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Editorial Results (free)

1. Events -

Church Health will host a Living Life Deliberately: Mindfulness Meditation in Daily Life class Monday, July 24, at noon in the Church Health Meditation Chapel, 1350 Concourse Ave. Rob Dove from Rhodes College Counseling will discuss how to practice meditation in ways that foster the ability to live deliberately. The class will be offered again July 31 at noon. Email slateryj@churchhealth.org with any questions.

2. Events -

Church Health will host a Saturday Morning Unwind Session on July 22 at 9:30 a.m. in its meditation chapel at Crosstown Concourse, 1350 Concourse Ave. Unwind and refocus with mindfulness expert Greg Graber. Free and open to the public. Visit churchhealth.org/events for details.

3. Last Word: Closing the Door, Midtown Rents and Red West's Many Roles -

It didn’t take the Shelby County Commission very long Wednesday to close the door on its budget season – about 20 minutes in the day’s special meeting to approve a county property tax rate of $4.11 on third and final reading. That’s not a quick up or down vote. And it took just a bit longer because there is still some discussion about whether this was a reduction in the tax rate or a tax cut in the sense that a homeowner in Shelby County would understand the term.

4. Events -

Nick Black will perform as part of Stax Museum’s Live in Studio A summer concert series Tuesday, July 18, from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. at 926 E. McLemore Ave. The concert is free for Shelby County residents (who get free museum admission with ID on Tuesday afternoons), and free with paid admission for out-of-towners. Visit staxmuseum.com.

5. Dean Touts ‘Middle Of the Road’ Focus For Democrats -

Former Nashville Mayor Karl Dean is making exactly the same observation in his bid for the Democratic nomination for Tennessee governor that Republicans are making on their side of the 2018 race.

6. Events -

A NASA Contracting Outreach Forum will be held Tuesday, July 18, from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. in Southwest Tennessee Community College’s Nursing, Natural Sciences and Biotechnology Building, 675 Union Ave. Representatives from NASA’s Johnson Space Center, Marshall Space Flight Center and Shared Service Center will share how local and regional business owners can become NASA suppliers, subcontractors or service providers. Cost is free; registration required. Register at tsbdc.org/swtcc or call 901-333-5085 for details.

7. Tennessee Democrat Mackler Raises $451K in US Senate Bid -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Nashville attorney and former Army helicopter pilot James Mackler says he has raised $451,000 in his Democratic bid for the U.S. Senate.

Mackler's campaign says the total accounts for all fundraising since launching his 2018 campaign for Sen. Bob Corker's seat on April 17.

8. Council Delays Discussion About Future of DMC, RDC -

Memphis City Council members put off a discussion Tuesday, July 11, on a call to look at restructuring or abolishing the Downtown Memphis Commission and the Riverfront Development Corp.

9. Saturday Night Scenes on Beale Street -

Some observations from three consecutive Saturday nights on Beale Street at and after 10 p.m.

Beale Street just before 10 p.m. is about bubbles. Street vendors selling bubble guns – toy guns that shoot bubbles – do a brisk business before 10. A girl in a stroller watches with wide eyes as her finger is locked on the trigger and bubbles spew forth. By the time she reaches the middle of the block between B.B. King Boulevard and Second Street, the stream of bubbles begins to slow.

10. Events -

Moonlighting for the Cure 2017, a seven-band show and silent auction benefiting St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, is Saturday, July 15, from 5 p.m. to 10 p.m. at Tin Roof, 315 Beale St. Each band features one or more St. Jude employees who “moonlight” as musicians, and several art pieces in the silent auction were donated by St. Jude employees. Admission by voluntary donation. Visit facebook.com/moonlightingforthecure for details.

11. Panel Calls on FDA to Review Safety of Opioid Painkillers -

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration should review the safety and effectiveness of all opioids, and consider the real-world impacts the powerful painkillers have, not only on patients, but also on families, crime and the demand for heroin.

12. Military Plane Crash Kills at Least 16 in Mississippi -

ITTA BENA, Miss. (AP) – A U.S. military plane crashed into a field in rural Mississippi on Monday, killing at least 16 people aboard and spreading debris for miles, officials said.

Leflore County Emergency Management Agency Director Frank Randle told reporters at a late briefing that 16 bodies had been recovered after the KC-130 spiraled into the ground about 85 miles (135 kilometers) north of Jackson in the Mississippi Delta.

13. Council Delays Discussion About Future of DMC, RDC -

Memphis City Council members put off a discussion Tuesday, July 11, on a call to look at restructuring or abolishing the Downtown Memphis Commission and the Riverfront Development Corp.

14. Bridge Protest Anniversary Draws More Action, Reflection -

A year after the spontaneous protest march that ended with more than 1,000 people shutting down the Hernando DeSoto Bridge for several hours, the leader of that effort was again moving north along B.B. King Boulevard on Sunday, July 9.

15. Rep. Camper To Lead National Organization -

State Representative Karen Camper of Memphis is the new president of the National Organization of Black Elected Legislative Women.

16. Democrat Karl Dean Raises $1.2M for Tennessee Gov's Campaign -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Former Nashville Mayor Karl Dean raised $1.2 million through the first half of the year for his bid for Tennessee governor, the Democrat's campaign announced Thursday.

17. Memphis Coaches Employ Advanced Metrics to Help Tomorrow’s Cardinals -

Almost an hour after a Sunday afternoon game at AutoZone Park, Memphis Redbirds hitting coach Mark Budaska and pitching coach Bryan Eversgerd are sitting at a small table doing their homework. There are pieces of paper on the table and some visible charts.

18. Rep. Camper to Lead National Organization -

State Rep. Karen Camper of Memphis is the new president of the National Organization of Black Elected Legislative Women.

19. Memphis 3.0 Effort Gets to Basic Facts -

Putting together the city’s first long-term comprehensive development plan since the 1980s is proving to be about covering a lot of the same material at public meetings.

Before a standing-room-only crowd Thursday, June 29, at the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art, Ashley Cash, the comprehensive planning administrator for the city, dutifully covered how the city is going about putting together the Memphis 3.0 plan that will debut in 2019. The emphasis is on letting those at the meeting know the city wants input from them and people they know. And the appeal can’t be made too often.

20. African-American Museums Get $400K in State Funding -

A group of eight Tennessee museums that focus on the history of African-Americans in the state will get $400,000 in state funding.

The Tennessee Black Caucus of State Legislators announced the funding agreement Monday, June 26, with Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam as part of the state’s 2017-2018 budget.

21. Last Word: Ransomware, Memphis Charitable Giving and The Race for Governor -

The ransomware problem got so serious Wednesday that trading in FedEx stock was stopped briefly during the afternoon. The virus was specifically aimed at TNT Express operations. Here’s a more detailed story via Bloomberg on what happened.

22. Tupelo's Police Advisory Board Meets for 1st Time -

TUPELO, Miss. (AP) — A police advisory board has met for the first time in a Mississippi city, one year after the fatal shooting of a black man by a white officer led to racial tensions and hundreds of people protesting.

23. Mississippi Man Takes Confederate Flag Fight to High Court -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — A black Mississippi citizen is taking his case against the state's Confederate-themed flag to the U.S. Supreme Court.

In papers filed Wednesday, attorneys for Carlos Moore said lower courts were wrong to reject his argument that the flag is a symbol of white supremacy that harms him and his young daughter by violating the Constitution's guarantee of equal protection to all citizens.

24. Tennessee, Left Coast a World Apart on Immigration -

San Francisco resident Terry Karlsson relishes her hometown’s reputation for embracing “multi-cultural diversity.”

The wife of a Swedish immigrant, Karlsson says she believes San Francisco’s status as a sanctuary city, one in which it refuses to participate in the enforcement of federal immigration law, reflects a nation born of people who moved here, a land of immigrants from many countries.

25. Sessions Gets More Opposition to Ending DOJ Memorandum -

U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions has been getting a lot of mail from Memphis lately about Juvenile Court.

26. 3 Chicago Police Officers Indicted in Laquan McDonald Case -

CHICAGO (AP) — Three Chicago police officers were indicted Tuesday on felony charges that they conspired to cover up the actions of a white police officer who shot and killed 17-year-old Laquan McDonald.

27. Subway Digging Uncovers 'Pompeii-Like Scene' in Rome -

ROME (AP) — Digging for Rome's new subway has unearthed the charred ruins of an early 3rd-century building and the 1,800-year-old skeleton of a crouching dog that apparently perished in the same blaze that collapsed the structure.

28. African-American Museums Get $400K in State Funding -

A group of eight Tennessee museums that focus on the history of African-Americans in the state will get $400,000 in state funding.

The Tennessee Black Caucus of State Legislators announced the funding agreement Monday, June 26, with Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam as part of the state’s 2017-2018 budget.

29. Tourism Leaders Focus on City’s Complexity, Struggle -

Stax Records turns 60 years old this year, going back to its origins as a country music label called Satellite at a tiny studio in Brunswick. Next year marks 50 years since the sanitation workers strike and the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. In August, it will be 40 years since the death of Elvis Presley. And in 2019, the city of Memphis will mark 200 years since its founding.

30. Freedom Fund Luncheon Speakers: Democratic Party Must Change -

Former U.S. Rep. Harold Ford Jr. says if voters can make the big change they made last November in the White House they can do it again.

As one of two keynote speakers at the NAACP Freedom Fund luncheon Saturday, June 24, marking the centennial of the Memphis Branch NAACP, the former Memphis congressman said he is optimistic, even though he disagrees with much of what President Donald Trump has done since taking office six months ago.

31. Last Word: Cooper-Young Complications, The Mackin Investigation and Tuition Hike -

Landmarks status for Cooper-Young is on hold because part of the process for the status isn’t an official part of the application process. That would be the part that requires a certain number of signatures to get the status. And it has put on hold a similar process in Vollintine-Evergreen.

32. Tenth Anniversary of Minority Business-Focused Forum on Tap -

The 10th anniversary gathering of the Economic Development Forum will bring together top decision-makers and business executives when it convenes June 27-29 at the Guest House at Graceland.

The forum is produced by the Mid-South Minority Business Council Continuum and the Memphis MBDA Business Center.

33. County Commission Reviews Juvenile Court Moves as Monitors Say Issues Remain -

The call to end a 5-year-old U.S. Justice Department memorandum of agreement governing conditions and due process at Memphis-Shelby County Juvenile Court goes before a group Wednesday, June 2, that has consistently had a lot of questions about the court.

34. June 23-29, 2017: This week in Memphis history -

2014: Formal opening of the $301 million expansion of the Frayser Nike plant. As he tours the plant expansion, Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam learns the U.S. Supreme Court has ruled in favor of same-sex marriage in an appeal of Tennessee’s constitutional amendment that specifically banned gay marriages.

35. Stanley Cup Run Makes State Sports History List -

Time and again during the recent Stanley Cup Final, people asked the rhetorical question: Is this the greatest moment in Nashville sports history?

Let the debate continue. But let’s take it a step further: Was this the greatest moment in the state’s sports history?

36. Riar Connects Memphis via Radio Waves -

Ask Kiran Riar – settling in for a rainy Sunday afternoon shift on the air at Q107.5 – what got her into the radio business, and the answer might surprise you.

Her path to this radio booth spans decades and continents – and Indira Gandhi has a cameo role. Kiran Riar’s grandmother in New Delhi had been widowed young when she propelled herself to a career supporting herself and her two infants. That career was at All India Radio, India’s public broadcasting station.

37. Memphis NAACP Marks Centennial With Challenge -

When the Memphis Branch NAACP holds its annual Freedom Fund Luncheon Saturday, June 24, there will be a lot of memories and a lot of history.

The Memphis Branch’s largest annual event this year marks the centennial of an organization founded in the wake of the 1917 lynching of Ell Persons. James Weldon Johnson, the NAACP national office’s investigator who came to the city to gather facts on the incident, encouraged Robert Church Jr. to start a local chapter.

38. Shelby County Commission to Probe Juvenile Court Moves -

The call to end a 5-year-old U.S. Justice Department memorandum of agreement governing conditions and due process at Memphis-Shelby County Juvenile Court goes before a group Wednesday, June 2, that has consistently had a lot of questions about the court.

39. Boyd Talks Gaps In Higher Ed During Whitehaven Stop -

Republican contender for governor Randy Boyd says there is a gap in the state’s Tennessee Promise plan and its reality.

40. County Seeks End to DOJ Memorandum -

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell said the move by him and Shelby County Sheriff Bill Oldham and Juvenile Court Judge Dan Michael to end a 5-year-old memorandum of understanding with the U.S. Justice Department over conditions at Juvenile Court indicated “significant progress,” but not that all of the problems at Juvenile Court are resolved.

41. County Leaders Seek End to Juvenile Court Memorandum With Justice Department -

The Shelby County government institutions that signed off on a 2012 agreement with the U.S. Department of Justice to overhaul Memphis-Shelby County Juvenile Court want to end what is left of the memorandum of understanding.

42. Commission OKs Funding For Old Forensic Center -

Shelby County Commissioners approved a $4 million contract with Jaycon Development Corp. Monday, June 12, for the renovation of 1060 Madison Ave., which served as the county forensic center until 2012 and is slated to become the new location of the Rape Crisis Center and the Crime Victims Center.

43. Last Word: Bar-Kays & ConFunkShun, Suburban Politics and Tom Bowen's 5 Years -

The Bar-Kays and ConFunkShun -- there’s a double shot of the deepest funk from the 1970s and 1980s. And they are together again Friday at the Cannon Center for the Juneteenth Urban Music Festival. It is also Larry Dodson’s last hometown show fronting The Bar-Kays.

44. Century Mark -

During a visit to Memphis in April, Andrew Young was talking with reporters about his lengthy public history – being part of Dr. Martin Luther King’s inner circle, a congressman, mayor of Atlanta, U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations. It was as he talked about King’s death in Memphis that Young, without any prompting, talked about a trio of Memphis attorneys – Benjamin Hooks, Russell Sugarmon and A. W. Willis – that were the key to his and King’s efforts to get things done in Memphis and the surrounding region.

45. Jackson State to Cut Budget and Borrow Money to Aid Finances -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) – Jackson State University will cut its next budget by nearly 8 percent and borrow $6 million as it continues to work through financial difficulties

The moves at Mississippi's largest historically black university were approved Thursday by College Board trustees. The board also approved plans to eliminate nine departments through mergers and to downgrade the School of Journalism and Media Studies to a department.

46. Gov. Haslam Vows to Stay on Sidelines of Race to Succeed Him -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Gov. Bill Haslam won't endorse any of the Republicans seeking the nomination to succeed him, but said he has spoken to several potential candidates about the emotionally taxing nature of a running a statewide campaign in Tennessee.

47. Whitehaven Unveils New Development Direction -

It’s been 10 months since Rev. Earle Fisher was among the individuals turned away from Graceland’s annual candlelight vigil by Memphis police in a reaction to possible protests at the event.

48. Whitehaven Leaders Unveil New Economic Development Group -

It’s been 10 months since Rev. Earle Fisher was among those turned away from Graceland’s annual candlelight vigil by Memphis Police in a reaction to possible protests at the vigil commemorating the anniversary of Elvis Presley’s death.

49. Medicaid Cuts Could Hit Rural Children Hardest -

As Congress fiddles with an Obamacare replacement, one likely to cut billions in Medicaid spending, health care experts warn a decrease in funding could be hard on Tennessee.

During a recent forum in Jackson, Andy Schneider of the Georgetown Center on Children and Families reported that 50 percent of Tennessee’s children in small towns and rural areas are covered by Medicaid, a higher percentage than the rest of the nation, and more than in Tennessee’s urban areas where 39 percent have Medicaid.

50. Norris to Oversee Second Panel Reviewing Juvenile Justice -

Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris is set to oversee a comprehensive review of Tennessee’s juvenile justice system in an effort to reshape the lives of offenders.

51. Commission OKs Funding For Old Forensic Center -

Shelby County Commissioners approved a $4 million contract with Jaycon Development Corp. Monday, June 12, for the renovation of 1060 Madison Ave., which served as the county forensic center until 2012 and is slated to become the new location of the Rape Crisis Center and the Crime Victims Center.

52. Labor Activists, Memphis Agree to Settle Civil Rights Suit -

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) – Activists pushing for higher wages at fast-food restaurants have settled a lawsuit that claimed police in Memphis, Tennessee, threatened protesters with arrest and followed labor organizers home after meetings.

53. RedRover Adds Will Cook As Design Architect -

RedRover Sales & Marketing has added three new employees in recent months, including design architect Will Cook, who has more than 10 years of graphic design experience and comes to RedRover from The Commercial Appeal and Savant Learning Systems. In his new role, Cook primarily designs print and web collateral for RedRover’s clients while also assisting the sales and marketing teams in other ways, including participating in sales meetings and calls.

54. County Commission Continues Tax Cut Calculations -

Shelby County Commissioners approved a three-cent reduction in the county property tax rate Monday, June 12, on the first of three readings but delayed a vote on the operating budget resolution for more discussion about how to account for a cut in the tax rate.

55. Last Word: Double Berger, The CEO of Baptist and Storm Reflections -

The Overton Park Conservancy raised $1 million by the Monday deadline to move ahead with the Overton Park-Memphis Zoo parking compromise. The conservancy announced Sunday afternoon that it met the goal with hours to spare with more details to come Monday on how this came together.

56. The Week Ahead: June 12-18 -

Get ready to groove, Memphis, because this week we're welcoming the inimitable Ruthie Foster to town, along with the return of both the Juneteenth Urban Music Festival and the Soulsville Record Swap. Plus, we've got details on the state House District 95 election, free MATA rides and what else you need to know in The Week Ahead...

57. Freedom Fund Luncheon Features Critic of NAACP's Relevance -

Melissa Harris-Perry, the former MSNBC host who last month penned a New York Times op-ed challenging the relevance of the NAACP, will be one of the keynote speakers at the Memphis Branch NAACP’s June 24 Freedom Fund Luncheon.

58. Editorial: One Tom Lee Memorial, Not Two -

For the second time in 14 years, the original Tom Lee obelisk memorial has been toppled by straight-line winds.

The city should take the hint and send the monument declaring Lee a “very worthy Negro” to a museum as a relic from a past era of patronizing racial distinctions that have no place in modern society – either as aspiration or fact.

59. Lee Campaigns in Collierville After Nashville Fundraiser -

The night after he raised $1.3 million in Nashville at the first major fundraiser in his bid for Tennessee governor, Bill Lee was in Collierville for a local Republican Party gathering, along with a few hopefuls in countywide races on the ballot earlier in 2018.

60. A New Life Made Possible by a $170 Discount -

A harassment conviction lingered on the record of Memphis resident Brenda A. for 10 years, the high cost of expungement making it difficult to erase the past.

Like many people convicted of misdemeanors and felonies, she paid her court fees and fines, along with probation costs, years ago, but had trouble cobbling together the money to expunge her record, making it hard to land a good job and make a fresh start.

61. Tubby Smith, Barrett Jones, Former MLB All-Stars Joined FESJC Pro-Am June 5 -

The 60th FedEx St. Jude Classic teed off on Monday, June 5, with the Danny Thomas Pro-Am at TPC Southwind.

It is the continuation of a tradition. Back in 1960, the Memphis Open Golf Tournament presented Thomas with a check for $600. It was seed money that went toward the opening of St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. 

62. Final Budget, Tax-Rate Votes Lead Council Agenda -

Memphis City Council members are poised to end their budget season Tuesday, June 6, with a set of votes on four resolutions and six ordinances that are up for third and final reading.

The resolutions and ordinances would approve a roughly $680 million city operating budget and a $77.8 million capital budget, hikes in stormwater and sewer fees and take the city property tax rate from $3.40 to $3.27.

63. Green Drops Gubernatorial Bid After Failed Trump Nomination -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Republican state Sen. Mark Green announced Friday that he will not resume his bid for Tennessee governor after withdrawing from consideration as President Donald Trump's pick for Army secretary.

64. Former Vol Gault Sprints Into State Sports Hall of Fame -

It was way back in 1980 that John Ward, the University of Tennessee’s legendary former play-by-play man, delivered one of his more memorable lines.

65. Tale of a Lost Tiger: Woods Can’t Go Much Lower -

Sometimes context can be found in the most obvious of places. Right now, at pgatour.com, Tiger Woods shows up as the 876th-ranked golfer in the world.

He’s right behind Han Lee, who last played a PGA tour stop in 2007 and has amassed $5,970 in career winnings.

66. Southern Heritage Classic Founder Touts Value of Annual, One-Off Events -

When he came up with the idea of an annual football game in Memphis between the teams of two historically black universities with large alumni bases locally, Fred Jones had two primary goals for what he called the Southern Heritage Classic.

67. Last Word: Foote Homes Falls, Kellogg Layoffs and The SCS Ask -

Once upon a time in South Memphis it could be difficult to tell where Foote Homes began and Cleaborn Homes ended or vice versa. The key to this was which side of Lauderdale you were looking at. The east side was Cleaborn and the west was Foote with Lauderdale as the dividing line.

68. Mississippi College Board Faces Resistance Over Choice for JSU President -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) – Some Jackson State University alumni and faculty are fighting William Bynum's nomination to become the president of Mississippi's largest historically black university.

69. View From the Hill: GOP Points True North on State’s Moral Compass -

It was billed as the start of the 2018 governor’s race, but the GOP’s Reagan Day Dinner in Murfreesboro last week often sounded more like a tent revival.

Vote for one of these candidates and you’re guaranteed a place in heaven, ran the subtext of the evening, because, after all, everyone knows only Republicans know the road to salvation.

70. City Council Weighs $7.3M Cut in Police Budget -

Memphis City Council members will likely be discussing possible amendments to the city budget right up to the final June 6 votes on the budget and tax rate resolutions and ordinances.

In a council budget committee wrap-up session Tuesday, May 30, that drew nine of the 13 council members, the group considered but took no action on a proposal by council member Martavius Jones to cut $7.3 million in funding for the Memphis Police Department.

71. City Council Discusses $7.3 Million Cut in Police Budget -

Memphis City Council members will likely be discussing possible amendments to the city budget right up to the final June 6 votes on the budget and tax rate resolutions and ordinances.

In a council budget committee wrap-up session Tuesday, May 30, that drew 9 of the 13 council members, the group considered but took no action on a proposal by council member Martavius Jones to cut $7.3 million in funding for the Memphis Police Department.

72. Green Puts Off Public Announcement of Gubernatorial Plans -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Republican state Sen. Mark Green has made up his mind about whether to rejoin the governor's race in Tennessee, but he doesn't want to make his decision public until later this week.

73. Hanover Students Follow King’s Pilgrimage -

Even before it was the National Civil Rights Museum, the Lorraine Motel had pilgrims – visitors coming to the place where Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated to stand where he fell, even stay a night on the same floor of his room when the Lorraine was still a working hotel.

74. New 'Blue Lives Matter' Laws Raise Concerns Among Activists -

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) – Following a spike in deadly attacks on police, more than a dozen states have responded this year with "Blue Lives Matter" laws that come down even harder on crimes against law enforcement officers, raising concern among some civil rights activists of a potential setback in police-community relations.

75. Local Democratic Reorganization Starts to Come Into Focus -

Shelby County Democrats should have a framework for a reorganized local party soon.

Discussions at town hall meetings around the county in the last month show it will probably be a party with a less complex structure and a more stable size from election to election. And a draft of the bylaws will probably include a larger policy council of sorts that meets on a quarterly basis to talk over larger issues than winning the next elections.

76. Trump Seeks to End Program for Older Jobless Americans -

HARRISBURG, Pa. (AP) – Nathan Singletary is beyond the traditional retirement age, but he's only just beginning a new career – helping other low-income, unemployed Americans over age 55 find jobs.

77. Last Word: Sessions Visit, Election Day and Beale Street's Journey -

U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions in Memphis Thursday to talk about crime in a city whose record homicide count in 2016 Sessions has recently mentioned. Sessions is in town to talk with local, state and federal prosecutors and law enforcement. When the Attorney General comes to town, he or she is usually coming with policy talking points from the White House.

78. Women CEOs Earn Big Pay, But Few of Them Have the Top Job -

NEW YORK (AP) – Women CEOs earned big bucks last year, but there's still very few of them running the world's largest companies.

The median pay for a female CEO was $13.1 million last year, up 9 percent from 2015, according to an analysis by executive data firm Equilar and The Associated Press. By comparison, male CEOs earned $11.4 million, also up 9 percent.

79. Mississippi Accused of Unequal Schooling for Black Students -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — Mississippi is denying good schools to African American students in violation of the federal law that enabled the state to rejoin the union after the Civil War, a legal group alleged Tuesday.

80. Black Caucus: White Rep Should Resign Over Lynch Comment -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — Black lawmakers in Mississippi are demanding the resignation of a white colleague who said Louisiana leaders should be lynched for removing Confederate monuments.

81. Last Word: Minority Business Mic Drop, Truckers & Taxes and Confederate Statues -

Quite the buzz around the minority business discussion on “Behind The Headlines” – notably the progress report from Greater Memphis Chamber board chair Carolyn Hardy about what’s working and, more to the point, what is not working. In Hardy’s view that would be general minority business goals that she said amount to black-owned businesses being left out some three years into the renewed push for minority business growth – in government contracts and private business-to-business contracts.

82. Not Just 'Sgt. Pepper': Many 1967 Musical Firsts Echo Today -

NEW YORK (AP) – "Sgt. Pepper" was only the beginning. Half a century after the Beatles' psychedelic landmark, it stands as just one of many musical astonishments of 1967 that shaped what we listen to now.

83. Past, Present Converge at Lynching Centennial -

The only thing that runs through the area where the Macon Road bridge stood 100 years ago are power lines on wooden poles that take them over the oxbow lake, thick kudzu and two bridge supports almost overtaken by undergrowth on the edge of a thickly-wooded area.

84. Council Faces Railgarten, Beale Bucks, Police Overtime -

Memphis City Council members have a rare evidentiary hearing Tuesday, May 23, at the top of their agenda on an unusual development case the council approved several months ago.

The council holds an evidentiary hearing on the Railgarten bar and restaurant on Central Avenue east of Cooper Street that the council granted a special use permit for. The council moved to possibly revoke that permit after Railgarten added some intermodal containers and an outside area to the development.

85. Hardy: EDGE’s MWBE Program Not Working -

The chairwoman of the Greater Memphis Chamber board said first indications are that minority business requirements in tax breaks awarded by the Economic Development Growth Engine – or EDGE – aren’t working.

86. Present Day Issues Surface in Centennial of Persons Lynching -

The interfaith prayer ceremony Sunday, May 21, marking the centennial of the lynching of Ell Persons included several mentions of the removal of Confederate monuments in the last month in New Orleans.

87. Barbecue Decoy Surfaces As Overton Square Protest -

Several dozen people staged a street theater protest in Overton Square Saturday, May 20, after a decoy call for a protest Downtown at the Memphis In May International Barbecue Cooking Contest.

“So while they (police) deployed their resources at BBQ fest, CCC was at Overton Square highlighting the real obscenities,” Al Lewis, a member of the Memphis Coalition of Concerned Citizens, posted on Facebook Saturday afternoon.

88. Barbecue Decoy Surfaces As Overton Square Protest -

Several dozen people staged a street theater protest in Overton Square Saturday, May 20, after a decoy call for a protest Downtown at the Memphis In May International Barbecue Cooking Contest.

“So while they deployed their resources at BBQ fest, CCC was at Overton Square highlighting the real obscenities,” Al Lewis, a member of the Memphis Coalition of Concerned Citizens, posted on Facebook Saturday afternoon.

89. Barbecue Decoy Surfaces As Overton Square Protest -

Several dozen people staged a street theater protest in Overton Square Saturday, May 20, after a decoy call for a protest Downtown at the Memphis In May International Barbecue Cooking Contest.

“So while they deployed their resources at BBQ fest, CCC was at Overton Square highlighting the real obscenities,” Memphis Coalition of Concerned Citizens leader Al Lewis posted on Facebook Saturday afternoon.

90. Last Word: Carousel Preview, New Crime Stats and EDGE Does Multi-Family -

The group Friends of the Fairgrounds got together Thursday evening at the Children’s Museum of Memphis and got the first group tour of the Grand Carousel center under construction at CMOM. This is as the museum focuses more on fundraising for the $6 million project that has already raised the money for the restoration of the carousel itself and now sets about the task of paying for the building around it including a banquet hall. Here’s a look from our Facebook page with more to come on CMOM and the Fairgrounds for the Monday edition that will probably go up on line Friday.

91. Lauded Rocker Chris Cornell Killed Himself by Hanging -

DETROIT (AP) – Chris Cornell, one of the most lauded and respected contemporary lead singers in rock music with his bands Soundgarden and Audioslave, killed himself Wednesday by hanging in a Detroit hotel room, according to the city's medical examiner. He was 52.

92. Roger Ailes, Media Guru and Political Strategist, Dies at 77 -

NEW YORK (AP) – Roger Ailes, the communications maestro who transformed television news and America's political conversation by creating and ruling Fox News Channel for two decades before being ousted last year for alleged sexual harassment, died Thursday, according to his wife, Elizabeth Ailes. He was 77.

93. Burr is Building a Prison-to-Opportunity Pipeline -

The first time Mahal Burr walked into the Shelby County Jail, she was planning to meet with prison officials. Instead, to her surprise, she was shown into a room with 18 incarcerated kids.

“The sheriff’s office rep said, ‘This is Mahal and Evan from BRIDGES, and they’re going to do an activity with you around youth leadership,’” recalls Burr.

94. Local Democratic Party Organizers Grapple With Activism -

Once the new bylaws and a new executive committee is in place for the reconstituted Shelby County Democratic Party this summer, there will still be a fundamental question about the political strength of the new organization.

95. Southwest Tennessee Community College Moves Toward Change -

Kenyatta Lovett, the executive director of the nonprofit education advocacy group Complete Tennessee, says there is an old joke in higher education that sometimes comes to the surface when change is promised or pledged.

96. Beale Street Issues Deepen and Grow -

The issue of who controls what in the Beale Street entertainment district has come to the forefront after the abolition of the Beale Street Tourism Development Authority.

The Memphis City Council abolished the authority in April and has now moved into a deepening debate about the Beale Street Bucks program used by merchants and the street’s interim manager, the Downtown Memphis Commission, as a crowd control measure.

97. Last Word: Council Day Issues, 'A Man Of Color' and East Memphis 'Novel' -

A busy day at City Hall Tuesday by the City Council agenda and by at least one completely unplanned moment during council budget committee sessions. It was so busy that at the start of Tuesday’s council session, chairman Berlin Boyd couldn’t find his gavel and technical glitches prompted him to ask for a can of WD-40. Throw in a visit to City Hall by civil rights leader Rev. Jesse Jackson and you have our comprehensive same night rundown of how it went and for whom it went.

98. Study: Side Effects Emerge After Approval for Many US Drugs -

CHICAGO (AP) – Almost one-third of new drugs approved by U.S. regulators over a decade ended up years later with warnings about unexpected, sometimes life-threatening side effects or complications, a new analysis found.

99. Last Word: Railgarten Redux, Raleigh Springs Mall and Forrest Author Speaks -

Railgarten II, Son of Railgarten, Railgarten, Beyond the Board of Adjustment, Railgarten, Enter The City Council … Take your pick of sequel titles. Railgarten goes back to the City Council Tuesday for at least a committee discussion in which the council considers whether it should take back the special use permit it granted the bar-restaurant. This is a follow up to the Board of Adjustment decision last month to delay any action on approving the other annexes of the business for 30 days.

100. Why I Wrote 'Nathan Bedford Forrest’s Redemption' -

Nathan Bedford Forrest recently made the news again, but it is never for a good reason. Rep. Mike Sparks of Smyrna introduced a House Resolution (HR 97) to honor me, and shortly thereafter Forrest made the news. Some might wonder why I would write a book praising Forrest. My answer is, “I didn’t.” I wrote a book praising Jesus for having the ability to save any sinner, including Nathan Bedford Forrest. This is why the word “redemption” is used in my title.