» Subscribe Today!
More of what you want to know.
The Daily News
X

Forgot your password?
Skip Navigation LinksHome > Name & Property Search
Search results for 'First Freedom' | Search again
DeSoto Public Records:0
Shelby Public Records:20
Editorial:100
West Tennessee:11
Middle Tennessee:6058
East Tennessee:17
Other:0

You must be a subscriber to see the full results of your search.

Please log in or subscribe below if you are not already a subscriber.

The Daily News subscribers get full access to more than 13 million names and addresses along with powerful search and download features. Get the business leads you need with powerful searches of public records and notices. Download listings into your spreadsheet or database.

Learn more about our services | Search again


Editorial Results (free)

1. Last Word: Regrouping, Freedom Awards and The View From Another Bridge -

It will be a year come Sunday – a year since Darrius Stewart, a passenger in a car pulled over by Memphis Police in Hickory Hill was shot and killed by Officer Conner Schilling.

2. EU Says China Needs to Give EU Companies Fair Market Access -

BEIJING (AP) — The EU trade commissioner said Monday that China has to give European companies the same kind of market access that Chinese companies enjoy in Europe before discussions can start on a bilateral free trade agreement.

3. US Gives Tentative OK to Flights to Cuba From 10 US Cities -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The U.S. government on Thursday tentatively approved scheduled commercial airline service to Havana from 10 American cities, further bridging the gulf between countries as close as 90 miles and an hour flight but long kept at a greater distance by the Cold War.

4. Pat Summitt, Winningest Coach in D1 History, Has Died at 64 -

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Pat Summitt, the winningest coach in Division I college basketball history who lifted the women's game to national prominence during her 38-year career at Tennessee, died Tuesday. She was 64.

5. Career Independence Day -

The Fourth of July is just around the corner. It’s so close that you can almost smell the fireworks and taste the barbecue. But, before Independence Day was a family holiday, it was a commemoration of the adoption of the Declaration of Independence. It’s a celebration of the independence of the United States from Britain.

6. ServiceMaster Disrupting Its Culture With Move Downtown -

ServiceMaster is converting Peabody Place into a corporate headquarters that would rival a Silicon Valley tech outfit.

On Friday, June 3, ServiceMaster laid to rest months of speculation about whether the company would relocate to a larger city like Atlanta or Dallas. Memphis’ available Class A office space can’t currently accommodate ServiceMaster’s needs, so it looked to the retail sector for its new home.

7. New $60M Project to Fight for 1st Amendment in Digital Age -

NEW YORK (AP) – The First Amendment is getting a new champion, with some deep pockets.

The John S. and James L. Knight Foundation and Columbia University on Tuesday announced the launch of a $60 million project, the Knight First Amendment Institute at Columbia University, which would use litigation as well as research and education to fight for freedom of expression in an ever-evolving digital era.

8. Corker: No 2nd Thoughts Over Sitting Out Presidential Race -

CHATTANOOGA, Tenn. (AP) – U.S. Sen. Bob Corker says he doesn't have any regrets about sitting out this year's presidential campaign.

The Tennessee Republican in 2014 floated his name as a potential candidate, but announced by early the next year that he decided against a bid.

9. ‘Underground’ Stars Surface in Memphis -

The last time fans of the television show “Underground” saw actor Alano Miller, his character, Cato, was believed to be dead. The unexpected twist for a complex and central character in the WGN America drama based on the Underground Railroad in pre-Civil War America was still generating plenty of social media disbelief nearly a week later.

10. The Week Ahead: May 9-15 -

Alright, Memphis, grab your calendars! Whether you want to book it over to the Ruby Bridges Reading Festival or just baste in the scent of barbecue, there’s plenty to do this week. Here’s our roundup...

11. Planning Your Second Act -

Ray’s Take When surveyed, many baby boomers say they plan to do some kind of work in retirement. The reality is that we are living longer, healthier lives than our parents and grandparents. When we reach the traditional retirement age, we probably have a lot of years of living (and spending) left. What to do with those years is changing with the retirement of the boomer generation.

12. Gasol on the Mend, Stephenson Looking For Home -

Struggling to get over the way the Grizzlies’ season ended – in a wave of injuries and 10-day contracts before the San Antonio Spurs hit them with that first-round broom?

Worried Mike Conley might leave as a free agent?

13. Kyles Played Big Role in Civil Rights Movement -

The world knows him through his story of standing near Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. on the balcony of the Lorraine Motel in 1968 just seconds before King was assassinated.

14. Daughter of Duality, Gibbs is Building a Better Justice System -

Say you stole a television worth $300. How long should you be punished? A year? Five years? Whatever you answered, it probably wasn’t “for the rest of your life.” But that’s how the U.S. legal system currently treats many people who have been convicted of felonies.

15. The Evolving Role of Design, Part One -

Editor’s note: Part one in a two-part series. The role of design evolves at the speed of innovation, the dizzying, dynamic speed of the market. Design now has a seat at executive and board tables across the globe. More than ever, a holistic sense of design is valued as a legal means of significant competitive advantage.

16. US Government Sets Record for Failures to Find Files When Asked -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Obama administration set a record for the number of times its federal employees told disappointed citizens, journalists and others that despite searching they couldn't find a single page requested under the Freedom of Information Act, according to a new Associated Press analysis of government data.

17. Clark Butcher is Pedaling to Glory -

It’s 6 a.m. on a rainy Wednesday morning. Outside, the sun has not yet risen. But inside Victory Bicycle Studio, they’re already playing Rihanna. “We’re gonna start with some two-minute openers,” shouts Clark Butcher, over the thump of the music. “I want you at 70 percent of your max. Let’s go!”

18. Strickland Backs No-Gang Zones in Legal Challenge -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland says court-ordered zones that forbid alleged gang members from gathering or associating in public within the zone are working as a crime-fighting tactic.

19. Anne Dixon Joins BRIDGES as CFO -

Anne Dixon has joined BRIDGES as vice president of finance and chief financial officer. Dixon, who is a Bridge Builders alumna, is responsible in her new role for financial reporting and analysis to help BRIDGES leadership in performing their responsibilities. 

20. Cutting taxes, school choice, tort reform drive Sen. Kelsey -

State Sen. Brian Kelsey calls himself “a proud conservative who likes to get results.”

21. Tennessee Lawmakers Return With Eye Toward Campaign Season -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Tennessee lawmakers return Tuesday for the second session of the 109th General Assembly with an eye toward quickly disposing of their business and heading home for election season.

22. Corker Says Visa Waivers a Bigger Risk Than Refugees -

U.S. Sen. Bob Corker says he believes the nation needs to stop admitting Syrian refugees until security problems are solved, but the nation’s “bigger risk” in letting terrorists slip into the country lies with the nation’s Visa Waiver Program.

23. Knee-Jerk Outbreak -

A SAD STATE OF AFFAIRS. WASHINGTON, D.C. – The United States government has mobilized against a clear threat to the country.

Troops have been sent to identify and capture members of an ersatz government openly operating here in defiance of federal law. This group claims theirs as the only true religion, and that laws be based on it as prescribed in the tome of that religion. They believe no other laws to be valid in the eyes of God, and no rights assigned or any authority recognized if any are based on such godless laws. They seek to prohibit the teaching, or even mention, of any other religion in schools.

24. Pound of Poetry, Part 3 -

In 1967, Ezra Pound told Allen Ginsberg, “The worst mistake I made was that stupid suburban prejudice of anti-Semitism.” Some say it was an apology. Pound died in Venice in 1972, shortly after his 87th birthday. In one of his final cantos, he wrote, “I have tried to write Paradise. … Let the Gods [and] those I love try to forgive what I have made.” The above was well after the treason case.

25. If Fear Is Goal, Terrorists Have Won in Tennessee -

The terrorists who struck Paris three weeks ago succeeded in more than killing and wounding hundreds of people. Their attack is pitting Americans against each other in how to respond, and Tennessee politicians are no exception.

26. Greenprint Summit Shows Region’s Possibilities -

Trails and bike lanes aren’t the only path to regional success, but they’re playing a growing role in partnerships among communities that sometimes find themselves competing for jobs.

To date, 19 of those communities have adopted a 25-year, green-centric plan that was introduced earlier this year and has been endorsed by more than 50 organizations.

27. Posturing Against Supreme Court Is a Waste of Money -

Legislation rejecting the U.S. Supreme Court’s same-sex marriage ruling faces major constitutional questions and, if passed, could put a financial burden on Tennessee taxpayers.

When the high court declared gay and lesbian couples have the right to be married across the United States, overturning state laws to the contrary, Tennessee’s Republican legislators started brainstorming for methods to work around the decision or to defy it. The Republican Caucus still hasn’t announced the outcome.

28. Hattiloo Forum Explores Black Generation Gap -

Always looking for a good topic of conversation, Hattiloo Theatre founder Ekundayo Bandele decided to put a group of millennials and active senior citizens together.

The Tuesday, Oct. 13, event was prompted by a dinner conversation Bandele had with his 21-year-old daughter.

29. Just City Taps Spickler as Executive Director -

Josh Spickler is the first executive director of the nonprofit criminal justice reform group Just City, which was formed earlier this year.

Spickler most recently served as director of the Defender Resource Network at the Shelby County Public Defender’s office, where he worked on community engagement initiatives and with the special litigation team.

30. This Week in Memphis History: October 9-15 -

2014: Stevie Wonder receives the first Epitome of Soul Award from the Consortium Memphis Music Town. The show, held at the Cannon Center for the Performing Arts, also featured performances by Chaka Khan, BeBe Winans, Jordan Sparks and Eddie Levert. It’s not the first award Wonder has received in Memphis; he was a recipient of the National Civil Rights Museum’s Freedom Award in 2006.

31. Just City Taps Spickler As Executive Director -

Josh Spickler is the first executive director of the nonprofit criminal justice reform group Just City, which was formed earlier this year.

Spickler most recently served as director of the Defender Resource Network at the Shelby County Public Defender’s office, where he worked on community engagement initiatives and with the special litigation team.

32. Spickler Tapped As Just City Executive Director -

Josh Spickler is the first executive director of the nonprofit criminal justice reform group Just City, which was formed earlier this year.

Spickler most recently served as director of the Defender Resource Network at the Shelby County Public Defender’s office, where he worked on community engagement initiatives as well as with the special litigation team. He also worked on the Jericho Project, a diversion program for special-needs inmates and prisoners.

33. Shifting Memphis Media Market, Like Every Other, In Flux -

Lauren Lee never picks up a newspaper. Which isn’t much of a surprise because she’s 33 years old, works in marketing, and has the technological savvy and finger dexterity to operate a smartphone.

34. Today’s Schools Need to Operate Like Independent Businesses -

“If you always do what you always did, then you always get what you always got.”

It is one of those truisms that seems to fit perfectly into the ongoing debate on the effectiveness of education in the United States. There is a multitude of critics who want schools to do what they did 50 years ago and get better results. The problem with that is that everything has changed.

35. Civil Rights Museum Names Freedom Awards Recipients -

Ava DuVernay, the director of the movie “Selma,” Freedom Rider Joan Trumpauer Mulholland and Ruby Bridges-Hall, who as a 6-year-old integrated schools in New Orleans, are the recipients of the 2015 National Civil Rights Museum Freedom Awards.

36. Fast Lane Flavor -

From a distance, Memphis' food truck operators like Terry and Allison LaRue might seem like the ultimate entrepreneurial renegades.

37. Civil Rights Museum Names 2015 Freedom Awards Recipients -

Ava DuVernay, the director of the movie “Selma,” Freedom Rider Joan Trumpauer Mulholland and Ruby Bridges-Hall, who as a 6-year-old integrated schools in New Orleans, are the recipients of the 2015 National Civil Rights Museum Freedom Awards.

38. Lawyer: Tennessee Shooter's Uncle Detained in Jordan -

CHATTANOOGA, Tenn. (AP) — An uncle of the man who killed four Marines and a sailor in attacks on Tennessee military sites has been in custody in Jordan since a day after the attack, a lawyer said Tuesday.

39. Disruptive Innovation Helps Fill in the Gaps -

Being out of work in today’s economy can be daunting. Even as things continue to improve, finding a job can be tough. In addition to the small number of new positions created each day, the entire hiring process takes longer – despite when you find the perfect job.

40. Special Action on Same-Sex Nuptials a Waste of Time -

With Republican lawmakers scrambling for a response to the U.S. Supreme Court’s gay-marriage ruling, Tennesseans on both sides of the issue say they are seeking "equality."

Immediately after the court’s decision on Obergefell v. Hodges, Democratic U.S. Rep. Jim Cooper of Nashville said, "Love and equality won. I’m glad the Supreme Court ruled on the right side of history."

41. Developer Arranging Financing for 100 North Main -

The owner of the skyscraper at 100 N. Main St. is closing in on a financing package to redevelop the building and will pay his utility bill as soon as the deal is complete, according to a review of public records.

42. School’s End -

When Catholic Bishop Terry Steib put on a hardhat a week ago to break ground on the Immaculate Conception Cathedral School’s new $4.2 million Cathedral Center, he had the attention of the school’s youngest students.

43. 'King of the Blues' B.B. King Dead at 89 at Home in Vegas -

LAS VEGAS (AP) – B.B. King, whose scorching guitar licks and heartfelt vocals made him the idol of generations of musicians and fans while earning him the nickname King of the Blues, died late Thursday at home in Las Vegas. He was 89.

44. What to Do After a Big Raise -

As today’s professionals are learning, the fastest way to get a big raise is to switch jobs. Often, staying at the same job will put an additional 2 to 3 percent in your pocket each year. That’s not enough to keep up with the rising costs of rent, food or much of anything.

45. On Second Thought -

“When is the law that is the law not the law? And vice versa.”

Yeah, I know, that was last week’s column. But it’s apropos of the rash of laws that have been bandied about, and passed in some states, recently. They’re called Religious Freedom Restoration Acts.

46. Memphis & The Law -

Over the long life of the city’s legal community, Court Square has been a place where attorneys and judges come together outside the courtroom and their law practices.

In many cases, it’s a chance encounter since no court has ever met in Court Square – despite its name and the intent of those who drew up the plan for Memphis nearly 200 years ago.

47. Memphis & The Law -

Before there was Law Week, there was Law Day.

The observance by the Memphis Bar Association as well as bar associations and attorneys across the country was created in the mid-1950s as a way of promoting the legal community and its impact.

48. Lessons Learned from $800 Million Cookie Franchise -

I knew from the age of 7 that marketing was my destiny as I embarked on my first moneymaking venture, but I hadn’t really reflected, until recently, on the combination of forces that in all likelihood nudged me down that path.

49. On Saban, Calipari and NCAA grandstanding -

Hold up your hand if you’re an Alabama football player and you have not been arrested in the last week. Three Crimson Tide players were arrested, one on suspicion of domestic violence, another for driving under the influence and another on a marijuana charge.

50. Eastman Brings Military Experience to YWCA -

Any nonprofit’s operations can benefit from some military precision, and that’s what the YWCA of Nashville & Middle Tennessee is hoping for with the hiring of Marjorie Eastman as its first president and chief operating officer.

51. Finding the Right Work-From-Home Job -

Finding a work-from-home job (or WFH job as they’re sometimes called) can seem to be an impossible proposition. It’s like finding a unicorn. You’ve heard they exist, but you’ve never actually seen one.

52. Self-Employment and Retirement Planning Responsibility -

Ray's Take: Being self-employed has some great perks, such as the financial freedom to expand your business on your own terms. You decide about days off and holidays. You make all the executive decisions. But with those freedoms, comes responsibility.

53. Battle of the Band(width) -

Joyce Coltrin’s business is wandering in Bradley County’s technological wilderness. And it’s likely to remain there – because of legal threats – until the General Assembly changes state law.

54. The Ransom Note on Tennessee Public Records -

The fastest way to shut down access to government records is to charge fees people can’t afford to pay.

Another way is to simply ignore or delay responding to citizens or media who make requests under the Tennessee Public Records Act.

55. Roy’s Events Take Wine, Travel, Even Chocolate to New Audience -

Entrepreneur Maja Djorcev Roy knows the value of connecting people, sharing stories and developing an appreciation for artisan quality goods

Roy, a native of Slovenia, follows her passion and shares her knowledge of wine and the stories of the vineyards through her business, Wine Forté.

56. Desperate Families Plead for Cannabis Oil -

Josie Mae Mathes had her first birthday recently, but because she suffers from childhood epilepsy and infantile spasms, she’s so medicated she can barely move.

57. One Team, Two Coaches: Grizzlies A Product of Hollins-Joerger -

Lionel Hollins’ departure from the Grizzlies was awkward, messy, ill-timed and could have been the start of a very disheartening chapter in franchise history.

“It could have been a train wreck, honestly,” point guard Mike Conley said.

58. Long Live the Pasquins -

Charlie Hebdo promotes itself as having a viewpoint that reflects “all components of left wing pluralism.” Its business is satire. It skewers Jews, Catholics, Protestants and Muslims. It has twice been attacked by terrorists. The attack in 2011 didn’t kill anyone.

59. Net Neutrality and What It Could Mean to You -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A top U.S. regulator just announced he wants more power to oversee Internet service, much in the same way that the government already regulates phone service and other public utilities. The goal is to prevent Internet service providers like AT&T, Verizon, Comcast, Sprint and T-Mobile from blocking or slowing down Web traffic, or striking deals with companies that provide content like Amazon, Google or Netflix to move their data faster than others.

60. Panel Hears Testimony on EPA Regulations -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A Tennessee Republican senator has joined lawmakers in other states who have filed legislation that seeks to curtail federal regulation.

Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris of Collierville discussed the resolution on Tuesday during a special joint committee meeting on the effect of Environmental Protection Agency regulations in Tennessee.

61. Ferguson and Freedom -

The two journalists honored in the annual Freedom Awards given by the National Civil Rights Museum had the most to say Tuesday, Dec. 2, about the broader impact of events in Ferguson, Mo.

The police shooting, grand jury decision and rioting that followed were an undercurrent at the annual awards public forum Tuesday at the Temple of Deliverance Church of God in Christ.

62. Rogero Talks ‘Smart Growth,’ Democratic Politics -

Knoxville Mayor Madeline Rogero became the first woman to hold that office when she won the election in 2011.

She’s been actively involved in a number of local issues since her election, from urban-core revitalization and business recruitment to broader social issues such as marriage equality.

63. Patients Before Profit -

When Hillary Clinton visited St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital 20 years ago to dedicate the then new patient care center, she was the first lady.

Clinton – the former first lady, U.S. senator and secretary of state – was back at St. Jude on Thursday, Nov. 20, to attend the dedication of the hospital’s Marlo Thomas Center for Global Education and Collaboration.

64. Marlo Thomas Getting Medal of Freedom -

Marlo Thomas, who serves as national outreach director for St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, is getting a Presidential Medal of Freedom.

The White House on Monday announced the names of 19 recipients getting the award, which is the nation’s highest civilian honor presented to “individuals who have made especially meritorious contributions to the security or national interests of the United States, to world peace, or to cultural or other significant public or private endeavors.”

65. Events -

Memphis Grizzlies and BlueCross BlueShield of Tennessee will host a family-friendly event Tuesday, Nov. 18, from 5 p.m. to 6 p.m. near the giant Grizzlies jersey in Tom Lee Park Downtown. Attendees can register for a Fitness Trail Passport, and those who complete all six stations will be in the running for prizes, including tickets to Grizzlies opening night and autographed items. Visit getriverfit.com.

66. Marlo Thomas Getting Medal of Freedom -

Marlo Thomas, who serves as national outreach director for St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, is getting a Presidential Medal of Freedom.

The White House on Monday announced the names of 19 recipients getting the award, which is the nation’s highest civilian honor presented to “individuals who have made especially meritorious contributions to the security or national interests of the United States, to world peace, or to cultural or other significant public or private endeavors.”

67. Marlo Thomas Getting Presidential Medal of Freedom -

Marlo Thomas, who serves as national outreach director for St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, is getting a Presidential Medal of Freedom.

The White House on Monday announced the names of 19 recipients getting the award, which is the nation’s highest civilian honor presented to “individuals who have made especially meritorious contributions to the security or national interests of the United States, to world peace, or to cultural or other significant public or private endeavors.”

68. Entrepreneur Spirit Drives Owners of The Attic -

She was young and had a nice corporate career going straight out of school. So a lot of people would have traded places with Alexandra Nicole, who spent six years as a sales rep at International Paper.

69. Charter School Resistance Flares -

When leaders of the Yes Prep charter group walked into a hostile meeting at American Way Middle School Monday, Oct. 27, set up by the Achievement School District, they also walked into a “Save Our School” rally organized by opponents of the school’s takeover by the state-run district.

70. ASD Considers 12 Additional Memphis Schools -

The Achievement School District is considering adding up to 12 Memphis schools to the state-run school district that is now in its third school year.

Leaders of the school district released Wednesday, Oct. 15, the list of schools being considered for the 2015-2016 school year. The schools are taken from the bottom 5 percent of schools statewide in terms of student achievement test results.

71. I Choose Memphis: Lori Spicer Robertson -

“I Choose Memphis” spotlights Memphians who are passionate about calling this community home. New Memphis Institute provides the profiles.

Name: Lori Spicer Robertson

72. African-American Icons Highlight Freedom Awards -

The National Civil Rights Museum will honor journalist Charlayne Hunter-Gault, Freedom Summer icon Bob Moses and baseball Hall of Famer Frank Robinson at the 2014 Freedom Awards.

73. Government for the Prosperity of the People -

The reporting out of the US on China is uniformly downbeat. By applying our western perspectives, China appears inhumane, politically oppressive, over-indebted and fragile.

From the American perspective, functional nations should look more ... well ... like us. They should have democracy, inalienable property rights, free and open markets, freedom of expression, apple pie, etc. Our national belief in the ideology of American exceptionalism defines our worldview.

74. Embracing Cremation -

As business decisions go, this was a tricky one.

Jeff and Steve Murphy, owners of Music City Mortuary, opened their Nashville business in 2001, catering primarily to the needs of other funeral directors, providing transportation, embalming and preparation services, shipping – everything a mortuary business provides.

75. Meet Hong Kong -

I just realized that while I have now lived in Hong Kong for nearly a month I have failed to properly introduce you. Allow me to give you the tour.

Between 1842 and 1997, the British controlled the 425-square-mile territory of Hong Kong, which includes Kowloon, the New Territories and over 200 smaller islands. Its proximity to China and its naturally deep water ports make Hong Kong an ideal trade destination. When China reopened in the 1980s, manufacturing boomed in nearby Shenzhen, and Hong Kong became the natural financial and logistics center ... in a way, China’s front office.

76. The Skinny -

THE NAKED TRUTH. Of the occasions I’ve been skinny dipping, two stand out. The first ended in an FBI interrogation and the other in front of a generation of city leaders.

The summer before my senior year in high school, a group of us made frequent trespasses to a secluded wet spot on a farm off Winchester. Elam’s Pond has long since been lost to progress and the airport, the girls and boys who splashed there those bright afternoons have long since become fully clothed and responsible adults – well, fully clothed anyway.

77. Dance Teacher Spreads Love of Dance From Cordova -

Arman Sahakyan, born in Armenia’s capital city of Yerevan, started taking dance classes as a 6-year-old.

Fast forward almost three decades, and today the 33-year-old remains committed to dance as an art form – only now he’s also spreading that enthusiasm to others as the owner of Dancing With Arman, a dance studio in Cordova.

78. Corporations are People? It's a Real Legal Concept -

WASHINGTON (AP) – There may be more to that "we the people" notion than you thought.

These are boom times for the concept of "corporate personhood."

Corporations are people?

79. Giving Your Child Independence -

Parents of newly minted graduates have all heard about it: the “Boomerang Generation.” According to Pew Research Center, It’s estimated that some 45 percent of college graduates between the ages of 18 and 24 are living at home with family. If you are a parent, you may be wondering what you can do to give your children the gift of independence on this Fourth of July.

80. Supreme Court: Religious Rights Trump Birth Control Rule -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A sharply divided Supreme Court ruled Monday that some companies with religious objections can avoid the contraceptives requirement in President Barack Obama's health care overhaul, the first time the high court has declared that businesses can hold religious views under federal law.

81. Amazon, Microsoft, Boeing Lure Interns With Perks -

SEATTLE (AP) – Amazon, Microsoft and Boeing sweeten already lucrative job offers in Seattle with subsidized, furnished housing. Transportation is covered from anywhere in the country, including airport food, baggage fees and taxis. There's free breakfast and dinner, biweekly housekeeping, a private party with Macklemore and Deadmau5.

82. Salon Owner Loves Neighborhood Feel of Cooper-Young -

If what they say is true about doing what you love and you’ll never work a day in your life, then native New Yorker Felicia Scarpati-Lomax hasn’t worked in decades.

She owns a nail salon in Cooper-Young that she opened here after relocating to Memphis from the Big Apple and falling in love with both the city and with Cooper-Young. She’s been doing nails since she was a kid – she’s always loved the creative expression associated with it – and she’s done it off and on in some formal capacity for about 10 years.

83. Starbucks Clears College Degree Path for Workers -

NEW YORK (AP) – Starbucks is giving its baristas a shot at an online college degree, an unusual benefit in an industry where higher education is often out of reach for workers.

The coffee chain is partnering with Arizona State University to make an undergraduate degree available at a steep discount to 135,000 U.S. employees who work at least 20 hours a week.

84. Game Changer -

One educator’s reform is another educator’s wrong move.

Dorsey Hopson doesn’t use the word “reform” as often as he uses the term “game changer.”

But the superintendent of Shelby County Schools has himself become a game changer as the school board that signed him to a three-year contract last September weighs a further extension of his three-year contract that for now runs through September 2016.

85. Justices Reject Reporter's Bid to Protect Source -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A reporter who has been ordered to divulge the identity of the source of classified information lost his bid Monday to get the Supreme Court to clarify whether journalists have a right to protect their confidential sources.

86. Google Faces Up to Image Problem in Europe -

AMSTERDAM (AP) – As Google bowed to a European court ruling to consider users' claims to remove embarrassing search results, the company took the first step toward preventing any more such punishing decisions – acknowledging it has an image problem in Europe.

87. House Passes Curbs on NSA Surveillance -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The House on Thursday passed legislation to end the National Security Agency's bulk collection of American phone records, the first legislative response to the disclosures by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden.

88. News Media Challenge Ban on Journalism Drones -

WASHINGTON (AP) – More than a dozen media organizations challenged the government's ban on the use of drones by journalists Tuesday, saying the Federal Aviation Administration's position violates First Amendment protections for news gathering.

89. Poetry in Motion -

Darius Clayton was one of the few people at a recent NAACP political forum who wasn’t running for Shelby County office this year or working for a candidate.

Clayton came to the event at Mt. Olive Cathedral CME Church as part of his immersion into the city’s political environment.

90. Women’s Foundation Honors Five Legends -

The list of Legends Awards honorees keeps growing. Since 2009, the Women’s Foundation of Greater Memphis will have honored 32 women with the addition of this year’s five Legends Award honorees. This year’s honorees range in age from 86 to 97 but, if anything, their vast years of experience have served as an inspiration to younger women.

91. Volkswagen Expansion Talks at Standstill in Tennessee -

NASHVILLE (AP) – Expansion talks at Volkswagen's lone U.S. plant have ground to a halt amid disagreements about the role of organized labor at the factory in Tennessee.

An acrimonious vote in February at the plant in Chattanooga resulted in the narrow defeat of the United Auto Workers union.

92. Museum Reopening Raises Issues About Present -

There was a moment in the April 5 two-hour reopening ceremony for the renovated National Civil Rights Museum that demonstrated the tension that still exists when it comes to the important issue of who is telling the story of history.

93. Events -

National Civil Rights Museum will host a community day and grand reopening Saturday, April 5. The event includes a 9:30 a.m. Freedom Forward Parade from Cook Convention Center to the museum, 450 Mulberry St. Visit civilrightsmuseum.org.

94. Events -

National Civil Rights Museum will host a candlelight vigil honoring the life of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Friday, April 4, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. in the museum courtyard, 450 Mulberry St. Cost is free. Visit civilrightsmuseum.org.

95. Campfield Sticks to Goals of Smaller Government -

For a decade, state Sen. Stacey Campfield has been unafraid of making headlines.

First as a state representative, and then in the Senate, he’s spoken his mind and put forth legislation that meets his stated goals of shrinking government.

96. Judge Upholds Country of Origin Label for Meat -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Shoppers who want to buy American beef for dinner instead of meat from Canada or Mexico will still be able to find the country of origin on the label.

A federal appeals court ruling Friday allows the government to go forward with rules that require labels on packaged steaks, ribs and other cuts of meat to say where the animals were born, raised and slaughtered. The meat industry attempted to block the rules, which went into effect last year, saying they are costly and provide no health benefits to the consumer.

97. High Court Seems Divided Over Birth Control Rule -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Supreme Court seemed divided Tuesday over whether employers' religious beliefs can free them from a part of the new health care law that requires that they provide coverage of birth control for employees at no extra charge.

98. ‘History Has Changed’ -

The headquarters for Freedom Summer is still being set up and nearby the stage is almost ready for the March on Washington.

The almost-finished exhibit on the black power movement includes an interactive media table that is as bold as the moments and cultural history it offers.

99. Tigers Revel in Season Sweep of Louisville -

Any in-the-moment analytical evaluation of the Tigers’ chances after Louisville forward Montrezl Harrell slammed home a dunk for an eight-point lead with 4:46 left in the game would have been dire.

100. Health Care Law Will Mean Fewer People On the Job -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Several million American workers will reduce their hours on the job or leave the workforce entirely because of incentives built into President Barack Obama's health care overhaul, the Congressional Budget Office said Tuesday.