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Editorial Results (free)

1. Trust Fund Mentioned as Possible $1.1B Solution on School Benefits Liability -

A trust fund is one possibility that has surfaced early in the formal discussions of the Shelby County School system’s $1.1 billion benefits liability.

The first meeting of the ad hoc committee on the matter last week drew nine of the 13 Shelby County Commissioners, the administration of Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell and two of nine Shelby County Schools board members.

2. Cannon Wright Blount Senior Tax Manager Answers Questions -

The busy time of the year is fast approaching for Dan Walker, senior tax manager with Cannon Wright Blount.

3. Fenced Out -

There’s a major problem in Memphis when it comes to minorities: African-Americans make up 63 percent of the population but garner less than 1 percent of total business receipts within Memphis, according to the most recent U.S. Census data.

4. County Commission Forms OPEB Committee -

Shelby County Commissioners have created an ad hoc committee to talk over the health insurance benefits liability of the former Memphis City Schools system and who is responsible for it.

Commission chairman Terry Roland announced Monday, Jan. 25, he had formed the committee, which includes leaders of the Shelby County Schools system and Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell’s administration.

5. The Persecution of Jeremy Durham -

Inhumane and unfair: That’s the only way to describe the “liberal media’s” treatment of state Rep. Jeremy Durham over the last month.

6. Reaves: Memphis Should Pay Share of Schools Liability -

The Shelby County commissioner who sought a legal opinion over who pays $1.1 billion of Shelby County Schools’ benefits liability says he has more questions.

Commissioner David Reaves requested the opinion from Tennessee Attorney General Herbert Slatery in December through state Sen. Brian Kelsey.

7. Last Word: The Crest, OPEB Fever, Armstrong Leaves and An Elvis Warning -

The crest is here and it is not quite 40 feet on the Mississippi River gauge. The projections Thursday evening going into Friday’s crest of the river at Memphis changed a bit from the 40.3 foot level. The crest is 39.8 feet.
No reports of major damage anywhere in Shelby County, according to the Shelby County Office of Prepardness.
But the river’s high water is still a sight to behold.

8. Let’s Not Forget -

BELL. BOWLING. CROWE. GARDENHIRE. KELSEY. NICELY. ROBERTS. AND NORRIS. As the Tennessee General Assembly gets going in 2016, let’s remember how they started 2015 – with the abandonment of common sense and decency and hundreds of thousands of Tennesseans.
The story of what they did bears repeating as a cautionary tale. If we let them do it again, we all bear responsibility.

9. Luttrell: State Likely to Mandate $1B Liability -

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell said the state of Tennessee will most likely move to require Shelby County Schools to fully fund its $1.5 billion liability for health insurance and similar employee benefits.

10. Survey: US Progress on Health Insurance Stalled in 2015 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Going into President Barack Obama's last year in office, progress has stalled on reducing the number of uninsured Americans under his signature health care law, according to a major survey out Thursday.

11. After First Meeting, Personality of New Council Emerges -

The judgments began early for the new Memphis City Council, which met for the first time Tuesday, Jan. 5, at City Hall.

State Sen. Lee Harris, on hand to be honored as a former city council member, called the group the “Kumbaya Council,” as it approved 13 appointees by Mayor Jim Strickland, 11 of them with unanimous votes.

12. Council OKs Strickland's Directors, He Defends Pay Raises -

Memphis City Council members approved Mayor Jim Strickland’s slate of 12 division chiefs and directors Tuesday, Jan. 5, at the first council meeting of 2016. And Strickland defended the pay raises for some of those positions compared to the salaries those appointed positions paid in the Wharton administration.

13. What 2016 Will Do to Your Checkbook: Rent, Food, Gas, Raises -

Wondering how you will fare financially in 2016? Below are what experts think next year will hold for financial matters close to home: Raises, rent, gas, food and health.

WILL YOU GET A RAISE NEXT YEAR?

14. Strickland Takes Office, Doubles Down on Change Theme -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland took office New Year’s Day with a pledge to immediately begin to “target and remove” street gang leaders and equip police with the ability to immediately issue domestic violence orders of protection.

15. Market Volatility Causes IPO Market to Stall Out in 2015 -

NEW YORK (AP) – The volatile trading that defined 2015 led to a very choppy market for companies wanting to go public.

The number of U.S. companies that successfully made an initial public offering of stock in 2015 dropped by more than 40 percent compared with 2014, according to a report by IPO research firm Renaissance Capital.

16. Refugees, Regents, Privatization On Tap for New Session -

State Sen. Ken Yager isn’t quite ready for the state of Tennessee to reclaim the Refugee Resettlement Program from Catholic Charities.

17. Strickland Takes Office Promising Change -

Things move quickly once it is decided the incumbent mayor will not be returning to City Hall.

The political spotlight shifts quickly to the new mayor who has about two months and two weeks to make some important decisions about his inner circle, set some priorities and figure out what needs to wait for more deliberation.

18. After a Year of Triumphs and Defeats, Haslam Looks Ahead -

Eight days into 2015, Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam formally set a special session of the Tennessee legislature for February on his Insure Tennessee plan, a Medicaid expansion Haslam negotiated with the Obama administration.

19. Health Law Reporting Extension Issued for Employers -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Treasury Department on Monday gave employers an extension of critical reporting requirements, as it seeks to manage some of the most complicated parts of the federal health care law.

20. Legislature Not Playing Santa With Insure Tennessee -

It’s going to take a Christmas miracle for Insure Tennessee to make it into anyone’s stocking this year.

As the 2016 session of the General Assembly approaches in early January, Republicans are showing no support for the plan Gov. Bill Haslam offered for a special session in early 2015.

21. Protect Your Retirement From The Unexpected -

Ray’s Take We plan carefully during our years in the workforce to create a solid income for our retirement. But how can we protect that plan after we retire and have less flexibility and increased vulnerability to unexpected events? We want to avoid finding ourselves in the position of having to go back to work.

22. What 2016 Will Do to Your Checkbook: Rent, Food, Gas, Raises -

Wondering how you will fare financially in 2016? Below are what experts think next year will hold for financial matters close to home: Raises, rent, gas, food and health.

WILL YOU GET A RAISE NEXT YEAR?

23. Sister Pact Aims to Raise Breast Cancer Awareness for Black Women -

Debra Melton did just about the best thing a young African-American woman in Memphis – or anywhere – can do in the fight against breast cancer.

24. ARCpoint Labs Opening First Memphis Location in January -

Maria Stevenson has been passionate about clinical laboratory science for much of her life, and now she’s preparing to bring a franchise location of full-service national laboratory company ARCpoint Labs to Memphis next month.

25. Knee-Jerk Outbreak -

A SAD STATE OF AFFAIRS. WASHINGTON, D.C. – The United States government has mobilized against a clear threat to the country.

Troops have been sent to identify and capture members of an ersatz government openly operating here in defiance of federal law. This group claims theirs as the only true religion, and that laws be based on it as prescribed in the tome of that religion. They believe no other laws to be valid in the eyes of God, and no rights assigned or any authority recognized if any are based on such godless laws. They seek to prohibit the teaching, or even mention, of any other religion in schools.

26. Emami's Care2Manage Startup Helps Families Care for Aging Loved Ones -

Ela Emami has a vision for her startup Care2Manage, an entity focused on helping families caring for a loved one, that blends technology with a human touch.

Her venture is a service platform for families with an elderly loved one that connects them to social workers, local elder care resources and organizes total health care needs. Emami also works as a geriatric care consultant, something she sees as a complementary service to her technology platform.

27. Conrad: Mike Williams ‘Should Be Fired’ -

Incoming Memphis City Council chairman Kemp Conrad thinks the city should consider firing Mike Williams, president of the Memphis Police Association, for helping recruiters from other police forces set up job fairs in Memphis.

28. Report Shows Impact of Tennessee's Health Care 'Gap' -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — A new report reveals the negative impact that the state's health care "gap" is having on local communities.

The report was released this week by the Tennessee Justice Center in Nashville.

29. Unions Go To Court Over Pension Changes -

Five unions representing city of Memphis employees, including police officers and fire fighters, are taking the city to court in an effort to stop pension and benefits changes.

Union leaders have vowed for the last year to file a lawsuit in reaction to the changes, which would reduce pension and health insurance benefits for city of Memphis employees and retirees.

30. Five City Unions Go To Court Over Pension Changes -

Five unions representing city of Memphis employees, including police officers and fire fighters, are taking the city to court in an effort to stop pension and benefits changes.

Union leaders have vowed for the last year to file a lawsuit in reaction to the changes, which would reduce pension and health insurance benefits for city of Memphis employees and retirees.

31. Armstrong Ponders Mayoral Transition -

When outgoing Memphis Mayor A C Wharton said last week that Memphis Police Department director Toney Armstrong plans to retire at year’s end, what followed was the best representation of the off-kilter relationship between the mayor’s office and police brass.

32. Strickland: Expect Smaller Memphis City Hall Administration -

Several city division directors under outgoing Memphis Mayor A C Wharton have told Mayor-elect Jim Strickland they do not intend to seek reappointment in the new administration.

33. Craig Gordon Joins Advanced Dermatology -

Dr. M. Craig Gordon has joined Advanced Dermatology & Skin Cancer Associates. As a general dermatologist, Gordon manages dermatologic conditions ranging from acne, warts, eczema and psoriasis to more complex cutaneous lymphomas and autoimmune skin conditions. He also performs cutaneous surgeries and offer medical cosmetic services.

34. Memphis City Council to Talk ‘Rooney Rule’ For Minority Contracts -

Memphis City Council member Edmund Ford Jr. wants to bring the NFL’s “Rooney Rule” to City Hall’s approach to minority business contracting.

The council discusses the proposed ordinance at a 10:30 a.m. Tuesday, Oct. 20, committee session.

35. Health Law Fine on The Uninsured Will More than Double -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The math is harsh: The federal penalty for having no health insurance is set to jump to $695, and the Obama administration is being urged to highlight that cold fact in its new pitch for health law sign-ups.

36. Client Compassion Drives Clay & Land’s Cook -

Kathryn Cook finds her profession rewarding. But building a successful career in an industry that doesn’t have many female producers hasn’t been easy, particularly for the single mother of a special-needs child.

37. PACE Act Brings Fresh Attention to Insurance Policy Fixes -

President Barack Obama’s signing of the Protecting Affordable Coverage for Employees Act (PACE) in recent days has some small businesses now relieved that they’ll be spared from health insurance premium increases.

38. Alternative Health Policies Still Available at Premium Prices -

As owners of East Nashville’s popular Art & Invention Gallery, Meg and Bret MacFadyen are part of the city’s growing population of creatives, a group that includes entrepreneurs, artists, musicians, writers and all sorts of contractors.

39. Why Are Tennessee’s ACA Rate Hikes Among Nation’s Largest? -

Can you imagine your car payment going up by 44 percent next year? Or that the cost of your cable was going up another 36 percent per month?

That’s what it will feel like for hundreds of thousands of Tennesseans in 2016 as the nation gets ready for its third year of the Affordable Care Act, a.k.a. Obamacare, which provides health care insurance to more than 231,440 people in the state who couldn’t otherwise obtain insurance.

40. Report: Number of Uninsured Tennesseans Drops Again -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — The estimated number of Tennesseans without health insurance has dropped again, according to a recent annual report by the University of Tennessee Center for Business and Economic Research.

41. Home… Free? -

Ray’s Take Wikipedia defines a mortgage-burning party as a 20th-century American custom that is the ritual burning of a paid-off mortgage document by homeowners often including a party in which extended family and friends are invited to celebrate.

42. Memphis City Council Votes on One Beale Garage Financing -

The last Memphis City Council meeting before Thursday’s Memphis election day should be a short one given the campaign blitz underway by candidates in the 13 council races as well as the races for Memphis mayor and City Court clerk.

43. Sheehan: No Quick Fix for Health Care -

It’s becoming more commonplace to see health professionals in Memphis talking up not so much the high-tech advancements that dominate specialized practices around the city but rather the opposite end of the care spectrum.

44. Lipscomb & Pitts Retains Industry Honor -

Memphis-based Lipscomb & Pitts Insurance LLC has retained its status as part of an elite group of independent insurance agencies around the U.S. participating in the Independent Insurance Agents & Brokers of America best practices study group.

45. Good Shepherd Health in Memphis Charts Different Pharmacy Path With New Model -

It quickly becomes apparent that Dr. Philip Baker, a pharmacist and founder of Good Shepherd Health in Memphis, runs a different kind of pharmacy operation out of his base in the Hickory Ridge Mall when he rattles off figures like this one.

46. Shelby County Commission Agrees to Budget Summit -

Shelby County commissioners will meet with Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell in October to hold a budget summit.

47. Lipscomb & Pitts Retains Industry Honor -

Memphis-based Lipscomb & Pitts Insurance LLC has retained its status as part of an elite group of independent insurance agencies around the U.S. participating in the Independent Insurance Agents & Brokers of America best practices study group.

48. Study Shows Employers Shifting More Medical Costs to Workers -

Employers are leaving a bigger chunk of the bill for care to workers who use their health insurance, and benefits experts see few signs of this trend slowing.

Most companies now offer health coverage that requires employees to pay an annual deductible before insurance kicks in, and the size of that deductible has soared in the past decade, according to a survey released Tuesday by the Kaiser Family Foundation and Health Research & Educational Trust.

49. Clinton Adds Details to Plans on Prescription Drug Costs -

DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) — Vowing to build upon President Barack Obama's signature health law, Hillary Rodham Clinton is unveiling a sweeping plan to hold down the rising cost of prescription drugs and target pharmaceutical companies that flood the airwaves with ads.

50. Novel Plan to Curb Drug Costs Seeks Candidates' Attention -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Consumer-friendly ratings of the benefits of new drugs. Limits on what patients pay. Requiring drug companies to disclose how much they actually spend on research.

With the public concerned about the high cost of new medications, these are some of the proposals offered Friday by a policy center often aligned with the Obama administration.

51. The Field -

The most competitive race for Memphis mayor in 24 years is in the hands of Memphis voters who will determine whether it will be as close as recent polls suggest it could be.

Early voting in advance of the Oct. 8 election day opened Friday, Sept. 18, with all 13 Memphis City Council seats on the ballot as well as the race for the City Court Clerk’s office.

52. Mayoral Contenders Break New Ground In Last TV Debate -

Even after numerous debates, including three on television, it turns out the four major candidates for Memphis mayor did have a few new things to say during the last televised debate of the 2015 election year.

53. Memphis City Council Approves Retirement Freeze, Debate on Impact Continues -

Memphis City Council members gave final approval Tuesday, Sept. 15, to a freeze on the city’s deferred retirement program in an effort to bolster police ranks and keep the force from dropping below 2,000 officers.

54. Council Approves DROP Freeze To Bolster Police Ranks -

Memphis City Council members gave final approval Tuesday, Sept. 15, to a freeze on the city’s deferred retirement program in an effort to bolster police ranks and keep the force from dropping below 2,000 officers.

55. Council Approves DROP Freeze To Bolster Police Ranks -

Memphis City Council members gave final approval Tuesday, Sept. 15, to a freeze on the city’s deferred retirement program in an effort to bolster police ranks and keep the force from dropping below 2,000 officers.

56. Council Voting on Retirement Freeze to Stem Memphis Police Exodus -

Memphis City Council members take a final vote Tuesday, Sept. 15, on a freeze of the city’s deferred retirement plan that is designed to keep the police force from dipping below 2,000 officers.

The council meets at 3:30 p.m. at City Hall, 125 N. Main St. Follow @tdnpols, www.twitter.com/tdnpols, for live coverage of the meeting and updates from committee sessions earlier in the day.

57. Health Care Suffers As Rural Hospitals Continue Slow Fade -

Fayette County is the latest victim of hospital closings in Tennessee as many rural health care facilities continue to struggle financially.

Methodist Healthcare-Fayette Hospital closed in late March, bringing to four the number of shuttered hospitals in West Tennessee after Gibson General, Humboldt General and Haywood Park Community called it quits in 2014.

58. Health Insurance Signups Near 10 Million in Midyear Report -

CHICAGO (AP) — About 9.9 million people have signed up and paid for health insurance under President Barack Obama's health care law, the administration said Tuesday, a slight dip from a previous count but on track toward the administration's year-end goal of 9.1 million.

59. Metabolic CrossFit Owner Combines Physician Services With Exercise -

Dr. Jeremy Draper’s patient waiting room is a gym. Draper is the co-owner of Metabolic CrossFit, the only CrossFit affiliate in the city to offer training and a physician practice under the same roof.

60. Judge Could Ruling This Week on Tennessee School Funding Lawsuit -

CHATTANOOGA, Tenn. (AP) — A Davidson County judge says she plans to rule this week on whether to grant class-action certification on a lawsuit filed by several school boards alleging Tennessee's education funding shortchanges them and students.

61. Retirees Could Shore Up Memphis Police Ranks -

Memphis City Council members are exploring the idea of encouraging retired police officers to get back in uniform on a regular basis as reserve officers to keep the force from slipping to less than 2,000 officers.

62. Council Explores Retirees Return To Police Ranks -

Memphis City Council members are exploring the idea of encouraging already-retired police officers to get back in uniform as reserve officers to keep the police force from slipping to less than 2,000 officers.

63. Council Continues Talks on Deferred Retirement Freeze -

Two months into the city of Memphis’ new fiscal year and after a year of decisions on changes to pension and health insurance benefits for city employees and retirees, the Memphis City Council is still making adjustments.

64. Rocking for Love -

When Lahna Deering and Jason Freeman join the other musicians performing at the Rock for Love music festival next week, the gig will be a bit more meaningful for them than the shows they normally play.

65. Fred’s Reports Second-Quarter Loss -

The toughest part of guiding a ship, Fred’s Inc. CEO Jerry Shore told analysts Thursday, Aug. 27, is changing its direction.

66. Fred’s Reports Second-Quarter Loss -

The toughest part of guiding a ship, Fred’s Inc. CEO Jerry Shore told analysts Thursday, Aug. 27, is changing its direction.

67. Fred’s Reports Second-Quarter Loss -

The toughest part of guiding a ship, Fred’s Inc. CEO Jerry Shore told analysts Thursday, Aug. 27, is changing its direction.

68. ‘Punching Out’ for the Last Time -

Ray’s take: According to AARP, baby boomers are turning 65 at the rate of 10,000 per day. That means a lot of people are looking at the traditional retirement age coming up fast. Whenever you plan to not have to work anymore, there are some basic financial decisions you should make as you near that age.

69. Memphis Mayoral Endorsements Split -

The first wave of endorsements in the 2015 Memphis elections finds no mayoral contender with a sweep, one of the four major contenders without an endorsement so far and two of the big three municipal unions backing different mayoral candidates.

70. Tardy Tax Filers Risk Loss of Health Care Subsidies -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Sign-up season for President Barack Obama's health care law doesn't start for another couple of months, but the next few days are crucial for hundreds of thousands of customers at risk of losing financial aid when they renew coverage for 2016.

71. Connexion Point Plans Memphis Grand Opening -

Health care services company Connexion Point is preparing to open its Memphis contact center, which is slated to employ nearly 400 people.

The Salt Lake City-based company will cut the ribbon on its 38,000-square-foot office – located at 1769 Paragon Place, suite 100, in Nonconnah Corporate Center – Thursday, Aug. 20, at 11:30 a.m.

72. Haslam: No Discussion With AG About Supreme Court Vacancy -

MURFREESBORO, Tenn. (AP) — As observers wait to see whether Attorney General Herbert Slatery has any interest in filling an upcoming vacancy on the Tennessee Supreme Court, Gov. Bill Haslam said he hasn't had any discussion about it with his close friend and former top legal adviser.

73. Mayoral Debate Clash Focuses on City Finances -

Memphis city government’s financial problems and how those problems happened was the flashpoint for the latest meeting of the top mayoral contenders on the Oct. 8 ballot.

The Wednesday, Aug. 19, forum sponsored by The Commercial Appeal at the University of Memphis saw incumbent Mayor A C Wharton Jr. clash with challengers and city council members Jim Strickland and Harold Collins. The fourth debate contender, Memphis Police Association president Mike Williams, argued for different city priorities and a slower move toward economic development goals.

74. Deferred Retirement Freeze Reflects Larger Police Problem -

In response to a police officer shortage, the Memphis City Council on Tuesday, Aug. 18, took its first step toward approving an ordinance that would allow city employees to freeze their retirement plans.

75. Council Gives Final Approval To Forrest Statue Removal -

Memphis City Council members gave final approval Tuesday, Aug. 18, to an ordinance setting the stage for removal of the Nathan Bedford Forrest statue in Health Sciences Park

76. Connexion Point Plans Memphis Grand Opening -

Health care services company Connexion Point is preparing to open its Memphis contact center, which is slated to employ nearly 400 people.

The Salt Lake City-based company will cut the ribbon on its 38,000-square-foot office – located at 1769 Paragon Place, suite 100, in Nonconnah Corporate Center – Thursday, Aug. 20, at 11:30 a.m.

77. Memphis City Council to Revisit Benefits Changes -

Memphis City Council members continue Tuesday, Aug. 18, to revisit decisions they made on retiree and employee benefits in the last year.

At its Tuesday session, council members vote on the first of three readings of an ordinance that would allow some city employees to “freeze” their decision to enter the city’s Deferred Retirement Option Program.

78. Health Law Sign-Ups Keep Growing; Uninsured Rate Declines -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Nearly a million people signed up for health insurance under President Barack Obama's law even after the official enrollment season ended, helping push the share of uninsured Americans below 10 percent and underscoring how hard it could be for Republicans to dismantle the program.

79. Emergency Fix -

Memphis is making non-emergency calls a top priority. The Mayor’s Innovation Delivery Team, Memphis Fire Department and area health care providers are working in conjunction with IBM consultants to streamline emergency services.

80. First Mayoral TV Debate Features Aggressive Contenders -

The first televised debate of the 2015 race of Memphis Mayor Monday, Aug. 10, saw incumbent Mayor A C Wharton Jr. and city council member Jim Strickland clash repeatedly while fellow council member and mayoral challenger Harold Collins said Strickland and Wharton were “acting like Tom and Jerry.”

81. Memphis Divorce Attorneys Prepare for Same-Sex Separations -

Memphis attorneys Miles Mason Sr. and Larry Rice have written the book on divorces.

Each is the author of authoritative guides to divorce law.

82. ADA Marks 25 Years With Accomplishments, Challenges -

America is a different place because of the Americans with Disabilities Act, which became the law of the land 25 years ago.

Older buildings without some kind of wheelchair ramp look out of place. Other accommodations for the disabled are an expected part of the landscape including curb cuts, lowered water fountains and restroom accommodations.

83. Strickland, Collins Clash on DROP Freeze -

Two political challengers to Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. clashed Tuesday, Aug. 4, over a plan by his administration to keep the city’s police ranks above the 2,000 mark.

City chief administrative officer Jack Sammons approached the council Tuesday in executive session about a plan to freeze the deferred retirement option plan (DROP) for city employees who have set their retirement date up to three years ahead of schedule.

84. Tax Filing Problems Could Jeopardize Health Law Aid for 1.8 Million -

WASHINGTON (AP) – About 1.8 million households that got financial help for health insurance under President Barack Obama's law now have issues with their tax returns that could jeopardize their subsidies next year. Administration officials say those taxpayers will have to act quickly.

85. Urge to Merge -

First it was big insurer Aetna, announcing it’s reached a deal to buy rival Humana for $34.1 billion. Only a few weeks later, another pair of insurers decided to get hitched, with Anthem announcing it would buy Cigna for $48.4 billion.

86. Same-Sex Marriage Ruling Means Changes for Benefits -

On June 26, 2015, in the case of Obergefell v. Hodges, the U.S. Supreme Court recognized that all couples, regardless of gender, have a fundamental right to marry. The court also directed states to issue marriage certificates to same-sex couples, and to recognize same-sex marriages performed in states that previously recognized this union. This decision will impact employee benefits in a number of ways.

87. New Daisy Renovation Signals New Era for Historic Building -

With a national partner found in Live Nation Entertainment, the New Daisy Theater is getting all dolled up to host nearly 200 musical acts annually.

The job doesn't just call for a new coat of paint to cover the decades of graffiti: the historic theater at 330 Beale is getting a complete overhaul.

88. Events -

The Farms at Bailey Station will host a free seminar titled “The 7 Things Every Senior Needs to Know About Estate Planning and Long-Term Care,” presented by J. Anthony Bradley of The Bradley Law Firm, Thursday, July 23, at 6 p.m. and Saturday, July 25, at 10 a.m. at the Farms at Bailey Station model, 10013 Grand Central Circle E. Email mmotes@farmsabs.com or call 901-328-4850.

89. Events -

Central Defense Staffing will host a recruitment event Wednesday, July 22, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at The Landers Center, 4560 Venture Drive in Southaven. CDS is hiring various positions for large accounts in Memphis and North Mississippi. Applicants should come prepared for an informational interview. For details on available positions, call 901-473-6385.

90. Charles Hughes to Head Rhodes’ Memphis Center -

Dr. Charles L. Hughes has been named director of Rhodes College’s Memphis Center, an academic hub focused on the human experience of the Memphis and Mid-South region. He will be teaching classes on Memphis history and culture, coordinating student projects and developing programs, and also will be continuing his own research on the area.

91. Families Face Tough Decisions as Elder-Care Cost Soars -

NEW YORK (AP) — Doris Ranzman had followed the expert advice, planning ahead in case she wound up unable to care for herself one day. But when a nursing-home bill tops $14,000 a month, the best-laid plans get tossed aside.

92. Events -

On Location: Memphis Shorts Festival will continue with screenings of short live-action films Tuesday, July 21, at 7 p.m. at Hard Rock Café, 126 Beale St. The audience will give on-the-spot reviews to determine which is screened in the OL:M International Film and Music Festival in September. Cost is free. Visit onlocationmemphis.org.

93. Resurrection Health Expands With Whitehaven Clinic -

A faith-based, evangelical health service organization that’s only halfway through its first year of existence has opened a second clinic to help support its mission of addressing health care disparities in Memphis.

94. Watchdog: Budget Cuts Lead to Poor Taxpayer Service at IRS -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The IRS provided poor customer service during this year's tax filing season as taxpayers struggled with a rise in identity theft and complications related to President Barack Obama's health law, a government watchdog said Wednesday.

95. Tennessee’s ‘Fighting 26’ Democrats Work to Stay Relevant -

Sometimes Tennessee Democrats must feel like a tree that falls in the forest: Does anyone hear them?

When Democratic legislative leaders called for a special session this summer on Insure Tennessee, Gov. Bill Haslam’s market-based plan to use federal dollars to catch 280,000 working people in a health care coverage gap, they found themselves alone.

96. Mayoral Contenders and a Campaign Cash Update -

The four most visible candidates for Memphis mayor spent nearly $130,000 from April through June laying the groundwork for the heart of summer campaigns, where they take their message to voters across the city.

97. Under Fire for Data Breach, Obama Personnel Chief Steps Down -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The embattled head of the government's personnel office abruptly stepped down Friday, bowing to mounting pressure following the unprecedented breach of private information her agency was entrusted to protect.

98. New Birth Control Rule for Employers With Religious Qualms -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Hoping to put to rest one of the most difficult disputes over its health care law, the Obama administration Friday unveiled its latest plan to address employers' religious objections to providing free birth control for their female workers.

99. It’s the Law -

THE LAW, AND I QUOTE. Oh, the outrage! Across the nation, people have reacted to the laws passed and validated by the courts, their liberty threatened, the Constitution violated, the republic at risk.

100. Back-to-School Fair Planned in Whitehaven Saturday -

The Academy for Youth Empowerment, along with business leaders and community organizations, are sponsoring the 15th annual Back to School Health Fair and Family Festival on Saturday, July 11.

The annual health fair is a public event where medical professionals offer various free services for both children and adults, including immunization shots, preschool physicals, dental screening, eye exams, blood pressure checks and HIV testing, among others.