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Editorial Results (free)

1. Return of Beale Street Cover Charge Adds Fuel to Debate -

There are still some details left to work out about the return of the Beale Street cover charge.

The Downtown Memphis Commission and Memphis police have to set criteria for when to use the cover charge. There is also the question of whether it is a $10 cover with coupons from merchants or the $5 cover with no rebates that was in place before the council abolished the cover altogether.

2. 'Don't Play Games With It': Florence Takes Aim at Southeast -

WILMINGTON, N.C. (AP) — People who thought they were relatively safe from the onslaught of Hurricane Florence began boarding up and Georgia's governor declared a state of emergency Wednesday as uncertainty over the path of the monster storm spread worry along the Southeastern coast.

3. Surge, wind, rain, floods: Hurricane Florence could hit hard -

Surge, wind, rain, floods: Hurricane Florence could hit hard

By JONATHAN DREW, Associated Press

RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — Hurricane Florence churned Tuesday toward the Eastern Seaboard as a storm of "staggering" size, forcing a million people to evacuate the coast. Many more were left to wonder where they might be safe if days of torrential rains unleash floods from the mountains to the sea.

4. Companies Weighing Options to Continue Recycling -

Recycling capabilities for many Memphis businesses and institutions were stopped or substantially reduced in recent weeks, even as global warming continues to escalate.

Republic Services confirmed that its Memphis recycling facility, ReCommunity, recently stopped accepting recycling items from commercial and institutional sources.

5. Memphis City Council Debates Reality vs. Perception on Beale -

A stabbing in the Beale Street entertainment district the Saturday night before Memphis City Council members took up safety and crowd-control recommendations from a task force added some urgency to an already emotional subject.

6. Hurricane Lane Soaks Hawaii's Big Island With Foot Of Rain -

HONOLULU (AP) — Hurricane Lane soaked Hawaii's Big Island on Thursday, dumping 12 inches of rain in as many hours as residents stocked up on supplies and tried to protect their homes ahead of the state's first hurricane since 1992.

7. 11 of 30 Suburban Races in November Decided at Filing Deadline -

Of the 30 elected positions on the Nov. 6 ballot in five suburban towns and cities in Shelby County, 11 were decided at the Thursday, Aug. 16, deadline for candidates to file their qualifying petitions.

8. 11 of 30 Suburban Races in November Decided at Filing Deadline -

Of the 30 elected positions on the Nov. 6 ballot in five of the six suburban towns and cities in Shelby County, 11 were decided at the noon, Thursday, Aug. 16, deadline for candidates to file their qualifying petitions.

9. Last Word: Hotel on the Mall, The Twist in Council Day and Rallings on Surveillance -

At this point, the second convention center hotel is a bit like the Pyramid was at one point. Before the first dirt was turned on the Pyramid in the late 1980s, there was the discussion about where it should go and there were a lot of ideas on that covering a lot of territory – so much so that then-Shelby County Mayor Bill Morris had a model of a pretty generic looking Pyramid on his desk that had some lego wheels attached to it.

10. Memphis City Council Could Take Final Vote On Historic Districts Oversight -

After a two-and-a-half-month delay, Memphis City Council members may be ready Tuesday, Aug. 14, to take a final vote on new rules for historic districts including more oversight by the council.

A vote on third and final reading of the ordinance was delayed in June so the sponsor, council member Kemp Conrad, could meet with all sides of the issue to come up with a compromise. The ordinance follows council votes to grant historic district status, with guidelines enforced by the Landmarks Commission, for the Cooper-Young and Speedway Terrace neighborhoods.

11. Last Word: Early Voting's Strong Finish, School Moves and City Hall Crackdown -

Most of the major contenders for Tennessee Governor – Democratic and Republican – were in Shelby County over the weekend in which early voting ended and the campaigns now adjust their last minute efforts to the gap between early voting and election day on Thursday.

12. Nashville’s Metro Council Reeling with Money Woes -

The Metro Nashville City Council is “just worn out,” councilman Robert Swope says.

“All of us are completely beat up. We’ve had more elections in the last three months than we’ve had in the last five years. We’re all sick of it,” Swope says. “We’ve got the MLS soccer stadium thing going crazy. Look at it, transit, property taxes, budget. This is a part-time gig for us. I’m spending 70 hours a week working on my part-time gig.

13. Last Word: The Fuse, TnReady on SCS Literacy Efforts and Death By Amazon? -

More than 32,000 of you have voted early in advance of the Aug. 2 election day through Saturday and going into the final week of early voting, which runs through July 28. That compares to 37,168 early voters through the first eight days in 2014 for this same election cycle and 41,310 in 2010 at the same point. In 2010 and 2014 there were 21 early voting sites compared to today’s 27. And the Downtown location was the only site open for the first two days of those early voting periods compared to five of the 27 sites open for the first three days of the current period. For the full 2014 early voting period, keeping in mind the differences, there were 82,403 early voters and in 2010 there were 93,700.

14. FCC Commissioner Tours Baptist eICU to Learn About Telemedicine -

It may sound like science fiction, but doctors at Baptist Memorial Health Care Corp. recently saved a patient from becoming paralyzed by essentially Skyping with an infectious diseases specialist.

15. Last Word: Almost Fixed, Early Voting Flap and New Chandler Numbers -

Less than 500 MLGW customers still without power Tuesday evening going into Wednesday when the utility’s goal is to have all power outages from the weekend storms fixed. Right after the storm and when this recovery effort began, 35,000 customers were without power.

16. Food Truck Evolution: Owners Strategize as Novelty Wears Off -

NEW YORK (AP) – Starting a food truck to sell tacos or barbecue on downtown streets may seem easy or fun, but owners are finding they need more sophisticated plans now that the novelty has worn off.

17. Last Word: Riverfront Change, Skeleton to Canopy and Summer Camp -

The two contenders for Shelby County Mayor in the Aug. 2 county general election – Democratic nominee Lee Harris and Republican nominee David Lenoir – meet for the first time in the general election campaign Wednesday at the Memphis Kiwanis Club weekly luncheon. It is the first of several debates between the two. And judging from what Harris and Lenoir have said separately and what we’ve reported from those appearances, this is a highly anticipated debate/discussion about the future of Shelby County on several fronts.

18. Young Entrepreneurs Overcome Inexperience and Skeptics -

NEW YORK (AP) – The age-old issue came up again recently: A potential client asked Nate Hartmann, "Hey, how old are you?"

Since Hartmann founded Yellow Box in 2010 at age 18, he's encountered skeptics who doubted his company could design websites and create online marketing strategies. Some clients even set out to teach them.

19. First Horizon’s Flippin: $4B Initiative ‘Laser-Focused on Helping People’ -

Since joining First Horizon National Corp. as executive vice president and chief communications officer in January, Candace Steele Flippin has met with community leaders and organizations to identify areas that are prime candidates for the bank’s recently announced Community Benefit Plan. This $4 billion, five-year initiative earmarks funds for small-business loans, home loans, and community development in low- to moderate-income areas within the bank’s footprint.

20. Tackling Transit, Reappraisal at Once Not Smart -

Nashville’s Metro Council is taking the hit for falling asleep at the wheel in a period of unprecedented prosperity and waking up to a budget shortfall in mid-2018.

“We’ve been drunken by our growth and the label of the It City,” Councilwoman Tanaka Vercher admits. “But this is what happens in growth. It stabilizes.”

21. Beale Street Bucks Comeback Recommended as Lawsuit Dismissed -

Almost a year after all cover charges to get in the Beale Street Entertainment District were dropped, the cover charge program known as Beale Street Bucks could be making a comeback.

The suggestion is sure to renew a vocal debate about whether charging a cover after 10 p.m. on Saturdays during the summer is an effective security measure or selective crowd control on the street that gave birth to the blues, where Saturday night crowds are a part of its history. 

22. Spinosa Takes Job With Chamber, Resigns from Council -

Philip Spinosa, Jr. has resigned from the Memphis City Council and was named the new senior vice president of the Greater Memphis Chamber’s Chairman’s Circle.

Spinosa will be taking over for Shea Flinn, who announced he would be vacating his position in March. Much like Spinosa, Flinn left his post on the council in 2015 to join the chamber.

23. How to Win At Fundraising -

Wonder why it’s easy for some nonprofits to raise money and not so much for others? Here’s what we have learned: sustained successful fundraising requires consistent attention, action, funding and leadership. It is proactive and donor-focused.

24. Young Says Construction About to Begin on South City Residential -

South City is about to begin construction east of Danny Thomas Boulevard and the road to construction has had some unexpected turns. “There’s a certain amount of anxiety when you talk about these big projects because people don’t know whether it’s actually going to happen or not,” Memphis Housing and Community Development Division director Paul Young said on the WKNO/Channel 10 program “Behind The Headlines.”

25. Calling Our Bluff -

Marie Pizano believes everyone has a story, and she is building her business on telling it. The founder and CEO of MVP3 Entertainment Group, Pizano is producing films based on Memphis history.

On April 19, Pizano was in Washington, D.C., getting footage for her latest film, “Journey4Justice: The Abigail Noel Story.” Noel, a native Memphian and psychic/medium, claims there is more to be known regarding music icon Prince’s death. Noel is leading the movement #JusticeforPrince, which aims to press President Donald Trump to order a new investigation into the artist’s 2016 death.

26. Southwest Has Been Faced With Fines, Union Safety Complaints -

DALLAS (AP) – Southwest Airlines runs its planes hard. They make many short hops and more trips per day than other U.S. airliners, which adds to wear and tear on parts, including the engines.

27. Wells Fargo Fined $1B for Mortgage, Auto Lending Abuses -

NEW YORK (AP) — Wells Fargo will pay $1 billion to federal regulators to settle charges tied to misconduct at its mortgage and auto lending business, the latest punishment levied against the banking giant for widespread customer abuses.

28. State Weighted Caseload Study Shows Two More Judges Needed Locally -

Shelby County’s court system – civil and criminal – is down about two judges, according to the Tennessee Comptroller’s annual report on weighted caseloads.

The report, required by state law since 1997, calculates the number of judges needed to handle different kinds of cases.

29. Out of Flowers? Flour? Businesses Contend With Supply Crises -

NEW YORK (AP) – When heavy rain pelted Central America, Shane Pliska couldn't get shipments of taupe-colored roses he needed for clients' weddings.

"Of course, this was the season when everyone wanted champagne- and gold-themed weddings, and the champagne part was all taupe roses," says Pliska, owner of Planterra, a commercial florist and owner of a wedding venue where the decor is all about flowers and plants.

30. When to Ask Your Boss For More Money -

Who wouldn’t like to make more money? If you’ve read my column before, you probably know that I’m an advocate of changing companies every three to five years (for many industries). On top of gaining extra experience, switching has the potential to bump up your pay considerably. But often there are times when you need a raise at your current employer.

31. City Working to Settle EPE/Grizzlies Dispute as Litigation Mounts -

As the litigation piles up in a dispute between two of the most recognizable brands in Memphis, city officials say they are still hopeful a deal can be worked out between Elvis Presley Enterprises and the Memphis Grizzlies.

32. Can Zuckerberg's Media Blitz Take the Pressure Off Facebook? -

NEW YORK (AP) – In the wake of a privacy scandal involving a Trump-connected data-mining firm, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg embarked on a rare media mini-blitz in an attempt to take some of the public and political pressure off the social network.

33. Facebook Crisis-Management Lesson: What Not to Do -

NEW YORK (AP) – The crisis-management playbook is pretty simple: Get ahead of the story, update authorities and the public regularly, assume responsibility and take decisive action. Crisis-management experts say Facebook is 0-for-4.

34. Peace of Mind -

Each summer, about 150 inner-city youth enjoy For the Kingdom Camp. The purpose is to provide a Christ-centered and challenging camping environment for discipleship, character-building and recreation.

35. Coming Full Square -

For the first time in a while, Overton Square isn’t 100 percent leased. And while no one really expects that to be the case for very long, these rare vacancies provide a good chance to stop and examine what the popular entertainment destination has going on.

36. Soulsville Foundation Adds Board Members, Eyes Future Growth -

The foundation that launched 20 years ago and operates the Stax Museum of American Soul Music, Stax Music Academy and the Soulsville Charter School has added a dozen names to its board of directors. An expansion that’s meant to help lift the organization to new heights.

37. Companies Updating Their Sexual Harassment Policies -

Workplace sexual harassment has been making headlines nationwide, with high-profile individuals in entertainment, media and other industries losing their jobs over accusations of misconduct. In recent months, companies have been taking a closer look at their harassment policies and updating them where necessary.

38. Rotating Forrest Bust Out of Capitol Gains Momentum -

Confederate Lt. Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest’s days in the State Capitol could be numbered. Lt. Gov. Randy McNally, an Oak Ridge Republican, says he could support a move to rotate Forrest’s bust out of the Capitol and make sure Capitol displays are “more reflective of the entire history of Tennessee.”

39. Ford Outlines Budget Process As Memphis’ New CFO -

Shirley Ford has been named chief financial officer for the city of Memphis. Ford, who was selected to be CFO by Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland and confirmed by the City Council, has served as the city’s comptroller since 2014. She has more than 30 years of financial, accounting and managerial experience. In addition, she is a certified public accountant and a certified municipal finance officer as designated by the state comptroller.

40. Stumble Bravely Into Innovation -

I met many people who have been put in charge of their organization’s innovation program because of their past performance record. They were product managers, engineers, database architects, IT professionals, HR specialists or marketers by training. Suffice to say, they have proven to be capable and trustworthy in the past with a given initiative. 

41. Moore Named Executive Director of Explore Bike Share -

Trey Moore has been named executive director of Explore Bike Share, the Memphis nonprofit that is preparing to launch a local bike-share system with 600 bicycles and 60 stations. Moore, who is returning to Memphis from Atlanta, Georgia, will lead Explore Bike Share’s staff in operations, fund development and community engagement activities in partnership with the organization’s board of directors.
As executive director, he also is committed to bicycling as a sustainable transportation option with access to as many Memphians as possible, and will help promote a bike-friendly culture in Memphis while encouraging exercise and healthy lifestyles.

42. Beale’s Question Mark -

For all of the change in the Memphis landscape announced in 2017 – including the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art’s decision to move to the riverfront and plans for several “gateway” developments around the city – Beale Street was in a holding pattern for most of the year.

43. UTHSC's Stern Proposes Substance Addiction Network -

For Dr. David Stern of the University of Tennessee Health Science Center, his interest in proposing a new pilot program to benefit those with mental health and substance use problems comes from a deeply personal as well as professional place.

44. As Health Premiums Rise, Small Businesses Seek Alternatives -

NEW YORK (AP) – As small business owners learn what their 2018 health insurance costs will be, some are considering providing different types of coverage for their employees.

Companies are receiving notices of premium and coverage changes for 2018. The changes vary, depending on factors including the state where a company is located, how many employees it has and how comprehensive its insurance is. But many owners are seeing rate increases of double-digit percentages, finding dramatically reduced coverage, or both. Health insurance consultants expect more owners to rethink their strategies beyond 2018 and choose alternatives like paying for claims themselves or adding health services that can lower costs.

45. Q&A: $69B Aetna Bid Pushes CVS Deeper Into Consumers' Lives -

A drugstore chain that used to hawk cigarettes behind the front counter now wants to offer nutrition advice and work with your doctor to keep you healthy.

CVS Health says it wants to use its roughly $69 billion acquisition of the insurer Aetna to dive deeper into managing customer health, with its nearly 10,000 stores becoming "front doors" for care. The companies plan to expand the health services offered through CVS locations and get more involved in helping patients stay on their medicines or manage their chronic conditions.

46. Two Issues Nonprofits Should Address Now -

As we enter the last month of the year, there is a lot for nonprofits to consider, plan for and take action on. With this column we share news updates on #GivingTuesday and sexual harassment.

First up: #GivingTuesday. This new “holiday” is celebrated on the Tuesday after Thanksgiving and is all about making financial gifts to nonprofits large and small. It is a global day of giving fueled by the power of social media. This year, more than 1.6 million gifts were made, raising $177 million online in 98 countries.

47. Commission Overrides Two Luttrell Vetoes -

Shelby County commissioners, meeting in special session Wednesday, Nov. 29, voted to override two vetoes by County Mayor Mark Luttrell of commission resolutions earlier this month.

48. Commission Overrides Two Luttrell Vetoes -

Shelby County commissioners, meeting in special session Wednesday, Nov. 29, voted to override two vetoes by County Mayor Mark Luttrell of commission resolutions earlier this month.

49. Human-Trafficking Group Gets First Leader -

Not long after starting her new job Oct. 1 as the first executive director of Thistle & Bee, a social enterprise focused on helping women who’ve survived sex trafficking and prostitution, Jordan Boss was allowed to ride along one night with a Memphis Police Department detective.

50. County Commission Overrides Two Luttrell Vetoes -

Shelby County commissioners, meeting Wednesday, Nov. 29, in special session, voted to override two vetoes by county mayor Mark Luttrell of commission resolutions earlier this month.

51. Supreme Court Wrestles With Whistleblower Protection Issue -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Supreme Court on Tuesday seemed reluctant to broadly apply whistleblower protections passed by Congress following the 2008 financial crisis, suggesting those particular protections only apply to people who report problems to the government.

52. Hall Joins Arc Mid-South As a Case Manager -

De’Borah Hall recently joined The Arc Mid-South as a case manager, bringing with her nearly 15 years of experience in human resources. In her new role, Hall visits The Arc’s clients, who have intellectual and developmental disabilities, in their homes to determine if the organization’s direct support professionals are providing appropriate services, such as bathing, feeding and light housekeeping. The visits also help her evaluate staff members and determine if additional training or disciplinary measures are needed.

53. County Primary Filing Opens With Paperwork Flurry -

A total of 37 prospective candidates in the May 2018 county primaries pulled qualifying petitions last week on the first day of the filing period Friday, Nov. 17.

And the first contenders through the doors at the Shelby County Election Commission in a period that extends to a February deadline confirms a few trends.

54. Gradient’s Worthington Looks To Increase Access to Pain-Relief Device -

With an extensive history as a researcher in pain management and a dedication to assisting patients suffering from pain due to aging, activity or surgery, Dr. W. Bradley Worthington recently joined Memphis-based Gradient Medical, creator of the Quadrabloc wearable therapeutic magnetic device for managing pain, as its new chief medical officer. 

55. Sports Complex Remains Driver of Fairgrounds Redevelopment Plan -

Parts of the city’s tentative plan for redevelopment of the Mid-South Fairgrounds may still come and go and the cost estimates could vary. But Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland’s administration made it clear at a Monday, Nov. 6, public meeting to unveil the most specific plan yet that a youth sports tournament complex is the anchor and driver of the financing for a redevelopment covering 175 acres.

56. City's Tentative Fairgrounds Plan Confirms Separating Coliseum from Youth Sports -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland’s tentative plan for the redevelopment of the Mid-South Fairgrounds, presented Monday, Nov. 6, included a renovation of old Melrose High School in neighboring Orange Mound and a confirmation that the city administration doesn’t think the Mid-South Coliseum should be part of a youth sports tournament complex.

57. Last Word: The Run, 70 Million Gallons a Day and More Shipping Containers -

This will be another busy week on the political front with more candidates declaring their intentions in advance of Thanksgiving. Meanwhile, Republican contender for governor Randy Boyd ends his run across the state Tuesday morning on Mud Island – a variation on Lamar Alexander’s walk across the state in the 1978 Republican primary for Governor that remains a part of the state’s political folklore almost 40 years later.

58. Protecting Wealth -

Gena Wolbrecht, who heads up the newly launched investment program at BankTennessee, encourages potential clients to make some of the same considerations they do when they turn to other non-financial specialists like a doctor.

59. Working With A Coach Is Not a Sign Of Weakness -

Coaching is now part of American culture. On a personal level there are coaches to help us improve our nutrition, lose weight and set goals. Coaches add value in our professional lives as executive coaches, business coaches, sales coaches and more. It is not a luxury but a necessity. We believe it is especially important in the area of fundraising. Here’s why.

60. US Agrees to Pay Tea Party Groups in Suits Over IRS Scrutiny -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration has agreed to what a lawyer described as a "very substantial" payout to hundreds of tea party groups to settle a class-action lawsuit over the extra, often burdensome IRS scrutiny they received when applying for tax-exempt status during the 2012 election.

61. ACA Sales Tax to Impact Businesses, Employees Starting In January 2018 -

With ongoing premium increases small and large businesses and their employees normally experience each year, the added cost of a new sales tax on health insurance premiums that goes into effect on Jan. 1 is expected to hit particularly hard.

62. Not Just for Scouts: Be Prepared in IT -

Everyone knows the scout’s motto by heart. “Always be prepared” may be more likely to invoke images of campfires and merit badges, but it applies to corporate life.

September is National Preparedness Month. With the recent devastation of hurricanes Harvey and Irma, preparedness may already be on your mind. You probably already have plans in place for your home if a natural disaster hits – or at the very least a homeowners or renters insurance policy. But, have you thought about how secure the information technology system is at your office?

63. AutoZone Reports Mild Fiscal Fourth Quarter -

Memphis-based auto parts retailer AutoZone Inc. continues to find itself in an environment that’s unusual for the company and one that it’s not accustomed to, with the company’s fiscal fourth quarter sales bearing that out.

64. Opioid Committee on Right Track, Obstacles Remain -

Smyrna Police Chief Kevin Arnold can remember the first time his detectives brought a heroin case to him three or four years ago.

“Of course, my reaction immediately was, ‘I thought that went away in the late 70s.’ But we’re seeing it. In fact, we are averaging approximately five heroin overdoses a month just in the town of Smyrna,” adds Arnold, whose city about 10 miles southeast of Nashville has a population of nearly 48,600.

65. Review: Deadly Tennessee Fire Could Become 'New Normal' -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Drought-stricken Great Smoky Mountains National Park was not prepared for last year's catastrophic fire, and climate change is among the factors that will likely make conditions that led to the disaster the "new normal" for the park, according to a federal review released Thursday.

66. Council to Weigh Statues, Funding Projects -

Memphis City Council members have a busy agenda Tuesday, Sept. 5: continued discussion regarding bypassing a Tennessee Historical Commission waiver process to remove Confederate monuments and a recently enacted ban on sewer connections to properties outside the city limits.

67. Experts Differ on Convention Center Hotel Financing -

At the end of the final hour-long panel discussion during the two-day Southern Lodging Summit Downtown, Chad Crandell, the managing director and CEO of CHM Warnick – one of the best-known hotel asset management firms and advisers to hotel owners – made his pitch.

68. Hotel Summit Panel Differs On Ways to Finance Convention Center Hotel -

At the end of an hour-long panel discussion at the very end of the two-day Southern Lodging Summit Downtown, Chad Crandell – the managing director and CEO of CHM Warnick, one of the best known hotel asset management firms and advisors to hotel owners in the business -- made his pitch.

69. One Decade Later: Effects of Financial Crisis Still Linger -

Ten years removed from the worst financial crisis since the Great Depression, the banking industry has transformed itself and wealth managers say investors remain leery.

Among other things, First Tennessee Bank jettisoned its national mortgage operation in the wake of the crisis. It refocused its attention and efforts around being a strong regional bank, as opposed to one with aggressive national ambitions. It trimmed headcount, boosted investment in technology and began to specialize, creating new industry-specific teams in verticals like health care and music-industry banking.

70. VW Executive Pleads Guilty in Emissions Scandal -

DETROIT (AP) – A German Volkswagen executive pleaded guilty Friday to conspiracy and fraud charges in Detroit in a scheme to cheat emission rules on nearly 600,000 diesel vehicles.

Shackled at the wrists and ankles and wearing red prison garb, Oliver Schmidt appeared before U.S. District Judge Sean Cox as part of the U.S. government's case involving the automaker, which has admitted to using software to get around U.S. emission standards.

71. ‘Doors Always Open’ for Titans, Help Dodd Ease Injury Angst -

The NFL can be a cold and cruel business. In such a high-risk business, one injury or a sudden drop in production can put a player’s very livelihood in jeopardy. NFL, in such situations, really can mean “Not For Long.”

72. Flying Ace Sully Makes Case Against Privatization -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Who are you going to trust when it comes to what's best for the flying public? Members of Congress or the hero of the Miracle on the Hudson, retired Capt. Chesley "Sully" Sullenberger?

73. HealthChoice Promotes Henning To Director of Population Health -

Sarah Henning has been promoted to director of population health programs at HealthChoice. Henning previously served as manager of the department. In her new role, Henning is responsible for designing, implementing and managing population health and wellness initiatives and programs for the HealthChoice network.
She also collaborates with stakeholders to promote and support these programs and to ensure they meet the needs of the affected populations and adapt with the changing health care environment.

74. Milford Joins Chamber As Programming, Events Director -

Ericka Milford recently joined the Greater Memphis Chamber as director of events and programming, a job in which she’s responsible for planning and executing chamber events and programs and for increasing engagement opportunities for members and the community. Milford’s new role marks her return to the chamber, where she served as events coordinator from 2007 to 2012 before taking a job with HigherVisibility.

75. UAW, Nissan Pressing High-Stakes Campaign for Worker Votes -

CANTON, Miss. (AP) — The United Auto Workers faces a strong anti-union campaign from Nissan Motor Co. as it tries to gain a foothold in the union-averse South by organizing workers at the Japanese automaker's Mississippi plant.

76. AutoZone’s Engine Starting to Stall -

AutoZone’s stock price is pointed in the opposite direction it’s been accustomed to for years now. Shares of the Memphis-based auto parts retailer are down more than 30 percent since the end of January. Needless to say, that’s an unusual place for the company, which continues to open new stores at a steady clip.

77. Low-Key FBI Director Pick Would Lead Agency Through Tumult -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The attorney selected to replace James Comey as FBI director is described by those close to him as admirably low-key, yet he'd be taking over the law enforcement agency at a moment that's anything but tranquil.

78. Foote Homes Last Vestige Of Public Housing -

As the last of the city’s large public housing developments is demolished, the oldest of the mixed-income communities that replaced them is about to turn 20.

College Park opened in 1998 on the site of what had been Lemoyne Gardens in the area of South Memphis now known as Soulsville.

79. Last Word: Ransomware, Memphis Charitable Giving and The Race for Governor -

The ransomware problem got so serious Wednesday that trading in FedEx stock was stopped briefly during the afternoon. The virus was specifically aimed at TNT Express operations. Here’s a more detailed story via Bloomberg on what happened.

80. Public Report Analyzes Mississippi Mental Health Spending -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — A report commissioned by the Mississippi Department of Mental Health confirms federal findings that the state has spent more on institutional care than community-based services for people with mental disabilities.

81. City Council Members: Beale Bucks Evolving -

Beale Street’s new $5 weekend night cover charge still has a few details to work out, says Memphis City Council chairman Berlin Boyd.

“We’re not putting a period there, we’re putting a comma because we are taking a pause,” Boyd said on the WKNO/Channel 10 program “Behind The Headlines.”

82. UTHSC's Center for Bleeding Disorders Growing -

The University of Tennessee Health Science Center stepped up a little more than a year ago to provide a special clinic for bleeding disorders, but has now turned that into a comprehensive center that provides life-changing treatment for those in the Mid-South afflicted with these disorders.

83. Last Word: "A Downward Spiral", Outdoors Pop-Up and Haslam in Raleigh -

At the end of another day of alarming news and denials from the White House, U.S. Sen. Bob Corker of Tennessee used a new phrase that has significance in a cycle of action and reaction and more action in which many of us gauge reaction by whether the person speaking has an R or a D after their name. The lines are that clearly drawn.

84. Unfair Labor Practices Charged at Volkswagen's US Plant -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – The National Labor Relations Board has filed another unfair labor practices complaint against Volkswagen for hiking health insurance premiums and changing working hours of employees who voted for union representation at the German automaker's only U.S. plant.

85. UTHSC Expanding Center For Hemophilia, Thrombosis -

The University of Tennessee Health Science center has launched and is expanding a comprehensive Hemophilia and Thrombosis Treatment Center, the only one of its kind in a 150-mile radius.

The clinic, one of only 120 in the country, aims to be a one-stop shop bringing together hematology physician services, nursing, case management and social work, infusion therapy, physical therapy, dentistry, a laboratory and pharmaceutical services. The clinic also has primary care physicians for routine health needs and collaborates with specialists.

86. Blight Summit to Mark Progress, Challenges -

When the leaders of the city’s anti-blight effort gather at Clayborn Temple for their second annual summit Wednesday, May 17, on the next block south of the church will be an example of work still to be done.

87. Bates Gold-and-Silver Fraud Case Includes Big Numbers -

At the end of a five-week trial in Memphis federal court this month, a jury convicted a former Tennessee state representative turned religious prophet and gold-and-silver broker on 46 counts of fraud.

88. UTHSC Building Up Hemophilia and Thrombosis Treatment Center -

The University of Tennessee Health Science Center has launched and is expanding a comprehensive Hemophilia and Thrombosis Treatment Center, the only one of its kind in a 150-mile radius.

The clinic, one of only 120 in the country, aims to be a one-stop shop bringing together hematology physician services, nursing, case management and social work, infusion therapy, physical therapy, dentistry, a laboratory and pharmaceutical services. The clinic also has primary care physicians for routine health needs and collaborates with specialists.

89. Business Time -

Had the flattering comments come from the Memphis Grizzlies’ own content producers, Grind City Media, they would have been easy enough to dismiss. After all, that would have been like what center Marc Gasol said at season’s end when stressing the importance of candid evaluation.

90. Last Word: DNA Unit Trouble, 100 Years After Ell Persons and Gas Tax Hike Redux -

The suspension of Ouita Knowlton, the Memphis Police detective overseeing the MPD's DNA Unit, appears to involve more than alleged violations of police policies. The unit oversees testing and processing of all current rape kits and those left unprocessed for decades that the city is currently working its way through five years after the admission. The District Attorney General’s office is part of the investigation of Knowlton, the office confirmed Monday. There are no specifics about what is involved here. But the police investigation will go to District Attorney General Amy Weirich who will then determine if criminal laws were violated and if there is a case to be made.

91. Defunct Beale Authority Seeks Exit From Beale Street Bucks Lawsuit -

Two weeks after the Memphis City Council voted to abolish the Beale Street Tourism Development Authority, the organization’s attorney has filed a motion to dismiss it from the complex federal lawsuit over the use of a cover charge with rebate coupons on summer weekend nights in the entertainment district.

92. Bohannon Joins Cumulus Media As Memphis Market Manager -

Morgan Bohannon recently joined Cumulus Media as vice president/market manager for its four-station group in Memphis, which includes KIX 106, 98.1 The Max, 98.9 The Vibe and 103.5 WRBO. Bohannon comes to Cumulus from iHeartMedia-Memphis, where he most recently served as area president. He worked for iHeartMedia/Clear Channel Radio for more than 20 years in various capacities and markets.

93. University of Memphis, UTHSC May Soon Face Outsourcing Decisions -

Forty-one state lawmakers signed a letter requesting the state put a hold on its outsourcing plans until the General Assembly can scrutinize its effect on state workers and services.

The state is set to sign a contract April 28 with Chicago-based JLL for facilities management work that could be used by universities and departments statewide. Even local government jobs could be doled out to the contractor.

94. Wells Fargo Claws Back $75M From Top Execs in Sales Scandal -

NEW YORK (AP) – The problems at Wells Fargo and its overly aggressive sales culture date back at least 15 years, and management had little interest in dealing with the issue until it spiraled out of control resulting in millions of accounts being opened fraudulently, according to an investigation by the company's board of directors.

95. The Week Ahead: April 11-17 -

Happy Monday, Memphis! For those so inclined, get out your John Calipari hate towels because he will be featured in an ESPN 30 for 30 documentary this week. It’s also time for some Memphians to vote again and the Grizzlies wrap up the regular season on the way to a first-round playoff series against the San Antonio Spurs, a rival that will not be getting a key to the city.  

96. Last Word: Spring Votes, Those Tax Bills and Tim McCarver on Baseball Changes -

Look for more details on the specifics of the “Gateway” project to start to emerge now that a crucial if overlooked piece of the geographic puzzle in the north Downtown area has come into public view. The city’s largest hotel, also the city’s original convention center hotel, is about to change hands and go back to flying the Marriott flag.

97. Motor Vessel Mississippi Returns to Memphis Riverfront -

The largest diesel towboat on the Mississippi River has been known to move 16 to 17 barges at one time – although it has done 33.

The motor vessel “Mississippi” does plenty of other heavy lifting including helping put in place the concrete mats that stabilize banks along the river.

98. Last Word: Tri-State Inks Move to Midtown, Main and Gayoso and 'Wise Trek' -

The open land across Union Avenue from AutoZone Park remains just that as some of it has changed hands again. Vision Hospitality buying the land that had been the location of the Greyhound bus station at Union and Hernando. Vision Memphis LLC sold to Vision Hospitality of Knoxville for $4 million, according to a warrant deed we reviewed Monday.

99. Inn Construction, Private Management Plan Draw Ire of State Sen. Lee Harris -

State Sen. Lee Harris is criticizing Gov. Bill Haslam’s decision to renew an outsourcing plan for development and operations at Fall Creek Falls State Park, calling it a move to bolster profits for a private company.

100. Last Word: 'Ono Poke and the Ghost of The Luau, Council Day and $3 Concerts -

The ghost of the Luau lives on. Loeb has a new tenant for the Shops of Chickasaw Gardens called ‘Ono Poke that features Hawaiian cuisine. And the restaurant will be just about on the other side of Poplar Avenue from where the Luau used to stand with its large concrete Easter Island head, Polynesian dishes and Hawaii Five-O era architecture – not the remake, the real Five-O and the real McGarrett.