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Editorial Results (free)

1. Last Word: Night in the Park, Hattiloo Goes Bigger & Cohen on the Republican Soul -

A gathering in Health Science Park a little before 11:30 Monday evening by a group of protesters who Facebooked that their intent was to take down the statue of Nathan Bedford Forrest. Memphis Police showed up quickly and the police supervisor told those around the statue that the park is a private park and that no one can be in the park after 8 p.m. No arrests but the police did ask for identification from those in the park.

2. Ex-Chef Valerie Morris Finds Right Recipe for Marketing Firm -

Just take one fact from her life and let your mind run to easy assumptions. Once upon a time, Valerie Morris was attending Le Cordon Bleu culinary arts school in Paris, France.

3. Ex-Chef Valerie Morris Creates Right Recipe for Marketing Firm -

Just take one fact from her life and let your mind run to easy assumptions. Once upon a time, Valerie Morris was attending Le Cordon Bleu culinary arts school in Paris, France.

4. Lawsuits Allege Poor Medical Care at Tennessee Jail -

HUNTSVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A jail in Tennessee is accused in three federal lawsuits of not providing adequate medical care to its inmates.

The Knoxville News Sentinel reported on Monday the lawsuits were brought on behalf of inmates Tammy Brawner, Benny Shane Pemberton and Jesse Perry, all of whom allegedly suffered ailments while incarcerated at the Scott County Jail.

5. Last Word: School Days, MLGW Moves Off Beale and Room For Peter Pan To Fly -

The K-12 school year begins Monday for most of Shelby County including the state’s largest public school system right here. Some schools have started earlier and some start later. So remember that in your daily travels going forward even if you don’t have school age children.

6. Last Word: Primary Care, Weirich On Twitter and Tigers Offense -

Shelby County District Attorney General Amy Weirich has been responding by Twitter for the last two days to the New York Times Magazine article about the Noura Jackson case that went up online earlier this week. Using the hashtag “ProCrimeNYTimes,” Weirich @ShelbyCountyDA -- tweeted Wednesday that the long read is “a blatant effort to create sympathy for the defendant while demonizing prosecutors.”

7. Editorial: The Ultimate Sustainability At the Corrections Center -

A life is a natural resource, more valuable than the resources being conserved at the Shelby County Corrections Center to great effect. So, with inmate levels at the corrections center currently at a relatively low level, we think there is another kind of opportunity for the aging prison.

8. Seeing the Light -

Four years ago, Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell was in Knoxville for a college football game. But with several hours before kickoff, he took a side trip to view the green initiatives at the Knox County Jail.

9. Juvenile Court Oversight Issue Spills Into Larger Criminal Justice Reform Debate -

Talking Monday, July 24, about criminal justice reform, Juvenile Court Judge Dan Michael mentioned the formal written request he, Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell and Sheriff Bill Oldham made to U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions in June to end Justice Department oversight of the court.

10. Early Release Halted for Germantown Man Convicted of Killing Mississippi Cop -

OXFORD, Miss. (AP) – The head of Mississippi's prison system has decided not to release an inmate convicted in the 2006 killing of a University of Mississippi police officer.

The Mississippi Department of Corrections notified victims, law enforcement agencies and court officials Thursday that Daniel Cummings, 31, would be released from prison July 28 after serving less than half of a 20-year sentence, The Oxford Eagle reported .

11. County Budget Talks Reveal Political Divide -

When Shelby County Commissioners convene Monday, July 17, it will be their third meeting in a week – following committee sessions Wednesday and the special meeting to approve a county operating budget two days before that.

12. A New Life Made Possible by a $170 Discount -

A harassment conviction lingered on the record of Memphis resident Brenda A. for 10 years, the high cost of expungement making it difficult to erase the past.

Like many people convicted of misdemeanors and felonies, she paid her court fees and fines, along with probation costs, years ago, but had trouble cobbling together the money to expunge her record, making it hard to land a good job and make a fresh start.

13. UT-Boling Center Gets New Associate Director -

Belinda Hardy has been named associate director of the UT-Boling Center for Developmental Disabilities at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center.

14. UT-Boling Center Gets New Associate Director -

Belinda Hardy has been named associate director of the UT-Boling Center for Developmental Disabilities at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center.

15. Luttrell Shuns Tax Cut In Proposed $1.2B Budget -

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell has taken a $1.2 billion consolidated county government budget proposal to the Shelby County Commission that would maintain a stable property tax rate but shift a part of the tax rate to establish a capital projects pay-as-you-go fund.

16. Luttrell Proposes $1.2 Billion County Budget with Stable Tax Rate -

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell has taken a $1.2 billion consolidated county government budget proposal to the Shelby County Commission that would maintain a stable property tax rate but shift a part of the tax rate to establish a capital projects pay-as-you go fund.

17. Bonner, Lane Line Up Early for 2018 Sheriff’s Race -

The Shelby County Democratic Party was disbanded last year, but there is already a Democratic contender for Shelby County sheriff in the 2018 elections.

Floyd Bonner Jr. is the chief deputy to Republican Sheriff Bill Oldham, running with Oldham’s backing.

18. Last Word: Who Needs To Be Watched, Hopdoddy and Fresh Fed Numbers -

Three Memphis City Council members on Behind The Headlines had quite a bit to say about protesters and lists and police surveillance. Council chairman Berlin Boyd and council members Kemp Conrad and Worth Morgan all say the surveillance question, which is the central issue now that the City Hall list has been pared significantly, is complex because of public postings and protests in public places.

19. County Commission Backs Medical Marijuana, Opposes School Vouchers -

Shelby County Commissioners endorsed state legislation Monday, Feb. 20, that would legalize marijuana for medical purposes, came out against a school voucher bill by state Senator Brian Kelsey of Germantown and turned away a social media use policy for county employees.

20. Private Prison Group Rejects Push for Independent Audits -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – The largest U.S. private prison operator has rejected a shareholder resolution seeking independent audits of its detention facilities.

The Human Rights Defense Center criticized CoreCivic, formerly Corrections Corporation of America, for the rejection.

21. Last Word: Bell at the Grammys, Old Dominick's Return and Luttrell & Strickland -

Memphis at the Grammys: William Bell was performer, presenter and winner at the Grammys Sunday evening. Gary Clark Jr. joined Bell to perform Bell’s calling card, “Born Under A Bad Sign” and the duo then presented a Grammy to Beyonce. In the non-televised Grammy awards, Bell won for Best Americana album for his Stax effort “This Is Where I Live.”

22. Private Prison Firm Sees Trump Immigration Push Opportunity -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – The United States' largest private prison operator said it can provide the additional detention facilities that will likely be needed under President Donald Trump's executive orders on immigration.

23. Haslam Adviser Hafner Leaving to Work for House Speaker -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Leslie Hafner is leaving her position as a top adviser to Republican Gov. Bill Haslam to take on a new role with House Speaker Beth Harwell.

24. Task Force Prepared for Juvenile Justice Legislation -

A General Assembly-led panel is backing legislation to change juvenile sexting laws and adopt measures to stop teens from being held in detention for minor offenses as part of an effort to improve juvenile justice.

25. HopeWorks Busy Helping People While Staying Grounded in Faith -

As executive director of nonprofit HopeWorks, Ron Wade has to be practical. And helping people get their education and find employment is about as practical as it gets.

26. Shelby County Commission Votes Down Pot Ordinance -

The Shelby County Commission voted down Monday, Dec. 5, an ordinance that would have matched a city of Memphis ordinance allowing police the option of writing a civil summons or ticket with a $50 fine for possession of half an ounce or less of marijuana.

27. Commission Votes Down Pot Ordinance -

Shelby County Commissioners voted down Monday, Dec. 5, an ordinance that would have matched the city of Memphis ordinance allowing police the option of writing a civil summons or ticket with a $50 fine for possession of half an ounce or less or marijuana.

28. Trump's Illegal Immigration Stance May Boost Private Prisons -

BOISE, Idaho (AP) – The population of American prisons is likely to rise for the first time in nearly a decade with President-elect Donald Trump's promise to detain and deport millions of immigrants who are in the country illegally and his selection of tough-on-crime Sen. Jeff Sessions to the nation's highest law enforcement post.

29. Fund Managers: No, the Election Won't Wreck Your 401(k) -

NEW YORK (AP) – Worried that the election will ruin your 401(k)?

Don't be, fund managers say, no matter who wins the White House. As long as you're a long-term investor willing to ride through whatever market bumps occur after Election Day, and there certainly could be scary ones, presidential elections historically haven't had much impact on stocks over the long term. Other factors, such as how expensive stocks are relative to their earnings and what the Federal Reserve is doing with interest rates, are more important factors for the market than who sits in the White House.

30. Prepping for the Next Market Correction -

Ray’s Take Stock market corrections are an inevitable part of investing. Since 1932, declines of 10 to 20 percent have occurred every two years on average. It might happen next week, three months from now, or next year. 

31. Coach Cliché Strikes the Right Note for Tennessee -

Coach Cliché tells us it was just another game. Coach Cliché tells us the next game is always bigger than the last one. And, yes, Coach Cliché tells us you build things brick by brick.

32. Shelby County Jail Population Up With Longer Stays While Awaiting Trial -

The Shelby County Jail is getting crowded and it’s because prisoners awaiting trial are staying longer.

And they are staying longer, in part, because of recent state laws that make plea deals less likely.

33. Prison Company Fights to Seal Documents About Strip Searches -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Private prison operator Corrections Corporation of America is trying to seal from public view documents in a lawsuit that claim female visitors to a Tennessee prison were forced to undergo strip searches to prove they were menstruating.

34. State Employees' Group Calling for an End of Private Prisons -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – An association representing state employees in Tennessee wants the state to stop using private prisons.

The Tennessean (http://tnne.ws/2bBeIKn) reports that Tennessee State Employee Association President Bryan Merritt is calling on the Tennessee Department of Correction to end the use of private prisons because he says state employees already do a great job managing prisons. He says private prisons provide an inferior product, lower levels of safety and security and debatable savings.

35. Sentencing for Carjackings In Tennessee Rises July 1 -

July 1 marks the implementation of new laws in Tennessee, including legislation that requires any person convicted of carjacking to serve no less than 75 percent of the sentence imposed by the court, less any earned and retained sentence credits.

36. Shelby County Budget Shuffle Endures -

By the end of Shelby County government’s budget season, a lot of paper was being passed around the County Commission chambers.

It was in keeping with the rules set by chairman Terry Roland going into the Wednesday, June 29, session that stretched on for seven hours: All amendments had to be put in written resolution form.

37. County Budget Done – Mostly -

Shelby County commissioners put most of their budget season to rest Wednesday, June 29, with $5 million from the county’s reserve fund after they added $13 million in amendments to the $1.1 billion county operating budget during a seven-hour session.

38. Sentencing for Carjackings In Tennessee Rises July 1 -

July 1 marks the implementation of new laws in Tennessee, including legislation that requires any person convicted of carjacking to serve no less than 75 percent of the sentence imposed by the court, less any earned and retained sentence credits.

39. Shelby County Budget Delay Centers on $3.5 Million for Schools -

Most of the declarations Monday, June 20, before the Shelby County Commission delayed final votes on local schools funding to next week came from the audience.

“For too long we’ve bled, died, cried and pled for education,” former Memphis City Council and Memphis City Schools board member TaJuan Stout-Mitchell told the commission.

40. Schools Funding Again Center Stage For County Commission -

Shelby County commissioners could wrap up most of the formalities Monday of their budget season.

But it will probably take a while.

The biggest issue of the season – school funding – appeared to be resolved with a compromise last week in committee sessions.

41. Last Word: The Fragile Compromise, Late by Train and NY Times on Chips Moman -

It looks like there is a deal to fully fund the Shelby County Schools system’s budget. But don’t look at the deal too long because it is very fragile.

It unraveled a bit within an hour after this got thrashed out in marathon Wednesday committee sessions by the Shelby County Commission.

42. Prisons Keeping Schedule Blamed for Low Morale, Turnover -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – State prison officials say they are keeping a controversial shift schedule that critics have blamed for understaffing and violence.

Correction Department spokeswoman Neysa Taylor says the 28-day schedule won't change, although facilities may now use 12-hour shifts or 8.5-hours shifts, depending on their needs.

43. Corrections Officers Want Commission to Increase Pay -

Shelby County Commissioners approved a stable county property tax rate of $4.37 Monday, June 6, on the first of three readings and set the stage for final budget deliberations in committee sessions next week.

44. Commission Adds To Budget Decisions, Backs Herenton Juvenile Offender Schools -

Shelby County Commissioners approved a stable county property tax rate of $4.37 Monday, June 6, on the first of three readings and set the stage for final budget deliberations in committee sessions next week.

45. Commission Adds To Budget Decisions, Backs Herenton Juvenile Offender Schools -

Shelby County Commissioners approved a stable county property tax rate of $4.37 Monday, June 6, on the first of three readings and set the stage for final budget deliberations in committee sessions next week.

46. Tennessee's Newest Prison Halts Admissions After Problems -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Tennessee's newest prison has had to halt new admissions after just four months of full operation.

A memorandum from a state prison official about the privately run Trousdale Turner Correctional Facility says guards there do not have control of the housing units, aren't counting inmates correctly, and are sending them to solitary confinement for no documented reason.

47. Greenline Work to Affect Germantown Pkwy. Traffic -

On the first day of spring, Sunday, March 20, construction will begin on the Shelby Farms Greenline crossing of Germantown Parkway.

Work crews will begin northbound and southbound lane shifts, which are necessary to build the median shelter that will allow those using the greenline to cross the busy parkway with a wait in the middle.

48. Pine Bluff Prison Takes Step Closer To West Memphis Move -

WEST MEMPHIS, Ark. (AP) – A prison in Pine Bluff is a step closer to moving into a vacant hospital in West Memphis.

The Arkansas Democrat-Gazette (http://bit.ly/1SSL2sl) reports that the Arkansas Board of Corrections and the Crittenden County Quorum Court voted in separate meetings Tuesday to enter into a lease agreement allowing the Southeast Arkansas Community Correction Center in Pine Bluff to move its operation to the vacant Crittenden County Hospital in West Memphis.

49. Greenline Construction to Affect Germantown Parkway Traffic -

On the first day of spring, Sunday, March 20, construction will begin on the Shelby Farms Greenline crossing of Germantown Parkway.

Work crews will begin northbound and southbound lane shifts, which are necessary to build the median shelter that will allow those using the greenline to cross the busy parkway with a wait in the middle.

50. ‘Fearless’ Stewart Embraces Battles With Supermajority -

Democratic state Rep. Mike Stewart lives on the front lines of the Tennessee General Assembly. As chairman of the House Democratic Caucus with 26 members, Stewart could employ a bunker mentality, but instead has chosen to take the fight to the other side of the aisle.

51. Don’t Panic Over The Market Drop -

Ray’s take: The stock market has had one of the worst starts of the year ever, and the roller coaster shows no sign of letting up. Market naysayers have stolen the spotlight and are further inciting panic with their rhetoric.

52. Luttrell Declares for Congressional Bid -

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell announced Monday, Feb. 29, that he will be a candidate in the August Republican primary for the 8th Congressional District.

53. Drones Pose New Contraband, Smuggling Challenge For Prisons -

SPRINGFIELD, Ill. (AP) – Wily inmates and their associates on the outside are deploying drones to deliver drugs, cellphones, and other contraband to prison yards, leaving prison guards and correctional authorities trying to decide how to deal with the new technology.

54. Protect Your Retirement From The Unexpected -

Ray’s Take We plan carefully during our years in the workforce to create a solid income for our retirement. But how can we protect that plan after we retire and have less flexibility and increased vulnerability to unexpected events? We want to avoid finding ourselves in the position of having to go back to work.

55. Kelsey Proposes No Parole For Especially Aggravated Burglary -

State Sen. Brian Kelsey of Germantown will introduce legislation to bar parole for those convicted of especially aggravated burglary.

56. Editorial: New Faces, Familiar Questions at City Hall -

The new Memphis City Council will face some old issues and questions at the outset of their four-year term.

But as new councilwoman Patrice Robinson pointed out in our cover story, the challenge will be to move beyond treading water in the deep end of the political pool.

57. Kelsey Proposes No Parole For Especially Aggravated Burglary -

State Sen. Brian Kelsey of Germantown will introduce legislation to bar parole for those convicted of especially aggravated burglary.

58. Tennessee Says Prison Officer Assaults Down Year Over Year -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — The number of recorded assaults on prison officers is down compared with a year ago, but critics say it's hard for them to accept any statistics from the Tennessee Department of Correction as fact.

59. Tennessee Prisons to Pay Officers $1,000 'Retention Bonus' -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Tennessee prison administrators plan to give current officers a $1,000 bonus before the end of the year as part of an effort to bolster retention among a department that corrections officers say has been severely understaffed.

60. A September to Forget -

September typically delivers negative performance, and this September was no exception. September’s poor performance punctuated a dismal third quarter. Using MSCI stock indices, the USA, Europe and the emerging markets fell 7 percent, 9 percent and 18 percent respectively. Feeling down? You are not alone…

61. Commission Confirms Orgel Appointment to DMC -

Shelby County commissioners confirmed Monday, Sept. 14, county mayor Mark Luttrell’s appointment of Benjamin Orgel to the Downtown Memphis Commission board.

62. County Commission Confirms Orgel Appointment to DMC -

Shelby County commissioners confirmed Monday, Sept. 14, county mayor Mark Luttrell’s appointment of Benjamin Orgel to the Downtown Memphis Commission board.

63. Roland Claims County Commission Chairmanship -

Three weeks after Steve Basar was elected – and an hour later un-elected – as chairman, the Shelby County Commission settled the discussion of who would be its leader next year by electing commissioner Terry Roland.

64. Fuente, Tigers Now Nitpick Imperfections as Winning Continues -

As season openers go, it had just about everything: a big crowd, with more than 41,000 showing up at Liberty Bowl Memorial Stadium; spirited tailgating on Tiger Lane; and really cool replica rings given out to the first 3,500 fans in celebration of the team’s 10-win season, share of the American Athletic Conference title and victory in the Miami Beach Bowl.

65. Q&A: What Are the Signs of a 'Bear Market' for Stocks -

The stock market's sharp downturn in recent weeks has pulled the three major U.S. stock indexes into what is known as a "correction." But when does a market correction effectively end a bull market and usher in a full-blown bear market?

66. Playing the Pullback -

After four years of up, markets have quickly entered correction territory. Unfortunately, since most investors operate with short memories, the current pullback feels major since recent comparisons have been minor. However, markets corrections don’t presage negative annual returns.

67. Four Shelby County Jailers Plead Guilty to Smuggling Drugs -

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) — Federal prosecutors say four Shelby County corrections deputies have pleaded guilty to attempting to smuggle prescription drugs into a jail.

The U.S. attorney's office in Memphis said Thursday that Torriano Vaughn, Brian Grammer, Anthony Thomas and Marcus Green participated in a scheme to smuggle what they thought were OxyContin pills into Shelby County Jail on multiple occasions between May and December 2014.

68. Nashville Prison Faces 'Emergency Staffing Issues' -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — A state prison in Nashville that houses men with mental illnesses is facing a critical shortage of corrections officers.

Officials at the Lois M. DeBerry Special Needs Facility say they are struggling to meet the demands brought about after implementing a new schedule intended to save $1.4 million statewide in wage costs, according to documents obtained by The Tennessean.

69. Supreme Court Upholds Use of Controversial Execution Drug -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Trading sharp words, a deeply divided Supreme Court upheld the use of a controversial drug in lethal-injection executions Monday, even as two dissenting justices said for the first time they think it's "highly likely" the death penalty itself is unconstitutional.

70. Different Strokes -

Five years ago, Jim Napolitano left Hillwood Country Club in Nashville to become general manager at Chickasaw Country Club. The economy was still wheezing and Chickasaw, which received its charter in 1922 – or two years after the 19th Amendment gave women the right to vote – was trapped in a time warp.

71. Global Ministries Appeals Failing HUD Scores at Memphis Properties -

A month after 40 units at the Goodwill Village and Warren Apartments were declared unfit by federal housing officials, the units have been repaired and the residents moved back in.

72. Sustainability Means Opportunity for Shelby County -

Editor’s Note: This column will appear weekly throughout April in honor of Memphis and Shelby County’s Sustainability Month.

Shelby County is investing in energy efficiency upgrades, waste reduction and green workforce training through the Green Prisons Initiative at the Shelby County Corrections. With a state grant to conduct energy efficiency upgrades, sustainability and reentry programs intersect. Not only will the facility receive upgrades, but the installation will be used as reentry training for the inmates as they will be trained to install the systems. With my background in law enforcement, at Shelby County Corrections, Federal Prisons, and as Shelby County Sheriff, I have a keen interest in reducing recidivism and reentry programs are known to be effective.

73. Collins Plots Different Course for Memphis Mayoral Bid -

Backers of Memphis mayoral contender Harold Collins are referring to his campaign as a crusade in which incumbent Mayor A C Wharton Jr. and Collins’ City Council colleague Jim Strickland may have claimed most of the contributions and support of business leaders.

74. Aramark Corrections Center Food Contract Approved -

Aramark Correctional Services Inc. will take over food service at the Shelby County Corrections Center, four years after the private company did the same at the Shelby County Jail and Jail East.

75. County Commission Considers $3.6 Million Prison Food Contract With Aramark -

Who feeds those behind bars in Shelby County has been a politically volatile government issue for years.

It touches on several political hot spots including whether or not to use local companies and local subcontractors, the privatization of a county government function and the possible loss of government jobs in the transition.

76. Bill Would Restrict Where CCA Inmates Could File Lawsuits -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A bill has been filed in the legislature that would prevent Corrections Corporation of America from being sued anywhere in the state except for the county where the private prison is operated.

77. Wharton's City Hall Shake-Up Has Ripples -

The political timing of Memphis Mayor A C Wharton’s shake-up of his leadership team could have been worse – closer to the October city elections in which he is seeking a second full term.

78. Wharton Eyes City Hall Shake-Up -

Facing specific criticism from political challengers that his administration is disorganized and hasn’t focused on priorities much past initial press conferences, Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. acted this week to shake up his office starting at the top.

79. Building From a New Blueprint -

When recruiting new businesses, East Tennessee economic development officials have long touted the benefits of partnering with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the University of Tennessee.

The lab and the university both have a history of working closely with private business to develop cutting-edge manufacturing techniques, technologies and new products. That research effort recently received a major boost with President Obama’s announcement of a new manufacturing innovation hub based in the Knoxville area.

80. Haslam: "No Regrets" on Insure Tennessee, Problems Still Exist -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam opened his State of the State address Monday, Feb. 9, where the special legislative session on Insure Tennessee ended last week – the defeat in committee of his Medicaid expansion proposal.

81. Haslam: "No Regrets" on Insure Tennessee, Problems Still Exist -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam opened his State of the State address Monday, Feb. 9, where the special legislative session on Insure Tennessee ended last week – the defeat in committee of his Medicaid expansion proposal.

82. HopeWorks Starts Series Aimed at Fighting Poverty -

HopeWorks is initiating a new educational series that aims to educate and equip community members actively seeking to join in the fight against poverty.

The “Understanding Poverty” series will feature a variety of guest speakers who are specially trained in particular levels of poverty and will lend advice on developing individual worth and becoming financially independent.

83. Shelby County Inmate to be Honored for Rescue -

A Shelby County jail inmate will be honored for rescuing a woman who was involved in a car crash.

County officials say Tyteaddis Johnson was serving jail time for aggravated burglary when he was assigned to a grass-cutting crew near Memphis International Airport on July 21.

84. HopeWorks Starts Series Aimed at Fighting Poverty -

HopeWorks is initiating a new educational series that aims to educate and equip community members actively seeking to join in the fight against poverty.

The “Understanding Poverty” series will feature a variety of guest speakers who are trained in particular levels of poverty and will lend advice on developing individual worth and becoming financially independent. The first HopeWorks UP session, which is free and open to the public, will feature Larry James, president and CEO of CitySquare in Dallas, Oct. 26 from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. at White Station Church of Christ, 1106 Colonial Road.

85. Probate Court Trio Returns for New Terms -

The two judges and clerk whose court is at the center of the practice of estate law in Shelby County were returned to their offices by Shelby County voters in the August county general elections.

Probate Court Judges Karen D. Webster and Kathleen N. Gomes as well as Probate Court Clerk Paul Boyd each faced challengers in the election that drew a 27 percent voter turnout overall.

86. Commission Confirms Luttrell Appointees -

In the first voting meeting of the new four-year term of office, the Shelby County Commission approved Monday, Sept. 8, County Mayor Mark Luttrell’s reappointment of Harvey Kennedy as chief administrative officer, Mike Swift as finance director, Yvonne Matlock as health services director, John Halbert as chief information officer, Tom Needham as public works director and Richard Copeland as director of the city-county Office of Planning and Development. The commission also approved William Gupton as the new director of the county’s corrections division.

87. County Commission Confirms Luttrell Appointees -

In the first voting meeting of the new four-year term of office, the Shelby County Commission approved Monday, Sept. 8, County Mayor Mark Luttrell’s reappointment of Harvey Kennedy as chief administrative officer, Mike Swift as finance director, Yvonne Matlock as health services director, John Halbert as chief information officer, Tom Needham as public works director and Richard Copeland as director of the city-county Office of Planning and Development. The commission also approved William Gupton as the new director of the county’s corrections division.

88. Ford Is New County Commission Chairman In Latest Crossover Trend -

Shelby County Commissioners elected a Democratic chairman Monday, Sept. 8, but for a second consecutive year, that chairman was elected with the support of a majority of the Republicans on the body.

89. County Commission Begins New Term -

Shelby County Commissioners elect a new chairman Monday, Sept. 8, for the next year at the first voting meeting of their four-year term of office.

And their agenda includes votes on appointments by Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell to his second-term team of division directors and administrators.

90. Medtronic Launches Pediatric Spine Product -

Medtronic Inc. on Thursday, Aug. 28, announced the 510(k) clearance and launch of a product designed for treatment of skeletally immature pediatric patients younger than 10 years of age diagnosed with severe, progressive, life-threatening, early-onset spinal deformities.

91. Medtronic Launches Pediatric Scoliosis Treatment -

Medtronic Inc. on Thursday, Aug. 28, announced the 510(k) clearance and launch of a product designed for treatment of skeletally immature pediatric patients younger than 10 years of age diagnosed with severe, progressive, life-threatening, early-onset spinal deformities.

92. City Mulls Plan to Buy Former State Building -

It would be cheaper and more efficient for the city of Memphis to lease and then buy the vacant Donnelley J. Hill state office building across Main Street from Memphis City Hall than to continue leasing multiple properties spread across town, consultants and city officials told City Council members Tuesday.

93. Local Projects Win State Grant Money -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam handed out five oversized grant checks Wednesday, July 23, on the University of Memphis campus for a total of $1.4 million in grants funding for various pedestrian, park and recreation projects across Shelby County.

94. Sheriff’s Race Reflects Different Law Enforcement Cultures -

Bennie Cobb remembers how he got his first job in the local criminal justice system.

It was 1980, and Cobb – then 19 years old – went to apply for a job at the old City Jail.

95. Tennessee ‘Ready’ to Use Electric Chair -

Tennessee’s top prisons official says the state is “ready as needed” to use the electric chair if it can’t get the drugs used for lethal injections.

A corrections spokeswoman said Friday that the state doesn’t have a supply of the drugs but authorities are confident they could acquire some. The chemicals have become scarcer following a European-led boycott of drug sales for executions.

96. Tennessee 'Ready' to Use Electric Chair If Needed -

Tennessee's top prisons official says the state is "ready as needed" to use the electric chair if it can't get the drugs used for lethal injections.

A corrections spokeswoman said Friday that the state doesn't have a supply of the drugs but authorities are confident they could acquire some. The chemicals have become scarcer following a European-led boycott of drug sales for executions.

97. County Commission Ready for Budget Analysis -

Shelby County Commissioners begin their detailed look at the county’s consolidated budget proposal Wednesday, April 16, for the coming fiscal year.

The budget committee, chaired by commissioner Heidi Shafer, begins its hearings with a look at the budgets for the offices of Sheriff, Trustee, Register and the Juvenile Court and its Clerk’s office.

98. Commission Budget Season Begins Quietly -

Shelby County Commissioners began their budget season quietly with a first look in committee sessions last week at a $1.2 billion consolidated county budget proposal by Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell.

99. Mississippi Governor Signs Criminal-Justice Overhaul Bill -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) – Mississippi Gov. Phil Bryant on Monday signed a bill designed to make the criminal justice system more efficient and less expensive.

Bryant said House Bill 585, which becomes law July 1, will protect public safety and could save the state $266 million in prison expenses, spread over 10 years.

100. Sustainability is a Win for All -

Editor’s Note: This column will appear Tuesdays through April in honor of Sustainability Month for Memphis and Shelby County.

This April marks the third annual Sustainability Month for Memphis and Shelby County. It has been remarkable and rewarding to watch the growth in activity and awareness around this important issue.