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Editorial Results (free)

1. IMC Official Discusses Transportation Challenges -

Although Memphis has long been known as America’s distribution center, simply being in the right place at the right time isn’t always enough.

For example, a driver and chassis shortage is crippling the city’s supply chain, said Donna Lemm, IMC Companies’ executive vice president of national sales.

2. Another Conscious Company: Which Wich -

Editor’s note: Columnist Michael Graber interviewed Jeff Sinelli, founder and “chief vibe officer” at Which Wich, about the sandwich chain’s focus on conscious capitalism. 

3. What Statewide Candidates Say About Opioid Crisis, Public Safety -

The spread of opioid abuse claimed over 1,600 lives in Tennessee in 2016, and it is getting worse. Methamphetamine abuse, while not getting the headlines, has increased. Gun violence and murder is increasing. What proposals do our candidates have to help Tennesseans address these public safety issues?

4. Residents React to Cooper-Young’s Tentative Historic Overlay Status -

Though the Memphis City Council on Tuesday, April 10, granted Cooper-Young the historic overlay district status it has been seeking since last year, there is still a sense of concern among many of the residents.

5. A Memphis Parable -

HOWARD AND BILL. One of my first columns was this very Memphis story. It’s time to tell it again. 

In the ’60s, Howard Robertson was a black postal carrier moonlighting as a waiter at the capital of white money dining in Memphis, Justine’s, housed in an antebellum mansion. Bill Loeb was a successful white businessman, owner of ubiquitous laundry branches about town, and the brother of Henry Loeb, mayor during the 1968 sanitation strike. Loeb lived in a home literally bordering the Memphis Country Club. Robertson lived in the other Memphis those of us who grew up white then never really acknowledged.

6. Last Word: The RDC's New Leader, Potter on 100 North Main and FedEx Moves -

Is Memphis big enough for FedExForum and some kind of event space on the Graceland campus in Whitehaven? The city administration thinks that could be the case. But it requires an “honest broker” between Graceland and the Grizz – who run the forum for the city and county – to quote city chief legal officer Bruce McMullenif there is a deal to be had.

7. Novel Approach -

The smallest of the city’s 17 public libraries is also one of its most used. The Frayser Branch library is a brick-and-glass rectangle on a half-acre at 3712 Argonne St. With some modest columns and shrubs, a few planters and cinderblock lattice work, it is shoe-horned into the side of a hill in a residential neighborhood a block from the commercial corridor of North Watkins Road still dominated by churches.

8. Heir on the Side of Caution -

The closest and best parcel of land for a second convention center hotel in Downtown Memphis is the Mud Island parking garage. It’s a block away from the Memphis Cook Convention Center and is the first site that came up when a Denver developer approached the city last year about possibly building such a hotel.

9. Trump Revives Push for Limits on Immigrants Bringing Family -

NEW YORK (AP) — When the U.S. government approved Ricardo Magpantay, his wife and young children to immigrate to America from the Philippines, it was 1991. By the time a visa was available, it was 2005, and his children could not come with him because they were now adults.

10. Even 'Safe' Bond Investments Falter as Markets Tumble -

NEW YORK (AP) – The stock market isn't the only thing dropping. Bonds, which are supposed to be the safe part of every investor's portfolio, have faltered, too.

In what's been a rude awakening for some investors, bond funds have lost ground these past couple of weeks, unlike in past downturns for stocks. What's different this time is that the same things undercutting stocks are hurting bond prices: worries about inflation and the possibility of much higher interest rates.

11. Tennessee Bill Would Exempt Gun Safes From State Sales Tax -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Democratic and Republican lawmakers in Tennessee are pushing legislation to exempt gun safes from the state's sales tax.

At a news conference Monday, Republican Sen. Kerry Roberts of Springfield said the bill shows how the state Senate can find common ground and work in a bipartisan manner.

12. 2 Dead, 17 Injured in Kentucky School Shooting; Suspect Held -

BENTON, Ky. (AP) – A 15-year-old student opened fire with a handgun inside his rural Kentucky high school Tuesday, killing two classmates, injuring 17 others and sending hundreds fleeing for safety.

13. Facebook to Emphasize 'Trustworthy' News Via User Surveys -

Facebook is taking another step to try to make itself more socially beneficial, saying it will boost news sources that its users rate as trustworthy in surveys.

In a blog post and a Facebook post from CEO Mark Zuckerberg Friday, the company said it is surveying users about their familiarity with and trust in news sources. That data will influence what others see in their news feeds.

14. Titans Fire Coach Mike Mularkey After Playoff Win -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – The Tennessee Titans believe the potential reward from quarterback Marcus Mariota working with his third head coach in his fourth NFL season outweighs the risk of change.

15. Weekend Monuments Protests, Response Suggest Shift -

Memphis Branch NAACP president Deidre Malone may have had the most concise description of what has changed since the city’s two most visible Confederate monuments came down Dec. 20.

“What we want happened. The monuments are down,” Malone said Friday, Jan. 5, as the NAACP and other groups called on Memphians to ignore plans for protests in the city the next day by groups opposed to the removal of the monuments.

16. Homeland Chief: Wait and See on Citizenship for Immigrants -

SAN DIEGO (AP) – The Trump administration would consider immigration legislation that includes a pathway to citizenship for hundreds of thousands of young people, the U.S. Homeland Security secretary said Tuesday, while emphasizing no decision on that issue has been made and a border wall remains the priority.

17. NBC Names Hoda Kotb as Lauer Replacement on 'Today' -

NEW YORK (AP) – NBC News opened the new year Tuesday by appointing Hoda Kotb as co-anchor of the "Today" show's first two hours with Savannah Guthrie, replacing Matt Lauer following his firing on sexual misconduct charges in late November.

18. Editorial: Though Statues are Down, Work is Just Beginning -

They may be the most famous pedestals in Memphis – the ones where the horseback image of Nathan Bedford Forrest stood for 113 years and the relatively slender pinnacle where Jefferson Davis stood for a mere 53 years.

19. The Cutoff -

When Memphis leaders got together with suburban mayors in September at Agricenter, it was to talk about a unified countywide approach to getting Amazon’s $5 billion HQ2 project.

It was supposed to be a time for leaders of the county and its seven cities to talk about their common good, regionalism and all things they agree on, with none of what they disagree on at least for the moment.

20. RCV Goes To Ballot, Term-Limit Change May Join It -

Memphis City Council members gave final approval Tuesday, Dec. 5, to a November 2018 referendum that would repeal the use of ranked-choice voting (RCV) in some city council races starting with 2019 city elections.

21. Diaz Makes Second Bid for County Commission Seat -

Geoff Diaz came to Memphis in 2010 with a lot of political experience and inside knowledge of how the legislative process works.

He moved to Memphis with his wife for her job at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital and arrived just after the 2010 midterm congressional primaries. With Charlotte Bergmann as the Republican nominee for the 9th Congressional District seat held by Democratic incumbent Steve Cohen, he immediately signed on as her campaign manager.

22. Is There Room for Common-Sense Gun Legislation? -

The Tennessee chapter of Moms Demand Action picks its battles judiciously. Once labeled as a bunch of anti-gun extremists, the group is anything but, spokeswoman Kat McRitchie says.

“We seek common ground. We work with legislators on both sides of the aisle. We’re nonpartisan,” McRitchie explains. “We’re simply looking for common-sense gun solutions, which the majority of Americans support.”

23. Banks Behind Lakeland Residential Developments -

4501 Chambers Chapel Road, 
Lakeland, TN 38002 (et. al)

Application Date: Nov. 16, 2017

24. Fired Testing Company Seeks $25.3M for Work on TNReady’s Bumpy Rollout -

Tennessee officials won’t talk about the state’s ongoing dispute with the testing company it fired last year, but the company’s president is.

Henry Scherich says Tennessee owes Measurement Inc. $25.3 million for services associated with TNReady, the state’s new standardized test for its public schools. That’s nearly a quarter of the company’s five-year, $108 million contract with the state, which Tennessee officials canceled after technical problems roiled the test’s 2016 rollout.

25. Man survives 9/11, Las Vegas shootings -

RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — Mike Dempsey never thought he would be a part of a second national tragedy.

26. Editorial: Ways Forward in the Age Of the Active Shooter -

When the word “numb” starts to show up a lot as the reaction to a mass shooting in which 59 people were slaughtered even as time passes – when the incident very quickly goes into the timeline of such incidents and is then filed away for the next time it happens – we have a problem.

27. Corporate Disaster Aid: How and When -

Disasters are chaotic and complex. Just a few minutes of howling wind or shaking earth can leave years of cleaning up, rebuilding and coping with a new reality.

Naturally, people want to help when they witness significant duress, like we’ve seen recently with hurricanes Harvey and Irma and like we’ve seen countless times globally. Some of the greatest moments I’ve witnessed in business have come in the aftermath of disasters.

28. Alexander, Corker Look Beyond ‘Skinny Repeal’; Cohen Rant Goes Viral -

Tennessee’s two U.S. senators see the failure of the “skinny repeal” health care bill in the Senate as a missed opportunity.

Lamar Alexander and Bob Corker both supported the measure, along with all but three of the rest of the Republican majority in the Senate. But the bill that would have repealed Obamacare without an immediate replacement and which Republicans senators didn’t want the House to approve and send to President Donald Trump fell short of passage with only 49 votes.

29. Alexander, Corker Look Beyond ‘Skinny Repeal’; Cohen Rant Goes Viral -

Tennessee’s two U.S. senators see the failure of the “skinny repeal” health care bill in the Senate as a missed opportunity.

Lamar Alexander and Bob Corker both supported the measure, along with all but three of the rest of the Republican majority in the Senate. But the bill that would have repealed Obamacare without an immediate replacement and which Republicans senators didn’t want the House to approve and send to President Donald Trump fell short of passage with only 49 votes.

30. Remember Memphis? Titans Would Rather Not -

Time flies, doesn’t it? A lot can happen in 20 years. Think about it: In 1997, Bill Clinton was sworn in for his second term as president. Princess Di was killed in a car crash. The Dow Jones Industrial Average closed above 8,000 for the first time. And the Tennessee Oilers played their home games in Memphis.

31. Binghampton, Frayser Retail Projects Look To Lift Communities -

They say retail is a numbers game, and for some communities, when those numbers don’t add up they can get left behind by developers.

That’s why the Binghampton Gateway and Frayser Gateway – a pair of retail projects in different areas and stages of development – hope to send a message that overlooked communities have more to offer than just numbers.

32. Harris Calls for Suspension of TVA Well Permits -

State Sen. Lee Harris wants the county’s Ground Water Control Board to suspend permits for water wells at the site of the new Tennessee Valley Authority plant in southwest Memphis and begin an investigation of high lead and arsenic levels found in area groundwater “as soon as practicable.”

33. Binghampton, Frayser Retail Projects Could Lift Respective Neighborhoods -

They say retail is a numbers game, and for some communities, when those numbers don’t add up they can get left behind by developers.

That’s why the Binghampton Gateway and Frayser Gateway – a pair of retail projects in different areas and stages of development – hope to send a message that overlooked communities have more to offer than just numbers.

34. Not Ours, Not Theirs -

Not the apple of the apple's eye. The only other person on the subway platform that night years ago was in a hood-up hoodie and seemed to be about 8 feet tall, and seemed to get taller as he walked toward me. Even sober, I wouldn’t be able to do anything about whatever he had in mind, and I was far from sober after a three-hour meal in Tribeca. I was done.

35. FedEx Corp. Reports Strong Q4, Fiscal Year -

Memphis-based FedEx Corp. reported a record Q4 and full-year earnings at its fourth-quarter earnings call Tuesday, June 20.

36. St. Jude Hosts Pediatric Palliative Oncology Symposium -

St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital welcomed 325 physicians, nurses and psychosocial professionals from around the world in recent days for the first Pediatric Palliative Oncology Symposium, the largest conference of its type that has been held in the U.S.

37. Last Word: Halfway Point, The Cancer-Influenza Connection and Wade Baldwin's Way -

Monday was the day that Memphis Light Gas and Water Division reached the halfway point in restoring power. There were 90,384 customers without power Monday evening, compared to 188,000 without power at the outset Saturday evening at 11 p.m. There were 126 utility crews working by Monday evening.

38. Medical District Apartments Sell for $5.2 Million -

A medical district apartment switches hands in a multimillion-dollar deal, a Downtown developer plans an apartment complex near FedExForum, and a California investor buys a local industrial portfolio. Details in this week’s Real Estate Recap...

39. Medical District Apartments Sell for $5.2 Million -

A 128-unit apartment high-rise in the Memphis Medical District has sold for $5.2 million.

Axon LLC, which has ownership based both in Memphis and California, bought the Park Tower Apartments, located at 57 N. Somerville St., from California-based Memphis Medical Redevelopment Group LLC.

40. Q&A: Campbell Clinic’s Miller Talks Sports Medicine, Injury Prevention -

Dr. Robert Miller graduated Vanderbilt University School of Medicine in 1980 and completed a residency in 1985 in Memphis and a fellowship in sports medicine in Georgia in 1986. So, he was pretty much in on the ground floor of the sports medicine discipline.

41. Roger Ailes, Media Guru and Political Strategist, Dies at 77 -

NEW YORK (AP) – Roger Ailes, the communications maestro who transformed television news and America's political conversation by creating and ruling Fox News Channel for two decades before being ousted last year for alleged sexual harassment, died Thursday, according to his wife, Elizabeth Ailes. He was 77.

42. Poag Works with Residents to Build Strong Neighborhoods -

When it comes to community development, money helps. But if the neighborhoods don’t know what you’re up to – or if they don’t like it – you may as well stop now, because your plan is doomed to fail. It’s a lesson Memphis has learned the hard way.

43. View From the Hill: Gas Tax Rancor Lingers as Session Coasts to Close -

Remnants of rancor over Republican leadership roiled the House, a reminder of outrage over roguish behavior as representatives reached the finish line.

Alliteration is probably better suited for poetry. But in a case of what could be considered poetic justice, at least for some, this literary device – goofiness maybe – is suitable for legislative action requiring a score card to keep up with the characters and a bit of history to put it all together.

44. Groups Prepare for Persons’ Lynching Centennial -

When a pair of new historical markers on Summer Avenue are unveiled later this month, it will be the latest milestone in current discussions about what happened long ago in Memphis.

The markers will be unveiled at and near the site where Ell Persons was burned by a lynch mob 100 years ago this month.

45. LaRose Students Get Protest Primer on King Anniversary -

A group of 48 third-, fourth- and fifth-graders at LaRose Elementary School made signs and walked a picket line around their school campus Tuesday, April 4, as part of a lesson about protests on the anniversary of Dr. Martin Luther King’s assassination that drew five Memphis police cars.

46. Collierville Mayor Stan Joyner Says Political Path Kept Calling -

Before he ever ran for anything in Collierville, Stan Joyner spent a dozen years on the town’s planning commission. And he was an elected alderman for another 12 years before he ran for and was elected mayor of the town of 48,000 people.

47. 4 Tips for Approaching Decision Makers -

One way to help sustain your organization is to build and nurture relationships with decision makers who can provide finances and resources. 

Be intentional as you expand the number of decision makers who know your organization. It takes time for an executive within a corporation – or a board within a foundation – to decide to make a major gift or grant. While many executives have the authority to make discretionary grants, in most cases these are substantially smaller than grants made through the formal grant making process. 

48. Genetic Code -

While the anachronistic farmer trope may be a common pop-culture perception, these stewards of the land have in fact been on the cutting edge of technology for thousands of years.

And every milestone since the Neolithic period, from the first plows to today’s automated tractors, has allowed farmers to increase their yields and support a perpetually growing population.

49. FedEx Falls Short of Q3 Profit Forecasts -

Memphis-based FedEx Corp. enjoyed record shipping levels in its peak season for deliveries, but still fell short of third-quarter profit forecasts.

In its Tuesday, March 21, earnings call, FedEx reported net income of $562 million, or $2.07 per share, for the fiscal quarter that ended Feb. 28. That was an increase from $507 million, or $1.84 per share, for the same period last year.

50. FedEx Corp. Falls Short of Q3 Profit Forecasts -

Memphis-based FedEx Corp. enjoyed record shipping levels in its peak season for deliveries, but still fell short of third-quarter profit forecasts.

In its Tuesday, March 21, earnings call, FedEx reported net income of $562 million, or $2.07 per share, for the fiscal quarter that ended Feb. 28. That was an increase from $507 million, or $1.84 per share, for the same period last year.

51. Bill to Create Criminal Trespassing at Apartment Complexes Could Face Legal Challenges -

NASHVILLE – Two Memphis lawmakers are pushing legislation designed to clear apartment complexes of trespassers, in some cases to ensure that emergency personnel avoid intimidation and threats when they answer calls dealing with shootings.

52. US Airlines Post Another Month of Increasingly Common Delays -

U.S. airlines are having trouble keeping flights on time this winter, and they are recording a sharp increase in long delays.

The Transportation Department said Tuesday that 42 flights in January were stuck on the ground so long that the airlines could face fines. That is the highest number of long ground delays in one month since February 2010, shortly before the rule allowing fines took effect.

53. Business Economists Disagree With Trump on Trade, Budget -

NEW YORK (AP) – A majority of business economists disagree with the Trump administration on several key issues, notably immigration, trade and the budget, according to a survey by the National Association for Business Economics.

54. Council to Discuss Police Retention Bonus Grant As Union Objects -

Memphis City Council members review a $6.1 million four-year grant for police retention bonuses Tuesday, March 7, during council committee sessions.

The grant from the Memphis-Shelby Crime Commission was announced last week by Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland and Crime Commission president Bill Gibbons.

55. Last Word: Bar Louie's Corner, Chucalissa and Shark Tank for Ag -

The key corner at the intersection of Madison Avenue and North Cooper Street is the southwest corner where since the opening of a renovated Overton Square several years ago Bar Louie has had the corner. And the restaurant chain wants to keep the corner although its landlord wants to make a change. That’s the bottom line in bankruptcy reorganization court documents filed in February.

56. Local Democratic and Republican Partisans Already Looking To 2018 -

U.S. Rep. David Kustoff says former Lt. Gov. Ron Ramsey was right in describing his 8th Congressional District as the most Republican of the state’s nine congressional districts.

57. Developers Request to Amend Downtown Hotel Project -

Memphis City Council members will consider an amendment Tuesday, Feb. 7, to plans for a 150-room hotel on the northwest corner of Madison Avenue and B.B. King Boulevard.

The change by Wessman Holdings LLC for the Leader Federal Bank building and the two-story building next to it on the corner would add a new nine-story building past the corner on the B.B. King side.

58. Connecting People at Heart of Plans For $12M Friendship Park -

Heartsong Church and the Memphis Islamic Center, neighbors in Cordova, are shattering notions of hatred and divisiveness seen elsewhere in the world with plans to develop a $12 million Friendship Park connecting their two properties.

59. Let’s Get Real About Charters -

Charter schools and public education have been the focus of increased national attention lately and I’m proud that Tennessee is often held up as a model of how charter public schools can work for families.

60. New Wood Technology May Offer Hope for Struggling Timber -

RIDDLE, Ore. (AP) – John Redfield watches with pride as his son moves a laser-guided precision saw the size of a semi-truck wheel into place over a massive panel of wood.

Redfield's fingers are scarred from a lifetime of cutting wood and now, after decades of decline in the logging business, he has new hope that his son, too, can make a career shaping the timber felled in southern Oregon's forests.

61. Change Defines Education Landscape in 2016 -

By the time Rhodes College trustees made their choice in December of Marjorie Hass as the college’s new president, higher education in Memphis had been through quite a few changes.

Hass succeeds William Troutt, president of Rhodes for the last 18 years.

62. Memphis Democrat Karen Camper Learns To Work With Majority -

Editor’s note: This is part one of Nashville correspondent Sam Stockard’s feature on Memphis state Rep. Karen Camper. Read part two in the Friday, Dec. 23, edition of The Daily News or online at memphisdailynews.com.

63. Trump Picks Fast Food Executive Andrew Puzder for Labor -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President-elect Donald Trump plans to add another wealthy business person and elite donor to his Cabinet, saying he would nominate fast-food executive Andrew Puzder as labor secretary.

64. Trump Taps Former Campaign Rival Carson as Housing Secretary -

NEW YORK (AP) – President-elect Donald Trump, moving closer to filling his Cabinet, chose former campaign rival Ben Carson on Monday to be secretary of the Department of Housing and Urban Development.

65. Distracted To Death -

When the Tennessee Highway Patrol began using a tractor-trailer on the interstate to catch people texting while driving, the troopers knew their view from above would help their cause. From that higher vantage point, they could see drivers holding their phones in their laps and typing.

66. Deep South Drought Kills Crops, Threatens Herds, Dries Lakes -

ATLANTA (AP) – Six months into a deepening drought, the weather is killing crops, threatening cattle and sinking lakes to their lowest levels in years across much of the South.

The very worst conditions – what forecasters call "exceptional drought" – are in the mountains of northeast Alabama and northwest Georgia, a region known for its thick green forests, waterfalls and red clay soil.

67. Five-Year Crime Plan Avoids 'Stop & Frisk' Reference -

Memphis-Shelby Crime Commission president and CEO Bill Gibbons won’t even say “stop and frisk.”

68. FedEx Grows Q1 Profit to $715M, Expects Another Big Holiday Season -

FedEx grew its profit to $715 million for the quarter ended Aug. 31 from $692 million during the year-ago quarter, the company reported Tuesday, Sept. 20, a week ahead of its annual meeting of shareholders in Memphis.

69. SEACAP Financial Helping Clients Navigate Economic Waves -

What, a prospective client might fairly wonder, is a Memphis-based business advisory group doing with the name SEACAP Financial? Don’t they realize their nearest shore is beside the Mississippi River?

70. Editorial: Sister Constance’s Dilemma -

Sometime before fall arrives by the calendar, nine people – six children and three adults – will be eulogized and buried. A seventh child was removed from life support this week and will be allowed to die.

71. Champ or Chomp, But Not Chump -

A few years back I wrote a column in which I noted that champ at the bit had been used in my daily paper. Twice in one day. In different articles, a few pages apart.

The first was a quote from a coach: “[O]ur guys are champing at the bit to get back on the court.” The second usage was in a headline. Another team was said to be “champing at the bit in the NCAAs.”

72. Eating to Win, Be It at the Olympics or in Daily Life, Takes Planning -

The Rio 2016 Olympic Games were historically successful for Team USA, as Americans topped the medal chart in every category: 121 total medals, 46 golds, 37 silvers, and 38 bronzes.

Swimmer Michael Phelps added five more golds and a silver and now has 28 medals overall, 23 golds. Simone Biles became the first American to win four golds in gymnastics at a single Games.

73. Uptown Vision -

Brand new sidewalks, streetlights and paved roads set the stage for Habitat for Humanity’s Jimmy and Rosalynn Carter Work Project in North Memphis, where nearly 1,500 volunteers have descended this week to build a subdivision from scratch.

74. Last Word: Busy Council Day, Crosstown High and Local Democratic Post Mortem -

There aren’t any terms yet. But it would appear that there is enough common ground between the owners of Wiseacre Brewing and the administration of Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland to take what amounts to a letter of intent on the Mid-South Coliseum to the City Council Tuesday.

75. Last Word: Candlelight Protest, International Paper Rumors and Ruby Wilson -

Graceland and Black Lives Matter meet again Monday evening, according to the announcement as the weekend began of the Coalition of Concerned Citizens.

The coalition, which includes leaders of the July 10 bridge protest as well as the July 12 protest that briefly blocked traffic on Elvis Presley Boulevard outside Graceland, isn’t too happy with how its meeting with Mayor Jim Strickland went last Thursday.

76. Schism Among State Republicans Hits Critical Point With Resignation -

A rift within the Tennessee Republican Party, whether a tempest in a teapot or the early signs of implosion, isn’t likely to hit the big tent party hard at the polls this fall.

But make no mistake, there is some trouble in paradise.

77. 8th District Republican Contenders Highlight Differences -

Most of the 13 contenders in the August Republican primary in the 8th Congressional District agree on a lot. They think the country is going in the wrong direction. They believe the policies of a Democratic president are a factor in that, and they support Donald Trump as the Republican Party’s presidential nominee.

78. Goal of Owning Home Still Strong, and 8 Other Housing Trends -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Americans still want to own homes – if they can afford to. That's the finding of a report being released Wednesday by the Harvard University Joint Center for Housing Studies.

79. Streetcars En Vogue, But Study Urges Use Beyond Tourists -

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) – As Oklahoma City prepares to break ground on its first streetcar line in seven decades, and as other cities adjust to having them again, authors of a federally backed study suggest their routes move people with a purpose – not just target the tourist trade.

80. Snapshot: How Memphis-Based Public Companies are Faring -

Acquisitions have been a common theme among many Memphis-based public companies the past few quarters. Here is a roundup of those transactions and other business highlights from each of the companies.

81. Opera Memphis: If You Sing – Anywhere – They Will Listen -

For everything else opera might be, Ned Canty has made it his business to see opera as opportunity.

The general director for Opera Memphis, when Canty came to town five years ago the company was in decline.

82. Raleigh Mall Demolition Signals Change After Delays -

The crowd of several hundred people on the south end of the Raleigh Springs Mall Saturday, May 7, was larger than the crowd inside the mall to shop.

They came to watch the beginning of the end.

83. Last Word: Overt Acts, Fringe Element and Roller Derby -

Gang cases in Memphis Federal Court are fairly common. Federal gang cases in which murder or attempted murder to further a criminal enterprise is among the charges are not common.

The last case to surface was also the largest drug case ever brought in Memphis Federal Court. It was the 2008 case against Craig Petties and his multi-state drug operation with direct ties to the Sinaloa drug cartel.

84. Hamilton & Holliman Bringing Mixed Upscale Housing to South Main -

What was once Downtown’s industrial and rail district is now one of the most densely populated residential neighborhoods in Memphis. Over 2,000 units are under development in the South End, and the current population is expected to double over the next two to three years, according to the Downtown Memphis Commission.

85. Time for Strunk to Become Titans' Most Valuable Player -

Quick question about the Titans: Who has the most to prove?

Is it Mike Mularkey, a two-time loser as a head coach?

Is it Jon Robinson, a first-time general manager?

86. Last Word: Basketball Intervention, Medical Inventory and Memphis in the 1960s -

Five games left for the Grizzlies to win three and then get to play more in the NBA playoffs. And what seemed to be a foregone conclusion is now not such a sure thing based on the Grizz performance in Sunday’s 119-107 loss to the Orlando Magic in Orlando.

87. Time On The Porch -

ON PORCHES. Whatever porches are about, the best ones are about time. Time for swings and rocking chairs and reflection. Time spent alone with your thoughts or time shared with others sharing space and experience. Time to be very quiet. Or very loud. Life in real time.

88. 1866 Massacre Author Says Riot Has Important Lessons -

When historian Stephen V. Ash went looking for source material on that most difficult of events to piece back together – three days of mob violence in a 19th century Southern city – he expected a challenge.

89. FedEx CEO Downplays Amazon ‘Industry Disruption’ -

FedEx Corp. founder and CEO Fred Smith never said the word “Amazon,” but the e-commerce giant was clearly on his mind Wednesday.

Smith addressed speculation about “industry disruption” by Amazon from the outset of Memphis-based FedEx’s quarterly earnings conference call. He also defended the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade agreement, noting that both of the frontrunners for the Democratic and Republican presidential nominations are opposed to it.

90. Old Dominick Built for Aging -

A block-wide warehouse at 301 S. Front St. is getting new life as the Old Dominick Distillery. When it opens to the public in December, the distillery will brew and bottle two kinds of vodkas and three kinds of whiskey. Plans for the historic 54,000-square-foot warehouse include two tasting rooms, a rooftop patio, restaurant and retail area in addition to best-in-class equipment.

91. EdR Reports 34 Pct. Drop In Fourth-Quarter Earnings -

EdR wrapped up the fourth quarter of 2015 with an increase in funds from operations but a sharp drop in net income.

The Memphis-based real estate investment trust on Monday, Feb. 22, reported Q4 net income of $14.8 million, or 27 cents per share. That’s a 34 percent decrease from Q4 2015, when net income was $22.4 million, or 47 cents per share.

92. EdR Reports 34 Percent Drop in Q4 Earnings -

EdR wrapped up the fourth quarter of 2015 with an increase in revenue but a sharp drop in net income.

The Memphis-based real estate investment trust on Monday, Feb. 22, reported Q4 net income of $14.8 million, or 27 cents per share. That’s a 34 percent decrease from Q4 2014, when net income was $22.4 million, or 47 cents per share.

93. Trailblazer -

Carolyn Chism Hardy is a trailblazer, a success story, an advocate for the poor and middle class, and now she’s one of the most influential people in the private sector.

94. Last Word: TN(not)Ready, Hatiloo Expands and Tax Season Advice -

So what do you do when the test-makers fail the test?

You go back to the old test in the case of the Tennessee Education Department and the TNReady tests.
These were the new tests for the new statewide student achievement standards that replaced Common Core standards.
They can only be taken online.
But the system crashed Monday, which was the day that all of the preparation in the last year was geared toward. That included two tests locally of the on-line capacity and other technical standards necessary to make this go smoothly.
Here is a good account of what happened statewide and locally with a few other stops across the state to take in the scope of how big a failure this was and what failed.

95. Memphis Zoo CEO: Mediation, Court Action Can Coexist in Greensward Dispute -

The Memphis Zoo’s move to Chancery Court next week in the Overton Park greensward controversy does not damage the mediation process between the zoo and the Overton Park Conservancy.

That’s what zoo president and CEO Chuck Brady said as attorneys on both sides of the controversy prepare to make their cases in court.

96. On Deadline -

What do the following phrases have in common: Due date, Editor’s concern, End point, Freelancer’s problem, Time limit, and Zero hour?

Answer: They have all been used as clues in crossword puzzles for the answer DEADLINE.

97. Money Matters -

There’s an issue that keeps popping up over and over again. I’ve got to be honest. It’s one of my biggest pet peeves. And, I’ve heard it from so many people lately, I’m fired up about it.

98. Outside the Box -

Southwest Tennessee Community College is opening its new Whitehaven Center on Tuesday, Jan. 19. The building, which accommodates nearly 2,000 students at 1234 Finley Road off Elvis Presley Boulevard, is seeing new life following its run as a Kroger store that closed in 2011.

99. RVC Outdoor Submits Ambitious Mud Island Plan -

RVC Outdoor Destinations, the Memphis-based company headed by Andy Cates, is proposing a conservancy for Mud Island River Park similar to the Overton Park Conservancy. And its proposal seeks an agreement directly with the city for his company to develop the park, bypassing the Riverfront Development Corp.

100. Council OKs Strickland's Directors, He Defends Pay Raises -

Memphis City Council members approved Mayor Jim Strickland’s slate of 12 division chiefs and directors Tuesday, Jan. 5, at the first council meeting of 2016. And Strickland defended the pay raises for some of those positions compared to the salaries those appointed positions paid in the Wharton administration.