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Editorial Results (free)

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HEALTH
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2. Cellphone Radiation Study Raises Concerns Despite Low Risk -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A new federal study of the potential dangers of cellphone radiation, conducted in rats, found a slight increase in brain tumors in males and raised long-dormant concerns about the safety of spending so much time with cellphones glued to our ears.

3. Workforce Officials Bringing Job Coaches to Frayser -

The Tennessee Department of Labor and Workforce Development’s mobile Career Coach will be at the North Frayser Community Center, 2555 St. Elmo Ave., on Tuesday, June 7, from noon to 4 p.m. Coach staff will help area residents complete online applications, create resumes and register on Jobs4TN.

4. UTHSC Taps Director For Patient Safety Center -

Dr. Chad Epps has been named executive director of the new $36.7 million Interprofessional Simulation and Patient Safety Center being built at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center.

5. First-Quarter Results Show Fred’s on Rebound -

Especially for a company like Memphis-based discount retailer Fred’s Inc., quarterly earnings results are about more than the numbers.

Fred’s – which grew total sales 8 percent during the quarter ended April 30 over the same period last year and earned $1.3 million in net income – is in the midst of a broad strategic and operational realignment. On the heels of new additions to management last year, plus new strategic imperatives and a big acquisition, changes the company is pushing this year include positioning itself as more of a health care company.

6. Methodist Gets Approval For Hospital Modernization -

The Tennessee Health Services and Development Agency has approved the certificate of need filed by Methodist Healthcare for the $280 million modernization of Methodist University Hospital, the Methodist system’s flagship.

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8. Snapshot: How Memphis-Based Public Companies are Faring -

Acquisitions have been a common theme among many Memphis-based public companies the past few quarters. Here is a roundup of those transactions and other business highlights from each of the companies.

9. Editorial: Innovation Must Link Memphis’ Needs, Promise -

The innovation efforts starting to bear fruit in Memphis’ medical community didn’t just appear miraculously.

Leaders of this effort started to plow rock-hard ground years ago.

While business innovation is difficult, health and medical innovation aimed at commercial applications is much more brutal. The reward for a breakthrough at this level is greater, but so is the risk, with investors’ capital burned through quickly whether or not an idea is brought to fruition.

10. Innovating Health -

Dr. Guy Reed’s Memphis-based medical startup hit a big milestone toward the end of 2015, when Japanese pharmaceutical company Daiichi Sankyo reached a deal to license the company’s technology.

11. Dollar General Q1 Profit Beats as Customers Spend More -

GOODLETTSVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Discount retailer Dollar General on Thursday posted better-than-expected first-quarter profit as more customers spent more.

Sales at stores open at least a year, considered an important measure of a retailer's health, rose 2.2 percent in the fiscal first quarter from the same period the year before. More customers came to stores and the average amount they spent rose too.

12. Methodist Gets Approval For Hospital Modernization -

The Tennessee Health Services and Development Agency has approved the certificate of need filed by Methodist Healthcare for the $280 million modernization of Methodist University Hospital, the Methodist system’s flagship.

13. THDA to Resume Apartment Inspections -

The Tennessee Housing Development Agency plans to inspect at least a dozen apartment complexes in Memphis where federal subsidies pay tenants’ rent.

THDA executive director Ralph Perrey said the agency’s authority to make the inspections resumes in July. And the agency isn’t saying which properties will be visited “so as not to ruin the surprise,” Perrey said Wednesday, May 25, as he announced the resumption of the inspections.

14. Female CEOs See Pay Rise, But Numbers Remain Small -

For the second year in a row, female CEOs earned more than their male counterparts and received bigger raises. But only a small sliver of the largest companies are run by women, and experts say gender parity at the top remains way off.

15. Kellogg Foundation Grant Targets Healthier Babies -

Right! From The Start will continue work in the Delta through a new $1.9 million W.K. Kellogg Foundation grant to the Community Foundation of Northwest Mississippi. The initiative will work to increase the breastfeeding rates of extremely low birth-weight babies utilizing a multi-agency approach to ensure better outcomes and effect systemic change. The funding continues through March 2019.

16. U of M Receives Grant From Urban Child Institute -

The Urban Child Institute has awarded the University of Memphis a $2 million grant to support the ACE (Adverse Childhood Experiences) Prevention Project.

Through the project, the U of M will build on relationships with the University of Tennessee Health Science Center and Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital to create a culture of health for vulnerable children in Memphis. The university and its partners will tackle issues such as child neglect and abuse, housing, asthma and breastfeeding.

17. THDA Resumes Inspections of HUD-Subsidized Apartments -

The Tennessee Housing Development Agency plans to inspect at least a dozen apartment complexes in Memphis where federal subsidies pay tenants’ rent.

THDA executive director Ralph Perrey said the agency’s authority to make the inspections resumes in July. And the agency isn’t saying which properties will be visited “so as not to ruin the surprise,” Perrey said Wednesday, May 25, as he announced the resumption of the inspections.

18. Legislators Sweating the Small Stuff -

My late father kept a paper weight on his desk at home that read: “Don’t sweat the small stuff.”

Well, we’re sweating the small stuff – from the federal government down to the states – with this harangue over transgender bathrooms.

19. U of M Receives Urban Childhood Institute Grant -

The Urban Child Institute has awarded the University of Memphis a $2 million grant to support the ACE (Adverse Childhood Experiences) Prevention Project.

Through the project, the U of M will build on relationships with the University of Tennessee Health Science Center and Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital to create a culture of health for vulnerable children in Memphis. The university and its partners will tackle issues such as child neglect and abuse, housing, asthma and breastfeeding.

20. Last Word: Graduation Day and Our Outrage, An ASD Offer In Raleigh and Fashion -

According to Shelby County Schools superintendent Dorsey Hopson, 15,000 people have watched the several dozen high school graduation ceremonies the school system has streamed live on its website including the 14 graduations held Saturday.

21. Former Church Health Center President Joins Methodist -

Methodist Le Bonheur Healthcare has added former Church Health Center president Antony Sheehan to its leadership team.

Sheehan, who will serve the hospital system as a senior adviser, left the faith-based Church Health Center organization in recent days over what it said was “a difference in philosophy” between him and Dr. Scott Morris, the center’s founder.

22. Last Word: The Hot Seat, The Cohen-Rubio Letter and a New Historical Marker -

The hottest seat in a room of hot seats in city government can be being director of the Memphis Animal Shelter.

You wouldn’t think that from the job description, which seems pretty basic. Round up stray animals and put them up for adoption. But that’s being overly simplistic because it begs a lot of questions about how many animals and what happens if you run out of space.

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24. Global Ministries Continues to Take More Heat -

The receiver for the Warren and Tulane Apartments is in place with the notice filed in Memphis federal court last week that Foresite Realty Management LLC had accepted the job and that its bonding is in place.

25. Baptist Adding ICU at Children’s Hospital -

The Spence and Becky Wilson Baptist Children’s Hospital has hit its ceiling and is now expanding to meet increased demand. When the 19,000-square-foot pediatric emergency department opened last year, Baptist Memorial Health Care expected to treat 35 children a day. That figure is more like 65 to 70 children, with the hospital expecting to exceed 20,000 patients in its first year.

26. Global Ministries’ Bonds Downgraded for 2nd Time -

For the second time this year, S&P Global Ratings has downgraded bonds used to support Global Ministries Foundation’s apartment projects.

On May 3, S&P Global Ratings, formerly known as Standard & Poor’s Ratings Services, lowered its investment rating on 23 multifamily bonds issued on behalf of GMF. S&P removed all 23 ratings from CreditWatch, where the bonds had been placed in February, with negative implications.

27. Church Health Center President Steps Down -

Antony Sheehan has stepped down as president of the Church Health Center.

Marvin Stockwell, a spokesman for the faith-based health care organization, said "it came down to a difference in philosophy" between Sheehan and founder Dr. Scott Morris about how to carry out the organization's mission forward, without elaborating.

28. Crosstown High Organizers Say It Will Be Innovative, Whether Charter or Optional -

Crosstown High School could be a charter school after all.

That was the original plan when charter operator Gestalt Community Schools signed on as one of the early tenants of Crosstown Concourse, the transformation of the old Sears Tower on Cleveland Avenue. When Gestalt pulled out of the project in late 2015, a group of philanthropists and community leaders rallied to recruit another school for the mixed-use high-rise.

29. Events -

Memphis Blues Society and Overton Square will open its 2016 Bluesday Tuesday concert series with Earl "The Pearl" Banks on Tuesday, May 24, from 7:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. in the Tower Courtyard, 2101 Madison Ave. Cost is free. Visit overtonsquare.com for a series schedule.

30. West Cancer Doc Building Blood and Marrow Transplant Program -

As a measure of how far Dr. Yasser Khaled’s field has come, the medical director of the West Cancer Center’s recently formed Blood and Marrow Transplant Program still recalls some eye-opening statistics that date back to his early days in the field some 15 years ago.

31. One Family -

An unprecedented private investment aims to restore a commercial heart to the Soulsville USA neighborhood, where a pair of sprawling buildings take up nearly a full block across from the Stax Museum of American Soul Music. It isn’t an eyesore, but inactivity within those walls has been a drag on the community.

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EMPHASIS Health Care
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33. Church Health Center President Steps Down -

Antony Sheehan has stepped down as president of the Church Health Center.

Marvin Stockwell, a spokesman for the faith-based health care organization, said “it came down to a difference in philosophy” between Sheehan and founder Dr. Scott Morris about how to carry out the organization’s mission forward, without elaborating.

34. Events -

Germantown Community Theatre will present Paul Rudnick’s “I Hate Hamlet” Friday, May 20, through June 5 at GCT, 3037 Forest Hill-Irene Road. Buy tickets at gctcomeplay.org.

35. Family Planning – Beyond the Diaper Fund -

Ray’s Take: So, you’re planning to start your family. Have you considered the finances involved beyond painting a room and knowing it’s going to take a lot of diapers? Three can certainly live as cheaply as two – as long as one of them doesn’t eat or wear clothes.

36. Elephants Abound -

The old joke goes this way: Every morning on the commuter train to work a man watches another man read his paper, meticulously folding every page to a single column width, then unfolding and refolding as he reads each column top to bottom. Finally, unable to stand it anymore, the first approaches the second and asks, “Why do you do that?” “It keep elephants off the train,” comes the reply.

37. Baptist Executive Vaughn Receives U of M’s Highest Alumni Award -

Anita Vaughn’s notable 43-year career with Baptist Memorial Hospital started on a whim.

“I went to University of Memphis for a year thinking I was going to be a commercial artist,” Vaughn said. “Then a friend just happened to say, ‘You know what? I’m going down to Baptist School of Nursing,’ and I said, ‘Well, OK. Me too!’

38. Vanderbilt Poll Finds Trump With 9-Point Lead in Tennessee -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Presumptive Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump has a 9 percentage point lead over Democrat Hillary Clinton in Tennessee, according to a Vanderbilt University poll released Thursday.

39. Poll: Two-Thirds of US Would Struggle to Cover $1,000 Crisis -

NEW YORK (AP) – Two-thirds of Americans would have difficulty coming up with the money to cover a $1,000 emergency, according to an exclusive poll released Thursday, a signal that despite years of recovery from the Great Recession, Americans' financial conditions remain precarious as ever.

40. Poll: Americans More Upbeat About Own Finances Than Economy -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Americans are of two minds about the economy in the midst of an elec-tion race that largely hinges on the issue. They are strikingly pessimistic about the national econ-omy yet comparatively upbeat about their own financial circumstances.

41. Events -

Shelby County Commissioner Van Turner will host a community town hall meeting Thursday, May 19, at 6 p.m. at Anointed Temple of Praise, 3939 Riverdale Road. The focus is the county government’s upcoming FY2017 budget proposal.

42. Global Ministries’ Bonds Downgraded for 2nd Time -

For the second time this year, S&P Global Ratings has downgraded bonds used to support Global Ministries Foundation’s apartment projects.

On May 3, S&P Global Ratings, formerly known as Standard & Poor’s Ratings Services, lowered its investment rating on 23 multifamily bonds issued on behalf of GMF. S&P removed all 23 ratings from CreditWatch, where the bonds had been placed in February, with negative implications.

43. Court Appoints Receiver for Warren, Tulane Apartments -

The Tulane and Warren apartments are under the control of a court-appointed receiver.

U.S. District Judge Jon P. McCalla appointed Foresite Realty Management LLC of Rosemont, Ill., as the receiver of the two properties Tuesday, May 17, by a consent order.

44. Receiver Appointed for Warren and Tulane Apartments -

The Tulane and Warren Apartments are under the control of a court-appointed receiver.

U.S. District Judge Jon P. McCalla appointed Foresite Realty Management LLC of Rosemont, Illinois as the receiver of the two properties Tuesday, May 17, by a consent order.

45. Events -

Job Fair and Educational Summit for U.S. Veterans and People Living With Disabilities will be held Wednesday, May 18, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Kroc Center, 800 East Parkway. Meet with more than 50 local employers along with 30 community services and training providers. Breakout sessions from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. will cover interviewing tips, job preparedness skills and lifestyle issues. Cost is free. For more information, call 901-636-7940, 901-438-0412 or 901-726-6521.

46. SCS Budget Quest About More Than Dollar Figures -

When the Shelby County Commission meets next week to look over the budget proposal approved Monday, May 16, by the Shelby County Schools board, there will be a debate that goes beyond the bottom line dollar figures and line items.

47. Ag-Focused Startup Accelerator Launching Cohort -

The community of startup founders launching companies in Memphis keeps getting bigger.

AgLaunch Accelerator, which will incubate six agriculture and food innovation startups in the city, is launching a new cohort in August. The program is a collaboration among the Memphis Bioworks Foundation’s Ag Innovation Development Group, the Tennessee Department of Agriculture, EPIcenter, Start Co. and a variety of other partner organizations.

48. SCS Board Approves $993.8M Budget, Delays Northside High Closing A Year -

Shelby County Schools board members voted Monday, May 16, to send a $933.8 million operating budget proposal to the Shelby County Commission for funding. And the board voted to close Messick Adult Center as well as Memphis Health Careers Academy with the end of the current school year next week.

49. Baptist Taps CEO For Crittenden County Hospital -

Baptist Memorial Health Care Corp. has named Brian Welton as CEO and administrator of the hospital the system is building in Crittenden County.

50. Mike Conley Finalist For Community Assist Award -

The NBA today announced the finalists for the 2015-16 season-long NBA Cares Community Assist Award, with Grizzlies guard Mike Conley making his first finalist nomination for the league-wide award.

51. HealthLink’s Medical Device Logistics Business Poised to Grow -

A Netherlands-based medical device logistics company has moved into the Lamar Avenue corridor.

Building on proximity to FedEx Corp. and Memphis’ emerging biosciences hub, HealthLink Europe & International made Memphis its latest flagstaff operation.

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HEALTH CARE
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53. Station to Station -

Even now, Explore Bike Share founder Doug Carpenter does not try to pretend that the initiative will cure all that ails Memphis. 

It won’t wipe out poverty. It can’t cure cancer. It won’t eliminate diabetes and obesity, solve all of the city’s transportation problems or totally bridge cultural and racial gaps that predate the bicycle’s invention.

54. Baptist Taps CEO For Crittenden County Hospital -

Baptist Memorial Health Care Corp. has named Brian Welton as CEO and administrator of the hospital the system is building in Crittenden County.

55. Retirement Spending – Easy to Underestimate -

Ray’s Take: Conventional wisdom from cookie-cutter financial calculators about retirement is to aim for 70 percent of current income in retirement. But, when told about the 70 percent figure, people tend to ignore the implied message that it means a 30 percent cut in lifestyle. As a result, many people underestimate the amount they need.

56. Shelby County Schools Board Eyes Wheel Tax to Bridge Budget Gap -

Shelby County Schools board members are looking at the county wheel tax to bridge some, but not all of the $27 million gap in their still tentative budget for the new fiscal year.

The specific solution they are looking at is the half of the $32 million in annual revenue from the wheel tax that Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell has proposed go instead to capital projects across all seven public school systems in Shelby County. The new fiscal year begins July 1.

57. Hopson Whittles Schools Budget Gap To $27 Million -

After an estimate of as much as $86 million in red ink, Shelby County Schools superintendent Dorsey Hopson has presented the Shelby County Schools board with a budget that is $27 million in the red.

58. Bank Seeks Receiver for Warren, Tulane Apartments -

The Bank of New York Mellon Trust Co. wants a federal judge to appoint a receiver for the Warren and Tulane Apartments owned by Global Ministries Foundation, citing “an appearance of fraud” by GMF in a memorandum filed with the call for a receiver.

59. Last Word: Humdingers, Gangster Disciples Paper Work and Underground Day -

Sometimes you think you know what is going on and then something happens like Chris Wallace, the general manager of the Memphis Grizzlies, grabbing a bite to eat Monday at Humdingers out east with former Grizz coach Lionel Hollins. Next thing you know there’s another possibility for the next Grizz coach – a return engagement that would be exceedingly rare.

60. Bank of New York Seeks Receiver for Warren and Tulane Apartments -

The Bank of New York Mellon Trust Co. wants a federal judge to appoint a receiver for the Warren and Tulane Apartments owned by Global Ministries Foundation citing “an appearance of fraud” by GMF in a memorandum filed with the call for a receiver.

61. Study: Costs for Most Long-Term Care Keep Climbing -

Long-term care grew more expensive again this year, with the cost of the priciest option, a private nursing home room, edging closer to $100,000 annually, according to a survey from Genworth Financial.

62. FDA to Re-Evaluate Definition Of 'Healthy' -

NEW YORK (AP) – The Food and Drug Administration will re-evaluate its definition of "healthy," which could eventually change how a range of foods are marketed.

In light of evolving research, the FDA said it believes "now is an opportune time to re-evaluate the regulations concerning nutrition content claims, generally, including the term 'healthy'." The agency plans to solicit public comment on the matter in the near future, said Lauren Kotwicki, an FDA representative, in an email.

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64. Resurrection Health Merges With Larger System -

Resurrection Health, a faith-based, evangelical health service organization that’s opened a handful of Memphis-area clinics since launching in December 2014, has merged with a larger health system.

65. Last Word: The Airport and Hotels, Loans and Musicians and Underground in Town -

That didn’t take long. Fired one day, hired the next for Dave Joerger now formerly of the Grizz.

66. Impact of Teen Pregnancy is Focus of State Health Officials -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – The Tennessee Department of Health is trying to raise awareness about the impact of teen pregnancy in communities across the state as National Teen Pregnancy Prevention Month is observed during May.

67. Mike Conley a Finalist For Community Assist Award -

The NBA today announced the finalists for the 2015-16 season-long NBA Cares Community Assist Award, with Grizzlies guard Mike Conley making his first finalist nomination for the league-wide award.

68. Adults Not Helping Childhood Obesity Turn Corner Very Quickly -

Richard Hamburg does not pretend that there is a cure-all for childhood obesity, that just a little exercise will make things all better, that just a few policy changes or improvements in school lunch programs (which is happening), or a reduction of “food deserts” will solve the whole problem.

69. LGBT Community Braces for Impact of New Counseling Law -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Roddy Biggs was 13 and depressed, and had been seeing a therapist for six months before he revealed something he had denied even to himself: He was gay.

It took time because he hadn't fully acknowledged his sexuality, but also because he had to trust the therapist, he said.

70. Accounting Firm DHG Hosting Women Forward Event -

The Memphis office of accounting firm DHG will host its next Women Forward event, "Helping Women Build a Healthy Financial Foundation," on Tuesday, May 10, at the Dixon Gallery and Gardens’ Hughes Pavilion, 4339 Park Ave.

71. Memphis Economist: 'I Don’t Believe in National Economies Anymore' -

The day after Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam and Economic and Community Development Commissioner Randy Boyd met with officials in Shanghai as part of an economic development trip to Asia, Michael Drury shared with an audience of business professionals his idea about national economies.

72. Baptist’s Dr. Frank Groner Named To Hall of Fame -

Dr. Frank Groner, president emeritus of Baptist Memorial Hospital, is being inducted into the Tennessee Health Care Hall of Fame.

Leaders of the hall of fame announced Tuesday, May 3, that Groner is one of six health care pioneers to be included in its second class of inductees.

73. Tennessee Leads the Nation in Bankruptcies -

Tennessee has a model program for financial literacy in its public schools. All high school students must pass a personal finance course to graduate, and even kindergartners are learning about money under a new initiative to extend the curriculum to primary school.

74. Massacre: 1866 and the Battles Over How Memphis History is Told -

At the end of March with much secrecy, Rev. Keith Norman took delivery and responsibility for a large, heavy crate that stayed in his office for the next month.

“Don’t tell anybody, don’t let anybody get it, if they come in and say they work for the park commission or anybody, tell them to show identification,” were the instructions said Norman, who is president of the Memphis Branch NAACP.

75. 5 Tennessee Health Centers Getting $4 Million in Federal Funds -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Federal officials say five health centers in Tennessee are receiving more than $4.2 million to help them serve more patients.

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services said Wednesday that the centers will use the funding to renovate or acquire new clinical space to provide care to an estimated 8,140 new patients in Tennessee.

76. FDA Announces Rules That Could Upend E-Cigarette Industry -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The federal government on Thursday announced sweeping new regulations for electronic cigarettes that could upend the multibillion-dollar industry and for the first time require e-cigarette makers to submit their products for a safety review.

77. Akbari Proving to be Worthy Successor to Iconic DeBerry -

Those who wondered how Raumesh Akbari would do in following legendary Memphis legislator Lois DeBerry now have a much clearer picture.

78. Legislative Losers: All Who Disagree With Legislators -

The 109th General Assembly is done – almost – for the year. Here’s a look at the winners and losers.

Winner: State budget

Buoyed by $400 million in surplus revenue from fiscal 2015 and $450 million in projected surpluses for the coming fiscal year, Gov. Bill Haslam spread the wealth in a $34.9 billion budget. 

79. South Front Hits its Stride as Standalone Corridor -

South Front Street, which stretches Downtown from Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard to Central Station, is emerging as its own standalone residential and commercial corridor. What was once a heavy industrial area and warehousing district for South Main’s department stores is undergoing a transformation into Downtown’s most residentially dense neighborhood.

80. Tennessee Campus Carry Becomes Law Without Haslam Signature -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A bill allowing staff and faculty at Tennessee's public colleges and universities to be armed on campus became law Monday without the Republican governor's signature.

81. Baptist’s Frank Groner Named To Health Care Hall of Fame -

Dr. Frank Groner, president emeritus of Baptist Memorial Hospital, is being inducted into the Tennessee Health Care Hall of Fame.

Leaders of the hall of fame announced Tuesday, May 3, that Groner is one of six health care pioneers to be included in its second class of inductees.

82. Fisher & Phillips Adds David Jones -

Attorney David S. Jones has joined Fisher & Phillips LLP as a partner in the firm’s Memphis office. Jones has more than 15 years’ experience in immigration and employment law, most recently serving as a partner at Jackson Lewis P.C. In his new role, he represents corporate clients in complex matters relating to both immigration benefits and enforcement, as well as export control compliance under the Export Administration Regulations and International Traffic in Arms Regulations.

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84. FDA Effort Aims to Curb Smoking in LGBT Community -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Food and Drug Administration's latest anti-smoking campaign takes aim at young adults in the LGBT community, who officials say are nearly twice as likely to use tobacco as their peers.

85. How Healthy is Your Organization? -

It is officially allergy season. Stuffy nose, itchy watery eyes and sore throat are all normal symptoms, but how do you know when these might point to a larger problem? Symptoms can alert us to greater underlying problems, but don’t often give us the complete story. This is also true in a business setting.

86. FDA Reconsiders Training Requirements for Painkillers -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Food and Drug Administration is reconsidering whether doctors who prescribe painkillers like OxyContin should be required to take safety training courses, according to federal documents.

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88. The Week Ahead: May 2-8 -

So, you think this is the “off-week” of the Memphis In May International Festival – the gap between the Beale Street Music Festival and the World Championship Barbecue Cooking Contest. But, while Tom Lee Park gets a breather, there are plenty of cultural experiences to soak up across Memphis. Here's our weekly roundup of local happenings you need to know about...

89. Health Alliance Prepares for Annual Meeting May 12 -

The Common Table Health Alliance’s annual meeting will take place on Thursday, May 12, honoring three health impact leaders from the community and addressing the topic “Childhood Obesity: Have We Finally Turned the Corner?”

90. UTHSC Professor Wins Award for Debut Novel -

Memphis writer Jim Bailey was recently named among the winners of the Benjamin Franklin Awards for his debut novel, “The End of Healing.”

91. Shelby County Health Dept. Reports Six Measles Cases -

Shelby County Health Department officials have confirmed six unrelated cases of measles in the county.

The health department is urging residents to make sure their vaccinations are up to date and to be aware of the signs and symptoms of measles.

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93. US Economy Struggles at Start of Election Year -

WASHINGTON (AP) – It was not a great start for the U.S. economy.

With consumers and businesses turning cautious, the U.S. struggled to grow in the first three months of a presidential election year that is shining the spotlight on the economy's fitful recovery.

94. Verso Agrees to $10,000 Fine in Potomac River Latex Spill -

ANNAPOLIS, Md. (AP) – Memphis-based Verso Corp. will pay a $10,000 settlement for two chemical spills that tainted the Potomac River last fall, according to the Maryland Department of the Environment.

95. Memphis Attractions Touted at MCVB Tourism Party -

To kick off tourism season, the Memphis Convention & Visitors Bureau will host a tourism “Party in the Park” where more than 50 Memphis attractions will be on hand with interactive booths and giveaways. Food trucks will be selling food and there will be live music. Admission is free and open to the public. The Party in the Park will take place Tuesday, May 3, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. in Downtown’s Court Square

96. Tennessee Legislature's 2016 Session: Unbelievable -

THE STATE OF UN. In this nadir of presidential elections with everyone awash in slimy sound bites, with Congress and a Supreme Court nominee stuck in the mud, it takes truly jaw-dropping state legislative idiocy to draw the attention of the national media, make the monologues of late-night hosts and inspire “Saturday Night Live” skits.

97. Last Word: TNReady Termination, NFL Draft Day and What Drove The Bible Bill -

When students in public schools take tests these days, it is about more than how they are doing and whether they know what is being taught them.

The scores play a significant role in how teachers are evaluated and rated. And both play a role in their careers and how much they will be paid. They play a role in whether the state decides to take over a school or the school system they remain in decides to essentially start over with an Innovation School model.

98. Speaker Harwell's Health Care Task Force Holds First Meeting -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Members of a health care task force assigned with proposing alternatives to Republican Gov. Bill Haslam's Insure Tennessee plan on Tuesday stressed their desire to include "circuit breakers" to prevent out-of-control costs.

99. Common Table Health Alliance Prepping for Annual Meeting -

The Common Table Health Alliance’s annual meeting will take place on Thursday, May 12, honoring three health impact leaders from the community and addressing the topic “Childhood Obesity: Have We Finally Turned the Corner?”

100. Tennova Ceasing Opiate Prescriptions to Pain Clinic Patients -

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Tennova Healthcare will no longer offer long-term opiate medication prescriptions to patients at its pain clinics.

Patients of the centers, affiliated with Tennova's Physicians Regional and Turkey Creek medical centers, have been given letters as they come in for appointments, informing them of the change, the Knoxville News Sentinel reported (http://bit.ly/26rosN3).