democrats seeking 23 county offices – specifically the right to advance as the nominees of their respective parties to the August county general election.

60. Driving the Dream -

The aim of United Way of the Mid-South’s “Driving the Dream” project is still the same: Provide the means for more people to lift themselves out of poverty and, over time, achieve self-sufficiency.

61. Events -

The National Civil Rights Museum and the University of Memphis Benjamin L. Hooks Institute for Social Change will present “The Poverty Report: Memphis Since MLK” during a forum and panel discussion Tuesday, Feb. 27, from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. at NCRM, 450 Mulberry St. The report details how African-Americans and the poor have fared in Memphis and Shelby County over the past 50 years. Cost is free. RSVP at civilrightsmuseum.org.

62. Events -

The Voices of the South Writing Cabaret will meet Monday, Feb. 26, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at TheatreSouth, 1000 S. Cooper St. (in the First Congregational Church basement). At the start of the evening, participants receive a writing prompt and write for an hour, then everyone is given the opportunity to share what they have written. Cost is free; one drink minimum. Visit voicesofthesouth.org.

63. Events -

Hattiloo Theatre will perform “Selma: A Musical Tribute to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.” Friday, Feb. 23, through March 18 at Hattiloo, 37 S. Cooper St. The dramatic musical captures prominent moments such as the Montgomery Bus Boycott and the crossing of the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Alabama. Visit hattiloo.org for showtimes and tickets.

64. Rev. Billy Graham, Known as 'America's Pastor,' Dies at 99 -

MONTREAT, N.C. (AP) – The Rev. Billy Graham, the magnetic, movie-star-handsome preacher who became a singular force in postwar American religious life, a confidant of presidents and the most widely heard Christian evangelist in history, died Wednesday at 99.

65. Weaver Joins Paragon Bank As Senior Loan Officer -

Steve Weaver has been appointed senior vice president, senior loan officer, at Paragon Bank. He brings with him more than 27 years’ experience in the banking industry, most recently at Simmons Bank, where he served as Southwest Tennessee market president and spearheaded the institution’s entry into the Memphis market in 2013.

66. Report: 6 UT Employees Violated Sexual Misconduct Policies -

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — In the last two years, six cases of sexual misconduct by faculty or staff at the University of Tennessee Knoxville led to those employees resigning or disciplinary action being taken.

67. Signing Class Disappointing, But Groundwork Laid -

Tennessee football fans are hoping for a better National Signing Day in 2019. This year’s was a relative dud.

New coach Jeremy Pruitt, hired on Dec. 7, signed six players on Feb. 7 but whiffed on several high-profile recruits he and his staff were pursuing. He had signed 14 players during the first-ever early signing period Dec. 20-22.

68. Last Word: The Mural Takedown, Corker's Calculation and Beale Crowd Control -

Cue the organ music from the old-fashioned television soap operas: As the weekend began, city public works crews had painted over – either completely or partially – a lot of the Paint Memphis program murals on the west side of Willett near Lamar. That would be the ones city council members complained about and others that no one complained about.

69. FedEx Institute of Technology Makes New Strides in Innovation -

The FedEx Institute of Technology at the University of Memphis has been laying the groundwork for a few years now via hires and launching specific industry focuses to become the center of technology and innovation in the city.

70. Med-Tech Company Hooks Up With FedEx Institute -

The University of Memphis has signed a memorandum of understanding that will help bring the U.S. operations of Waterloo, Canada-based medical technology company DayaMed to Memphis.

The company, a leading provider of mobile medical devices and patient-centric data analytics, will located in the university area and plans to work with the FedEx Institute of Technology’s Biologistics Research Cluster.

71. Canada Med-Tech Company Launching Memphis Presence -

The University of Memphis has signed a memorandum of understanding that will help bring the U.S. operations of Waterloo, Canada-based medical technology company DayaMed to Memphis.

The company, a leading provider of mobile medical devices and patient-centric data analytics, plans to locate in the university area and work with the FedEx Institute of Technology’s Biologistics Research Cluster.

72. Nasdaq Vice President Talks Up Blockchain in Memphis -

The guest speaker at this month’s Economic Club of Memphis luncheon discussed blockchain technology, a subject that has filtered into the mainstream conversation. Presenting the topic to a roomful of bankers and business leaders also gave it additional prominence at a time when blockchain-related news has been multiplying.

73. House Republicans Working to Plan to Avert Another Shutdown -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The era of trillion-dollar budget deficits is about to make a comeback – and a brewing budget deal could mean their return comes just next year. In the meantime, House GOP leaders are grappling with the need to pass legislation to avert another government shutdown at midnight on Thursday.

74. US Services Firms Record Strongest Performance Since 2005 -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The U.S. services sector boomed in January, registering the best performance since 2005 and delivering more evidence of American economic strength.

The Institute for Supply Management, a trade group of purchasing managers, said Monday that its services index hit 59.9 last month, up from 56 in December and the highest since it reached 61.3 in August 2005. Anything above 50 signals that the sector is expanding. The services sector is now on a 96-month winning streak.

75. St. Jude Awarded NIAID Grant -

The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases has awarded $202,039 to St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital for allergy, immunology and transplantation research.

U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen of Memphis announced the grant Friday, Feb. 2, saying the funds “will allow the researchers and doctors at St. Jude to continue their important work to improve the health and well-being of all children.”

76. Hooks Institute Elects New Advisory Board Chair -

The Benjamin L. Hooks Institute for Social Change advisory board has elected Darin Johnson as its new chair. Johnson, who is a senior vice president at First Tennessee Bank, has served on the Hooks Institute advisory board since August 2016.

77. Digest -

Memphis Toys R Us

To Remain Open

A representative with Toys R Us has confirmed to The Daily News that the retailer’s Memphis location, at 7676 Polo Ground Blvd., won’t close after all.

78. Hooks Institute Elects New Advisory Board Chair -

The Benjamin L. Hooks Institute for Social Change advisory board has elected Darin Johnson as its new chair. Johnson, who is a senior vice president at First Tennessee Bank, has served on the Hooks Institute advisory board since August 2016.

79. Amazon, Buffett And JPMorgan Join Forces on Health Care -

Three of corporate America's heaviest hitters – Amazon, Warren Buffett and JPMorgan Chase – sent a shudder through the health industry Tuesday when they announced plans to jointly create a company to provide their employees with high-quality, affordable care.

80. For-Profit Loan Forgiveness Program Could See Major Cut -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Education Department's plan to provide only partial loan forgiveness to some students defrauded by for-profit colleges could reduce overall payments by about 60 percent, according to a preliminary analysis obtained by The Associated Press.

81. Ford Outlines Budget Process As Memphis’ New CFO -

Shirley Ford has been named chief financial officer for the city of Memphis. Ford, who was selected to be CFO by Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland and confirmed by the City Council, has served as the city’s comptroller since 2014. She has more than 30 years of financial, accounting and managerial experience. In addition, she is a certified public accountant and a certified municipal finance officer as designated by the state comptroller.

82. Local Crime Statistics Show General Crime Rise, Drop in Murders -

Year-end crime statistics from the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation and the Memphis-Shelby Crime Commission confirm a drop in the murder rate for 2017 compared to the city’s record murder rate in 2016.

83. Year End Stats Show Violent Crime Up In Memphis, Murders Down -

Year-end crime statistics from the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation and the Memphis-Shelby Crime Commission confirm a drop in the city and countywide murder rates for 2017 compared to the city’s record murder rate in 2016. But the numbers also show violent crime as a general category increased in 2017 from 2016 by 8.3 percent in the city and 7.9 percent countywide, including the city of Memphis.

84. Study Confirms Flu Increases Risk of Heart Attack in Elderly -

NEW YORK (AP) – As if the flu wasn't bad enough already: Researchers have confirmed that flu sharply increases the risk of heart attack for older people.

Doctors have long known that flu can trigger heart problems. It's one of the reasons flu shots are recommended for nearly everyone.

85. Atlanta Development Proposal Just Happens to be Amazon-Sized -

ATLANTA (AP) – As Atlanta vies for Amazon's second headquarters, a developer just happens to be proposing a $5 billion downtown project with 9.3 million square feet (87 million square meters) of office space – more than three times the amount in the Empire State Building.

86. Dunavant Awards Will Feature Hardy As Keynote -

As a lifelong Memphian and successful entrepreneur, Carolyn Hardy is all about finding new ways to grow the city.

87. Humane Society Names Davis 2018 Board President -

Ted Davis has been named 2018 president of the board of directors for the Humane Society of Memphis and Shelby County. Davis, who is a wealth adviser for Regions Bank, joined the humane society board in December 2015. His first priority was a campaign inspiring adopters to become donors, which led him to being the Paw Prints Gala committee chair in 2017.

88. FedEx Institute Partners With Data Analytics Leader -

Analytics leader SAS is locating a first-of-its-kind training center at the FedEx Institute of Technology at the University of Memphis, with the goal being to increase the flow of data-savvy workers into the Mid-South.

89. FedEx Institute Partners With Data Analytics Leader -

Analytics leader SAS is locating a first-of-its-kind training center at the FedEx Institute of Technology at the University of Memphis, with the goal being to increase the flow of data-savvy workers into the Mid-South.

90. Last Word: A New Majority, A Plan After Kroger and Cold Cases -

Shelby County elections administrator Linda Phillips has been watching the ebb and flow of petitions for the 2018 elections and has found what she believes is a link to the weather. “Apparently when the dreaded ‘snow’ word is mentioned in the forecast, not only do people go out and clear the shelves of milk, bread and eggs. They also decide to pick up a petition,” she wrote in an email with the list of who has pulled and who has filed in the last two days.

91. Global Reach -

Jasbir Dhaliwal wears many titles – and carries many responsibilities – at the University of Memphis. He is vice provost of academic affairs and dean of the graduate school. He is chief innovation officer and the executive director of the FedEx Institute of Technology.

92. Walmart Boosts Starting Pay, Closing Dozens of Sam's Clubs -

NEW YORK (AP) – Walmart confirmed Thursday that it is closing dozens of Sam's Club warehouse stores across the country – a move that seems sure to cost jobs – on the same day it announced that it was boosting its starting salary for U.S. workers and handing out one-time bonuses to others.

93. CW/CA Adds Fenton As Marketing, Research Director -

Laura Fenton has joined Cushman & Wakefield/Commercial Advisors as director of marketing and research. CW/CA’s Marketing & Research department serves as the commercial real estate firm’s in-house agency for brokers and clients, and in her role, Fenton leads strategic communication, marketing and research for business development initiatives, marketing on behalf of clients, public relations, advertising, internal communications, social media and community involvement. 

94. Retail Workers Feel Disruption From Shifting Shopper Habits -

NEW YORK (AP) – With new options and conveniences, there's never been a better time for shoppers. As for workers ... well, not always.

The retail industry is being radically reshaped by technology, and nobody feels that disruption more starkly than 16 million American shelf stockers, salespeople, cashiers and others. The shifts are driven, like much in retail, by the Amazon effect – the explosion of online shopping and the related changes in consumer behavior and preferences.

95. US Hits Record for Costly Weather Disasters: $306 Billion -

WASHINGTON (AP) – With three strong hurricanes, wildfires, hail, flooding, tornadoes and drought, the United States tallied a record high bill last year for weather disasters: $306 billion.

96. Last Word: The Stay Away Plan, Kroger and the Lamar Gateway and Silo Square -

City Hall says ignore and avoid the two parks that used to have Confederate monuments and the Tennessee Welcome Center Saturday. All could be the scene of gatherings Saturday by groups opposed to the removal of the monuments including white nationalist groups. If this sounds familiar it’s because this was the city’s strategy in 1998 when a Klan group from Indiana rallied on the courthouse steps and there was a marked departure from that in 2013 when another Klan group – also from Indiana also rallied at the courthouse – different set of steps though. More on the history behind all of this when next we meet.

97. Decade Since Recession: Thriving Cities Leave Others Behind -

As the nation's economy was still reeling from the body blow of the Great Recession, Seattle's was about to take off.

In 2010, Amazon opened a headquarters in the little-known South Lake Union district – and then expanded eight-fold over the next seven years to fill 36 buildings. Everywhere you look, there are signs of a thriving city: Building cranes looming over streets, hotels crammed with business travelers, tony restaurants filled with diners.

98. In a Milestone Year, Gene Therapy Finds a Place in Medicine -

After decades of hope and high promise, this was the year scientists really showed they could doctor DNA to successfully treat diseases. Gene therapies to treat cancer and even pull off the biblical-sounding feat of helping the blind to see were approved by U.S. regulators, establishing gene manipulation as a new mode of medicine.

99. US Stocks Mount Milestone-Shattering Run in 2017 -

Taken a look at your stock portfolio lately? It's a good bet it's racked up solid gains for the year.

Wall Street has taken stock investors on a mostly smooth, record-shattering ride in 2017. The major stock indexes made double-digit gains for the year, led by Apple, Facebook and other technology stocks.

100. Democrats Look to Cooperate on Key Issues -

With the state’s budget projected to be tight and lawmakers lining up to run for re-election in 2018, the coming legislative session isn’t expected to yield many surprises.

But the 110th General Assembly still has a long row to hoe as the session starts Jan. 9 with new legislative offices and committee rooms in the renovated Cordell Hull Building in downtown Nashville.