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Editorial Results (free)

1. Studying 1 Million People to End Cookie-Cutter Health Care -

WASHINGTON (AP) – In a quest to end cookie-cutter health care, U.S. researchers are getting ready to recruit more than 1 million people for an unprecedented study to learn how our genes, environments and lifestyles interact – and to finally customize ways to prevent and treat disease.

2. Data Breaches Hurt Consumers and Businesses -

I recently served on a panel with an assistant U.S. attorney and a postal inspector talking about identity theft and offering advice on how to avoid becoming a victim. The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) and other organizations also offer tips.

3. Public Shaming Likely but GOP Wary of New Laws After Equifax -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Prospects are good for a public shaming in the Equifax data breach, but it's unlikely Congress will institute sweeping new regulations after hackers accessed the personal information of an estimated 143 million Americans.

4. Children's Foundation Donates $2M to Memphis Medical Institutions -

The Children’s Foundation of Memphis is donating $2 million to endow a chair of excellence at Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital and establish the first cerebral palsy research center in the southeastern United States.

5. Consumer Packaging Group to Reduce Confusing Food Labels -

NEW YORK (AP) – "Sell by?" ''Display Until?" ''Best Before?" These food date labels intend to help shoppers figure out what to throw away, but they're also mixed up with deadlines for retailers as well. That causes confusion among shoppers who can't figure out what they all mean on a can of beans or a bag of pasta. As a result, shoppers discard food that is either safe or usable after the date to the tune of $29 billion a year in the U.S. alone.

6. Epidemic at Work? Businesses Forced to Deal With Drug Abuse -

NEW YORK (AP) – After a troubled youth himself, Phillip Cohen made it a practice to hire people at his woodworking business who have also struggled with addiction and mental health issues. But when an employee died from a drug overdose, he adopted a zero-tolerance policy.

7. Events -

The Memphis 3.0 comprehensive planning process continues this week with two public workshops studying growth scenarios for the city through 2040. Participants will go through an exercise to identify which values are most important to drive future development, then select and amend a preferred scenario based on those values. Workshops are Wednesday, Sept. 20, from 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. at the Whitehaven Golf Course, 750 E. Holmes Road, and Thursday, Sept. 21, from 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. at McFarland Community Center, 4955 Cottonwood Road. Visit memphis3point0.com for details.

8. Events -

The Orpheum Theatre will kick off its 2017-18 Broadway season with Rodgers & Hammerstein’s “The King & I” Tuesday, Sept. 19, through Sept. 24 at 203 S. Main St. Visit orpheum-memphis.com.

9. West Cancer Fundraiser Set for This Weekend -

The West Cancer Center’s signature fundraising event, West Fight On: Cycle. Run. Walk, is set to take place at Shelby Farms Park this weekend.

10. West Cancer Fundraiser Set for This Weekend -

The West Cancer Center’s signature fundraising event, West Fight On: Cycle. Run. Walk, is set to take place at Shelby Farms Park this weekend.

11. Action on Student Loan Forgiveness Delayed as Rules Revised -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Tens of thousands of former students who say they were swindled by for-profit colleges are being left in limbo as the Trump administration delays action on requests for loan forgiveness, according to court documents obtained by The Associated Press.

12. American Household Income Finally Topped 1999 Peak Last Year -

WASHINGTON (AP) – In a stark reminder of the damage done by the Great Recession and of the modest recovery that followed, the median American household only last year finally earned more than it did in 1999.

13. Events -

The Project Management Institute Memphis Chapter will meet Wednesday, Sept. 13, at 6 p.m. at the Crescent Club, 6075 Poplar Ave., suite 909. Luke Pruett, recruiting director for City Leadership, will present “Why Millennials Believe in Memphis.” Visit pmimemphis.org.

14. Events -

NAWBO Memphis will present “Leaping the Million Dollar Hurdle” Tuesday, Sept. 12, from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Crescent Club, 6075 Poplar Ave. Clarion Security founder and CEO Kim Heathcott will share how she grew her business, tackled her first million-dollar hurdle and kept going to become Memphis’ largest female-owned business employer. Register at nawbomemphis.org.

15. Events -

NAWBO Memphis will present “Leaping the Million Dollar Hurdle” Tuesday, Sept. 12, from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Crescent Club, 6075 Poplar Ave. Clarion Security founder and CEO Kim Heathcott will share how she grew her business, tackled her first million-dollar hurdle and kept going to become Memphis’ largest female-owned business employer. Register at nawbomemphis.org.

16. Events -

Rhodes College will host “The Book Thief” author Markus Zusak for an interactive conversation about the book and the larger questions it raises Thursday, Sept. 12, at 6 p.m. in McNeill Concert Hall on Rhodes’ West Campus, 613 University St. Zusak’s presentation is part of the 2017 Memphis Reads program. Free and open to the public. Visit rhodes.edu for details.

17. Halvorson Assumes New Role At Cumberland Trust -

Independent corporate trust firm Cumberland Trust has promoted Rebecca M. Halvorson to senior vice president of business development and manager of regional markets. Halvorson, who joined Cumberland in 2010, is based in the company’s Memphis office.

18. Survey: US August Factory Activity at 6-Plus Year High -

WASHINGTON (AP) – U.S. factories expanded at a brisk pace in August, a likely sign of strength for the U.S. economy as new orders, production and employment all improved.

The Institute for Supply Management said Friday that its manufacturing index rose to 58.8 percent last month from 56.3 percent in July. Anything above 50 signals that factory activity is increasing.

19. Fewer Americans Buying Insurance in Coastal Areas -

PLANTATION, Fla. (AP) – Amanda Spartz nearly did not renew her home's flood insurance policy after her first year in Florida. Two hurricanes came close to the Fort Lauderdale suburbs last year, but they didn't hit and her home isn't in a high-risk flood zone. She figured she could put the $450 annual premium, due next week, to another use.

20. ‘Light It Gold’ Plans in Place For Childhood Cancer -

The Chris Hope Foundation plans to flood the city of Memphis with a sea of gold in September in recognition of Childhood Cancer Awareness Month.

The foundation, along with families affected by childhood cancer, city of Memphis officials and the community will gather Saturday, Sept. 2, at Tiger Lane for the Light It Gold Memphis kickoff. The evening of awareness, games, entertainment, food and more takes place under the glow of the Liberty Bowl Memorial Stadium, which will be lit up in gold for the occasion.

21. Exposure on 901 Day To Proceed as Planned -

Exposure on 901 Day, New Memphis Institute’s celebration of all things Memphis on the city’s unofficial holiday – 9/01 – will go on as planned Friday, Sept. 1.

Held again this year at AutoZone Park, Exposure will feature the second annual local celebrity kickball game, local entertainment and performance artists, and 150 local organizations hosting interactive opportunities for community engagement.

22. FedEx Institute Invests In 8 New Technologies -

The FedEx Institute of Technology recently awarded development grants for eight new technologies to researchers from across the University of Memphis.

The grants, totaling $160,000, were awarded to the most commercially promising technologies to promote faculty innovations, plus support the protection and commercialization of inventions made by faculty and researchers.

23. St. Jude Lets Scientific Community Tap Into, Build on Its Research -

St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital has taken another step forward in an ongoing effort to effectively open source the hospital’s expertise, research and discoveries, with the hospital now formally opening up its Childhood Solid Tumor Network to a wider audience.

24. Tax Overhaul Faces Resistance From Fans of Some Deductions -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Donald Trump and congressional Republicans have pledged to overhaul the nation's complex tax code. To slash taxes, they say they'll curb a web of expensive deductions and credits to allow more revenue to flow to the government.

25. Events -

The 2017 Delta Fair & Music Festival runs Friday, Sept. 1, through Sept. 10 at Agricenter International, 7777 Walnut Grove Road. Enjoy live music, festival food, carnival rides, a petting zoo and special events like lawnmower races and the “redneck yacht pull.” Visit deltafest.com for hours and tickets.

26. US Clears First 'Living Drug' for Tough Childhood Leukemia -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Opening a new era in cancer care, the Food and Drug Administration on Wednesday approved the first treatment that genetically engineers patients' own blood cells into an army of assassins to seek and destroy childhood leukemia.

27. Exposure on 901 Day To Proceed as Planned Friday -

Exposure on 901 Day, New Memphis Institute’s celebration of all things Memphis on the city’s unofficial holiday – 9/01 – will go on as planned Friday, Sept. 1.

Held again this year at AutoZone Park, Exposure will feature the second annual local celebrity kickball game, local entertainment and performance artists, and 150 local organizations hosting interactive opportunities for community engagement.

28. Events -

The 2017 Delta Fair & Music Festival runs Friday, Sept. 1, through Sept. 10 at Agricenter International, 7777 Walnut Grove Road. Enjoy live music, festival food, carnival rides, a petting zoo and special events like lawnmower races and the “redneck yacht pull.” Visit deltafest.com for hours and tickets.

29. ICCC Program Attracts Local Business Owners -

More than 100 local entrepreneurs received mentoring and coaching on Tuesday, Aug. 29, to help them grow their small businesses. The Inner City Capital Connections program at the FedEx Institute of Technology on the University of Memphis campus returned after first coming to Memphis in August 2014.

30. Inner City Capital Connections Program Attracts Local Business Owners -

More than 100 local entrepreneurs received mentoring and coaching on Tuesday, Aug. 29, to help them grow their small businesses.

The Inner City Capital Connections program at the FedEx Institute of Technology on the University of Memphis campus returned after first coming to Memphis in August 2014. The ICCC program was developed by the Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (ICIC), a nonprofit research and strategy organization.

31. Events -

Indie Memphis will screen “Obit,” a documentary chronicling the daily rituals of the New York Times obituary writers, as part of the Indie Wednesday film series Wednesday, Aug. 9, at 7 p.m. at Malco Ridgeway Cinema Grill, 5853 Ridgeway Center Parkway. General admission is $10; Indie Memphis members get in free. Visit indiememphis.com to buy tickets and view an Indie Wednesday series schedule.

32. Confederate Emblems Attacked Statewide -

Germantown aldermen approved a resolution Monday, Aug. 28, to “combat hate, extremism and bigotry” with two of the five aldermen, John Barzizza and Dean Massey, abstaining.

33. ‘Light It Gold Memphis’ Raises Childhood Cancer Awareness -

The Chris Hope Foundation plans to flood the city of Memphis with a sea of gold in September in recognition of Childhood Cancer Awareness Month.

The foundation, along with families affected by childhood cancer, city of Memphis officials and the community will gather Saturday, Sept. 2, at Tiger Lane for the Light It Gold Memphis kickoff. The evening of awareness, games, entertainment, food and more takes place under the glow of the Liberty Bowl Memorial Stadium, which will be lit up in gold for the occasion.

34. A Different Body of Work Emerges For The Hereafter -

With the cost of traditional casket funerals rising to an average of $9,000 or more, many people are choosing less expensive options like cremation and donating their bodies to science. Numerous “green” options for cremated remains such as biodegradable urns or even using ashes for tree planting, use in rebuilding coral reefs, for stones for jewelry or for tattoos and portraits are gaining popularity.

35. The Week Ahead: Aug. 28-Sept. 3 -

Hey, Memphis! It’s time to celebrate 901 Day – but not before you hit Tiger Lane Thursday for the University of Memphis Tigers’ season-opening football game. Plus, check out “the prince of kosher gospel” in concert and more hot happenings in The Week Ahead...

36. Regions, FedEx Backing Business Seminar -

Regions Bank is joining FedEx Corp. to provide financial backing for a seminar for business owners this week that will include 20 Regions bankers providing customized business coaching for entrepreneurs.

37. 9/01 in the 901 -

What started as an esoteric online conversation five years ago has grown into a massive citywide event to celebrate all the best parts of the Bluff City.

Though only in its second official year, attendance is expected to be high for Exposure at 901 Day, a free event that will be held at AutoZone Park from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. on, you guessed it – Sept. 1.

38. Studies: Automated Safety Systems Are Preventing Car Crashes -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Safety systems to prevent cars from drifting into another lane or that warn drivers of vehicles in their blind spots are beginning to live up to their potential to reduce crashes significantly, according to two studies released Wednesday.

39. Analysts say Trump's warning to Pakistan could backfire -

ISLAMABAD (AP) — President Donald Trump's warning to Pakistan to put an "immediate" end to harboring militants operating in Afghanistan didn't spell out the consequences of defiance or suggest a new strategy to get it to yield to longstanding U.S. demands, analysts said Tuesday.

40. Memphis College of Art Offers New Program for Fashion Studies -

Memphis College of Art and the Memphis Fashion Design Network have teamed up to launch a Fashion Design Certificate Program that starts this fall.

The program will consist of seven classes – from Draping Textiles to the Business of Fashion – held at MCA that will span nine months. As a non-degree program, the idea is to give participants who may not want to go back for another degree to instead get a Fashion Design Certificate, which can be used as an industry credential.

41. Fairgrounds Plan Will Consider Familiar Items -

The Fairgrounds redevelopment plan forming on a fast track will probably look familiar as far as the elements proposed for it.

“We are starting with the premise that we are using the previous planning efforts as insight for how we move forward,” Paul Young, city of Memphis Housing and Community Development director said on the WKNO/Channel 10 program “Behind The Headlines.”

42. Science Says: DNA Test Results May Not Change Health Habits -

NEW YORK (AP) – If you learned your DNA made you more susceptible to getting a disease, wouldn't you work to stay healthy?

You'd quit smoking, eat better, ramp up your exercise, or do whatever else it took to improve your odds of avoiding maladies like obesity, diabetes, heart disease or cancer, right?

43. Stronger Penalties Alone Won’t Solve State’s Opioid Crisis -

Rep. Bryan Terry deals with patients from every demographic caught up in the web of opiates.

Patients have an array of tolerance to opioids, as well, from those currently addicted to those who are recovering addicts. As a result, each patient requires an “individualized” anesthetic based on their background and the procedure or surgery they’re to have, says Terry, a Murfreesboro anesthesiologist.

44. Crosstown High School Gets $2.5 Million XQ Institute Grant -

A year from opening, organizers of Crosstown High School have secured a $2.5 million, five-year grant from a national education reform group focused specifically on high schools.

“It puts us in a much greater financial position,” said Chris Terrill, Crosstown High executive director. “But more important than the financial revenue is the connection we make to the XQ network of people.”

45. Survey Ranks Memphis 98th On Places to Retire List -

With the second-best adjusted cost of living score but a ranking of 143 in quality of life, Memphis finished 98th of 150 in a 2017 Retirement Confidence Survey from the Employee Benefit Research Institute on the best and worst places to retire.

46. Interest High in Fairgrounds Fast Track -

The shorter, more compressed drive to a Fairgrounds redevelopment plan feels, at the outset, more certain and much less tentative than versions that surfaced during the administrations of previous mayors Willie Herenton and A C Wharton.

47. Charting a Course -

Daphne Large, founder, CEO and president of Data Facts Inc., didn’t have her company certified as a woman-owned business for 25 years. “I don’t want to be chosen because I’m a woman, but because I’m the best,” Large said, voicing a sentiment that many women business owners agree with.

48. Hooks Institute Lands $20K For HAAMI Program -

The Benjamin L. Hooks Institute at the University of Memphis has received a $20,000 grant from the SunTrust Foundation to support the Hooks African-American Male Initiative (HAAMI).

The institute launched HAAMI in 2016 to increase the retention and graduation rates of black male students at the University of Memphis. Current data shows that for first-time, full-time students who graduated within a four-year period, black males have an average graduation rate of 10.6 percent, significantly less than all other groups. The Hooks Institute’s efforts with HAAMI are intended to help create prosperity for African-American males, which in turn helps to collectively benefit the lives of all Memphians and create positive social change.

49. Women-Owned Businesses Chart Progress of Diversity Contracting Efforts -

Daphne Large, founder, CEO and president of Data Facts Inc., didn’t get her company certified as a woman-owned business for 25 years.

50. Hooks Institute Lands $20K To Support HAAMI Program -

The Benjamin L. Hooks Institute at the University of Memphis has received a $20,000 grant from the SunTrust Foundation to support the Hooks African-American Male Initiative (HAAMI).

The institute launched HAAMI in 2016 to increase the retention and graduation rates of black male students at the University of Memphis. Current data shows that for first-time, full-time students who graduated within a four-year period, black males have an average graduation rate of 10.6 percent, significantly less than all other groups. The Hooks Institute’s efforts with HAAMI are intended to help create prosperity for African-American males, which in turn helps to collectively benefit the lives of all Memphians and create positive social change.

51. Events -

The Construction Specifications Institute-Memphis will meet Thursday, Aug. 10, at 11:30 a.m. at the Holiday Inn University of Memphis, 3700 Central Ave. Brett Ragsdale and Jason Jackson of brg3s will discuss the University of Tennessee Health Science Center Interprofessional Simulation Center. Visit csimemphis.org for details on upcoming events.

52. Arkansas Task Force To Study Dicamba Weed Killer -

Arkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson has directed Secretary of Agriculture Wes Ward and Plant Board director Terry Walker to convene and co-chair a task force to review the dicamba technology, investigate current problems with its use and application, and make long-term recommendations for the future.

53. Lawsuits Allege Poor Medical Care at Tennessee Jail -

HUNTSVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A jail in Tennessee is accused in three federal lawsuits of not providing adequate medical care to its inmates.

The Knoxville News Sentinel reported on Monday the lawsuits were brought on behalf of inmates Tammy Brawner, Benny Shane Pemberton and Jesse Perry, all of whom allegedly suffered ailments while incarcerated at the Scott County Jail.

54. American Paper Optics, St. Jude Promote Safe Solar Eclipse -

In anticipation of the historic solar eclipse Aug. 21, Bartlett-based American Paper Optics (APO) is partnering with St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital to educate the public on safe solar eclipse viewing.

55. St. Jude Signs Agreement To Commercialize Vaccine -

St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital and the Serum Institute of India have signed a licensing agreement to complete the development and commercialization of a St. Jude vaccine against the respiratory syncytial virus, a virus that causes serious lower respiratory infections.

56. City Reopens Fairgrounds Planning Process -

About two weeks after unveiling a concept plan for Memphis riverfront development, Mayor Jim Strickland’s administration has reactivated a dormant city move to redevelop the Mid-South Fairgrounds.

57. Last Word: St. Jude School, More Gannett Moves and Maida Pearson Smith -

For most, the school year starts next week. But classes are already underway at St. Jude’s new Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, an idea 15 years in the making, according to the physician who had that idea. The school is a big step in higher education in Memphis and its road to research center status.

58. Strickland Reopens Fairgrounds Redevelopment Planning -

By the end of the year, the administration of Mayor Jim Strickland plans to have a specific enough plan for Fairgrounds redevelopment to take an application for a Tourism Development Zone to state officials for approval.

59. Older People Dying on Job at Higher Rate Than All Workers -

Older people are dying on the job at a higher rate than workers overall, even as the rate of workplace fatalities decreases, according to an Associated Press analysis of federal statistics.

It's a trend that's particularly alarming as baby boomers reject the traditional retirement age of 65 and keep working. The U.S. government estimates that by 2024, older workers will account for 25 percent of the labor market.

60. Arkansas Officials Not Ready to OK 75 mph Limit on Highways -

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) – While a new Arkansas law that took effect Tuesday authorizes speeds of up to 75 mph on some major highways, state highway officials said, "Not so fast."

Engineers are still studying road designs and traffic patterns to determine whether Arkansas should join 18 other states with speed limits at least that high, Department of Transportation spokesman Danny Straessle said Tuesday. It's possible that no part of the state's 16,432-mile highway system can handle that speed, and there's a chance that some speed limits will have to be lowered because of higher traffic counts.

61. 2 Arkansas Community Colleges Merge -

FORREST CITY, Ark. (AP) – A technical institute in eastern Arkansas has merged with a neighboring community college.

The Arkansas Democrat-Gazette reports the Arkansas Higher Education Coordinating Board voted Monday in favor of merging Crowley's Ridge Technical Institute and East Arkansas Community College.

62. HealthChoice Promotes Henning To Director of Population Health -

Sarah Henning has been promoted to director of population health programs at HealthChoice. Henning previously served as manager of the department. In her new role, Henning is responsible for designing, implementing and managing population health and wellness initiatives and programs for the HealthChoice network.
She also collaborates with stakeholders to promote and support these programs and to ensure they meet the needs of the affected populations and adapt with the changing health care environment.

63. Last Word: Gentrification, ServiceMaster's New CEO Speaks and Gateway Resolution -

Gentrification in Binghampton? The g-word is a term that can start a real debate in Memphis these days. But those leading the hard fought redevelopment in Binghampton say a tax increment financing district there would mean an immediate capital infusion of $332,000 that would help to ward off the possibility of gentrification.

64. St. Jude Signs Agreement To Commercialize New Vaccine -

St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital and the Serum Institute of India have signed a licensing agreement to complete the development and commercialization of a St. Jude vaccine against the respiratory syncytial virus, a virus that causes serious lower respiratory infections.

65. St. Jude Signs Agreement to Commercialize New Vaccine -

St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital and the Serum Institute of India have signed a licensing agreement to complete the development of and commercialize a St. Jude vaccine against the respiratory syncytial virus, a virus that causes serious lower respiratory infections.

66. AIA Tennessee Convention Takes on Edge District -

More than 300 architects who are attending the American Institute of Architects of Tennessee annual convention in Memphis will take on a project of how to make the Edge District, which lies between the Memphis Medical District and Downtown, more livable.

67. UTHSC Researcher Wins Grant to Fight Strep Throat -

Dr. James Dale, the Gene H. Stollerman Professor of Medicine and chief of the Division of Infectious Diseases at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center, has won a $3.9 million grant from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.

68. Violent Crime Up Locally Almost 10 Percent -

Major violent crime in Memphis and countywide was up almost 10 percent for the first six months of 2017 compared to the first half of 2016, the Memphis-Shelby Crime Commission reported July 21.

Major violent crime as a general category was up 9.9 percent for Memphis and 9.3 percent countywide even as the rate of murders – one of four specific categories that make up the general category – dropped 12.2 percent citywide and 14.9 percent countywide from a year ago.

69. U of M Professor Chairs International Conferences -

University of Memphis professor Xiangen Hu recently served as the local arrangement chair for the 18th International Conference on Artificial Intelligence in Education (AIED) and as conference chair for the 10th International Educational Data Mining Conference, both in Wuhan, China.

70. Arkansas Technical Institute, Community College To Merge -

FORREST CITY, Ark. (AP) – A technical institute in Arkansas plans to merge with a neighboring community college.

The Times-Herald (http://bit.ly/2uFwsMV) reports the board of trustees at Crowley's Ridge Technical Institute voted 3-2 to merge with East Arkansas Community College. All three members who voted in favor of the merge were appointed this week by Gov. Asa Hutchinson.

71. NCAA Rule Ending Two-a-Days Forcing Teams to Adjust -

The two-a-day football practices that coaches once used to toughen up their teams and cram for the start of the season are going the way of tear-away jerseys and the wishbone formation.

As part of its efforts to increase safety, the NCAA approved a plan this year that prevents teams from holding multiple practices with contact in a single day.

72. Brain Disease Seen in Most Football Players in Large Report -

CHICAGO (AP) – Research on 202 former football players found evidence of a brain disease linked to repeated head blows in nearly all of them, from athletes in the National Football League, college and even high school.

73. U of M Professor Chairs International Conferences -

University of Memphis professor Xiangen Hu recently served as the local arrangement chair for the 18th International Conference on Artificial Intelligence in Education (AIED) and the conference chair for the 10th International Educational Data Mining conferences, both held in Wuhan, China.

74. UTHSC Researcher Wins Grant to Fight Strep Throat -

Dr. James Dale, the Gene H. Stollerman Professor of Medicine and chief of the Division of Infectious Diseases at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center, has won a $3.9 million grant from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.

75. Violent Crime Up Locally Almost 10 Percent -

Major violent crime in Memphis and countywide was up almost 10 percent for the first six months of 2017 compared to the first half of 2016, the Memphis-Shelby Crime Commission reported Friday, July 21.

76. Violent Crime Up Locally Almost 10 Percent -

Major violent crime in Memphis and countywide was up almost 10 percent for the first six months of 2017 compared to the first half of 2016, the Memphis-Shelby Crime Commission reported Friday, July 21.

77. Brain Scans May Change Care for Some People With Memory Loss -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Does it really take an expensive brain scan to diagnose Alzheimer's? Not everybody needs one but new research suggests that for a surprising number of patients whose memory problems are hard to pin down, PET scans may lead to changes in treatment.

78. Made-In-USA Goods Can Be Pricey and Elusive. Just Ask Trump -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Donald Trump's push this week to get Americans to buy goods "made in America" is harder than it might seem.

Even for Trump.

The gold-plated pens the president uses to sign laws are assembled in Rhode Island but lacquered and engraved in China. The Boeing jet he posed with to showcase America's industrial might is 30 percent foreign-made. The firetruck the administration parked at the White House this week to promote U.S.-made goods gets about 10 percent of its parts from abroad.

79. Will a Sugar Deal With Mexico Affect US Treat Prices? -

NEW YORK (AP) – Are Americans getting a raw deal on sugar prices?

President Donald Trump called a recent agreement on sugar with Mexico a "very good one" for both countries. But companies that make candy, cakes and other foods containing the sweetener say it will lead to Americans paying more than they already do.

80. Events -

The Metal Museum will host the “Cu in Summer: Inspirations” opening reception and sale Thursday, July 20, from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. at 374 Metal Museum Drive. The exhibition features works created by students ages 14-17 who participated in the museum’s six-week summer program. All proceeds go directly to the students. Visit metalmuseum.org.

81. Indie Memphis Announces Film Series Lineup -

Indie Memphis has announced the lineup for its “Indie Wednesday” film series, featuring narrative and documentary films, classics, festival encores and short-film programs throughout August, September and October.

82. Indie Memphis Announces Film Series Lineup -

Indie Memphis has announced its film lineup for August, September and October for its “Indie Wednesday” film series featuring narrative and documentary films, classics, festival encores and short-film programs.

83. Last Word: Overton Gateway Talks, Norris of the Governor's Race and Coach O -

Shelby County Commissioners have quite the disagreement going in several ways as they try to put another budget season in the books and let the ink dry. As we’ve reported, the commission approved a $1.2 billion county government budget Monday and there is no taking that back – at least as a budget. That now becomes an important detail because in committee sessions Wednesday in advance of next week’s meeting of the full commission, there were five votes to change the proposed county property tax rate from $4.10 to $4.13.

84. How to Avoid Digging With Spoons -

Legend has it that well-known 20th-century economist Milton Friedman once visited a canal-building site in China where thousands of people were digging with shovels to complete the project. Friedman asked the foreman why they didn’t bring in heavy equipment to get the job done better and faster. The foreman told him that would put a lot of people out of work. “In that case, why not have them dig with spoons?” Friedman said.

85. New Memphis Plans to Expand Programming for Millennials -

Through the end of this month, the New Memphis Institute is continuing the yearly Summer Experience it hosts each year that’s comprised of free events for local and visiting college students and recent graduates, all with a view toward encouraging them to put down roots in Memphis.

86. Events -

Talk Shoppe will meet Wednesday, July 12, from 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. in NovaCopy’s conference room, 7251 Appling Farms Parkway. Tim Marsh, special agent with the FBI Memphis Division, will present “Cyber Threats: Current and Emerging.” Cost is free. Visit talkshoppe.com.

87. Bullying 2.0: The Mean Co-Worker -

Growing up, it seemed like one of the perks of being an adult was a lack of bullies. After all, bullying stops after high school graduation, right? Unfortunately, this isn’t always the case. A few bullies sneak through life without giving up their bullying ways. Often, these meanies resurface at work, making your eight hours there much less rewarding.

88. Events -

Twilight Tuesday, Beale Street Landing’s free outdoor movie series, will feature “Captain America: Civil War” Tuesday, July 11, at 8:30 p.m. on the landing, 251 Riverside Drive. Bring a blanket or lawn chair and grab a spot on the landing’s sloping rooftop, with movies projected on a 24-foot screen at the bottom. Visit downtownmemphis.com for details.

89. Events -

The Bartlett Area Chamber will hold its monthly lunch meeting Tuesday, July 11, from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Unique Catering & Event Center, 2751 Bartlett Blvd. Guest speaker Mark Yoshida, partner/production director at Memphis Record Pressing, will present “Pressing for Success: How a Bartlett company took an old process and created a new opportunity.” Tickets are $20. RSVP at bartlettchamber.org by Monday, July 10.

90. First Tennessee Scores High Marks for Reputation -

A new report from the industry publication American Banker ranks First Tennessee Bank at No. 5 on a list of U.S. banks sorted by reputation.

91. Financing Set for New TAG Truck Center -

Financing has been completed for the new TAG Truck Center facility that will be located where the former Mall of Memphis once stood at 4451 American Way.

92. Events -

Memphis Area Legal Services, the Memphis Bar Association and the Access to Justice Committee will host a free legal advice and counsel clinic Saturday, July 8, from 10 a.m. to noon at the Benjamin L. Hooks Central Library, 3030 Poplar Ave. Volunteer attorneys provide free legal assistance on a first-come, first-served basis the second Saturday of each month. Visit malsi.org.

93. Financing Set for New TAG Truck Center -

Financing has been completed for the new TAG Truck Center facility that will be located where the former Mall of Memphis once stood at 4451 American Way.

94. Events -

The Metal Museum will host Whet Thursday: Young Professionals on Thursday, July 6, from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. at 374 Metal Museum Drive. Enjoy the museum and grounds for free while networking with other young professionals and enjoying food trucks and live music. Cost is free. Visit metalmuseum.org.

95. First Tennessee Scores High Marks for Reputation -

A new report from the industry publication American Banker ranks First Tennessee Bank at No. 5 on a list of U.S. banks sorted by reputation.

96. St. Jude Names Thomas VP Of Clinical Trials Operations -

Tangie Thomas has joined St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital as vice president of clinical trials operations. In that role, Thomas will lead support for clinical research at St. Jude and its affiliate sites, with duties that include implementing strategic goals, overseeing recruitment efforts and determining how resources are allocated for offices that support clinical research. Thomas previously served as director of clinical affairs at the Sarah Cannon Research Institute in Nashville.

97. Soy 'Milk'? Even Federal Agencies Can't Agree on Terminology -

NEW YORK (AP) – Dairy farmers want U.S. regulators to banish the term "soy milk," but documents show even government agencies haven't always agreed on what to call such drinks.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture "fervently" wanted to use the term "soy milk" in educational materials for the public, according to emails recently released in response to a lawsuit. That irked the Food and Drug Administration, the agency that oversees the rule defining milk as coming from healthy cows.

98. Survey: US Factory Activity Rises to Near a 3-Year High -

WASHINGTON (AP) – U.S. factories expanded at a robust pace in June, a likely sign of strength for the U.S. economy as new orders, production and employment each improved.

The Institute for Supply Management said Monday that its manufacturing index rose to 57.8 last month from 54.9 in May. Anything above 50 signals that factory activity is increasing. The measure now stands at its highest level since August 2014, pointing to solid economic growth.

99. Hamilton Eye Institute Director Earns Top Award -

Dr. James Fleming, director of the Hamilton Eye Institute at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center, has received the 2017 Outstanding Physician Award from the Tennessee Medical Association.

100. TBI: Most Charged With Violent Crimes Younger -

Tennessee Bureau of Investigation data for the first five months of 2017 shows more than 70 percent of Memphis Police Department arrests for murders and robberies were of suspects age 24 and younger.