» Subscribe Today!
More of what you want to know.
The Daily News
X

Forgot your password?
Skip Navigation LinksHome > Name & Property Search
Search results for 'Grant' | Search again
DeSoto Public Records:145
Shelby Public Records:948
Editorial:100
West Tennessee:1651
Middle Tennessee:8049
East Tennessee:2422
Other:98

You must be a subscriber to see the full results of your search.

Please log in or subscribe below if you are not already a subscriber.

The Daily News subscribers get full access to more than 13 million names and addresses along with powerful search and download features. Get the business leads you need with powerful searches of public records and notices. Download listings into your spreadsheet or database.

Learn more about our services | Search again


Editorial Results (free)

1. Rodney Baber Park To Be Expanded -

The city of Memphis is preparing to expand and raise part of flood-prone Rodney Baber Park in Frayser.

The city hasn’t done any maintenance on the park, which has eight softball fields, since it was heavily damaged in 2011 flooding when the Mississippi River at Memphis reached its highest level since 1937. The park is north of the Wolf River, one of the local tributaries that also flooded that spring, and the park has seen high water periodically since then.

2. Pettit Joins Food Bank As Chief Development Officer -

Attorney Peter Pettit has joined Mid-South Food Bank as chief development officer following his recent retirement as a partner in the Memphis office of Bass, Berry & Sims PLC. In his new role, Pettit works closely with food bank leaders to develop strategies and relationships with major gift donors, and specifically is working to complete the $12.5 million “Hunger to Hope” capital campaign.

3. Monuments, Elections, TDZ Expansion All Before Council -

Memphis City Council members take a third and final vote Tuesday, Oct. 17, on an ordinance directing the administration to act on “immediate” removal of Confederate monuments from two city parks.

4. Renovations Begin on ShowPlace Arena -

Agricenter International has begun a $6 million renovation of the ShowPlace Arena’s warm-up barn and interior main arena.

The two parts of the project are separately funded and contracted. The warm-up area is being funded by a grant from the state of Tennessee.

5. Historical Commission Grants City November Hearing on Forrest Statue -

The Tennessee Historical Commission agreed Friday, Oct. 13, to send the city's request to remove a statue of Nathan Bedford Forrest from Health Sciences Park to an administrative law judge for a hearing next month.

6. Monumental Decision -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland may not even get a discussion with the Tennessee Historical Commission Friday, Oct. 13, about moving the statue of Nathan Bedford Forrest out of a city park.

7. DeVos Touts School Choice, STEM as Education Priorities -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Education Secretary Betsy DeVos has announced a set of priorities for states and schools competing for federal grant money.

The areas of focus, outlined in a statement on Wednesday, range from school choice to science and technology to special education to school safety.

8. Designs for 3 Downtown Redevelopment Projects Approved -

Plans for three prominent Downtown redevelopment projects received the architectural green light Wednesday afternoon, Oct. 11, from the Downtown Memphis Commission’s Design Review Board.

Developer 495 TN Partners, which includes partners William Orgel, Jay Lindy and Adam Slovis, will be able to begin construction on Phase II of the Tennessee Brewery development at the southeast corner of Tennessee Street and Butler Avenue in the South Main Historic Arts District.

9. AP-NORC Poll: Most Don't Want Young Immigrants Deported -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Just 1 in 5 Americans want to deport young immigrants brought to the United States as children and now here illegally, the focus of a politically fraught debate between the White House and Congress.

10. Steele Joins Southern Growth Studio’s Anthropology Team -

April Steele has joined Southern Growth Studio as a business anthropologist, responsible for collecting and analyzing data to evaluate existing and potential products and services. Steele’s hire comes as the Memphis-based innovation consulting firm grows its applied anthropology practice. Using qualitative social research methods like ethnography, the anthropology team steers the innovation process, conducting primary research to distill and communicate key insights to clients.

11. Memphis to Receive $1.1M To Process Rape Kit Backlog -

The city of Memphis is set to receive nearly $1.1 million in grant money from the U.S. Department of Justice to help process untested rape kits.

The funding, announced by U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen on Friday, Sept. 29, comes from the Justice Department’s Sexual Assault Kit Initiative, which provides grants to address unsubmitted sexual assault kits in law enforcement custody.

12. ShowPlace Arena Receives $85,000 Government Grant -

The Shelby County Commission has voted to award an $85,000 Community Enhancement Grant to Agricenter International for a capital improvement project to install steps at ShowPlace Arena and finish paving the parking lot.

13. Binghampton Group Wins $200K FreshLo Grant -

The Binghampton Development Corp. has received a two-year, $200,000 grant from The Kresge Foundation to prepare minority entrepreneurs to establish successful food businesses through food entrepreneurship training, access to commercial kitchen facilities, and small-business assistance along with their partners, EPIcenter Memphis, Caritas Village, Refugee Empowerment Program, World Relief Memphis, Wiseacre Brewing Co., Broad Avenue Arts District and Community LIFT.

14. Last Word: Haslam Talks, Harding Consolidates and Lenoir Launches -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam had a bit more to say Thursday about a possible run for the U.S. Senate seat Bob Corker is leaving than the “I love my job” quote we chronicled earlier in the week that Corker quickened the pace of with his decision on re-election. Haslam says he is giving a run for the Senate serious consideration. Meanwhile, Peyton Manning is not.

15. Chandler Parsons, Grizzlies Hit Reset Button -

A much younger Chandler Parsons would not have liked last year’s $94 million chronically hurt, and painfully ineffective, Chandler Parsons. Not one bit.

Parsons grew up in Orlando and rooted for the Magic. He loved like a fan. He hated like a fan.

16. Fourth Bluff Effort Moves Toward More Permanent Plans -

You can still see the words on the surface of Riverside Drive from the RiverPlay area that took over the street between the Mississippi River and Memphis Parks during the summer.

“In Memphis We Ball” reads the chipped white lettering on the asphalt, with the word “ball” almost unrecognizable.

17. Binghampton Group Awarded $200K FreshLo Grant -

The Binghampton Development Corp. has received a two-year, $200,000 grant from The Kresge Foundation to prepare minority entrepreneurs to establish successful food businesses through food entrepreneurship training, access to commercial kitchen facilities, and small-business assistance along with their partners, EPIcenter Memphis, Caritas Village, Refugee Empowerment Program, World Relief Memphis, Wiseacre Brewing Co., Broad Avenue Arts District and Community LIFT.

18. Last Word: Corker's Decision, Buses & Bikes and Tenoke Comeback -

And with a brief, carefully-worded written statement Tuesday afternoon, U.S. Senator Bob Corker has blown up the forming-2018 race for the Senate seat he will give up at the end of 2018 and that probably applies to the 2018 race for Tennessee Governor. That’s even if Corker doesn’t follow Tuesday’s announcement by getting into the race for Governor at some point. Corker said nothing about what is next beyond his remaining time in office.

19. ShowPlace Arena Receives $85,000 Government Grant -

The Shelby County Commission has voted to award an $85,000 Community Enhancement Grant to Agricenter International for a capital improvement project to install steps at ShowPlace Arena and finish paving the parking lot.

20. Foundation Supports St. Jude Scientist Research -

Dr. Mark Hatley, a pediatric oncologist at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, is on the front lines of trying to change the fact that almost 2,000 children die of cancer each year in the U.S.

21. Mississippi State, Delta Health Alliance to Help Students -

STARKVILLE, Miss. (AP) – Up to 400 low-income Mississippi State students will get money for school and financial education through a partnership with Delta Health Alliance, a nonprofit that promotes healthier lifestyles.

22. Facebook Nixes Plan for New Stock Class Ahead of Court Fight -

NEW YORK (AP) – Mark Zuckerberg said Friday that Facebook is withdrawing plans to create a new class of stock that would have let him keep tight reins on the social media company even as he sold down his stake to fund his philanthropy.

23. Widening The Path -

He asked to only be a small part of this story. But when you come up with an idea so good, so powerful, that it’s named as one of the top 20 ideas in the Forbes Change the World Competition, you are the story’s foundation.

24. Epidemic at Work? Businesses Forced to Deal With Drug Abuse -

NEW YORK (AP) – After a troubled youth himself, Phillip Cohen made it a practice to hire people at his woodworking business who have also struggled with addiction and mental health issues. But when an employee died from a drug overdose, he adopted a zero-tolerance policy.

25. Southwest Community College Gets $140K State Grant -

The Tennessee Higher Education Commission has awarded $140,000 in Tennessee Promise Forward grants to Southwest Tennessee Community College.

It is part of nearly $800,000 in such grants awarded to five community colleges in Tennessee to develop and expand innovative student success and retention programs. The grants aim to boost the number of Tennessee Promise students earning a postsecondary credential through enhanced academic advising and community engagement and programming.

26. Commission Delays Votes On Finance Ordinances -

Shelby County Commissioners delayed votes Monday, Sept. 11, on a set of three resolutions dealing with county finances, citing the need for further discussion and questions.

The first of the three is a supplement to the interlocal agreement on financing the Memphis and Shelby County Sports Authority to pay the debt on FedExForum. The agreement allows revenue from a 2015 increase in the hotel-motel tax to be used to finance renovations of the Memphis Cook Convention Center as well as the debt on the arena.

27. House Adds $4M in Funds For Rape Kit Backlog -

The U.S. House of Representatives passed an amendment Tuesday, Sept. 12, offered by U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen, a Democrat representing Memphis, and U.S. Rep. Carolyn B. Maloney, D-New York, to include an additional $4 million in the fiscal 2018 House appropriations package for the U.S. Department of Justice’s Sexual Assault Kit Initiative (SAKI).

28. House Backs $1.2T Spending Bill With More Money for Military -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Republican-led House on Thursday passed a sweeping $1.2 trillion spending bill that provides billions more dollars for the military while sparing medical research and popular community development programs from deep cuts sought by President Donald Trump.

29. Ryan: Deporting Young Immigrants Not in Nation's Interest -

WASHINGTON (AP) – House Speaker Paul Ryan on Wednesday said that deporting hundreds of thousands of young immigrants brought into the country illegally is "not in our nation's interest," as he and President Donald Trump prepared to huddle with top Democrats to try to hash out a legislative fix.

30. Nearly $4M Federal Grant to Fund Veterans Cemetery Expansion -

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Tennessee will receive a nearly $4 million grant to expand a veterans cemetery.

WBIR-TV reports that the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs National Cemetery Administration announced the grant for the East Tennessee Veterans Cemetery on Tuesday.

31. US House Adds $4M in Funds For Rape Kit Backlog -

The U.S. House of Representatives passed an amendment Tuesday, Sept. 12, offered by U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen, a Democrat representing Memphis, and U.S. Rep. Carolyn B. Maloney, D-New York, to include an additional $4 million in the fiscal 2018 House appropriations package for the U.S. Department of Justice’s Sexual Assault Kit Initiative (SAKI).

32. Opioid Committee on Right Track, Obstacles Remain -

Smyrna Police Chief Kevin Arnold can remember the first time his detectives brought a heroin case to him three or four years ago.

“Of course, my reaction immediately was, ‘I thought that went away in the late 70s.’ But we’re seeing it. In fact, we are averaging approximately five heroin overdoses a month just in the town of Smyrna,” adds Arnold, whose city about 10 miles southeast of Nashville has a population of nearly 48,600.

33. Irma Evacuees in Tenn. Can Seek Unemployment Benefits -

Hundreds of residents from states impacted by Hurricane Irma escaped the storm by seeking refuge in cities across Tennessee. Many are staying with family or at local hotels and campgrounds and are not able to work.

34. Commission Delays Votes On Finance Ordinances -

Shelby County Commissioners delayed votes Monday, Sept. 11, on a set of three resolutions dealing with county finances, citing the need for further discussion and questions.

The first of the three is a supplement to the interlocal agreement on financing the Memphis and Shelby County Sports Authority to pay the debt on FedExForum. The agreement allows revenue from a 2015 increase in the hotel-motel tax to be used to finance renovations of the Memphis Cook Convention Center as well as the debt on the arena.

35. County Commission Joins City Call to Remove Confederate Monuments -

Shelby County Commissioners approved a resolution Monday, Sept. 11, backing the city’s efforts to remove Confederate monuments with a waiver from the Tennessee Historical Commission. The resolution by commissioner Walter Bailey also backs the Memphis City Council’s move to an ordinance that could take down the monuments after the Oct. 13 decision if the historical commission does not grant the waiver.

36. City Proposes 12 More Grants to Surviving ’68 Sanitation Workers -

The city administration has identified a dozen more recipients for grants of $70,000 each to surviving city sanitation workers from 1968. That brings the total receiving the one-time payments to 26, with council action on the new grants scheduled for its Sept. 19 session.

37. Tennessee Program to Award $10M in Broadband Grants -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Tennessee officials are now accepting applications for $10 million worth of broadband grants.

The Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development said in a news release Thursday it will accept applications for the Broadband Accessibility Grant until Nov. 17.

38. Delete Personal Data from Rental Car Systems -

I only have occasion to rent a car once or twice a year and have never paid for navigation, Bluetooth, streaming music, or other newer technologies that may be available.

But people who do should heed an FTC alert titled “What is your phone telling your rental car?”

39. Right Response -

For many people in the Mid-South with barriers to getting to the appropriate health care professionals, sometimes a 911 call has seemed like their only option. That’s all changing now thanks to a new collaborative effort between the Memphis Fire Department’s Emergency Medical Services (EMS) and local health care organizations, area hospitals, nonprofits and philanthropists.

40. Top US Fall Destinations -

Fall is my favorite time of year. The cooling temperatures, changing colors and football season all combine to make for a fun time of year.

It’s also a great time to travel. Fall means shoulder season in many top destinations, making travel a bit more affordable. But there also are some destinations that just seem to make more sense from Labor Day to the start of the holiday season at Thanksgiving. Here are my top U.S. fall destinations on my radar for travel this year.

41. Agricenter’s Sunflower Trail Makes Official Debut -

More than 30 years after its conception, the Agricenter Sunflower Trail finally enjoyed a ribbon-cutting ceremony Tuesday, Sept. 5, on the grounds of Agricenter International. Work started on both ends of the Greenprint-certified trail, which was one of the first in Shelby County, back in the mid-1980s.

42. Trump Rescinding DACA Program Protecting Young Immigrants -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Donald Trump on Tuesday began dismantling the government program protecting hundreds of thousands of young immigrants who were brought into the country illegally as children. Attorney General Jeff Sessions declared the Obama administration's program "an unconstitutional exercise of authority" that must be revoked.

43. First Arkansas Medical Marijuana Applicant Goes Public -

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) – The Arkansas Department of Finance and Administration says two businesses have applied for licenses to grow medical marijuana and five have applied for licenses to sell it.

44. Confederate Emblems Attacked Statewide -

Germantown aldermen approved a resolution Monday, Aug. 28, to “combat hate, extremism and bigotry” with two of the five aldermen, John Barzizza and Dean Massey, abstaining.

45. Trump Expected to Decide Soon on Fate of Young Immigrants -

WASHINGTON (AP) – After months of delays, President Donald Trump is expected to decide soon on the fate of young immigrants who were brought into the country illegally as children as he faces a looming court deadline and is digging in on appeals to his base.

46. Trump Prepares to Travel to Texas as State Copes With Harvey -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Donald Trump on Monday prepared to visit Texas to view the federal government's response to Harvey's devastating flooding as his administration vowed to help the millions of residents dealing with the catastrophic storm.

47. What Memphis Parents Should Know About How Schools Share Student Information -

The sharing of student information is at the center of the latest squabble between Shelby County Schools and state-authorized charter schools — making it more important than ever for Memphis parents to know what’s at stake.

48. August 25-31, 2017: This week in Memphis history -

2016: Former President Jimmy Carter is in Memphis to lead a group of 1,500 Habitat for Humanity volunteers in building 19 new homes in the Bearwater Park subdivision in North Memphis. The subdivision is on the site of what had been the Cedar Court apartment complex.
Carter was in Memphis for a similar homebuilding project the previous November, shortly after he was diagnosed with brain cancer. In an interview with The Daily News, Carter talked about the enduring problems of racism, poverty and inequality.
“We have the ability, proven over history, to correct our mistakes. We gave women the right to vote and then ended slavery and saw the civil rights movement, so we’ve been able to correct our mistakes,” he said. “But we are still seeing some mistakes now, with the disparity of opportunity between rich people and middle- and lower-class people and also between the races.”

49. $2M Grant Program to Bolster Tennessee Courthouse Security -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A $2 million grant program aims to improve security at courthouses across Tennessee.

The Administrative Office of the Courts has started the initiative with one-time money set aside by state lawmakers and Gov. Bill Haslam.

50. Council Mulls Legal Options To Move Park Monuments -

Memphis City Council members are exploring new options for the Confederate monuments in city parks that include boarding up statues of Nathan Bedford Forrest and Jefferson Davis as nuisances, to prevent them from being vandalized and maintain public order, or by citing a provision of the state’s Civil Rights Act.

51. Council Considers Other Legal Options on Confederate Monuments -

Memphis City Council members are exploring new options for the Confederate monuments in city parks that include boarding up statues of Nathan Bedford Forrest and Jefferson Davis as nuisances, to prevent them from being vandalized to maintain public order, or by citing a provision of the state’s Civil Rights Act.

52. Council Considers Other Legal Options on Confederate Monuments. -

Memphis City Council members are exploring new options for the Confederate monuments in city parks that include boarding up statues of Nathan Bedford Forrest and Jefferson Davis as nuisances, to prevent them from being vandalized, to maintain public order or by citing a provision of the state’s Civil Rights Act.

53. Los Angeles Wants In on Suit Over Trump Sanctuary Conditions -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Los Angeles is seeking to join a lawsuit by San Francisco over immigration restrictions placed on a major federal grant by the Trump administration.

Los Angeles City Attorney Michael Feuer said in a court filing Tuesday that the conditions imposed on the public safety grant program run by the Department of Justice are unconstitutional. Feuer asked a federal judge to allow the city to join San Francisco's suit, which raises similar objections.

54. The Latest: University Barricades Confederate Statue -

The Latest on efforts to remove Confederate monuments and the nationwide fallout from a white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia (all times local):

___

2:30 p.m.

Workers in a Florida city have started taking down a memorial to Confederate soldiers at a city-owned cemetery.

55. UTHSC Professor Wins $1.3 Million Grant -

Dr. Helena Parfenova, a professor in the Department of Physiology in the College of Medicine at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center, has been granted a $1.3 million award to study harmful seizure-activated mechanisms in the neonatal brain.

56. South City Redevelopment Activity Heating Up -

The up-and-coming South City neighborhood is enjoying a resurgence of redevelopment activity lately, with the restoration of several historic properties, new multifamily construction and talk of bringing in a grocery store. The city and the Downtown Memphis Commission have been instrumental in the renewed interest, with noteworthy projects including the Clayborn Temple, the Universal Life Building and the demolition of Foote Homes.

57. South City Redevelopment Heats Up With Renovations, New Construction -

The up-and-coming South City neighborhood is enjoying a resurgence of redevelopment activity lately, with the restoration of several historic properties, new multifamily construction and talk of bringing in a grocery store. The city and the Downtown Memphis Commission have been instrumental in the renewed interest, with noteworthy projects including the Clayborn Temple, the Universal Life Building and the demolition of Foote Homes.

58. Editorial: Make the System Take Down Monuments -

Instead of changing the names of its Confederate-themed parks, Memphis should have been going directly after its Confederate monuments in 2013, before the Tennessee Legislature enacted procedures that seem designed to draw out the process for as long as possible.

59. 2017, The Musical -

“GRANT US WISDOM, GRANT US COURAGE.” Episcopalians sing every week, as I’m sure many of you do, but most of us aren’t listening to the words. Their familiarity has bred if not contempt at least complacence.

60. SBA Head Sees Businesses Held Back by Lack of Loans, Workers -

NEW YORK (AP) – Six months into her tenure as head of the Small Business Administration, Linda McMahon sees a split among small business owners – they are increasingly optimistic, she says, but many are held back by their inability to get loans or find the right workers for jobs that are staying open.

61. Tenn. Officials Announce New Agribusiness Grant -

Tennessee officials are offering a new grant to develop agribusiness in the state.

A state Department of Agriculture news release says the Agriculture Enterprise Fund will award grants to aid agricultural and food businesses, farmers, nonprofits, local governments and other entities in Tennessee, particularly in rural counties. It will support new and expanding business ventures.

62. Last Word: 3 Vigils, A Decade Since the Recession and Fairgrounds Fast Track -

There were several vigils going on around this old town Tuesday night – two Downtown and one in Whitehaven. All involving lots of police – two about Confederate icons and one the king of rock and roll.

63. Crosstown High School Gets $2.5 Million XQ Institute Grant -

A year from opening, organizers of Crosstown High School have secured a $2.5 million, five-year grant from a national education reform group focused specifically on high schools.

“It puts us in a much greater financial position,” said Chris Terrill, Crosstown High executive director. “But more important than the financial revenue is the connection we make to the XQ network of people.”

64. County Mulls Garage For Long-Term Parking Fix -

Shelby County Jury Commission officials have points they always make with citizens on jury duty in Downtown Memphis. And it includes an apology for the parking situation around the Criminal Justice Center and the Judge D’Army Bailey Courthouse, where those called to be on juries will work for a week at a time.

65. County Commission Approves Sheriff's Office Parking Near CJC -

Shelby County Commissioners approved Monday, Aug. 14, a couple of one-year contracts totaling $226,250 for 519 parking spaces near the Criminal Justice Center for the Shelby County Sheriff’s Office.

66. County Commission Approves Sheriff's Office Parking Near CJC -

Shelby County Commissioners approved Monday, Aug. 14, a couple of one-year contracts totaling $226,250 for 519 parking spaces near the Criminal Justice Center for the Shelby County Sheriff’s Office.

67. Hooks Institute Lands $20K For HAAMI Program -

The Benjamin L. Hooks Institute at the University of Memphis has received a $20,000 grant from the SunTrust Foundation to support the Hooks African-American Male Initiative (HAAMI).

The institute launched HAAMI in 2016 to increase the retention and graduation rates of black male students at the University of Memphis. Current data shows that for first-time, full-time students who graduated within a four-year period, black males have an average graduation rate of 10.6 percent, significantly less than all other groups. The Hooks Institute’s efforts with HAAMI are intended to help create prosperity for African-American males, which in turn helps to collectively benefit the lives of all Memphians and create positive social change.

68. Editorial: Back-to-School Stability Includes Unresolved Issues -

Another school year is underway in Memphis, and it’s arguably the most stable for the Shelby County Schools system in the last seven years – maybe longer. Yet, there is much about education in our community that remains unresolved.

69. Postal Service: More Red Ink, Missed Payments as Mail Slumps -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The U.S. Postal Service warned Thursday that it will likely default on up to $6.9 billion in payments for future retiree health benefits for the fifth straight year, citing a coming cash crunch that could disrupt day-to-day mail delivery.

70. Hooks Institute Lands $20K To Support HAAMI Program -

The Benjamin L. Hooks Institute at the University of Memphis has received a $20,000 grant from the SunTrust Foundation to support the Hooks African-American Male Initiative (HAAMI).

The institute launched HAAMI in 2016 to increase the retention and graduation rates of black male students at the University of Memphis. Current data shows that for first-time, full-time students who graduated within a four-year period, black males have an average graduation rate of 10.6 percent, significantly less than all other groups. The Hooks Institute’s efforts with HAAMI are intended to help create prosperity for African-American males, which in turn helps to collectively benefit the lives of all Memphians and create positive social change.

71. Memphis-MidSouth Affiliate of Susan G. Komen Foundation Expanding Reach -

In 2017, there will be an estimated 252,710 new cases of invasive breast cancer and 40,610 breast cancer deaths. Those sobering numbers come from the Susan G. Komen Foundation, the largest nonprofit source of breast cancer research.

72. Home Sales Up, Price Slips in July -

As the housing market begins to head into a slower time of year with school restarting, home sales still continue to outpace last year’s figures despite a slight dip in average sales price.

The number of units sold in Shelby County was up 14 percent in July, with 1,808 sales recorded compared with 1,584 last July, according to real estate information company Chandler Reports, chandlerreports.com.

73. Monogram Foods Awards $25K to Memphis Nonprofits -

Memphis-based Monogram Foods is awarding a total of $25,000 to eight local nonprofits through its Monogram Loves Kids Foundation.

The grants are part of $250,000 the foundation is awarding this year to charities benefiting children and families in regions of the country where Monogram Foods operates.

74. U of M Receives Grant for Career Prep Academy -

The University of Memphis and three community colleges are set to get $773,447 from the Tennessee Higher Education Commission to increase student success and outcomes.

The grants, through the Institutional Outcome Improvement Fund Grant, will allow institutions to focus on student outcomes in areas such as credit-hour progression and degree completion.

75. Starbucks Denies Rumor of Discounts for Immigrants -

DETROIT (AP) – Starbucks Corp. is shooting down a rumor that its coffee shops will give discounted drinks and food to undocumented immigrants on Aug. 11.

76. Community LIFT Offering New Empowerment Grants -

Community LIFT is now taking applications for its latest grant opportunity, an empowerment fund designed to provide financial assistance to residents and grassroots organizations involved in community improvement work.

77. Problems Adrift -

David Ciarloni plants about 140 acres of soybeans on his 925-acre farm that straddles Shelby and Fayette counties. Those acres of beans are safe right now, but Ciarloni, who took over the family farm after his father recently retired, worries about a recent phenomenon that’s being called “dicamba drift.”

78. Seeing the Light -

Four years ago, Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell was in Knoxville for a college football game. But with several hours before kickoff, he took a side trip to view the green initiatives at the Knox County Jail.

79. New St. Jude Grad School Welcomes Inaugural Class -

Following years of planning, development of curriculum and recruitment of staff and faculty, the first class of a dozen students has begun studies at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital’s new Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences.

80. Community LIFT Introducing New Empowerment Fund -

Community LIFT is now taking applications for its latest grant opportunity, an empowerment fund designed to provide financial assistance to residents and grassroots organizations involved in community improvement work. Its purpose is to establish a network of resident leaders who are engaged and feel empowered to advocate for neighborhood revitalization that improves quality of life in Memphis’ under-resourced neighborhoods.

81. UTHSC Researcher Wins Grant to Fight Strep Throat -

Dr. James Dale, the Gene H. Stollerman Professor of Medicine and chief of the Division of Infectious Diseases at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center, has won a $3.9 million grant from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.

82. Haslam Taps Memphian As THDA Board Chair -

Gov. Bill Haslam has named Memphis-area homebuilder Kim Grant Brown chair of the Tennessee Housing Development Agency board of directors.

83. Last Word: Repeal Votes, ServiceMaster Exit and Cooper-Young Apartments -

U.S. Senator Lamar Alexander of Tennessee was among the seven Republican Senators who voted Wednesday against a bill that would have repealed the Obama administration’s Affordable Care Act without an immediate replacement. U.S. Senator Bob Corker voted for the repeal. The bill failed.

84. Haslam Taps Memphian As THDA Board Chair -

Gov. Bill Haslam has named Memphis-area homebuilder Kim Grant Brown chair of the Tennessee Housing Development Agency board of directors.

85. Resolution, Dollar-Figure Miscues Raise Sanitation Workers’ Grants by $20,000 -

After all of these years, maybe what happened Tuesday, July 25, to the city’s plan to pay the 14 surviving sanitation workers from 1968 a grant of $50,000 each was part of the larger narrative of the enduring turmoil of that historic time.

86. Milford Joins Chamber As Programming, Events Director -

Ericka Milford recently joined the Greater Memphis Chamber as director of events and programming, a job in which she’s responsible for planning and executing chamber events and programs and for increasing engagement opportunities for members and the community. Milford’s new role marks her return to the chamber, where she served as events coordinator from 2007 to 2012 before taking a job with HigherVisibility.

87. Juxtaposing Views Greet Voting Change -

Memphis City Council members Edmund Ford Jr. and Patrice Robinson have each been on the winning side of a council runoff election and share a district border along Elvis Presley Boulevard in Whitehaven.

88. Alliance for Nonprofit Excellence Adds 4 to Board -

The Alliance for Nonprofit Excellence has added four members to its board of directors.

The new members are Olliette Murry-Drobot, executive director of the Family Safety Center; Kiesha Davis, director of grant-making and capacity building at Memphis Music Initiative; Bonnie Hollabaugh, director of development for Christ Community Health Services; and Pat Mitchell Worley, owner of FanfareCR.

89. Summer Refreshers for Boards -

Calling all board members: Get ready for the flurry of fall activities that are a part of life within the nonprofit sector. Consider the following “board refreshers” as you enjoy – or hide from – the hot summer sun. Grab your board binder, put on your nonprofit sun visor, and let’s talk board engagement.

90. UTHSC Researcher Wins Grant to Fight Strep Throat -

Dr. James Dale, the Gene H. Stollerman Professor of Medicine and chief of the Division of Infectious Diseases at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center, has won a $3.9 million grant from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.

91. Scene Change -

The sprawling mixed-use complex opening next month on North Cleveland in Midtown is a high-profile example of where Memphis’ art community finds itself at the halfway mark in 2017.

When Crosstown Concourse opens there Aug. 19, it won’t just represent a new beginning that turns a former Sears distribution center into a 1.5-million-square-foot community mainstay. With tenants like Crosstown Arts moving in, the development is also a representation of how the city’s arts landscape is changing this year.

92. T&B Granted 15-Year PILOT to Relocated Corporate HQ -

Memphis-based Thomas & Betts has been awarded a 15-year PILOT (payment-in-lieu-of-taxes) to relocate its corporate headquarters from Southwind to the Ridgeway Center in East Memphis and consolidate its regional research and development functions.

93. T&B Granted 15-Year PILOT to Relocated Corporate HQ -

Low voltage electrical and commutations products manufacturer, Thomas and Betts has been awarded a 15-year PILOT (payment-in-lieu-of-taxes) to relocated its corporate headquarters and consolidate its regional research and development functions.

94. Haslam Awards TCAT Grants During West Tennessee Visit -

On the road in West Tennessee Wednesday, July 19, Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam made stops at Tennessee College of Applied Technology, or TCAT, campuses in Ripley and Covington to announce federal block grants for each of the schools.

95. Political Differences Endure After $4.11 Shelby County Tax Rate Compromise -

Shelby County commissioners were still calculating Monday, July 17, after they passed a compromised, $4.11 county property tax rate that appears will stay put long enough for the commission to take a final vote Wednesday at a special meeting.

96. County Commission Approves Compromise $4.11 County Property Tax Rate -

Shelby County commissioners compromised on a $4.11 county property tax rate Monday, July 17, on the way to a final vote on the compromise tax rate at a special meeting Wednesday that would bring down the curtain on the county budget season.

97. The Week Ahead: July 17-23 -

Hello, Memphis! Young, local artists are in the spotlight this week with a couple of art shows where you can meet these talented youths and someday say, “I knew them before they were famous.” Check out details on those, plus more cool events and hot happenings in The Week Ahead…

98. On National Summer Learning Day, Memphis Takes Stock of Programs for Kids -

When it comes to summer learning, it’s been a better year for Memphis, where a range of new programs have helped to stem learning loss that hits hard in communities with a high number of low-income students.

99. Three Local Developers Seeking DMC Grants to Attract New Tenants -

Three new redevelopment projects are seeking Exterior Improvement Grants from the Downtown Memphis Commission in the hopes of attracting new tenants.

The first applicant, Janice Holder, is a retired Tennessee Supreme Court Justice, seeking to restore the façade of her building, located 55 S. Main St., back to its Gilded Age roots.

100. Last Word: Fifth Wave, Hidden Gem in OB and the Freeze Filibuster -

There is one less contender in the crowded field of potential and declared candidates for the Republican nomination for Governor in 2018. State Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris of Collierville was nominated for federal court judge Thursday by President Donald Trump who also nominated Memphis attorney and former federal prosecutor Tommy Parker to the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Tennessee as well. Both are part of what The White House described as a “fifth wave” of judicial nominees.