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Editorial Results (free)

1. A New Benchmark -

Shelby Farms Park is gearing up for the second annual Mempho Music Festival and another chance to showcase the country’s largest urban park to a diverse and wide-reaching audience.
Memphis’ newest music festival is expecting a crowd of 20,000 on Oct. 6 and 7, which is impressive for a park two years out from a $70 million renovation embarked upon in 2010 with a distant vision for such an event.
The master plan for the park was designed not only for people to recreate and relax, but as a place to build community, and a music festival can be a big part of that, said Jen Andrews, executive director of Shelby Farms Park. Andrews has always had a larger vision for the park as a place where the community could come together and take ownership and pride in the best that Memphis has to offer.
Enter another visionary, native Memphian Diego Winegardner, founder of Mempho Fest and CEO of Big River Presents, which is putting on the festival. Winegardner grew up in Memphis and now lives outside of New York City where his day job is in finance and investment management. A couple of years ago on a trip home to Memphis he met some old friends for a bike ride at Shelby Farms Park.
“I was completely blown away,” Winegardner said. “The sun was setting on Hyde Lake, and I had this lightning-bolt moment of how special it would be to bring a world-class music festival to this site.
I thought about Memphis’ place in the annals of American music as the birthplace of blues, soul and R&B and the hip hop scene that we have here.
“If you think about the labels … Sun, Stax, Royal…I was exposed to all of that growing up, and seeing B.B. King on Beale Street was just normal,” he said. “I didn’t appreciate it until I was gone. I started to get really nostalgic about my hometown.”
Winegardner is a music enthusiast who has been to most of the notable music festivals in the U.S. and many around the world. He had the resources and connections to realize his dream. Last year, the first Mempho Fest kicked off with great success with 10,000 in attendance for two days of concerts featuring a variety of bands from different music genres.
“I’ve always been a big fan of (Memphis) and its people and a big defender of the city and its history,” Winegardner said. “This music festival was born out of my passion for music and my passion for the city of Memphis.”
When Winegardner first met with Andrews two years ago to pitch his idea, she caught his vision right away.
He approached it cautiously and wanted to understand how to protect the park and still give people a good experience, she said. “We like working with Diego,” she said. “They care about the park, and like us, have a big, bold vision, and they hired a professional team who knew how to put on a safe and fun event.”
This year’s festival will feature two days of multi-genre music headlined by Grammy Award-winning artist and hip-hop superstar Post Malone as well as Beck, Phoenix, NAS and Janelle Monae. Local talent like Lucero and alternative Mac deMarco also will perform, and there will be a special tribute to Willie Mitchell’s Royal Studios featuring the label’s past and present stars.
Sunday will feature performances by crowd favorites like George Clinton and Parliament Funkadelic and Stones Throw, Chuck Laevell’s Rolling Stones’ backer band.
The festival will not only expand in attendance, but will add a larger culinary and craft beer presence in addition to on-site camping and VIP and super-VIP experiences.
“We’re trying to create more than just music on a stage,” said Winegardner, who also created a nonprofit arm called Mempho Matters that will partner with organizations that line-up with the vision of the festival, such as Oceanic Global Foundation, #BringYourSoul, Learn to Rock and the Memphis Area Women’s Council’s “Memphis Says NO MORE” campaign.
As part of Mempho’s partnership with the Oceanic Global Foundation, the festival has a 100 percent waste-free goal, which will start with its no straw policy.
“A best practice environmental policy is important to help make sure the park is as pristine when we leave as when we showed up,” said Winegardner.
The partnership promoting the Memphis Area Women’s Council’s “NO MORE” campaign is to make sure that Mempho Fest’s female attendees feel safe. Winegardner, who has a teenage daughter, knows stories about the lack of safety for females at other events, prompting him to take up the cause.
“In this day and age, you really have to take a stand and make it an institutional part of our way of doing things,” he said.
Money raised through Mempho Matters will also benefit the Memphis community through contributions to musical education in the form of free tickets for students and teachers to attend the festival as well as instruments and money for music education in local schools.
Last year, Mempho Matters gave away 2,000 tickets to students and teachers.
“We want to build bridges into the community and be as inclusive as possible,” Winegardner said. “We want to educate the children and the youth of tomorrow about the history of Memphis musically and create a sense of pride for its citizens while also attracting new people and adding another chapter to Memphis’ long, rich history.”
Andrews is optimistic about the growth of Mempho Fest this year, projecting double the attendance in its second year as well as adding 400 weekend camping permits. Those include primitive camping, RV hookups and glamping.
“The camping option is an important part of festival culture, and one of the great benefits of the park is its tremendous scale, which can accommodate that,” Andrews said.
But the plan is to grow Mempho Fest slowly, she said.
“We learned a lot the first year, and we’re applying the learning to this year’s festival,” she said. “We have a strong plan for safely managing the crowd. We want this to be a world-class festival.”
Big River Productions and Winegardner have an undisclosed agreement with Shelby Farms Park, and both entities hope to continue the relationship.
“I’m hoping that Mempho Fest will become a long-term asset for the city of Memphis,” Winegardner said.
Music remains a big driver of visitors to Memphis — 56 percent of leisure visitors come to the city for something related to music, said Kevin Kane, president and CEO of Memphis Tourism, formerly called the Memphis Convention & Visitors Bureau. “We’re supporters of (Mempho Fest),” he said. “We believe in it and want to see it grow. Music festivals have a big impact on the economy. The more events we have based in music the better, and we think it’s great to utilize Shelby Farms in this way.”

2. Anniversary of Yellow Fever Epidemic Shows Ongoing Need in Community -

St. Mary’s Episcopal Cathedral dean Andy Andrews joked with Margery Wolcott over the weekend that her Constance Abbey street ministry has lasted longer than lots of restaurants do at five years.

3. Health, Educational and Housing Facility Board Moves to 20-Year PILOTs -

Developers of affordable housing say they hope to step up the pace of renovating and building new housing with affordable rents now that the city Health, Educational and Housing Facility Board can grant 20-year tax abatements instead of the maximum 10-year incentives it has been awarding since 2002.

4. Testimony Ends in Federal Case Questioning Memphis Police Surveillance Tactics -

After four days, the federal trial where the ACLU sued the city of Memphis over political surveillance of activists, ended Thursday, leaving the decision in the hands of U.S. District Judge Jon McCalla.

5. Crosstown Concourse Leaders Switch Financing -

Crosstown Concourse now has permanent financing that replaces a complex mosaic of financing from dozens of institutions that allowed the renovation and readaptation of the 1.5-million-square-foot landmark.

6. Trader Joe’s Moves Closer To Germantown Opening -

After years of waiting, anticipation and uncertainty over reports of Trader Joe’s arrival in the area, the California-based business is on the verge of opening its Germantown location.

The red-lettered Trader Joe’s sign recently was erected above the entrance to the former Kroger location at 2130 Exeter Road. The store is one of the main tenants in the Germantown Collection Shopping Center undergoing a makeover near the northeast corner of Exeter and Poplar Avenue.

7. New Life -

By this time next year, the formerly blighted Frayser Plaza will become Harmony Plaza, with Memphis STEM Academy as its anchor tenant and 100 percent occupancy. It’s part of a new trend of transforming out-of-date retail shopping centers into mixed-use, walkable concepts.

8. Trader Joe’s Moves Closer To Germantown Opening -

After years of waiting, anticipation and uncertainty over reports of Trader Joe’s arrival in the area, the California-based business is on the verge of opening its Germantown location.

The red-lettered Trader Joe’s sign recently was erected above the entrance to the former Kroger location at 2130 Exeter Road. The store is one of the main tenants in the Germantown Collection Shopping Center undergoing a makeover near the northeast corner of Exeter and Poplar Avenue.

9. Historic District Compromise Tabled Over State 'Threats' -

After months of discussions, compromises and amendments, the city council member sponsoring an ordinance giving the council more oversight of the local Landmarks Commission tabled the measure on third and final reading.

10. Historic District Compromise Tabled Over State 'Threats' -

After months of discussions, compromises and amendments, the city council member sponsoring an ordinance giving the council more oversight of the local Landmarks Commission tabled the measure on third and final reading.

11. Historic District Compromise Tabled Over State 'Threats' -

After months of discussions, compromises and amendments, the city council member sponsoring an ordinance giving the council more oversight of the local Landmarks Commission tabled the measure on third and final reading.

12. Trader Joe’s Moves Closer to Opening in Germantown -

After years of waiting, anticipation and uncertainty over reports of Trader Joe’s arrival in the area, the California-based business is on the verge of opening its Germantown location.

The red-lettered Trader Joe’s sign recently was erected above the entrance to the former Kroger location at 2130 Exeter. The store is one of the main tenants in the Germantown Collection Shopping Center undergoing a makeover near the northeast corner of Exeter and Poplar. 

13. Trump Appears to Change Story on Meeting with Russian Lawyer -

BRIDGEWATER, N.J. (AP) — President Donald Trump appears to have changed his story about a 2016 meeting at Trump Tower that is pivotal to the special counsel's investigation, tweeting that his son met with a Kremlin-connected lawyer to collect information about his political opponent.

14. New $95 Million Collierville High Gets Sunday Open House -

“It’s really not as daunting as it looks,” Collierville Schools superintendent John Aitken said Saturday, Aug. 4, as he took reporters on a tour of the $95 million Collierville High School. The new school had its formal opening with a Sunday afternoon ribbon cutting and has its first school day Aug. 13 when the Collierville Schools system academic year begins.

15. Collecting Online Sales Taxes No Cure-All For State -

Tennessee’s political officials are lauding the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision enabling states to effectively collect sales taxes from out-of-state online retailers.

But don’t expect the result of South Dakota v. Wayfair to be a watershed moment for the state budget. If you’re looking for a windfall to bolster education or house the homeless, close your eyes and dream on, because this likely isn’t about mo’ money, mo’ money.

16. Mayoral Security Comes with Controversy and Price Tag -

Some mayors and other elected officials have referred to it as “fan mail.” It ranges from explicit threats of violence to vague statements that could be taken as threats of physical harm or a prediction of defeat in the next election.

17. Strickland Defends Police Overtime for Personal Security -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland says he was reluctant initially to increase his security when he took office in 2016. Now in his third year of a four-year term, that has changed to include 24-hour police security on his home.

18. A Trade War Looms as Trump Slaps Tariffs on Chinese Imports -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Donald Trump brought the world's two biggest economies to the brink of a trade war Friday by announcing a 25 percent tariff on up to $50 billion in Chinese imports to take effect July 6.

19. Crosstown Crossroads -

When Octavia Young opened Midtown Crossing Grill in 2014, the area around what would eventually become the Crosstown Concourse was a lot different than it is now.

Though there were some agreements in place at the time, there were no guarantees that the wildly ambitious but risky project would a success, and even if it was, there was no telling how long it would take for that success to spill out into the surrounding neighborhood.

20. Convention Center Hotel Footprint Bigger Than 100 North Main -

Details of a tentative plan for a second convention center hotel at the 100 North Main Building show the conversion of the 53-year old skyscraper is just part of a plan that would have a larger footprint, taking in more Downtown real estate.

21. May 11-17, 2018: This week in Memphis history -

1976: An ad in The Daily News by Marx & Bensdorf offers a 170-acre estate at Holmes Road and Center Hill Road, then south of Collierville’s city limits, for sale for $1.1 million. The “picture book” estate is advertised as the one-time home of the state’s most famous walking horse, Carbon Copy, the 1964 world grand champion.

22. Not Taking Sides -

Elvis Presley Enterprises’ push to get city and county officials to back its plans for a Whitehaven arena hasn’t made very much progress, judging from discussions this month by the Memphis City Council and the Shelby County Commission.

23. Fall Creek Falls Project Leaves Destructive Trail -

The Fall Creek Falls Inn and Conference Center will soon be in ruins like the livelihoods of the state employees who worked there.

Fewer than half the state employees who worked at the inn found new state jobs after it closed in early April. Some are working for nearly half the pay, and some had to move away from Van Buren County or drive long distances to keep a job with the state.

24. 3D Realty Plans to Bring Additional Mixed-Use Communities to Memphis -

Fresh off the Shelby County Board of Adjustment’s April 25 unanimous vote to advance 3D Realty’s mixed-use community underneath the iconic Broad Avenue water tower, James Maclin says the company doesn’t intend on slowing down anytime soon.

25. Gibson Building Owners to Partner with Orgel Family -

The new owners of the Gibson Guitar Factory building in Downtown Memphis have partnered with a prominent local family to bring the prime parcel of land back to life. 

On Monday, April 30, New York-based real estate investment firm Somera Road Inc., which purchased the 150,000-plus-square-foot building and showroom located at 145 Lt. George W. Lee Ave. for $14.4 million in January, announced it would be partnering with Billy and Benjamin Orgel’s Orgel Family LP to redevelop the guitar factory.

26. When It Rains, It Pours -

Ray’s Take

I always have an umbrella in my car. Most of the time it just takes up space and I end up pushing it aimlessly around the car to make room for other things. And there are many months of the year when an umbrella seems utterly pointless. But in Memphis, when it rains, it pours, and when that day comes I’m happy to have it. 

27. One City, One Team: When a Memphis sports entity succeeds, everyone wins -

On the occasion of the home opener for the reigning Pacific Coast League champion Memphis Redbirds at AutoZone Park, new Memphis basketball coach Penny Hardaway was given the honor of throwing out the first pitch. Predictably, he received a standing ovation just for walking out to the pitching mound.

28. Luttrell Says County Pre-K Funding Source Likely to Differ From City’s -

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell probably won’t follow the city’s blueprint for funding universal prekindergarten in Shelby County.

29. The Week Ahead: March 19-25, 2018 -

Good morning, Memphis! Spring fever’s in the air as the equinox officially arrives Tuesday morning. Tell winter to take a hike at the new Heels 4 Healing 5K for St. Jude this weekend, then let the kids dance the blues away at a pair of family ballet events. Here’s what else you should know about in The Week Ahead…

30. Heir on the Side of Caution -

The closest and best parcel of land for a second convention center hotel in Downtown Memphis is the Mud Island parking garage. It’s a block away from the Memphis Cook Convention Center and is the first site that came up when a Denver developer approached the city last year about possibly building such a hotel.

31. Week Ahead: Feb.19-25 -

It seems the only thing consistent about this hot again, cold again weather is the rain. As we enter another week of the waning winter, there are plenty of events to keep you entertained. But don’t forget the umbrellas, Memphis!

32. DCA Planning to Add Community Amenities To Downtown HQ -

Creative communications consulting firm DCA has submitted plans to the Downtown Memphis Commission for some upgrades and new community-oriented amenities at its South Main headquarters.

DCA founder Doug Carpenter bought the 100-year-old former Nabisco warehouse at 11 W. Huling Ave. last April and relocated the firm there in December.

33. DCA Unveils New-Look Downtown HQ -

Creative communications consulting firm DCA has submitted plans to the Downtown Memphis Commission for some upgrades and new community-oriented amenities at its South Main headquarters.

DCA founder Doug Carpenter bought the 100-year-old former Nabisco warehouse at 11 W. Huling Ave. last April and relocated the firm there in December.

34. Christine Staples Joins Buckman As VP of Water Technologies -

Christine Staples recently joined Memphis-based Buckman as global vice president of water technologies. She comes to Buckman from Ecolab, where she held a number of executive leadership positions in both the water and energy industries.

35. Staples Joins Buckman As VP of Water Technologies -

Christine Staples recently joined Memphis-based Buckman as global vice president of water technologies. She comes to Buckman from Ecolab, where she held a number of executive leadership positions in both the water and energy industries.

36. Teaming Up -

Several factors have combined to upend business conditions at the Tunica casinos in recent years, but there is renewed optimism among gaming operators there who are discovering there is strength in numbers.

37. Shot Fired From Memphis Ignites Civil War Rematch -

Confederate Lt. Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest died in 1877, but 140 years later some people just can’t let their hero or the Old South go away.

In fact, the state Legislature is set to reignite the Civil War – to some degree – in 2018. We hope no gunshots are fired.

38. Lamar Avenue Mural Draws Council Contempt -

The state’s largest collaborative mural might be missing a few panels soon after a City Hall showdown Tuesday, Jan. 9, between the head of Paint Memphis and City Council members upset by the images on Lamar Avenue near Willett Street.

39. Splinter Creek Brings Eco-Living to Oxford -

OXFORD, Miss. (AP) — Splinter Creek housing development in Taylor, Miss. is gaining regional attention.

The owners, a mother-daughter team made up of Ellen Leakes and her daughters Elizabeth Keckler and Blair Wunderlich, were recently named one of Southern Living Magazine's Top Southern Tastemakers for 2018. The development, nestled right outside of Taylor, Miss., is a 650-acre plot of land with space for up to 26 homes, where structures are designed to take their cues from nature.

40. Attorney Wooten Joins Evans Petree as Shareholder -

Attorney William Allen Wooten has joined Evans Petree PC as a shareholder, working in the firm’s Memphis office as well as its new location at the current Wooten Law Firm in Covington, Tennessee.

41. Downtown Hotel Revival; Two Companies Look to Expand in Southwest Memphis -

5050 E. Holmes Road
Memphis, TN 38118

Project Cost: $720,000

Application Date: Dec. 20, 2017

42. Technicolor, Agilent Approved for Tax Incentives -

The Economic Development Growth Engine for Memphis and Shelby County approved a pair of tax abatements Wednesday, Dec. 20, that have the potential to affect more than 1,000 jobs in the county.

The payment-in-lieu-of-taxes agreement for California-based life sciences, diagnostics and applied chemical company Agilent Technologies would create 117 new jobs, while one for a division of multimedia production and distribution giant Technicolor would retain anywhere from 158 to 916 jobs.

43. Frayser Bauhaus -

Memphis' best and most unique example of art deco-international style Bauhaus architecture has been hiding in plain sight in Frayser for nearly 70 years.

Tens of thousands of daily motorists drive past the white, multilevel building at 3590 Thomas St., on the northeast corner of Thomas and Floyd Avenue, where curved windows look out on the highway down the hill and large trees landscape the slope to the street.

44. Sawyer, Goff Kick Off Commission Campaigns -

Tami Sawyer and Sam Goff may be seeing each other on the August county general election ballot. But between now and May, they have separate primary races for the District 7 seat on the Shelby County Commission.

45. Clarion's Heathcott Named NAWBO Women Business Owner of the Year -

Kim Heathcott, founder and CEO of Clarion Security, recently was named the National Association of Women Business Owners’ 2017 Women Business Owner of the Year. The award, one of NAWBO’s highest honors, recognizes an entrepreneur who excels at strategy, operations, finances and problem solving; overcomes adversity; and gives back to her community.
Heathcott, who founded Clarion in 2010 with one customer, has grown to 600 employees and around 90 customers.

46. Gradient’s Worthington Looks To Increase Access to Pain-Relief Device -

With an extensive history as a researcher in pain management and a dedication to assisting patients suffering from pain due to aging, activity or surgery, Dr. W. Bradley Worthington recently joined Memphis-based Gradient Medical, creator of the Quadrabloc wearable therapeutic magnetic device for managing pain, as its new chief medical officer. 

47. Trump Barges Into Tax Debate, Seeks Deeper Cut for Wealthy -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Donald Trump on Monday barged into congressional Republicans' carefully calibrated work on revamping the nation's tax code, calling for a steeper tax cut for wealthy Americans and pressing to add a contentious health care change to the mix.

48. Gibson Confirms Plans for New Memphis Facility -

Nashville-based guitar maker Gibson Brands Inc. confirmed Friday, Oct. 20, it is putting its Downtown Memphis factory on the market and plans to build and lease a new facility nearby.

49. Gibson Confirms Plans for New Memphis Factory -

Nashville-based guitar maker Gibson Brands Inc. confirmed Friday, Oct. 20, it is putting its Downtown Memphis factory on the market and plans to build and lease a new facility nearby.

The Gibson Beale Street Showcase and Guitar Factory opened more than 16 years ago at 145 Lt. George W. Lee Ave., across South B.B. King Boulevard from FedExForum.

50. Elvis Items to Hit Celebrity Auction Block on Nov. 11 -

Elvis collectors and fans will soon have the chance to own a piece of history when a variety of items once owned by the King become available.

GWS Auctions is auctioning off 150 celebrity items in an online event on Nov. 11, with an impressive array of memorabilia from Elvis, Hugh Hefner, Marilyn Monroe, Whitney Houston, JFK, Jackie O, Michael Jackson and more.

51. City Lays Out Numerous Options in Confederate Monuments Controversy -

The city administration and Memphis City Council laid out numerous paths forward in the Confederate monuments controversy Tuesday, Oct. 17, that include closing Health Sciences Park entirely or building a memorial to lynching victims in the park plaza where a statue of Nathan Bedford Forrest is now the centerpiece.

52. Crosstown Crossroads -

For the past 90 years, Crosstown has seen its share of ups and downs. In the beginning, it was a shining beacon for the city’s eastward expansion; at its height, it anchored several vibrant and diverse neighborhoods; and at its lowest, Crosstown became the poster child for once-great inner-city areas of Memphis that had deteriorated.

53. Fairgrounds Proposal Coming Into Focus -

Aaron Shafer saw the writing on the wall, so to speak, at the second public gathering toward a redevelopment plan for the Fairgrounds last week.

54. Hurricanes Deliver Pain And Important Message -

Tens of thousands are still dealing with the floods and aftermath of Hurricanes Harvey and Irma, even as at least one more storm approaches the U.S. mainland. It’s gut-wrenching to see all the devastation and havoc these storms have caused.

55. City Hall Stands Ready to Assist Brooks Museum -

The Memphis Brooks Museum of Art’s first and only home is owned by the city of Memphis, and the institution is the state’s largest art museum. Those two facts make city government more than an interested onlooker in what happens next as the museum’s board explores possibly moving out of Overton Park to a newly built facility elsewhere in the city.

56. Graceland: New Arena Not Competing With Forum -

Graceland plans to go to the Economic Development Growth Engine (EDGE) in the next week seeking a bigger percentage of the city and county property tax revenue from its 120-acre campus for a $50 million arena in Whitehaven.

57. Last Word: Back From Jury Duty, ASD Changes and Southern Heritage Classic Is Here -

Back from a very short-lived jury duty on a short week for the courts – criminal and civil. Even a slow week at the Criminal Justice Center is a learning experience about not only our criminal justice system but also the Constitutional framework that puts those notices in the U.S. mail and results in several hundred citizens at a time showing up in a jury assembly room after the adventure of trying to find parking Downtown.

58. Graceland Says New Arena Not Competition For Forum -

The managing partner of Graceland Holdings LLC says the plan for a new $40 million  to $50 million Whitehaven arena with 5,000 to 6,000 seats isn’t to compete with any venue in Memphis and Shelby County.

59. Dorothy Day House Plants New Roots in Midtown -

Sister Maureen Griner, the executive director of the Memphis chapter of the Dorothy Day House, says that every night in Memphis there are about 160 families who will be sleeping in a shelter or somewhere inhabitable.

60. New Cooper-Young Apartments Receive Green Light -

A contentious apartment complex slated for the heart of the Cooper-Young Historic District is moving forward after receiving the green light from the Memphis & Shelby County Board of Adjustment. But the board’s approval of the project Wednesday, Aug. 23, wasn’t a quick process.

61. Avison Young’s Memphis Office Uses Diversified Approach -

Eighteen months ago, real estate brokers Shane Soefker and Jacob Biddle decided they wanted to do things a little differently, so they left their jobs at a local brokerage firm and set off on their own.

62. Avison Young’s Memphis Office Finds Strength In Diversified Approach -

Eighteen months ago, real estate brokers Jacob Biddle and Shane Soefker decided they wanted to do things a little differently, so they left their jobs at a local brokerage firm and set off on their own.

63. Remaking Crosstown -

As he was leading tours through Crosstown Concourse this month, Todd Richardson took a small group to a set of windows for a balcony view of an addition being constructed on the north side of the property.

64. Tax Breaks Broaden For Residential, Retail Deals -

Some changes are coming in the rules surrounding incentives that the Economic Development Growth Engine for Memphis and Shelby County – or EDGE – can use for different kinds of development and for broader use of tax increment financing – or TIF – zones to sustain redevelopment.

65. Last Word: Kustoff at Rotary, Royal's Vibe and The Terms of MEMPOWER -

The investment group that renovated the Chisca resurfaced Tuesday evening with a plan for the Wonder Bread factory, vacant for the last four years. But don’t look for a return of the bread smell to the Edge area. And if you look at what has started to happen in that particular corridor since Wonder Bread shut down, the mixed-use plan has some precedent. Throw in the move to sell The Commercial Appeal property just a few blocks away and if the economy remains this good, the transformation in this area could be radical in another four years.

66. Binghampton, Uptown Redevelopment Efforts Move Forward While Waiting for the CRA -

If Binghampton can get a proposal for tax increment financing (TIF) approved by the end of the year, it would mean an immediate $332,000 in capital and an estimated $26 million over the 30-year life of the TIF zone to sustain and further grow commercial and residential development in the area.

67. Last Word: Freeze Warning, Corker on Obamacare Repeal and The Disney Example -

What do you call it when you expect a lot of trouble coming from a specific direction – with a detailed roadmap -- and a completely different controversy comes in from a different direction, hits and leaves a crater. Whatever you call it, that is what happened to Ole Miss football coach Hugh Freeze Thursday evening. Or did it?

68. Last Word: Fifth Wave, Hidden Gem in OB and the Freeze Filibuster -

There is one less contender in the crowded field of potential and declared candidates for the Republican nomination for Governor in 2018. State Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris of Collierville was nominated for federal court judge Thursday by President Donald Trump who also nominated Memphis attorney and former federal prosecutor Tommy Parker to the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Tennessee as well. Both are part of what The White House described as a “fifth wave” of judicial nominees.

69. Legislature Losing Some Powerful, Familiar Members -

A shakeup in leadership is looming for the state Legislature, though it may portend more of a change in personalities than party strength.

In the House, longtime Rep. Craig Fitzhugh, the affable Democrat from Ripley in West Tennessee, is preparing for a 2018 gubernatorial run, a move that would knock him out of his House seat, at least temporarily, and the position as Democratic Caucus leader.

70. County Commission Leans Back to $4.13 Tax Rate -

Shelby County Commissioners took a step Wednesday, July 12, toward taking back a 3-cent cut in the county property tax rate.

And in the budget committee session, commissioners favoring the tax cut to a $4.10 tax rate said they would reopen this week’s contentious budget debate if the $4.13 tax rate appears to have traction when the full commission meets Monday, July 17.

71. Commission Goes Back to $4.13 County Property Tax Rate -

Shelby County Commissioners took a step Wednesday, July 12, toward taking back a three-cent cut in the county property tax rate.

And in the budget committee session, commissioners favoring the tax cut to a $4.10 tax rate said they would reopen this week’s contentious budget debate if the $4.13 tax rate appears to have traction when the full commission meets Monday, July 17.

72. Need For Speed -

Access to high-speed broadband is a growing issue in Tennessee as technological advances in business and education become more digitally based. For the rural areas around Memphis and across the state, it is becoming a matter of disparity both on the workforce-training front and in classrooms. And the two are inextricably linked.

73. Foote Homes Last Vestige Of Public Housing -

As the last of the city’s large public housing developments is demolished, the oldest of the mixed-income communities that replaced them is about to turn 20.

College Park opened in 1998 on the site of what had been Lemoyne Gardens in the area of South Memphis now known as Soulsville.

74. Resource Label Group Paved a Road From Lamar to New Bartlett Facility -

After more than 20 years at their facility near Lamar Avenue, Resource Label Group officials wanted to move to a bigger and better place.

After looking around Shelby County, they settled on Bartlett, largely due to the suburban town’s atmosphere and family nature.

75. Last Word: After the Last Hole, Cutting County Property Taxes and A Recycled Gown -

The story of how the Overton Park Conservancy raised $1 million in two months didn’t go according to the script. It wasn’t large donors, it was a lot of contributions of $250 or less it turns out, many from people who have never been to the park, the zoo or the greensward in particular whether it’s on foot or in a car. There were donations from Puerto Rico, the District of Columbia and every state, except South Dakota.

76. After the ‘Tom Lee Storm’: A Look At Recovery Efforts, What's Next -

Eleven days after the May 27 storm that knocked out power to 188,000 homes and businesses, Memphis Light, Gas and Water officials declared victory in the recovery with a Wednesday, June 8, late afternoon Tweet: “Update: Restored.”

77. Luttrell, Commission Working Out Details of 3-Cent Property Tax Cut -

Shelby County Commissioners have talked for several years about cutting the county’s property tax rate. But it’s never been more than talk and never had close to the seven votes necessary to drop the tax rate.

78. Golden India Seeks New Location Near Square -

The owners of Golden India restaurant in Overton Square want to move from their Madison Avenue storefront of 20 years to the site of a circa-1912 duplex on North Cooper Street where they intend to build a new restaurant.

79. Foote Homes Families Leave Behind Memories Happy and Sad -

Streets Ministries on Vance Avenue has worked closely with the residents of Foote Homes, the last of whom moved out on Jan. 31 in preparation for the demolition of the city’s largest public housing project.

80. Senses Allowed to Remain Open While Reapplying for Permit -

Senses, the Poplar Avenue nightclub that found itself in the midst of zoning dispute, will be allowed to remain open for business while the owners and the county sort out the zoning issues.

Shelby County Environmental Court Judge Larry Potter ruled Wednesday, May 24, the business could remain open, but with some stipulations.

81. Judge Rules Senses Can Remain Open While Reapplying for Permit -

Senses, the Poplar Avenue nightclub that found itself in the midst of zoning dispute, will be allowed to remain open for business while the owners and the county sort out the zoning issues.

Shelby County Environmental Court Judge Larry Potter ruled Wednesday, May 24, the business could remain open, but with some stipulations.

82. Vaco Risk Solutions' Brian Prentice Talks Data Breaches, Safety -

Vaco Memphis has added Brian Prentice as managing partner of Vaco Risk Solutions, a national consulting firm that works with organizations that have IT security, risk or compliance needs; have had a recent breach; are moving data centers; require a penetration test; or have any other project-based risk management needs.

83. Last Word: Minority Business Mic Drop, Truckers & Taxes and Confederate Statues -

Quite the buzz around the minority business discussion on “Behind The Headlines” – notably the progress report from Greater Memphis Chamber board chair Carolyn Hardy about what’s working and, more to the point, what is not working. In Hardy’s view that would be general minority business goals that she said amount to black-owned businesses being left out some three years into the renewed push for minority business growth – in government contracts and private business-to-business contracts.

84. EDGE Approves Trio of Tax Incentives -

The Economic Development Growth Engine board has granted tax incentives for a pair of Presidents Island manufacturing operations and a South Memphis health care company that together will result in the creation of 126 jobs and capital investments topping $140 million.

85. Inner City Health Care Company Earns PILOT for Expansion -

A health care company serving lower-income areas of South Memphis with a limited range of services has been granted a 15-year payment-in-lieu-of-taxes (PILOT) incentive by the Economic Development Growth Engine board to provide more expansive service.

86. View From the Hill: Haslam Credits GOP ‘Experiment’ for Tennessee’s Success -

If you ask Gov. Bill Haslam, Republican government is the best thing since sliced bread.

Not only is GOP leadership responsible for a myriad of tax cuts leading to record surpluses and a $37 billion budget funding better K-12 and higher education, shoring up the rainy day and TennCare funds, shrinking state debt and building an economic environment for job creation, Haslam says. It’s even bringing us the cleanest air since before the industrial revolution.

87. House Committee Postpones Action on Short-Term Rentals -

A day after the House targeted Nashville with a tough bill on short-term rentals, the Senate deferred action on legislation blocking the Metro Council from enacting any prohibitions.

The Senate Finance, Ways and Means Committee postponed a bill by Sen. John Stevens until January 2018, ending the debate this year on a measure singling out Davidson County efforts to restrict short-term rentals such as Airbnb.

88. Raleigh Springs Town Center ‘On Track and On Budget’ -

It’s the end of an era with the final demolition of Raleigh Springs Mall underway, and city and community leaders hope it’s the beginning of a brighter future with the much-anticipated Raleigh Springs Town Center set to rise in its place.

89. Boyd: Memphis Public Safety Spending Out of Balance -

Memphis City Council chairman Berlin Boyd says the city budget is lopsided when it comes to its priorities.

And Boyd called Wednesday, May 3, for a shift away from public safety spending – specifically city spending on police – the largest single part of the operating and capital budgets as well as the largest division in city government.

90. Last Word: Popovich's Tip, Strickland's Budget and Haslam's Jump Start on Roads -

Game 5 goes to the Spurs in San Antonio 116-103 over the Grizz who are back here Thursday. Spurs coach Gregg Popovich is not effusive in his comments to the media, which is fun to watch, but it does make tracking down and veryifying this next story a bit difficult. A credit card receipt showed up on Redditt that appears to show Popovich left a $5,000 tip on an $815.73 bill at McEwen’s Friday night between the two Memphis-based playoff games.

91. Memphis Democrats Prepare To Reorganize -

Shelby County Democrats hope to have the local party up and running by the Fourth of July. The Shelby County Democratic Party was disbanded by the Tennessee Democratic Party in August after two disastrous county election cycles for the Democratic slate and increasing dysfunction by the local party’s executive committee.

92. View From the Hill: Tearful End for Non-Citizen Tuition Relief Bill -

State Rep. Raumesh Akbari grew so emotional she couldn’t speak. On the verge of tears, the Memphis Democrat started to talk about a high school from her Shelby County district with a large number of undocumented immigrant students.

93. Shaffer Named Executive Director Of Rebranded BLDG Memphis -

John Paul Shaffer recently was named executive director of BLDG Memphis, the rebranded entity that brings the Community Development Council of Greater Memphis and Livable Mem-phis under a single organizational identity.
In his new role, Shaffer’s job is to guide the organization in its mission of supporting neighborhood revitalization through a network of organizations and individuals working in the community development space – which BLDG Memphis does primarily through organizational capacity building, community education and engagement, and public policy and advocacy – as well as to promote the new brand. 

94. Immigrant Student Tuition Bill Fails In House Education Committee -

Karla Meza dreams of enrolling in the University of Tennessee Law School after growing up in Knoxville and watching college students walk along Cumberland Avenue.

But that dream is on hold after a House Education committee refused Tuesday, April 11, to allow all students, including illegal immigrants, who graduate from Tennessee high schools to pay in-state tuition at state colleges.

95. Immigrant Student Bill Fails in House Education Committee -

Karla Meza dreams of enrolling in the University of Tennessee Law School after growing up in Knoxville and watching college students walk along Cumberland Avenue.

But that dream is on hold after a House Education committee refused Tuesday, April 11, to allow all students, including illegal immigrants, who graduate from Tennessee high schools to pay in-state tuition at state colleges.

96. “Gateway’ Puzzle Begins To Come Together -

Starting last summer, a new ownership group for the city’s largest hotel by room count was undertaking its due diligence largely out of the public eye.

There were some rumblings about the Sheraton Memphis Downtown changing hands three years after a renovation of the 600-room hotel attached to the Memphis Cook Convention Center.

97. City's Largest Hotel Changes Hands In Latest 'Gateway' Puzzle Piece -

The largest hotel in the city by room count is changing hands in what is a key part of the city’s effort to remake the Memphis Cook Convention Center as a part of a larger “Gateway project” in the general convention center area.

98. Last Word: The Catechism of 1968, Downtown Hotels and Earth Day on Auto Row -

What happened 49 years ago this week in our city began long before the first sanitation worker walked off the job or the first “I Am A Man” sign was made. Maybe it was that long arc that explains the timing of what happened here in late March into the first week of April of 1968. For just about half a century now we have thought and thought again about that chronology, reviewed the details. And what we have is a sort of catechism of moments that if they had happened differently, we can’t help thinking, might have produced a different result.

99. Riverside and Cooper Bike Lanes Draw Complaints -

Out of 10 repaving projects the city is considering for bike lanes by this fall, the two that got the most attention at an open house Monday, March 27, were the Riverside Drive and Cooper Street bike-lane proposals.

100. RDC President Gives Riverfront Update -

Pop-up parks, cruise lines and plans to enhance existing attractions were all topics Riverfront Development Corp. president Benny Lendermon touched on during a state of the riverfront he delivered Friday, March 24, to the Downtown Memphis Commission.