» Subscribe Today!
More of what you want to know.
The Daily News
X

Forgot your password?
Skip Navigation LinksHome > Name & Property Search
Search results for 'Black Men' | Search again
DeSoto Public Records:0
Shelby Public Records:2
Editorial:100
West Tennessee:3
Middle Tennessee:488
East Tennessee:51
Other:0

You must be a subscriber to see the full results of your search.

Please log in or subscribe below if you are not already a subscriber.

The Daily News subscribers get full access to more than 13 million names and addresses along with powerful search and download features. Get the business leads you need with powerful searches of public records and notices. Download listings into your spreadsheet or database.

Learn more about our services | Search again


Editorial Results (free)

1. Last Word: Veep Visit, Women and Baseball and Civil Rights Cold Cases -

Game time at FedExForum for the NCAA South semifinals and Vice President Mike Pence is expected to be here to cheer on the Butler Bulldogs. The Butler mascot – a live bulldog – was already in town Thursday making the rounds. I think March Madness requires that all involved up their mascot game if they get this far. So UCLA, we expect to see a live bear roaming Beale Street. You might be able to work a deal with the zoo on this. But if there’s a cost split make sure you nail down those percentages.

2. Turner Seeks Study of Civil Rights Cold Cases -

State Rep. Johnnie Turner can still feel the physical and emotional pain she endured for riding at the front of Memphis city buses while going home from LeMoyne-Owen College during the civil rights movement.

3. From Bedroom to Boardroom, Supreme Court is in Your Business -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Quick, name a Supreme Court justice. OK, name three. One of the current justices, Stephen Breyer, once noted wryly that their names are less well-known than those of the Three Stooges.

4. Last Word: Calipari's Return, Moss, McDowell & Stewart and Unemployment Up -

So John Calipari could be coming to town with his Kentucky Wildcats for the NCAA Southern Regional March 24 and 26 at the Forum. Aside from that local reminder of the long memory sports slights can have in our city, the regional in Memphis looks to be a big concentration of great college basketball in a city that hasn’t had a whole lot to cheer about recently on that front or the professional front.

5. 1892 Lynchings Remembered As Historic Moment -

When a mob of approximately 75 men in black masks took Thomas Moss, Calvin McDowell and Henry Stewart from a Downtown jail cell 125 years ago and shot them to death by a set of railroad tracks running by the Mississippi River, it was far from the first lynching in Memphis.

6. Events -

PRSA Memphis will meet Thursday, March 9, from 11:45 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the University Club, 1346 Central Ave. Thomas Carrier, director of this year’s NCAA Men’s Basketball Tournament South Regional, will be the guest speaker.  Cost is free for members and $25 for nonmembers. Register at eventbrite.com by Wednesday, March 8. 

7. Clayborn Temple Restoration Approaches One-Year Mark -

Box lunches and stained glass were the order of the day as developers of Clayborn Temple hosted the Rotary Club last month at the landmark Downtown church.

It was one in a series of events Frank Smith and Rob Thompson have hosted at the AME Church since they reopened its doors last October to explore uses for it and start a fuller renovation in time for the 50th anniversary of the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in the spring of 2018.

8. Events -

Memphis Black Restaurant Week will be held through Sunday, March 6-12. More than a dozen minority-owned eateries will be offering $15 two-course lunches and $25 three-course dinners or other specials. The week will wrap up with Soulful Food Truck Sunday on March 12 at Clayborn Temple, 294 Hernando St. Visit facebook.com/MemphisBlackRW for details.

9. The Week Ahead: March 7-13 -

Happy Monday, Memphis! Get your taste buds ready: Both Memphis Black Restaurant Week and the inaugural Vintage901 festival are taking place in the coming days. We’ve got details on those, plus plenty of other fun activities and entertainment to check out in The Week Ahead… 

10. The Week Ahead: February 28-March 6 -

It's Monday, Memphis – time to peek at this week's (very busy) dance card, from the opening of Graceland's $45 million entertainment complex to a showcase of the latest high-tech ag innovations to a celebration of some local "hidden figures." Check out what else you need to know about in The Week Ahead...  

11. New Book Spurs Call for Fresh Probe of Emmett Till Lynching -

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (AP) – The horrific 1955 Mississippi slaying of Emmett Till, which helped trigger the modern civil rights movement, should be re-investigated now that a key witness is quoted as saying she lied about what the black teen said and did before he was lynched, Till's relatives say.

12. Body Count -

A day at a time, Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland has been writing the names of those who have been murdered in a notebook he keeps with him since he became mayor in January 2016.

When five people, two of them 15 years old, died violently the weekend that much of the world’s attention was on protest marches and the new administration in Washington, Strickland was getting updates on the latest surge in violence.

13. Hart’s Tenure as AD Has Been Mostly Good for Vols -

While we wait – and wait and wait and wait – for the University of Tennessee to hire its next athletics director, let’s ponder the man who soon will walk out the door.

Dave Hart is leaving the UT athletics department better than he found it. He got things back on solid financial footing. He brought a measure of stability.

14. What are the Odds? Blackburn is Still the Favorite -

Tennessee has its search firm and its search committee is in place to find the replacement for Dave Hart as the university’s athletic director.

Hart announced last August he would retire June 30, and with Tennessee undergoing a transition in its chancellor’s position, the search for Hart’s replacement was put on the back burner.

15. Herenton's First New Year's Remarks In A Decade Stir Pot -

It’s been 10 years since Willie Herenton delivered his last New Year’s Prayer Breakfast message – a political homily Herenton made an institution while serving as mayor of Memphis.

16. Strickland, Herenton Seek Larger, More Focused Volunteerism Efforts -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland and former Memphis Mayor Willie Herenton pointed to a better coordinated form of volunteerism in 2017 at Strickland’s first annual New Year’s Prayer Breakfast.

17. 'Nashville' Returns With Transgender Actress, New Plot Lines -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – The new season of "Nashville" starts with traditional songs rooted in gospel and folk music rather than big production country songs.

Rayna, played by Connie Britton, finds a revelation after hearing a blind man singing "Wayfaring Stranger," an Appalachian tune estimated to be two centuries old. And Juliette, played by Hayden Panettiere, sees an angelic vision in white singing the hymn "God Shall Wipe All Tears Away."

18. US Life Expectancy Falls, As Many Kinds of Death Increase -

NEW YORK (AP) – A decades-long trend of rising life expectancy in the U.S. could be ending: It declined last year and it is no better than it was four years ago.

In most of the years since World War II, life expectancy in the U.S. has inched up, thanks to medical advances, public health campaigns and better nutrition and education.

19. LeBron as a Cub, Grizz Sign Toney Douglas, And Matt Barnes is in Trouble Again -

LeBron James and the Cleveland Cavaliers made a fantastic comeback to beat the Golden State Warriors in the NBA Finals last summer. But when the Cleveland Indians couldn’t hold off the Chicago Cubs in the World Series, it cost James dearly.

20. Last Word: Early Vote Numbers, Crime Q&A and School Suspensions in Memphis -

The last weekend of early voting is done and now we get the early vote surge through Thursday, which is the last day for early voting at the 21 polling places across Shelby County.

Through this past Friday, 161,239 early votes had been cast in Shelby County. That compares to 156,645 to the same point in 2008 and 151,809 in 2012.

21. Emmett Till Historic Sign Shot Full of Holes, Being Replaced -

GLENDORA, Miss. (AP) – A center dedicated to the memory of slain black teen Emmett Till has raised over $20,000 to replace a bullet-riddled sign commemorating the 1955 Mississippi killing that helped propel the civil rights movement.

22. Last Word: The Day After Big River, Freedom Awards Shift and Tubby & Fiz -

Once the ribbons were cut, the speeches made and all of the players on both sides of the river were thanked, Sunday was the day those who put the Big River Crossing project in motion waited for to see what the public’s verdict would be on the boardwalk crossing the Mississippi River.

23. Freedom Awards Explore New History -

In the sanctuary of Mississippi Boulevard Christian Church last week, with former Mississippi Gov. William Winter and some students who racially integrated Memphis public schools in 1961, Swin Cash talked about memories of her last season as a professional athlete.

24. Men Broke Key Race Barrier, Now Back on Vanderbilt Campus -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Two men who helped integrate college basketball came back to Vanderbilt University last week to share provocative views on the pace of change, take up matters they rarely dared to address as students, and describe the racism they encountered on their journey – indignities they once endured in silence on the Southern campus.

25. Last Word: FedEx Changes, The Blue Cross Exit and Armageddon -

Was that really autumn Monday or was the drop in humidity a prank to get the trees to drop their leaves?

The FedEx shareholder’s meeting Monday included some changes in the management chart at FedEx Corp. – more like some changes in the seating with one retirement by Mike Glenn, whose office is next to company founder Fred Smith.

26. Justice Department Announces $20M for Police Body Cameras -

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) – The Justice Department announced Monday it's awarding more than $20 million for law enforcement agencies around the country to establish or enhance their use of body cameras, a move that comes after several fatal shootings of black men by police that have prompted widespread protests.

27. Basketball Aside, Fizdale Belongs in Memphis -

When he was growing up in South Central Los Angeles, a young David Fizdale couldn’t imagine that he would one day be in Memphis or an NBA head coach.

Sure, he played basketball. He had his dreams. But the real challenge was day-to-day survival. He saw friends shot and killed in the street. He once dove under a car to avoid stray gunfire.

28. Photographer Steber Captures Fading Legends on Blues Highway -

Bill Steber stood at the crossroads in the Mississippi Delta and made a deal with the devil that would allow him to not only master his photographic skills but become one of the most respected documentarians of Mississippi Delta blues. And kind of make a living (or at least fashion his life) while he’s at it.

29. Good Cops Greater Than All Quarterbacks -

I have read and listened to quarterback Colin Kaepernick’s reasons for protesting the American flag and the National Anthem.

He is not without some valid points – at least when looking through his chosen lens – and I give him much credit for voicing his concerns and for his recent pledge to donate $1 million and proceeds from his now runaway NFL jersey sales.

30. Aug. 26-Sept. 1: This week in Memphis history -

1986: It’s Memphis Slim Day in Shelby County. The blues icon himself returns to the city from Paris for the honors, including a birthday party on the Plantation Roof of The Peabody, which has been reopened for five years. Slim, whose real name is Peter Chatman, also is being honored with a brass note on the new Beale Street.

31. Police Separate Elvis Fans From Protesters -

The latest Black Lives Matter movement protest included a show of force by Memphis Police that included plenty of questions about how police functioned as gatekeepers for Graceland’s annual candlelight vigil.

32. Elvis Vigil Draws Protest, Heavy Police Presence -

Several hundred Black Lives Matter movement protesters massed south of Graceland Monday, Aug. 15, on the 39th anniversary of Elvis Presley’s death as several thousand people gathered on the other side of a thick police presence for Graceland’s annual candlelight vigil.

33. Jones Teaches Tech to Underrepresented Minorities -

On a blistering Friday in early July, in a colorful classroom at Lester Community Center, 25 middle-schoolers are getting a crash course in data encryption. “Who can tell me the difference between a black-hat hacker and a white-hat hacker?” asks Audrey Jones, standing at the front of the room.

34. Black Lives Matter Movement Defines Itself Beyond Single Leader -

The city’s Black Lives Matter movement doesn’t have a single leader or “figurehead” and shouldn’t be oversimplified, said a coalition of several groups involved in the protests.

35. After The Bridge -

Four and a half hours after it began Sunday, July 10, the city's most significant and largest Black Lives Matter protest ended with police in riot gear slowly walking a group of around 100 protesters off the Hernando DeSoto Bridge and south on Front Street.

36. Tenn. Police Look to Keep Peace at Black Lives Matter Protests -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Police in several major Tennessee cities have indicated they made a concerted effort to avoid arrests and maintain peace during recent Black Lives Matter protests.

37. On the Line of Scrimmage, Color Doesn’t Matter -

HOOVER, Ala. – Politicians love to tell us that young people are our future. It’s mostly an empty cliché used to bridge one vague policy position to another, something to fill space instead of trying to offer a real solution to a real problem.

38. Early Voting Opens For The Aug. 4 Election -

Early voting opens Friday, July 15, in advance of the Aug. 4 election day in Shelby County and across Tennessee.

The first day of early voting will be at a single location, the Shelby County Office Building, 157 Poplar Ave., but expands to 21 satellite locations across Shelby County on Monday.

39. Last Word: The Day After The Bridge, Big River Plans and the U of M Train Tracks -

The lure of the bridge was tempting some of the organizers of Sunday’s Black Lives Matter protest that shut down the Hernando DeSoto Bridge on the day after the protest that drew thousands.

40. SEC Commissioner Sankey Forced to Play Defense at SEC Media Days -

HOOVER, Ala. – Southeastern Conference Commissioner Greg Sankey opened his remarks at SEC Media Days with an acknowledgment of the turmoil in America over the last week because of police actions toward young black men, the fatal shootings of police offers in Dallas, and protests throughout the land.

41. Protest at Memphis Bridge Ends Peacefully -

Four and a half hours after it began Sunday, July 10, the city’s most significant and largest Black Lives Matter protest ended with police in riot gear slowly walking a group of around 100 protesters off the Hernando DeSoto Bridge to Front Street.

42. Black Lives Matter Protest Draws Thousands In Memphis Protest Milestone -

Four and a half hours after it began Sunday, July 10, the city's most significant and largest Black Lives Matter protest ended with police in riot gear slowly walking a group of around 100 protesters off the Hernando DeSoto Bridge and south on Front Street.

43. Authorities: Highway Gunman Motivated By Police Shootings -

BRISTOL, Tenn. (AP) – A black Army veteran accused of shooting indiscriminately at passing cars and police on a Tennessee highway told investigators he was troubled by police violence against African-Americans, authorities said Friday.

44. Last Word: Dallas, Baton Rouge and Minneapolis -

As I write this, I’m wondering if something else will happen once it goes up on our website that will render this irrelevant by the time you read it.

This time the datelines are Dallas, Baton Rouge and Minneapolis.

45. Scotty Moore, Elvis Presley's First Guitarist, Dies At 84 -

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) – Scotty Moore, the pioneering rock guitarist whose sharp, graceful style helped Elvis Presley shape his revolutionary sound and inspired a generation of musicians that included Keith Richards, Jimmy Page and Bruce Springsteen, died Tuesday. He was 84.

46. Symbols of War Keep Dragging Us Down -

More than 150 years ago, we fought our nation’s most bloody war, a conflagration that claimed 620,000 lives, almost as many as were killed in all other American war efforts combined.

Despite the horror of it all, we just can’t seem to learn a lesson, possibly because of Southern hardheadedness, and a century and a half later, we seem doomed to an eternal task: pushing Sisyphus’ rock to the top of a hill only to have it chase us back to the bottom.

47. Last Word: Democrats Settle, Scotty Moore and the Top Cop Search -

Tennessee Democratic Party Chairman Mary Mancini ordered the Shelby County Democratic Party to settle its differences with former local party chairman Bryan Carson Tuesday and accept his offer to repay the party $6,000 at $100 a month..

48. Born in the Projects, Norman Fights for Social Justice -

Keith Norman makes a habit of rising before the sun – and no wonder. As vice president of government affairs at Baptist Memorial Health Care and president of the Memphis branch of the NAACP, he’s got a lot on his plate. But if you want to see him in his element, stop by First Baptist Church on Broad, Sunday morning at 7:45 a.m.

49. Events -

West Tennessee Home Builders Association will bring back the Mid-South Parade of Homes on select days from Friday, June 10, through June 26. Twenty-two homes across the Mid-South will be showcased. Tickets are free at Siano Appliance Distributors and Regions Bank locations, Visit midsouthparade.com.

50. Weekend Crime Rampage Frames Criminal Justice Debate -

Now what? The two-word question was one of many reactions as the week began to a Downtown crime spree Saturday night in which a Memphis Police officer died and three people were shot and wounded – two in critical condition Sunday at Regional One Health center.

51. Editorial: Telling the Whole Truth Against All Odds -

Have you ever heard of Samuel Allen McElwee, Isham Franklin Norris or Monroe W. Gooden?

All were Tennessee legislators who represented Memphis and the surrounding area during the era of Reconstruction following the Civil War. Reconstruction was the result of the three-day orgy of violence led by the Memphis Police Department 150 years ago this month.

52. 1866 Memphis Massacre Anniversary Draws Historians -

South Street is now named G.E Patterson Boulevard in one of two name changes since the thoroughfare was a dirt road trod by horses and the wagons they pulled.

The only reminder of the street’s status as an epicenter of the violence 150 years ago this month that killed 46 people and burned every black church and school in the city to the ground is a plaque unveiled Sunday, May 1, in Army Park.

53. Memphis Gets Proven Commodity in Tubby Smith -

It started immediately, before the hiring was even official. The audible sighs on sports talk radio, the Twitter whining, and the figurative eye-rolling.

Tubby Smith? Really? That old guy?

If they didn’t call him “old” outright, they inferred it in every way imaginable.

54. Memphis Lags on State Minority Contracts -

The state of Tennessee did $400 million in business with minority- and women-owned businesses in 2015. It’s a share local minority business and civic leaders judge as a good number, considering the state spends $2.5 billion in contracts a year.

55. Events -

The Downtown Memphis Commission will meet Friday, Feb. 26, at noon in the DMC conference room, 114 N. Main St. Visit downtownmemphiscommission.com.

University of Tennessee Health Science Center College of Health Professions will host an open house Friday, Feb. 26, from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. in the Student-Alumni Center’s O.D. Larry Dining Hall, 800 Madison Ave. Learn about careers in physician assistant studies, physical or occupational therapy, medical laboratory science and more. For details, email cohpcareers@uthsc.edu or call 901-448-2042.

56. Events -

Poplar Pike Playhouse will present the regional premiere of Disney’s “The Little Mermaid” Thursday, Feb. 24, through March 12 at 7653 Poplar Pike. The “Under the Sea Party With Ariel and Friends,” featuring a character lunch, crafts and a framed picture with Ariel, will be March 5 and 12 at noon. Visit ppp.org for details and tickets.

57. Events -

The Orpheum Theatre will screen “Dorothea Lange” on Wednesday, Feb. 24, at 7 p.m. at the Halloran Centre, 225 S. Main St. The screening is part of the Southern Circuit Tour of Independent Filmmakers, which runs through April. Admission is $10. Visit orpheum-memphis.com.

58. Events -

B.I.G. for Memphis, a business interest group that connects Memphis Police colonels and business leaders, will meet Wednesday, Feb. 24, from 9:45 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. at Phelps Security, 4932 Park Ave. Mike Brady and Keith Tucker of Cyber Solutions Group Inc. will discuss cybersecurity in the workplace. Email bigformemphis@phelpssecurity.com to RSVP.

59. Events -

SRVS will host a free dance and movement class for the general public, including people with disabilities, on Tuesday, Feb. 23, from 10 a.m. to noon at the J.K. Lewis Senior Center, 1188 North Parkway. Participants must be 18 or older. Email astrid.french@srvs.org to register.

60. Hardy’s Advice For Women in Business -

Carolyn Hardy has been places a woman hadn’t been before in the Memphis business world.

Throughout her career at J.M. Smucker Co., Honeywell-POMS Corp., Coors Brewing Co. and her own ventures with Hardy Bottling Co. and Henderson Transloading, Hardy has made it a point to be confident with herself and make everyone else comfortable with having a woman at the boardroom table. Under her new role as chairman of the Greater Memphis Chamber, she’s advocating for greater inclusion of minority- and women-owned businesses in the private sector.

61. Events -

The Orpheum Theatre will screen “Dorothea Lange” on Wednesday, Feb. 24, at 7 p.m. at the Halloran Centre, 225 S. Main St. The screening is part of the Southern Circuit Tour of Independent Filmmakers, which runs through April. Admission is $10. Visit orpheum-memphis.com for tickets and a schedule.

62. Trailblazer -

Carolyn Chism Hardy is a trailblazer, a success story, an advocate for the poor and middle class, and now she’s one of the most influential people in the private sector.

63. Bratcher Shooting First Test of Local Pact With TBI -

The first fatal police shooting since local law enforcement and prosecutors adopted a policy of sending such cases to the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation is being watched closely.

And a quick initial account by the TBI is a change from the agency’s normal posture of not making any comments and abiding strictly by a state law that seals all of its records from the public unless by court order or subpoena.

64. In the Game -

Way back in the 1990s, perhaps before the Grizzlies and FedExForum were even a twinkle in anyone’s eye, Chris Wallace came to Memphis and The Pyramid for a preseason NBA game featuring Michael Jordan and the Chicago Bulls.

65. Black Caucus Demanding Change To Achievement School District -

NASHVILLE – The Tennessee Legislature’s Black Caucus, led by Memphis members, has its sights set squarely on the Achievement School District, either eliminating it or putting it on hold until major improvements are made.

66. This week in Memphis history: January 8-14 -

1973: The Harlem Globetrotters make their first appearance on ABC’s “Wide World of Sports” with a game from the Mid-South Coliseum, with Howard Cosell, Don Meredith and Frank Gifford hosting the telecast.

67. Measure Increasing Seat Belt Fines Among New Tennessee Laws -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Motorists in Tennessee who don't buckle up could face stiffer fines under one of many new Tennessee laws taking effect Friday.

The tougher seat belt law increases the fine for first-time offenders from $10 to $25 and from $20 to $50 for repeat offenders.

68. The Truth, Whole Truth, Nothing But the Truth -

THE INS AND UNS OF OUR TRUTH. Truth is the truth. It isn’t inconvenient, inconsistent or incomplete. It isn’t uncomfortable or unpleasant and certainly not untrue.

But what we’ve made of the truth is all of those things.

69. Sister Pact Aims to Raise Breast Cancer Awareness for Black Women -

Debra Melton did just about the best thing a young African-American woman in Memphis – or anywhere – can do in the fight against breast cancer.

70. The Week Ahead: Dec. 14, 2015 -

How was your weekend, Memphis? Here’s our weekly rundown of local happenings you need to know about, from the annual AutoZone shareholder convergence Downtown to the new Star Wars movie...

71. Events -

Holiday Fun in Cooper Young, hosted by the Cooper Young Business Association, will be held Thursday, Dec. 3, from 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Businesses will light up their windows and outdoor displays for the annual “Unwrapped” contest; the Peabody School Choir (5:30 to 6) and Memphis Men of Harmony (6 to 6:30) will perform in the gazebo. Call 901-276-7222.

72. The Week Ahead: Nov. 23, 2015 -

How was your weekend, Memphis? Here’s our weekly rundown of local happenings you need to know about, from The Peabody’s 36-foot dessert table to your potential (fingers-crossed, maybe not) last chance to see Paxton Lynch at the Liberty Bowl…

73. Lawyers for Stewart's Family Want Special Prosecutor -

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) — The top prosecutor in Memphis took more than two months to review an 800-page investigative report by the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation on the shooting death of a black teen by a white police officer. Then she recommended that a grand jury charge the policeman with voluntary manslaughter.

74. Ole Miss Removes State Flag that Features Confederate Emblem -

OXFORD, Miss. (AP) — The University of Mississippi's interim chancellor watched on a rainy morning as three Ole Miss police officers lowered the Mississippi state flag — which shows the Confederate battle emblem in the upper left-hand corner — for the last time.

75. Witnesses Testify About Officer's Fatal Shooting in Memphis -

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) — A witness to the fatal shooting of a Memphis policeman said Friday that he saw the suspect shoot the officer during a struggle as the pair walked toward a squad car, and heard six shots altogether.

76. City Defends 2010 Police Response to First Lipscomb Allegation -

The Memphis Police Department took seriously a 2010 complaint of sexual abuse against the city’s director of Housing and Community Development, city chief administrative officer Jack Sammons said Wednesday, Sept. 2, after reviewing five-year-old emails.

77. MHA Board Suspends Lipscomb, Sammons Defends Police 2010 Response -

UPDATE: The Memphis Housing Authority board suspended Robert Lipscomb Wednesday, Sept. 2, as executive director of the agency.

MHA named the city’s deputy chief administrative officer, Maura Black Sullivan, as the interim director.

78. ‘Black Wednesday’ Inspires Commission Run -

For a military man and dedicated physician, Richard Briggs has found time for a variety of pastimes and experiences with more adventure trips on the horizon.

79. Real Deal -

They were tossing around numbers, trying to guess the win total for the 2015 University of Memphis football season.

In the not-too-distant past, the two Highland Hundred members and longtime season-ticket holders might have been able to add their guesses together and still come up short of the six victories needed for their favorite team to be bowl-eligible.

80. Welcome Back -

When Shelby County’s public schools open for the first day of the 2015-16 school year, it will mark the first time in three years that there will be no historic, structural changes to the systems themselves.

81. Wilbourn Turns Self In To Marshals -

Memphis Police officer Sean Bolton apparently saw a car parked illegally Saturday night near South Perkins and Cottonwood roads and interrupted a minor drug deal in the car, leading to a fight with a passenger in the car who shot Bolton to death.

82. Haunted History, A Story Retold -

WORRY ABOUT THE DOGS. Depending on who’s talking and when, history around Fort Pillow changes.

At the time of this story – one I shared first in a 2013 column – it was called the Cold Creek Correctional Facility, a minimum-security operation farming about 6,000 acres in Lauderdale County. Next it was called the Fort Pillow Prison and Farm, next door to something called the West Tennessee High Security Facility, now the West Tennessee State Penitentiary.

83. Sparks Fly at Cooper-Young Mayoral Forum -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. was the target of two Memphis City Council members challenging him during most of a Cooper-Young political forum Tuesday, July 28.

It’s what Wharton predicted would happen once the campaign to the Oct. 8 ballot began to throw sparks.

84. Madeline Patterson Joins Burson Campaigns -

Madeline Patterson has joined the Memphis office of Burson Campaigns, the corporate issues management unit of Burson-Marsteller, as a vice president. In her new role, Patterson will work with Burson clients on issues and crisis management, communications strategy, and integrated marketing and communications campaigns.

85. Someone Else’s Shoes -

The group of men marching in late June from the Cannon Center for the Performing Arts to FedExForum moved slowly and with some missteps and awkwardness.

The women’s shoes they wore, many with heels, made the walk difficult between two events on June 25 that signaled a new phase in the official reaction to and fall out from the city’s now nearly two-year old scandal of more than 12,000 untested rape kits.

86. Southern Heritage Defined Differently Across Tennessee -

Tennessee’s loyalty was divided in the Civil War, and 150 years later, little is changed as the debate over Confederate symbols arises in the wake of the racist-fueled South Carolina church massacre.

87. Shelby County Commission to Resolve Budget Loose Ends -

The last time Shelby County Commissioners talked as a group about a county budget for the fiscal year that begins July 1, the consensus they thought they had reached was falling apart.

That was two weeks ago and as commissioners began to part company, the body approved a stable $4.37 county property tax rate on the first of three readings.

88. Stones’ Nashville Connections Go Way Back -

While Brad Paisley lives what he calls “a bucket list item” by singing while playing his guitar in typically showy fashion as the opening act for The Rolling Stones, the most important guitarist in rock ‘n’ roll history and a man idolized by Keith Richards and Ronnie Wood will be sitting in his house on Blueberry Hill in the hills of northern Davidson County.

89. Stones Rock Music City -

Pleased to meet you, hope you guessed our name. Well, hell, Mick, if it’s puzzling you, it’s Nashville. Music City USA.

We’re the national media’s flavor of the day – the “It city,” which has gone from being a secondary concert market – remember The Beatles played Memphis, not Nashville – to one of the country’s prime touring destinations.

90. Listen for Home -

WHEN YOU’RE HOME, YOU CAN HEAR IT. I was recently reminded of a story I heard from an actor friend years ago when he was in town for a commercial I was making. His name was Robert Lansing – if you’re old enough, you’ll remember him from TV’s “12 O’Clock High.”

91. Haslam Signs Bill Requiring Racial Profiling Ban -

Gov. Bill Haslam has signed legislation that requires all of Tennessee’s law enforcement agencies to adopt written policies to ban racial profiling.

The Republican governor signed the measure earlier this week. It unanimously passed the House 93-0 and was approved 27-0 in the Senate during the recent session.

92. Coalition to Work with Shelby County Schools on Educating Black Boys and Men -

Shelby County Schools has partnered with an education reform group focused on challenges and trends in educating African-American boys and young men.

The Coalition of Schools Educating Boys of Color is working toward a different approach in educating black men and boys. COSEBOC – as it is known – is bringing Gloria Ladson-Billings, the author of the book “The Dreamkeepers: Successful Teachers of African-American Children,” to speak to Memphis educators in June.

93. Events -

Five and Five Workshop (A Wake-Up Call for Business Owners) will be held Tuesday, April 28, from 7 a.m. to 11 a.m. at The Crescent Club, 6075 Poplar Ave., suite 909. Business coach and author Bridget DiCello and business attorney Alan Crone will present “The Five Most Common Mistakes Business Owners Make (and how to avoid them)” and “The Five Things Every Small Business Owner Should Have (but generally doesn’t).” Cost is $75. RSVP to fiveandfive@levelnineservices.com or 901-410-5154.

94. Eli’s Coming -

“Once again, as Eli swung around the dark trees and onto the lawn, the children fled.” – Philip Roth, in “Eli, the Fanatic” (1959).

95. A Range of His Own -

Derrick Kindred’s longtime activity in law enforcement and self-defense stems from a key belief.

“You’re responsible for your own safety,” he said. “If you have basic skills and basic knowledge, you can get away to a safe situation.”

96. King In Context -

The Selma to Montgomery voting rights march and the Alabama town’s Bloody Sunday in 1965 happened long before London Lamar was born.

When the Memphian went with her family to Selma last month for the 50th anniversary of the civil rights-era milestone, it was important to her to walk the Edmund Petus Bridge, the site of the brutal police charge that stopped the first attempt to march to Montgomery.

97. Bill Requiring Racial Profiling Ban Passes Tennessee Senate -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – The state Senate approved legislation on Monday that would require all of Tennessee's law enforcement agencies to adopt written policies to ban racial profiling.

98. Memphis Women in Business Face Low Receipts -

With a new political and civic push to improve minority business growth in Memphis’ public and private sectors, businesses owned by women are a specific part of the minority business community challenged in unique ways.

99. Dr. Phil Delivers Hockey Therapy to the Masses -

Dr. Phil toys with me as he allows me to work my center and left wing to get the puck tantalizingly close to his net.

Then that big smile erupts on the face of a man who hands out “Live With Happiness” dog-tags – like the one dangling beneath his Hawaiian shirt – as he passes through life. With a couple of cagey quick twists of his wrists, Dr. Phil clears his end of the rink and fires a slap shot past my befuddled defensemen and goalie.…

100. Old Favorites -

A few years ago, Tandy Wilson, chef and owner of City House, offered this tip about earning his respect as a diner: Don’t tell me you’re a foodie, he said, tell me you’re a “regular.”

We were having a conversation about overuse of the term “foodie,” and how even though it can be a well-meaning label to show a person’s interest in a particular topic, it also can carry the snobbish weight of those who salivate over the trendiest dishes – and then salivate over their keypads to type a Yelp review after just one visit.