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Editorial Results (free)

1. -
CHANDLER REPORTS NEIGHBORHOOD REPORT
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2. Midtown Neighborhood Starts 2016 Off With a Bang -

Touted as Midtown’s first working-class neighborhood, established in 1890, the Mount Arlington subdivision in the Cooper-Young district contains 856 properties with an average year built of 1927.

3. Cutting taxes, school choice, tort reform drive Sen. Kelsey -

State Sen. Brian Kelsey calls himself “a proud conservative who likes to get results.”

4. Few US Neighborhoods Affordable, Walkable With Good Schools -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Few neighborhoods can match the perks of Adams Morgan in Washington, D.C. — a reality that reflects a broader problem for the U.S. housing market.

Residents of Adams Morgan enjoy a bevy of bars, restaurants, exercise studios and shopping, just steps from their row houses and condo buildings. Home values are reasonable relative to neighborhood incomes. And in general, the area schools rate as better than average nationally.

5. Wal-Mart's Shutdown Creates New Food Deserts -

FAIRFIELD, Ala. (AP) — Wal-Mart's decision to shutter 154 stores across the country means that, starting Thursday, residents without cars in a neighborhood near a historically black college outside Birmingham, Alabama, will have to cross dangerous roadways on foot to get fresh produce and meat. Come Friday, folks in Coal Hill, Arkansas, will need to drive 15 miles to get to the nearest supermarket and pharmacy. Low-income neighbors of Wichita State University in Kansas, too, will be losing quick access to fresh groceries.

6. St. Agnes-St. Dominic Taps Thomas Hood as President -

St. Agnes Academy-St. Dominic School has a new president.

Thomas Hood’s appointment begins July 1. Since 2008, he’s served as the head of school at MMI Preparatory School in Freeland, Pennsylvania, an independent, co-educational college-preparatory day school with 252 students.

7. St. Agnes-St. Dominic Taps Thomas Hood as President -

St. Agnes Academy-St. Dominic School has a new president.

Thomas Hood’s appointment begins July 1. Since 2008, he’s served as the head of school at MMI Preparatory School in Freeland, Pennsylvania, an independent, co-educational college-preparatory day school with 252 students.

8. Grant Program Proving Beneficial To Neighborhood Watch Groups -

With backing from the City of Memphis, local neighborhood associations can receive up to $2,500 to make their neighborhoods safer.

“Responding to criminal offenses and making arrests are part of the efforts to combat crime,” said Lia Roemer, program manager with the Memphis Area Neighborhood Watch department. “The Neighborhood Crime Prevention Fund gives our neighborhoods the opportunity to grow and create crime prevention efforts.”

9. Editorial: Neighborhoods are the Battleground in Grocery Wars -

The development of grocery clusters in Germantown and Midtown raises some important questions about supermarkets in other parts of the city.

If these clusters of retailers, each aimed at different segments of a larger, overlapping market, are the reality of a supermarket business that was dominated by one chain not too long ago, how will Memphis’ food deserts be affected?

10. Office@Uptown Serves Neighborhood -

When Valerie Peavy bought the building at 594 N. Second St. in 2011, it was a furniture store that had been a community fixture in Uptown for years.

11. Miss. Governor Up with TV Ads, But No Air Time Yet for Dem -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — Mississippi Gov. Phil Bryant's campaign is running its first TV commercials this election season, but a new analysis shows his Democratic challenger, truck driver Robert Gray, hasn't bought any air time.

12. New Tax Incentive Aims to Boost Declining Memphis Neighborhoods -

Just north of Interstate 40, the commercially empty gateways to the Frayser neighborhood between North Hollywood Street and North Watkins Street are hardly fit to accommodate the thousands of vehicles that pass by every day.

13. Only ‘Fall Guy’ Needed Here Is Cris Carter -

Remember the quaint old days of American sport, when the symbol a player had made it was the number of luxury cars in his garage or unnecessary bathrooms in his mansion?

So passé. Now you’ve only made it if you have a “crew.” And if you have a crew, you must have a “fall guy.”

14. Former Transportation Official LaHood Joins OneJet -

Former U.S. transportation secretary Ray LaHood is the newest member of OneJet’s senior advisory team.

LaHood’s appointment to the board of the light jet air carrier focused on regional business travel was announced this week.

15. Former Transportation Official LaHood Joins OneJet Team -

Former U.S. transportation secretary Ray LaHood is the newest member of OneJet’s senior advisory team.

LaHood’s appointment to the board of the light jet air carrier focused on regional business travel was announced Tuesday, Aug. 18.

16. Events -

The Center City Development Corp. board will meet Wednesday, Aug. 19, at 9 a.m. in the Downtown Memphis Commission conference room, 114 N. Main St., and the Downtown Parking Authority will meet at 4 p.m. in the same location. Visit downtownmemphiscommission.com.

17. Events -

Playhouse on the Square will host the Great Wine Performances wine tasting Tuesday, Aug. 18, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Playhouse, 66 S. Cooper St. Characters in full costume will describe the wines. As guests sip, they can test their theatrical expertise for wonderful prizes. Tickets are $50 in advance or $65 at the door. Visit playhouseonthesquare.org.

18. Events -

Touchdown Club of Memphis will meet Monday, Aug. 17, from 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Chickasaw Country Club, 3395 Galloway Ave. Sportswriter and broadcaster Tony Barnhart, “Mr. College Football,” will speak. Cost is $60. Visit tdcmemphis.com.

19. Memphis Army Vet Lands Major Publishing Deal -

For Joshua Hood, everything changed after graduating from the University of Memphis in 2003.

The following year, he enlisted in the Army. His stint in the military, which included service in Iraq and Afghanistan, stretched to 2008. When that was done, he joined the Shelby County Sheriff’s Department in 2009.

20. Granddad, Hambone And The KKK -

IF THE KLAN DOESN’T LIKE YOU, PAT YOURSELF ON THE BACK.

Before their last sheety little show here a couple of years ago, an Exalted Cyclops of the KKK – must be just one hole in his hood – was quoted on Channel 5 and in The Huffington Post, “Y’all are going to see the largest rally Memphis, Tennessee, has ever seen. It’s not going to be 20 or 30 – it’s going to be thousands of Klansmen from the whole United States.”

21. Memphis Finalist for Choice Neighborhoods Grant -

Memphis is among the finalists for a federal grant worth up to $30 million that would fund the demolition and redevelopment of Foote Homes, the city’s last large public housing development.

The city got word Tuesday, July 14, from U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen that it is one of nine cities competing for the Choice Neighborhoods grant awarded by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development.

22. Memphis Finalist for Federal Choice Neighborhoods Grant -

The city of Memphis is among the finalists for a federal grant worth up to $30 million that would fund the demolition and redevelopment of Foote Homes, the city’s last large public housing development.

23. Boner, Fate and the Summer of Shame -

Phil Bredesen knew what he was trying to do. He just didn’t know if he could accomplish it.

“I had this sense that Nashville was ready for change,” says the former Metro mayor and Tennessee governor, reflecting on his early motivation for taking on the system that had run Nashville for decades.

24. St. Jude Launches Walk/Run to End Childhood Cancer -

St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital is launching a new, national event to coincide with Childhood Cancer Awareness Month in September.

The city of Memphis – and the campus of St. Jude – will be the epicenter of the St. Jude Walk/Run to End Childhood Cancer on Sept. 26. The event also will take place in 57 other communities nationwide on either Sept. 26 or Sept. 19.

25. St. Jude Launches National Walk/Run to End Childhood Cancer -

St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital is launching a new, national event to coincide with Childhood Cancer Awareness Month in September.

The city of Memphis – and the campus of St. Jude – will be the epicenter of the St. Jude Walk/Run to End Childhood Cancer on Sept. 26. The event also will take place in 57 other communities nationwide on either Sept. 26 or Sept. 19. (Click here for list of cities.)

26. Supporting Fathers and Fatherhood -

It’s time for Father's Day. Time to lift up fathers and fatherhood. And time to ask ourselves how we honor fathers in our daily lives, the work of our nonprofits, and through our business and public policies. News headlines spotlight the phenomenon “absent fathers,” seeking to assign blame for the many challenges we face as a country and as communities.

27. Creative Works Conference to Return in October -

As a result of last year’s quick sellout, a three-day conference for Memphis’ creative community is returning later this year, this time in a larger space.

The second Creative Works design conference will take place Oct. 1-3, and this year it’s moving from Downtown’s Visible Music School to Central Station. It’s the brainchild of Josh Horton, principal and founder at Memphis-based creative firm Hieroglyph, and tickets go on sale June 1.

28. Governor Signs Tennessee 'Neighborhood Protection Act' -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Gov. Bill Haslam has signed legislation that helps homeowner associations or neighborhood watch groups keep repeat offenders out of their communities.

The measure, called the "Neighborhood Protection Act," was signed by the Republican governor earlier this week. It passed the House 75-16 and was approved 31-1 in the Senate during the recent session.

29. Neighborhood Protection Act Headed to Gov. Haslam -

A proposal that would help homeowner associations or neighborhood watch groups keep repeat offenders out of their communities is headed to the governor for his consideration.

The measure, called the “Neighborhood Protection Act,” was approved 75-16 in the House on Monday. The Senate passed the proposal 31-1 last week.

30. 2015 Financial Markets Off to Converse Start From 2014 -

The first two months of the calendar year can present an intriguing opportunity to examine the state of the financial markets, as fourth quarter earning’s season is basically complete. Let’s take a look first at the broad equity markets, starting with a 2014 review:

31. Blues Birthplace -

Every day, Tunica, Miss., was missing an opportunity. Worst of all, that opportunity was passing by on the Blues Highway, also known as U.S. 61.

“You come out of Memphis and Beale and Graceland, and those interested in the genre of the blues were coming south and going to Clarksdale,” said Webster Franklin, president and CEO of the Tunica Convention and Visitors Bureau. “Before the museum, people would just drive right by. Now, those folks will make the museum their first stop in Mississippi.”

32. Google Sues Mississippi Attorney General -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) – A federal judge has denied Google Inc.'s motion to block enforcement of a subpoena issued by Mississippi Attorney General Jim Hood that seeks information from Google about parts of its operations, including information about advertising for imported prescription drugs.

33. Mississippi Renews Water-Rights Battle With Memphis -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — The U.S Supreme Court is asking the Obama administration to weigh-in on whether to allow Mississippi to file a new lawsuit alleging Memphis is stealing water from the state.

34. Ben Little's: Service Station Service in Self-Serve World -

The gentle soul who used to get his hair cut by an Everly Father a couple of doors down – and who pumped 100 percent pure gas to keep country immortal Ernest Tubb movin’ on – has enjoyed the last four-plus decades next to what used to be called Hailey’s Shopping Center.

35. Neighborhood Art -

Downtown’s South Main neighborhood may have been part of the first official arts district in the city of Memphis, but that’s not been exactly obvious while looking around on a drive or walk through the area.

36. Commitment to Fitness Looks to Reverse Childhood Obesity -

If American children and teenagers are fat, then those in the Mid-South are fatter. And you don’t have to rely on some “Fattest Cities in America” list aimed at generating clicks and views to reach this conclusion.

37. Ritualizing Your Parenthood -

We are people of ceremony and ritual. Every occasion of transition is cause for celebration. A prescribed formula marks our rite of passage from one status to another.

Significant milestones are pronounced by traditional words stating our readiness to take on the new responsibility. Marriage, membership initiations, military inductions, oaths of office, graduations, even citizenship, are all marked by ritual.

38. Mortarville to Memphis -

On the walls of his office at Hickory Ridge Middle School, principal Cedric Smith has a poster of an Iraqi flag. It’s from the time his Army reserve unit was called up in 2009 and stationed on a base that soldiers nicknamed “Mortarville” for how often it was hit by enemy shells.

39. Neighborhood Health -

As the owner of Inbalance Fitness in Cooper-Young, Scott Lebowitz is focused on the physical health of the clients who walk through his doors.

Starting a few years ago, however, Lebowitz began to wear an additional, albeit less obvious, professional hat. He’s also a commercial property owner, having bought the building in which his business operates as well as the space of other Cooper-Young businesses around him – which means that in addition to his clients’ health, he’s also paying close attention to the health of the neighborhood.

40. Grizzlies Draft UCLA's Adams, Memphis Native Stokes -

Whether it will prove to be a telling remembrance or not, news of the Grizzlies selecting guard UCLA shooting guard Jordan Adams with the No. 22 overall pick in Thursday night’s NBA Draft was largely met with mild disdain, sweeping indifference and a dash of tilt-your-head curiosity.

41. Salon Owner Loves Neighborhood Feel of Cooper-Young -

If what they say is true about doing what you love and you’ll never work a day in your life, then native New Yorker Felicia Scarpati-Lomax hasn’t worked in decades.

She owns a nail salon in Cooper-Young that she opened here after relocating to Memphis from the Big Apple and falling in love with both the city and with Cooper-Young. She’s been doing nails since she was a kid – she’s always loved the creative expression associated with it – and she’s done it off and on in some formal capacity for about 10 years.

42. Mississippi: Consumers Harmed by Experian -

Mississippi has sued credit reporting giant Experian, alleging sweeping errors in the company's data and routine violations of consumer protection laws. Mississippi's action – and a previously unreported multi-state investigation of credit bureaus led by Ohio – represent a significant new legal challenge to the industry.

43. Auto Industry Gets Serious About Lighter Materials -

DEARBORN, Mich. (AP) – Roofs made of carbon fiber. Plastic windshields. Bumpers fashioned out of aluminum foam.

What sounds like a science experiment could be your next car.

While hybrids and electrics may grab the headlines, the real frontier in fuel economy is the switch to lighter materials.

44. State Systems Prides Itself on Protecting Customers -

In 1986, the father-and-son team of Robert and Bob McBride bought a fledgling small business called State Systems.

45. Magna Bank Hires Three -

Magna Bank has made three customer-facing hires, including the addition of a new vice president.

Jodi Scruggs, who has more than 12 years of banking experience, has been tapped as vice president and private banking officer, and as such, she’ll work to build relationships with new and existing Magna clients, among other things.

46. Magna Bank Hires Three -

Magna Bank has made three customer-facing hires, including the addition of a new vice president.

Jodi Scruggs, who has more than 12 years of banking experience, has been tapped as vice president and private banking officer, and as such, she’ll work to build relationships with new and existing Magna clients, among other things.

47. I Was a Teenage Werewolf -

MEMORIES OF PARKING. AND FULL MOONS. Last week, if I remember correctly, I mentioned CRS – that remarkable condition that blocks the knowledge of what one had for breakfast but allows a clear and concise image of something that happened in, say, 1966.

48. Organizations Aim to Train Immigrant Entrepreneurs -

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) – After immigrating to Oregon from the Mexican state of Oaxaca more than two decades ago, Paula Asuncion worked on farms and in minimum wage jobs at fast-food restaurants – a widow struggling to feed six children, sharing cramped apartments with other families.

49. Tactical Urbanism: Citizen Projects Go Mainstream -

MEMPHIS (AP) – The city painted a crosswalk and installed tennis-ball green signs, but the cars just kept on zooming through. But rather than wave a white flag, Sarah Newstok grabbed an orange one instead.

50. Democrats Push for Mississippi State Employee Pay Raise -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) – Democrats say they'll keep trying to give all Mississippi government employees at least a $1,000 pay raise in the coming year, even after several attempts were blocked Wednesday in the Republican-majority House.

51. Biting Cold Puts a Freeze on Restaurant Business -

TOLEDO, Ohio (AP) – The homemade matzo ball and beef barley soups are lost on customers walking into Rascals' NY Deli – because there just aren't very many of them.

"After it starts getting really cold and the sun goes down, the people don't want to come," said Randy Smith, manager of the restaurant in the Cincinnati suburb of Blue Ash.

52. Horseback Rides With Weddings -

BRIDAL PATHS. As I did last year, I begin this year revisiting markers on the journey.

When I was little, I was sure you went to cool weddings by horseback.

After all, Roy and Dale were married, and they sang “Happy Trails To You” from the back of a horse every week. Mom and Dad were married, and they spent the first year of their marriage in Arizona riding horses and doing cool-sounding things like punching cattle, shooting rattlesnakes and smoking Old Golds.

53. Childhood Inspiration Leads Jambor to Fulfilling Career -

Like many children of the 1970s, Erik Jambor’s interest in film began with scrolling words on the big screen: “A long time ago in a galaxy far, far away … .”

For Jambor, it wasn’t so far away in Birmingham, Ala., where he nurtured a passion for film with a Super 8 video camera in his backyard.

54. Lindow Rejoins The Centre Group -

Tracy Lindow has rejoined The Centre Group human resources firm as a senior consultant following several years in Germany. As a senior consultant, Lindow will help organizations improve their bottom line through human asset development by leveraging compensations strategies, executive search, employee attitude research and leadership skills development.

55. Van Vliet Takes on Roles at UT Medical, The MED -

Dr. Michael M. Van Vliet has joined the department of plastic surgery at UT Medical Group, has been named assistant professor at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center and has been appointed director of burn critical care for the Firefighters Regional Burn Center at The Regional Medical Center at Memphis.

56. Hood: Google Still Not Effectively Fighting Crime -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) – Mississippi Attorney General Jim Hood is again asking Google to do more to prevent people from using the search engine to find illegal drugs and pirated videos, music and games.

57. College Football Notebook: November 27, 2013 -

It’s impressive that No. 1 Alabama has allowed an average of 9.3 points per game this season – best in the land. It’s maybe more impressive that in going 11-0, 7-0 in the SEC, the Crimson Tide has given up just 12 touchdowns. And more impressive still that only six of those TDs have been scored by teams other than Texas A&M with someone at quarterback not named Johnny Manziel.

58. Gates to Share Creative Vision at Crosstown -

Internationally acclaimed installation and social practice artist Theaster Gates will be in Memphis this week to share some of the beliefs and perspectives that fuel his creative vision.

Gates’ free, public lecture, “A Way of Working,” will be Saturday, Nov. 16, at Sears Crosstown, 495 N. Watkins St.

59. Obama Turns to Trusted Adviser on Health Care Woes -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A career management consultant with a knack for taming bureaucratic backlogs is the man President Barack Obama is now counting on to help turn around a problem-plagued website that has marred the rollout of Obama's signature health care law.

60. Schools Move Focus to Early Childhood -

The date still isn’t firm for the Nov. 21 ballot. But the campaign for a half-cent hike in the city’s sales tax rate to fund an expansion of pre-kindergarten in the city of Memphis is underway.

So are the complications that have been a close companion of the idea since it was first proposed a year ago and approved by the Memphis City Council.

61. Mississippi High Court Upholds Open-Carry Gun Law -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) – The Mississippi Supreme Court unanimously upheld the state's open carry-gun law Thursday, allowing it to take effect after a circuit judge's order had kept it on hold about two months.

62. Neighborhood Vitality -

The history at the Four-Way Restaurant is as rich and soulful as the food.

The walls of the South Memphis institution are decorated with photographs of politicians, athletes, entertainers, business leaders and civil rights icons – including the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. – who made the famous restaurant at Mississippi Boulevard and Walker Avenue a “home away from home.”

63. Appeal to Support Gun Law in Mississippi Coming -

Mississippi Attorney General Jim Hood says he’ll file an appeal early next week to try to push an open-carry gun measure into law.

64. Appeal to Support Gun Law in Mississippi Coming -

Mississippi Attorney General Jim Hood says he’ll file an appeal early next week to try to push an open-carry gun measure into law.

65. New Mississippi Laws Cover Wide Range of Issues -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) – Several new laws go into effect on Monday in Mississippi, including one to more clearly define that people have the right to openly carry guns in many public places.

66. Pro Relieved Near Loo, Amateur Pays Out Wazoo -

Did you ever wonder if in golf you get a lift from the loo? Or if there’s a penalty for breaking and entering while on the course? Tourneys in May spoke to these issues. Kinda.

The 2013 Volvo World Match Play Championship in Kavarna, Bulgaria, was won by Graeme McDowell, who bested Thongchai Jaidee in the final match. Ho hum. For present purposes, let’s go to McDowell’s May 19 quarterfinal match with Nicolas Colsaerts. On hole 10, a short par-4, Colasaerts sprayed his tee shot right of the fairway, near the green, into a thicket marked as a hazard.

67. Mississippi Revenue Collections Down in April -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) – Mississippi tax collections were $46 million, or 8.2 percent, below the estimate for the month of April.

Kathy Waterbury, a spokeswoman for the state Department of Revenue, said the majority of drop may be due to timing of receipts and processing.

68. Bill to Cut Arkansas Planned Parenthood Funding Stalls -

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — A bill aimed at cutting off state funding for two Planned Parenthood grants for sex education narrowly failed to clear an Arkansas House committee.

The Public Health Committee on Wednesday voted 10-8 in favor the measure, but it needed 11 votes in the 20-member panel to advance.

69. Granddad, Hambone and the KKK -

IF THE KLAN DOESN’T LIKE YOU, PAT YOURSELF ON THE BACK. An Exalted Cyclops of the KKK – must be just one hole in his hood – recently told Channel 5, also quoted in The Huffington Post, “Y’all are going to see the largest rally Memphis, Tennessee, has ever seen. It’s not going to be twenty or thirty – it’s going to be thousands of Klansmen from the whole United States.”

70. Avant Finds Soul, Passion in South Main Neighborhood -

In 2002, Ben Avant, now 35, was a young, Charleston, S.C.-based stock and bond trader with a world of possibilities at his feet and a heavy choice to make.

71. Horseback Rides With Weddings -

BRIDAL PATHS When I was little, I was pretty sure you went to cool weddings by horseback. After all, Roy and Dale were married, and they sang “Happy Trails To Us” from the back of a horse every week. Mom and Dad were married, and they spent the first year of their marriage in Arizona riding horses and doing cool-sounding things like punching cattle, shooting rattlesnakes and smoking Old Golds.

72. Mrs. Olds: Fire Lighter -

TEACHERS, NOT SCHOOLS, TEACH. If you’re wondering how many pieces of notebook paper it takes to produce a truly impressive spitball, it’s 10, give or take.

Terry was occupying most of the rear corner, busily inserting one piece of notebook paper after another into his mouth. Known for both gross weight and behavior, Terry was larger and older than us; the former the result of being so fond of everything in the cafeteria that he went back again and again, and the latter the result of being so fond of several grades that he went back for those, too.

73. Elvis Presley Boulevard Work Big Moment for Neighborhood -

As early afternoon truck traffic on Brooks Road mixed with after-school traffic Friday, Nov. 16, on Elvis Presley Boulevard, a few tourists from the Graceland area mixed with several dozen local government and business leaders at the visitors center at the intersection.

74. Mississippi Consumers Notified of E-Book Settlement -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) – Officials say they're sending out notices to Mississippi residents who might have overpaid for e-books and are eligible for a share of a nationwide settlement.

Mississippi Attorney General Jim Hood says the state is getting $407,823 of the $69 million settlement with publishers Hachette, HarperCollins and Simon & Shuster.

75. Mississippi Tax Revenue Drop Explained -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) – A computer conversion at the Mississippi Department of Revenue delayed some revenue collections from being posted and contributed to a report that showed a September drop in state tax collections.

76. Cooper-Young Featured in America’s Top 10 Great Neighborhoods List -

Cooper-Young has been named one of 10 Great Neighborhoods for 2012 under the American Planning Association’s Great Places in America program, noted for its revitalization, character and historic architecture.

77. Cooper-Young Featured in Top 10 'Great Neighborhoods' List -

Cooper-Young has been named as one of 10 Great Neighborhoods for 2012 under the American Planning Association’s Great Places in America program, noted for its revitalization, character and historic architecture.

78. Justice Department Wants Details on Mississippi Voter Law -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — Attorney General Jim Hood says the Department of Justice has asked for more information on Mississippi's voter identification law.

79. Neighborhoods, Festivals Form Fabric of the City -

When something good develops organically in Memphis, there is a great tendency to believe that if there are attempts to organize it too much or try to “improve” it, something essential will be lost.

80. Hard Work, Sincerity Keep Albertine Thriving -

When Gary Albertine Sr. got into the real estate business in 1948, an average 1,500-square-foot house sold for about $15,000.

Contracts were one-page long, men dominated the industry and the eastern boundary of Memphis city limits was Goodlett Street. It was a simpler time, when business was based on trust and word of mouth.

81. As US Economy Steadies, Bank Closings Become Rarer -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Fewer U.S. banks are failing than at any time since the financial crisis erupted in 2008. The healthier banking industry is helping sustain an economy slowed by lackluster hiring, weak manufacturing and Europe's debt crisis.

82. City Kicks Off Neighborhood Innovation Effort -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr.’s administration is set to begin a concerted effort to bring back neighborhood retail in three parts of the city.

Wharton and his Innovation Delivery Team, funded by the Bloomberg Philanthropies of New York, rolled out the first moves Monday, July 2, for parts of South Memphis, Binghampton and the Madison and Cleveland area.

83. Rotary Pushes for Fatherhood Involvement -

Dads and their children are set to take over the Memphis Zoo this week for Fatherhood Friday, an initiative organized by the Memphis Rotary Club, an organization of businessmen and women committed to improving the community through service activities.

84. ArtPlace Grant Awarded to Soulsville Neighborhood -

A $678,195 grant from a Chicago group called ArtPlace will give a plan to revitalize the Soulsville neighborhood in Memphis a major lift.

Community LIFT, an economic and community development organization, is driving the first phase of the revitalization in partnership with the Memphis Symphony Orchestra.

85. International Paper Selling 3 Mills for $470 Million -

International Paper Co. said Friday that it is selling three mills for about $470 million, a sale required by the U.S. Department of Justice after International Paper’s acquisition of a rival.

86. Int'l Paper Selling 3 Mills for $470 Million -

MEMPHIS (AP) – International Paper Co. said Friday that it is selling three mills for about $470 million, a sale required by the U.S. Department of Justice after International Paper's acquisition of a rival.

87. Miss. High Court Rules Legal Fees are Public Funds -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) – The Mississippi Supreme Court ruled Thursday in two cases that legal fees paid to private lawyers to represent the state are public funds.

Justices said because the money belongs to the public, it should've been paid out to the lawyers from the attorney general's contingent fund or from other money appropriated to the attorney general.

88. Ready Shelby Finalist For Best Neighborhood Program -

Neighborhoods USA has selected Ready Shelby, Shelby County’s emergency preparedness initiative, as a finalist for the 2012 Best Neighborhood Program Award.

Neighborhoods USA is a national nonprofit committed to building and strengthening neighborhood organizations. It recognizes outstanding programs implemented by a governmental entity, business or corporation to improve neighborhoods.

89. Miss. Voter ID Bill Signed, Awaits Feds' Scrutiny -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) – Mississippi Gov. Phil Bryant on Thursday signed a bill requiring voters to show photo identification at the polls, but it's unclear whether it will become law.

Because of Mississippi's history of racial discrimination, the state is required to get federal approval for any change in election laws or procedures. The U.S. Justice Department in recent months has rejected voter ID laws from Texas and South Carolina.

90. Roots of Faith -

The man who correctly predicted the stock market convulsion of 1987, a veteran hedge fund manager who today is one of the richest men in America, held up a notebook at a celebration in his honor late last week.

91. Jones Has Memphis Homecoming At GPAC -

Rising star Caroline Jones’ performance Saturday, April 28, at Germantown Performing Arts Centre’s 2012 Gala will be a homecoming of sorts for the New York-based singer-songwriter.

92. The Fast Lane -

Forbes magazine recently published an article ranking the best CEOs in the country over the past year. Bill Rhodes, CEO at AutoZone Inc. since 1995, was one of the men who made that list of “best bosses.”

93. US Hiring Slows Amid Uncertainty About Economy -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The U.S. job market slowed in March as companies hit the brakes on hiring amid uncertainty about the economy's growth prospects. The unemployment rate dipped, but mostly because more Americans stopped looking for work.

94. DMC Wants to Brand South Main Neighborhood -

The Downtown Memphis Commission wants to find a firm that can help guide a branding initiative for Downtown’s South Main Historic Arts District.

According to a summary from the DMC, “the selected firm will develop a consistent brand image and offer implementation strategies for the district that would support a multi-faceted marketing plan to bring more patrons, foot traffic, awareness, identity and vibrancy to the District.”

95. Changes Continue for Memphis Neighborhood -

The street to Emmanuel Episcopal Center is the only reminder of what used to be part of Cleaborn Homes at Lauderdale Street and St. Paul Avenue.

Where the 1950s-era brick structures once stood are two thriving patches of green in the fertile and early Memphis spring.

96. Examining the Latest Market Trends -

Last week provided another powerful advance in both equity and fixed income markets. On the equity side, the three major domestic stock indices accomplished impressive feats. After briefly falling back below 13,000 at the end of February, the DJIA (Dow Jones Industrial Average) crept above that level at Tuesday’s close.

97. Violent Acts Take Stage in Fed Drug Trial -

When Mario McNeil allegedly threatened the mother of drug kingpin Craig Petties in 2007, the Memphis drug organization Petties ran from exile in Mexico took it seriously.

98. Petties Drug Trial Testimony Focuses on Defendants -

After three weeks of detailing a broad conspiracy to sell drugs in the Memphis region and silence those who cooperated with authorities, prosecutors in the Petties drug organization trial began the trial’s fifth week with more specific testimony about the two defendants.

99. Advocate Warns About Stress in Childhood -

High levels of stress during childhood may play a significant role in disease causation later in life.

Robin Karr-Morse, author of “Ghosts from the Nursery: Tracing the Roots of Violence” and her new book, “Scared Sick: The Role of Childhood Trauma in Adult Disease,” discussed the effects of what’s called toxic stress during a lecture Thursday, Feb. 16, at the University Center on the University of Memphis campus.

100. Planned Parenthood Affiliates Sue Tenn. -

Planned Parenthood Greater Memphis Region and Planned Parenthood of Middle and East Tennessee have filed a federal lawsuit in Nashville against John Dreyzehner, commissioner of the Tennessee Department of Health.