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Editorial Results (free)

1. AP-NORC Poll: Americans of All Stripes Say Fix Health Care -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Sylvia Douglas twice voted for President Barack Obama and last year cast a ballot for Democrat Hillary Clinton. But when it comes to "Obamacare," she now sounds like President-elect Donald Trump. This makes her chuckle amid the serious choices she faces every month between groceries, electricity and paying a health insurance bill that has jumped by nearly $400.

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3. Federal Reserve Sees Growth Pickup at End of Last Year -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The U.S. economy grew a bit faster at the end of last year, spurred by healthier sales for manufacturers and steady hiring that is slowly pushing up wages.

The Federal Reserve said Wednesday that its survey of economic conditions around the country found that growth was modest or moderate in 10 of its 12 districts. That is an improvement from seven in the previous report. Growth was slight in the Cleveland district and largely unchanged in New York.

4. St. Jude Expansion Looks East of Campus -

The city’s plan for the Pinch District between the Pyramid and St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital isn’t the only reason the city will seek expanded uses of the Tourism Development Zone and an expansion of a Tax Increment Financing district.

5. New Details of St. Jude Expansion Look to Medical Corridors To The East -

The city’s plans for the Pinch District between the Pyramid and St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital are only half of the plan the city will seek expanded uses of the Tourism Development Zone and an expansion of a Tax Increment Financing district for.

6. New Details of St. Jude Expansion Look to Medical Corridors To The East -

The city’s plans for the Pinch District between the Pyramid and St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital are only half of the plan the city will seek expanded uses of the Tourism Development Zone and an expansion of a Tax Increment Financing district for.

7. New Prescription: Doctor Offices That Look Like Apple Stores -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) – After a relative suffered a heart attack a few years ago, Silicon Valley entrepreneur Adrian Aoun got an unsettling look at a health-care system that he diagnosed as an inefficient and outdated mess.

8. Arkansas Lawmakers Advance Junk Food Ban for Food Stamps -

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) – Arkansas would ban food stamps from being used to buy soda or junk food under a plan that's heading to the state House for a vote.

The House Public Health, Welfare and Labor Committee on Tuesday endorsed the proposal by Republican Rep. Mary Bentley of Perryville to prohibit using Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program benefits to purchase foods and beverages with "insufficient" nutritional value.

9. Graves Named Director Of Downtown YMCA -

Angelic Graves has joined YMCA of Memphis & the Mid-South as executive director of the Louis T. Fogelman Downtown YMCA. Graves, a Chicago native, comes to Memphis from the YMCA of Metro Chicago, where she most recently served as executive director of the South Side YMCA.

10. Nonprofit Exercise Looks Toward, Beyond Trump -

At the end of Alvin Toffler’s 1970 futurist manifesto “Future Shock,” he wrote about a concept called “anticipatory democracy” as a cure of sorts for being overwhelmed by technological developments and other rapid fire changes.

11. Saint Francis Rolling Out Carpet for Nurses -

Faced with a growing demand for nurses, hospitals are finding they have to be more creative in their recruitment efforts to attract the best candidates.

That’s according to Keith Stanhill, chief human resource officer for Saint Francis Healthcare, which is hosting a job fair and hiring event next week and offering a potential hiring bonus of $10,000 for some eligible nurses.

12. U of M Adds Master Of Social Work At Lambuth -

The Department of Social Work at the University of Memphis will add the Master of Social Work (MSW) program to the U of M Lambuth campus beginning next fall. The new program will both address the need for the curriculum at the Jackson, Tennessee, campus and to better meet the demand for graduate-level social workers in the region.

13. Zipcar Expands Operations in Memphis With ‘Humility’ -

A Boston-based car-sharing company recently teamed up with officials at Christian Brothers University to give their students a little “Humility.”

Humility, of course, refers to the gray four-door Ford Focus parked on CBU’s campus that students will be able to reserve for as little as an hour or for multiple days, through Zipcar, a car-sharing service billed as an alternative to both car ownership and traditional rental facilities.

14. Last Word: Valero Protest Arrests, Anticipating Trump's Impact & Saving Booksellers -

A busy King holiday weekend that reflects what the week as a whole will probably be like at least politically. The weather is anyone’s guess. A group of about 40 people protested at the entrance to the Valero refinery in South Memphis Monday afternoon and a dozen were arrested by Memphis police.

15. Personalized IRS Letters Nudge Uninsured to Get Coverage -

WASHINGTON (AP) – If you haven't signed up for health insurance, you may soon be getting a not-too-subtle nudge from the taxman.

The IRS is sending personalized letters to millions of taxpayers who might be uninsured, reminding them that they could be on the hook for hundreds of dollars in fines under the federal health care law if they don't sign up soon through HealthCare.gov. It's an unusual role for a revenue-collection agency.

16. Crosstown Creator Named ‘Communicator of the Year’ -

Crosstown Concourse visionary Todd Richardson has been named the Communicator of the Year by the Memphis chapter of the Public Relations Society of America.

17. The Week Ahead: January 17-23 -

Good morning, Memphis! This is a good week to be inspired, as we honor the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and his courage to motivate and inspire change. Plus, UrbanArt Commission celebrates its 20th anniversary and the Brooks Museum of Art unveils an exhibition sure to make you hoppy – err, happy. Here’s what else you need to know in The Week Ahead...

18. First Horizon Exec Among American Banker’s Top 10 -

American Banker has included the chairman and CEO of First Tennessee Bank’s parent company on a list of 10 banking executives who “had a good year,” according to the publication.

19. UTHSC Taps Director For New Plough Center -

Dr. Harry Kochat has been named the new director of the Plough Center for Sterile Drug Delivery Systems at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center.

Recruited by Dr. Ken Brown, executive vice chancellor and chief operations officer at UTHSC, Kochat will direct the Plough Center’s two pharmaceutical manufacturing facilities on campus.

20. County Commission Renews Bolton Contract -

The Shelby County Commission voted Monday, Jan. 9, to renew a $65,000 contract with attorney Julian Bolton that runs through the 2017 calendar year.

21. Methodist Picks Interim EVP of Medical Affairs -

Dr. Guy Reed has been tapped as interim executive vice president of medical affairs for Methodist Le Bonheur Healthcare.

22. Christ Community Health Names New Chief Executive -

Christ Community Health Services has tapped Shantelle Leatherwood as its new CEO.

Leatherwood was the organization's CAO who managed compliance for federal, state and local regulations, acted as the liaison with the Bureau of Primary Care, and oversaw quality improvement and population health.

23. Events -

National Civil Rights Museum will remember Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s life and legacy Monday, Jan. 16, at its King Day Celebration, with the theme “Come Too Far to Turn Back Now.” The museum will offer reduced admission of $5 during the extended hours of 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. An entertainment stage, health pavilion and children’s activity tent (10 a.m. to 4 p.m.) will be set up outside. Visit civilrightsmuseum.org/king-day for details.

24. Events -

National Civil Rights Museum will remember Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s life and legacy Monday, Jan. 16, at its King Day Celebration, with the theme “Come Too Far to Turn Back Now.” The museum will offer reduced admission of $5 during the extended hours of 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. An entertainment stage, health pavilion and children’s activity tent (10 a.m. to 4 p.m.) will be set up outside. Visit civilrightsmuseum.org/king-day for details.

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26. Testing Wearable Sensors as 'Check Engine' Light for Health -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A next step for smart watches and fitness trackers? Wearable gadgets gave a Stanford University professor an early warning that he was getting sick before he ever felt any symptoms of Lyme disease.

27. US Budget Deficit Nearly Doubles in December From Year Ago -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The U.S. federal government's budget deficit rose from a year earlier for the second straight month, the latest sign of a rising financing gap.

The Treasury Department said Thursday that the December budget deficit was $27.5 billion, nearly double the $14 billion in December 2015. In the first three months of the government's budget year, the deficit is slightly below last year's total. But adjusting for calendar quirks that moved some large benefit payments into September, the deficit has worsened in the past three months.

28. Congress Takes First Steps to Dismantle Health Care Law -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Congressional Republicans are taking the first steps toward dismantling President Barack Obama's health care law, facing pressure from President-elect Donald Trump to move quickly on a replacement.

29. Christ Community Health Names New Chief Executive -

Christ Community Health Services has tapped Shantelle Leatherwood as its new CEO.

Leatherwood was the organization’s CAO who managed compliance for federal, state and local regulations, acted as the liaison with the Bureau of Primary Care, and oversaw quality improvement and population health.

30. Strickland: Core Services Strategy Sustaining Momentum -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland said his core services or “brilliant at the basics” strategy is working a year into his four-year term of office. But he told the Memphis Kiwanis Club Wednesday, Jan. 11, that the strategy will take some time and patience toward what he termed a “renaissance.”

31. Last Word: Charter Schools Views, Capitol Hill Round Up & Explaining The Cold War -

Double trouble Wednesday in Oklahoma. The Grizz lose to the Thunder 103-95 in OKC. They are on their way to Houston for a Friday game before returning home Sunday for the MLK game against the Chicago Bulls at the Forum. Meanwhile Tigers lose to Tulsa Wednesday, also in Oklahoma, 81-71. They are back at the Forum Saturday to play South Florida.

32. Tenn. Streamlines System To Fight Human Trafficking -

In honor of National Human Trafficking Day on Wednesday, Jan. 11, Tennessee has announced a streamlined, statewide collaboration enforced by Gov. Bill Haslam’s office, local law enforcement and four regional nongovernmental organizations to fight human trafficking.

33. Adapt To Survive -

According to Charles Darwin, it’s not the strongest or the most intelligent who will survive, but those who can best manage change. In my experience, that’s a true assessment not only for human beings, but also for businesses, regardless of the focus of the business.

34. For New Plough Center Director, Job is a Calling -

For Dr. Harry Kochat, the best parts of working in pharmaceutical development are the interactions with grateful patients. Like the one he remembers from early in his career, when Kochat – whose work has focused on the development of life-saving drugs for more than three decades – encountered a mother and her young son.

35. Literacy Mid-South Building Network to Raise Reading Levels -

As a child, Knox Shelton witnessed first-hand the struggle to break a generational cycle of marginal literacy. He grew up in Jonesville, Virginia, a small Appalachian coal mining town.

“I mostly remembered the good times of being a kid,” said Shelton, who recently was promoted to the role of executive director at Literacy Mid-South. “But little memories come back that are very dark and scary, just to think of situations kids were in. I’m gonna make it sound like an awful town, but there were kids pulled out of school in first grade to work with their families.

36. Rallings Finds Voice on Violent Crime -

Michael Rallings is just about at the one-year mark in his tenure as Memphis Police director and he has found his voice.

Much of what Rallings is saying a year into the job is about the city’s problem with violent crime, homicides in particular.

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38. Johnson & Johnson to Reveal Average Drug Price Increases -

Health care giant Johnson & Johnson plans next month to disclose price increases of its prescription drugs as the industry tries to calm the storm over soaring prices.

Experts say the company's move will help its image more than patients initially, but it could push other drugmakers to tame future price increases and be more transparent. The company says it will divulge average list price increases and what middlemen pay for medicines.

39. US Job Openings, Quits Rise, Pointing to Modest Hiring Ahead -

WASHINGTON (AP) – U.S. employers posted more jobs in November and quitting also increased – signs that job gains and wages may increase in the months ahead.

The number of available jobs rose 1.3 percent in November from the previous month to 5.5 million, the Labor Department said Tuesday. That's below a post-recession peak of 5.8 million in April. Hiring rose 1.1 percent to 5.2 million.

40. Rallings Questions Homicide Count, Calls for More Study of Violence -

Memphis Police Director Michael Rallings says he is going to “bring the fire” in 2017 when it comes to talking about and dealing with the city’s problem with violent crime.

In a wide-ranging speech Tuesday, Jan. 10, to the Memphis Rotary Club, Rallings used an extensive Power Point presentation to break down the city’s 228 homicides in 2016 – a record year for the homicide count.

41. Methodist Picks Interim EVP Of Medical Affairs -

Dr. Guy Reed has been tapped as interim executive vice president of medical affairs for Methodist Le Bonheur Healthcare.

42. County Commission Renews Bolton Contract -

Shelby County Commissioners voted Monday, Jan. 9, to renew a contract with attorney Julian Bolton after some debate about whether Bolton’s position is necessary.

43. Ugwueke Takes Reins as Methodist Healthcare CEO -

Michael Ugwueke’s first day on the job as CEO of Methodist Le Bonheur Healthcare, a post he assumed Jan. 1, included a round of meeting the troops.

The new chief executive of the Methodist organization visited all six of its hospitals, meeting employees and front-line staff and sharing his appreciation that they were there on New Year’s Day, a holiday for many people.

44. County Commission Continues Bolton Contract, Approves Legislative Wish List -

Shelby County Commissioners voted Monday, Jan 9, to renew its contract with attorney Julian Bolton after some debate about whether Bolton’s position in necessary.

45. UTHSC Taps New Director For Plough Center -

Dr. Harry Kochat has been named the new director of the Plough Center for Sterile Drug Delivery Systems at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center.

Recruited by Dr. Ken Brown, executive vice chancellor and chief operations officer at UTHSC, Kochat will direct the Plough Center’s two pharmaceutical manufacturing facilities on campus.

46. Elusive High-Speed Internet Sprouts in Rural Tennessee -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Rural Scott County could serve as a model for how grant money can be leveraged to spur much-needed infrastructure investments such as high-speed Internet.

The Tennessean (http://tnne.ws/2iw1xMn) reports that Scott County, located 60 miles northwest of Knoxville, is classified by the state as economically distressed, but its local cooperative now has some of the fastest internet services in the nation.

47. Parents, Save Up: Cost of Raising a Child is More Than $233K -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Expecting a baby? Congratulations! Better put plenty of money in your savings account.

The Department of Agriculture says the estimated cost of raising a child from birth through age 17 is $233,610, or as much as almost $14,000 annually. That's the average for a middle-income couple with two children. It's a bit more expensive in urban parts of the country, and less so in rural areas.

48. Commuter Program Works With Employers to Alleviate Transit Troubles -

Despite a reinvestment in the development of urban centers across the United States, the average American commute time is still increasing, which is placing a strain on both commuters and their employers.

49. Obama's Final Jobs Report: Big Pay Gain, Slower Hiring -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Americans' paychecks rose in December at the fastest pace in more than seven years as steady hiring and low unemployment led some businesses to pay more to attract and keep workers.

50. First Horizon Exec Among American Banker’s Top 10 -

American Banker has included the chairman and CEO of First Tennessee Bank’s parent company on a list of 10 banking executives who “had a good year,” according to the publication.

51. Fewer Arkansas Adults Not Visiting Doctor Due to Cost -

A report by a private foundation said the percentage of Arkansas adults who went without medical care because of high costs decreased last year.

The Commonwealth Fund's report released last week shows 16 percent of adults in Arkansas went without health care because of the cost in 2015, compared to 18 percent in 2014.

52. Baker Donelson Completes Merger With Ober/Kaler -

Memphis-based Baker Donelson and Baltimore-based Ober/Kaler have completed their previously announced merger, creating one of the 50 largest law firms in the nation.

The firm, which maintains the name of Baker Donelson, added nearly 110 attorneys and more than 100 staff members from Ober/Kaler. That brings its headcount to more than 800 attorneys and advisers, including around 380 shareholders.

53. U of M Lambuth to Offer Master of Social Work -

The University of Memphis Lambuth will begin offering a Master of Social Work program this fall 2017, the university announced Wednesday, Jan. 4.

Online classes as well as evening classes at the Jackson, Tennessee, campus are designed to accommodate working students. The social work program addresses a shortage of social workers in the region as noted by the federal Health Resources and Service Administration.

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55. New Advice: Peanuts in Baby's Diet Can Prevent Scary Allergy -

WASHINGTON (AP) – New parents, get ready to feed your babies peanut-containing foods – starting young lowers their chances of becoming allergic.

The National Institutes of Health issued new guidelines Thursday saying most babies should regularly eat those foods starting around 6 months of age, some as early as 4 months. It's a major shift in dietary advice for a country fearful of one of the most dangerous food allergies.

56. 2016 – What Can We Learn From the Big Events? -

Ray’s Take One of the most important disciplines in financial planning is the annual review. A time to look at what worked, what didn’t, what needs adjusting and what we learned. As we look back on 2016, we can learn some financial lessons from the big events of the year.

57. Crosstown Concourse Sees First Residents -

Less than a week into 2017 and something is going on that hasn’t happened in nearly a quarter of a century. “We had our first apartment residents move in,” Crosstown Concourse co-founder Todd Richardson said. “After 24 years of being empty, we’ve got our first occupants.”

58. U of M Lambuth to Offer Master of Social Work Degree -

The University of Memphis Lambuth will begin offering a Master of Social Work program this fall, the university announced Wednesday, Jan. 4.

Online classes as well as evening classes at the Jackson, Tennessee, campus are designed to accommodate working students. The social work program addresses a shortage of social workers in the region as noted by the federal Health Resources and Service Administration.

59. Reactionaries, Evidence Vie on Medicinal Pot -

Three-year-old Josie Mae Mathis of Greene County used to suffer hundreds of seizures daily from epilepsy and infantile spasms. Aden Vogus, a pre-teen from Brentwood, has seen his seizures all but disappear.

60. Tennessee Lawmakers Could Raise, Lower Taxes This Session -

The 110th General Assembly is set to convene on Jan. 10 with unfinished business from previous sessions likely to dominate debate.

Here’s a look at some of the hottest topics expected to arise.

61. Arkansas Lawmaker: Modifications Eyed for Medicaid Plan -

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) – The top Republican in Arkansas' Senate says he expects lawmakers to begin modifying the state's hybrid Medicaid expansion even before the future of the federal health law that enabled the expanded insurance program is settled in Washington.

62. Last Word: Laurelwood Lament, Fairgrounds Redux and Deeper on Crime -

Booksellers at Laurelwood made it through the Christmas shopping season but will close its doors in Laurelwood probably in February with the liquidation sale beginning Friday – as in this Friday.

63. Baker Donelson, Ober/Kaler Complete Combination -

Memphis-based Baker Donelson and Baltimore-based Ober/Kaler have completed their previously announced merger, creating one of the 50 largest law firms in the nation.

The firm, which maintains the name of Baker Donelson, added nearly 110 attorneys and more than 100 staff members from Ober/Kaler. That brings its headcount to more than 800 attorneys and advisers, including around 380 shareholders.

64. Backtracking After Trump Tweet, GOP Won't Gut Ethics Office -

WASHINGTON (AP) – House Republicans abruptly reversed themselves Tuesday under pressure from President-elect Donald Trump and dropped plans to gut an independent congressional ethics board.

65. A Fresh Perspective -

One thing everyone can agree on is that new year’s resolutions are anything but new. In fact, it’s widely accepted that this practice dates back some 4,000 years. With such a longstanding tradition, I find it odd that less than 10 percent of those who make a new year’s resolution actually keep it.

66. New Wood Technology May Offer Hope for Struggling Timber -

RIDDLE, Ore. (AP) – John Redfield watches with pride as his son moves a laser-guided precision saw the size of a semi-truck wheel into place over a massive panel of wood.

Redfield's fingers are scarred from a lifetime of cutting wood and now, after decades of decline in the logging business, he has new hope that his son, too, can make a career shaping the timber felled in southern Oregon's forests.

67. Arkansas Adults Not Visiting Doctor Due to Cost Decreases -

A report by a private foundation said the percentage of Arkansas adults who went without medical care because of the cost decreased last year.

The Commonwealth Fund’s report released last week shows 16 percent of adults in Arkansas went without health care because of the cost in 2015, compared to 18 percent in 2014.

68. Community Foundation To Fund $224,000 in Grants -

The Community Foundation of Greater Memphis has announced grants totaling nearly $224,000 in its Nonprofit Capacity Building funding category.

The grant awards, to a total of 19 organizations, range from $2,500 to $21,762.

69. Memphis Bioworks Surpasses Goals of Labor Department Job-Training Grant -

The Memphis Bioworks Foundation is serious about workforce development and job training, along with the other high-profile work for which it’s known, like investing in companies related to bioscience and sustainability.

70. The FUNdraising Doctor is In, Part 2 -

Editor’s note: Part two in a two-part series. The financial health of an organization is often attributed to the board of directors. The composition of the board, its actions, the level of giving and the recognition of individual members all impact financial health.

71. Memphis Branch NAACP Executive Director Retires -

Madeleine Taylor, the executive director of the Memphis Branch NAACP, is retiring after 26 years with the organization, including six in her current position.

Taylor has been integral to the work of the civil rights organization that has been an essential part of the city’s history before, during and after the civil rights movement of the 1950s and 1960s.

72. Thirteen Local Nonprofits Awarded $2,500 Grants -

Thirteen Memphis-area nonprofit organizations have been chosen to receive $2,500 grants from FirstBank.

FirstBank Memphis president Jeff Hudson invited several organizations to make grant requests and hosted a pre-holiday reception at FirstBank’s financial center at 6482 Poplar Ave. An independent three-person selection panel made the decisions on which organizations would receive a share of the grants.

73. UT Mobile Stroke Unit Saving Lives in First Months on Streets -

With just more than four months on Memphis streets since its debut, the College of Medicine at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center is already seeing impressive results from its new Mobile Stroke Unit.

74. Riding Momentum -

Around this time each year, everyone tends to start fetishizing the blank slate a bit, with its attendant allure of reinvention and that sweeping away of the old order to make way for what comes next.

75. With Trump's Victory, GOP Hopes to Overhaul Medicaid -

ATLANTA (AP) – When President-elect Donald Trump takes office in January, Republicans will have the opportunity to pull off something they have wanted to do for years – overhaul Medicaid, the program that provides health care to tens of millions of lower-income and disabled Americans.

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77. Fixed Costs: Overhead That May Be Costing You Too Much -

Ray’s Take There’s an old cash flow joke about having too much month at the end of the money. It’s usually more a function of spending than earning. For most people there’s a lot more control over the expenditures side of the equation than there is over the income – at least in the short run. So cutting how much you spend on extras sounds great. But how much of your spending can really be reduced or eliminated? Too much “overhead” can result in disaster.

78. Growing Number of Americans are Retiring Outside the US -

Newly widowed, Kay McCowen quit her job, sold her house, applied for Social Security and retired to Mexico. It was a move she and her husband, Mel, had discussed before he passed away in 2012.

"I wanted to find a place where I could afford to live off my Social Security," she said. "The weather here is so perfect, and it's a beautiful place."

79. Great Expectations: Small Businesses Upbeat About 2017 -

NEW YORK (AP) – Donald Trump's election as president has made many small business owners more upbeat about 2017.

Dean Bingham says he's cautiously optimistic because business picked up at his auto repair shop after the election – people who had put off fixing their cars have decided it's time to get them serviced.

80. Thirteen Memphis Nonprofits Awarded $2,500 Grants -

Thirteen Memphis nonprofit organizations have been chosen to receive $2,500 grants from FirstBank.

FirstBank Memphis president Jeff Hudson invited several organizations to make grant requests and hosted a pre-holiday reception at FirstBank’s financial center at 6482 Poplar Ave. An independent three-person selection panel made the decisions on which organizations would receive a share of the grants.

81. Last Word: Liberty Bowl Memories, Talk About Violence and The Year In Ed & Med -

Grizz fall to the Celtics in Boston Tuesday 113-103. With Mike Conley and five other starters out. Away from triple digits, it is SMU over the Tigers at the Forum Tuesday 58-54.

82. Memphis Health Care Thrives With Investments, Growth -

Methodist Healthcare made a “great commitment” to Memphis this year. Those are the words of Methodist University Hospital CEO Jeff Liebman, who referenced the health care system’s multimillion-dollar investment into its flagship hospital at 1265 Union Ave., part of a master plan that will give the facility a modern overhaul.

83. New Tennessee Nursing Home Admissions Banned Amid Violations -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Tennessee health officials have banned a nursing home from taking in new residents due to violations.

The state Department of Health says new admissions were cut off at Brookhaven Manor in Kingsport last week.

84. GiVE 365 Now Accepting Grant Applications -

GiVE 365, the dollar-a-day philanthropy initiative of the Community Foundation of Greater Memphis, is accepting grant applications from area nonprofits.

The theme for this year’s grant cycle is Foundations for the Future.

85. Memphis Residential Real Estate Market Remains Healthy in 2016 -

A strong year in the Memphis-area residential real estate market has the potential to carry over into 2017 and even beyond.

Low inventory and the talk of potential interest rate increases are some of the main factors contributing to a competitive market.

86. Memphis Branch NAACP Executive Director Retires -

Madeleine Taylor, the executive director of the Memphis Branch NAACP, is retiring after 26 years with the organization, including six in her current position.

Taylor has been integral to the work of the civil rights organization that has been an essential part of the city’s history before, during and after the civil rights movement of the 1950s and 1960s.

87. The FUNdraising Doctor is In, Part 1 -

Editor’s note: This is part one in a two-part series. The board of directors of an organization is responsible for its financial health. What does this mean? How do you measure the fundraising health of the board? We at Saad&Shaw suggest a visit to the FUNdraising doctor. A check-up may be in order.

88. Hyde Foundations Gives $1M to Church Health -

The Hyde Family Foundations has given Church Health a $1 million gift as the organization prepares to move into Crosstown Concourse early next year.

Half of the money will go to cover capital expenses, and the Hyde Family Foundations has given another $500,000 and issued a 2-for-1 matching grant challenge to Church Health to raise a $1 million through new and increased donations that range from $2,500 to $24,999.

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90. December 23-29, 2016: This week in Memphis history -

2015: Eight people die in tornadoes in North Mississippi, with the Holly Springs area being hit hardest by the twisters in the region. The broader Southeast region is raked by the storms and other tornadoes through the long holiday weekend.

91. 'Obamacare' Holding Its Own: 6.4M Signed Up So Far -

WASHINGTON (AP) – "Obamacare" seems to be holding its own. The administration said Wednesday that 6.4 million people have enrolled for subsidized private coverage through HealthCare.gov, ahead of last year's pace.

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93. Church Health Receives $1M From Hyde Foundations -

The Hyde Family Foundations has given Church Health a $1 million gift as the organization prepares to move into Crosstown Concourse early next year.

Half of the money will go to cover capital expenses, and the Hyde Family Foundations has given another $500,000 and issued a 2-for-1 matching grant challenge to Church Health to raise a $1 million through new and increased donations that range from $2,500 to $24,999.

94. Karen Camper Crosses Aisle to Tackle State’s Most Pressing Issues -

Editor’s note: This is part two of Nashville correspondent Sam Stockard’s feature on Memphis state Rep. Karen Camper. Read part one in the Thursday, Dec. 22, edition of The Daily News or online at memphisdailynews.com.

95. Memphis Shelter’s New Vet Comes From Front Lines -

The new veterinary medical director of Memphis Animal Services has taken in a lot of abused animals, working on some of the worst cases of animal abuse in recent years.

Dr. Mary Manspeaker, who came to the shelter about two months ago, admits the post is different.

96. GiVE 365 Now Accepting Grant Applications -

GiVE 365, the dollar-a-day philanthropy initiative of the Community Foundation of Greater Memphis, is accepting grant applications from area nonprofits.

The theme for this year’s grant cycle is Foundations for the Future. In an effort to address some of the many causes of local poverty, grants will support programs that help youth meet their potential.

97. Memphis-Area Planned Parenthood Nears $12 Million Fundraising Goal -

Bracing for an uncertain future as President-elect Donald Trump prepares to take office, Planned Parenthood of the Greater Memphis Region is taking steps to stay operational in the event of losing its federal funding.

98. Analyst: Rite Aid Buy ‘Good Deal’ for Fred’s -

Memphis-based Fred’s Inc. got a “really good deal” on the 865 Rite Aid stores it’s agreed to buy for $950 million in a deal that takes the company beyond its core market and marks a significant new chapter in its story.

99. Last Word: Boca Ends Badly, Fred's Deal Still Moving and The Couch Dylan Sat On -

Z Bo ejected and the Grizz fall to the Celtics 112 – 109 Tuesday at the Forum. Post game, Fizdale says the team has a leadership problem.

The Tigers at the Forum Wednesday, playing the Incarnate Word Cardinals.

100. Infectious Disease Specialist Blatz Joins Resurrection Health -

Infectious disease specialist Dr. Peter Blatz recently joined the staff of Resurrection Health. In his new role, Blatz provides expert consultation on a variety of infectious diseases in both inpatient and outpatient settings. Currently he is focusing on providing HIV and hepatitis C care as well as teaching Resurrection’s family medicine resident physicians.