» Subscribe Today!
More of what you want to know.
The Daily News
X

Forgot your password?
Skip Navigation LinksHome > Name & Property Search
Search results for 'Black' | Search again
DeSoto Public Records:26
Shelby Public Records:1353
Editorial:100
West Tennessee:4165
Middle Tennessee:26556
East Tennessee:6085
Other:178

You must be a subscriber to see the full results of your search.

Please log in or subscribe below if you are not already a subscriber.

The Daily News subscribers get full access to more than 13 million names and addresses along with powerful search and download features. Get the business leads you need with powerful searches of public records and notices. Download listings into your spreadsheet or database.

Learn more about our services | Search again


Editorial Results (free)

1. Widening The Path -

He asked to only be a small part of this story. But when you come up with an idea so good, so powerful, that it’s named as one of the top 20 ideas in the Forbes Change the World Competition, you are the story’s foundation.

2. Bandele Crafts Cultural Hub for Black Artists -

Early one clear September morning, Overton Square is still half-asleep, the parking lot next to Hattiloo Theatre empty save a few cars. In 12 hours, Hattiloo’s lobby will pulse with a throng of guests at the opening night of “Fetch Clay, Make Man,” the theater’s current production. But for now, Ekundayo Bandele, Hattiloo’s founder and CEO, is leaning back in a desk chair, dreaming aloud about the year 2022.

3. Overton Square Hotel Awarded Tax Incentives -

The developers of a $24 million Overton Square hotel and a Canadian elevator company looking to build its first U.S. facility in Memphis have been awarded tax incentives to move ahead with their projects.

4. Overton Square Hotel Approved for Tax Incentives -

The Economic Development Growth Engine board has approved Loeb Properties' request for a 15-year tax abatement to build a 100-room boutique hotel near Overton Square.

Despite some concerns from the EDGE board over the definition of blighted property, Loeb Properties and its partners, boutique hotel developer LRC2 Properties and hospitality management company MMI Hotel Group, were approved for the payment-in-lieu-of-taxes incentive Wednesday, Sept. 20, to help offset the construction costs of the $24 million hotel.

5. Events -

The Mid-South Fair opens Thursday, Sept. 21, and runs through Oct. 1 at the Landers Center, 4560 Venture Drive in Southaven. Enjoy midway rides, fair food, and live entertainment, including the Tiger Encounter, Wolves of the World, and a meet-and-greet with 13-year-old “America’s Got Talent” winner Grace VanderWaal on Saturday, Sept. 23. Visit midsouthfair.com.

6. Are Achievement Schools a Problem or the Solution? -

Forgiveness or farewell: What should be the fate of the Achievement School District?

Among Memphis legislators, it just depends.

State Rep. Mark White calls the task to pull Shelby County’s poorest performing schools out of the state’s bottom 5 percent a “heavy lift.”

7. Last Word: The Brooks Question, Boyd's Answer and Tigers In the Polls -

Art as a real estate consideration. One of the more unusual of many considerations as the Brooks search for a new site – a possible new site, I should add, becomes the city’s favorite topic. So from the CRE vantage point – here are two more possible sites to think about if you haven’t already – Cossitt Library and the Fairgrounds, as well as right where it has been for the last century.

8. Tennessee Gubernatorial Candidate Diane Black to be Deposed -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Republican gubernatorial candidate Diane Black is being deposed in a lawsuit related to a television ad that ran in her first campaign for Congress.

9. Beale, Bourbon Street Protocols Examined -

As the Beale Street Task Force moves toward making recommendations to the Memphis City Council on a Saturday night Beale Street cover charge, there isn’t a consensus on the $5 charge.

Task force members who have been to New Orleans and consulted other cities have found very different models for crowd control.

10. White House, Black College Heads to Meet Amid Strained Ties -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Donald Trump on Monday named a lawyer and former NFL player as executive director of the White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities, as the administration faces criticism from those institutions of promises unkept.

11. Dean: Economic Development More Difficult in Memphis -

It’s a story that former Nashville Mayor Karl Dean tells just about every place in the state he goes in his campaign to be the state’s next governor.

12. A Tasteful List: 2017 -

DIG IN, MEMPHIS. Presenting the Tasteful List 2017 – alphabetical local favorites in one decidedly local man’s opinion – all good if not good for you. Some are farm to table, some got waylaid by sugar, flour, corn meal and deep-frying along the way, but all are ours, bless their hearts. 

13. Juvenile Court Resisting Remedies, Says Former Settlement Coordinator -

The coordinator overseeing the Memphis and Shelby County Juvenile Court settlement with the U.S. Department of Justice resigned in June as a reaction to the letter County Mayor Mark Luttrell, Juvenile Court Judge Dan Michael and Sheriff Bill Oldham sent U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions requesting an end to federal oversight of the court.

14. Last Word: The Monument Letter, Soulsville Gateway and Gas Tax Hike Regrets -

The Redbirds take Game 1 of the Pacific Coast League Championship series Wednesday evening with a 6-4 win over El Paso at AutoZone Park. Game 2 is noon Thursday at B.B. King and Union.

15. GOP Candidates for Tennessee Governor Uneasy About Gas Tax -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – The ink may be dry on a new state law that boosts funding for road projects through Tennessee's first gas tax hike in 28 years, but that doesn't mean all Republicans running for governor are happy with it.

16. More Than 150 Clergy Call for Removal of Forrest Statue -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland has posted a letter from 153 local clergy members in the Memphis area backing the city’s call for a waiver from the Tennessee Historical Commission next month to allow the city to remove Confederate monuments from city parks.

17. Last Word: Midtown Moves, A Spike in Chandler Numbers and Old School Expo -

The Brooks looking for a place outside of Overton Park is a huge story that broke Tuesday evening. And it is one of those stories that has a lot of dominoes you might say. Our story looks at some earlier options the museum developed mid recession, which is what delayed fuller consideration of this whole question.

18. Tennessee Lawmaker's Campaign Pays for 2,000 Rounds of Ammo -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A Republican congressional candidate in Tennessee spent campaign funds to cover the cost of 2,000 rounds of machine gun ammunition from his personal stockpile.

The Tennessean reports state Rep. Judd Matheny of Tullahoma provided belted ammunition for large tripod-mounted weapons fired at an April shooting event.

19. Entrepreneur Strikes Right Note At Pop-Up Shop -

Visitors to Tonya Dyson’s pop-up music shop at Edge Alley are greeted by a few sights all at once. Walls adorned with music-themed art, shelves stocked with records from Memphis artists and cozy furniture all help give the impression they’ve stepped into the living room of a serious music fan.

20. Last Word: Southern Heritage Recap, Funky Week Ahead and the Amazon Contest -

The 28th annual Southern Heritage Classic is in the books with a close game at the Liberty Bowl Saturday and the kind of attendance that if sustained through our civic football season – Southern Heritage, Tigers home schedule and AutoZone Liberty Bowl – promises continued growth and changes in our development. Whether there is that growth or not, 47,407 came, tailgated and saw Tennessee State beat Jackson State 17-15.

21. Editorial: Historical Commissions Must Be Run by Pros -

At some point, the question of what becomes of our city’s Confederate monuments will be resolved. Whenever that is, there are still some critical and arguably larger issues that should be addressed.

22. Events -

Author Preston Lauterbach will share the history of Downtown Memphis at a Memphis Heritage Trail event Friday, Sept. 8, at 11:30 a.m. at the Paradise Event Center, 645 E. Georgia Ave. Lauterbach, author of “Beale Street Dynasty” and “The Chitlin Circuit,” will highlights the Heritage Trail district, a 20-block area that is considered the epicenter of local black history, heritage and culture. Free and open to the public. Visit memphisheritagetrail.com.

23. Events -

Memphis Opportunity Scholarship Trust (MOST) will host a Fundraising Feast for Kids’ Scholarships on Thursday, Sept. 7, from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. at Mosa Asian Bistro, 850 S. White Station Road. A portion of sales benefit MOST, which provides need-based scholarships to Memphis-area students. Mention MOST at check-out. Visit memphisscholarships.org for details.

24. ‘Divisive Symbols’: Mississippi Case Offers Hope for Forrest Bust Removal -

State Sen. Lee Harris is encouraged by the U.S. Supreme Court’s request for the state of Mississippi to respond to a lawsuit seeking to remove the Confederate battle flag from its state flag.

25. Riverdale Expansion Goes Beyond Bricks and Mortar -

By the time work began in 2016 on an addition to Riverdale School in Germantown, the K-8 school was using 22 portable classrooms, Germantown Municipal School District superintendent Jason Manuel said.

26. Whitehaven Boom Gets Arena Catalyst -

As she looked across Elvis Presley Boulevard from the parking lot of the new Tri-State Bank headquarters at Elvis Presley and Farrow Road last week, Memphis City Council member Patrice Robinson took in the view of the new five-bay retail strip and looked north at another new strip soon to come online, and talked about a third in the works.

27. Nathan Bedford Forrest Bust to Stay in Capitol -

The Tennessee Capitol Commission blocked Gov. Bill Haslam’s request Friday, Sept. 1, to move the embattled Nathan Bedford Forrest bust out of the State Capitol to the Tennessee State Museum.

28. 'Easy Money' Made Selling Army Weapons Stolen by US Soldiers -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – More than $1 million in weapons parts and sensitive military equipment was stolen out of Fort Campbell, Kentucky, and sold in a vast black market, some of it to foreign buyers through eBay, according to testimony at a federal trial this week.

29. Delivery Without Drivers: Domino's, Ford Team Up for Test -

ANN ARBOR, Mich. (AP) – No ring of the doorbell, just a text. No tip for the driver? No problem in this test, where Domino's and Ford are teaming up to see if customers will warm to the idea of pizza delivered by driverless cars.

30. Tri-State Hosts Grand Opening of Banking HQ -

Tri-State Bank CEO Thomas Felder estimates that the more than 70-year-old institution – which has shifted its retail bank headquarters from Downtown to Whitehaven – will have a $2.5 million economic impact on the neighborhood surrounding it.

31. Commission Votes Down Health Coverage Change -

Shelby County Commissioners voted down a switch Monday, Aug, 28, of the county’s health insurance administration contract from Cigna to an $11 million, two-year contract with two one-year renewal options with Aetna.

32. County Commission Votes Down Health Coverage Change -

Shelby County Commissioners voted down a switch Monday, Aug, 28, of the county’s health insurance administration contract from Cigna to Aetna in an $11 million two-year contract with two renewals of one year each.

33. August 25-31, 2017: This week in Memphis history -

2016: Former President Jimmy Carter is in Memphis to lead a group of 1,500 Habitat for Humanity volunteers in building 19 new homes in the Bearwater Park subdivision in North Memphis. The subdivision is on the site of what had been the Cedar Court apartment complex.
Carter was in Memphis for a similar homebuilding project the previous November, shortly after he was diagnosed with brain cancer. In an interview with The Daily News, Carter talked about the enduring problems of racism, poverty and inequality.
“We have the ability, proven over history, to correct our mistakes. We gave women the right to vote and then ended slavery and saw the civil rights movement, so we’ve been able to correct our mistakes,” he said. “But we are still seeing some mistakes now, with the disparity of opportunity between rich people and middle- and lower-class people and also between the races.”

34. Corker's Careful Balancing Act on Trump Knocked Off Kilter -

CLARKSVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Sen. Bob Corker refuses to say whether he'll seek a third term, but he has carefully said and done all the right things to avoid provoking a spirited primary challenge next year.

35. State Panel Sheds New Light on Racial Atrocities -

State Rep. Johnnie Turner has seen what can happen when old wounds are never allowed to heal.

She’s seen it most recently in clashes between neo-Nazis, Ku Klux Klansmen and white supremacists and those who resisted their hatred in Charlottesville, Virginia, where a counter-protester was killed and 19 were injured when a car was intentionally driven into a group of counter protesters. Two state troopers also died in a helicopter crash that weekend.

36. The Latest: University Barricades Confederate Statue -

The Latest on efforts to remove Confederate monuments and the nationwide fallout from a white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia (all times local):

___

2:30 p.m.

Workers in a Florida city have started taking down a memorial to Confederate soldiers at a city-owned cemetery.

37. University of Texas in Austin Removes Confederate Statues -

AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — The University of Texas quickly removed statues of Robert E. Lee and other prominent Confederate figures overnight from the main area of the Austin campus, a spokesman said Monday morning, just hours after the school's president ordered they be taken down.

38. South City Redevelopment Activity Heating Up -

The up-and-coming South City neighborhood is enjoying a resurgence of redevelopment activity lately, with the restoration of several historic properties, new multifamily construction and talk of bringing in a grocery store. The city and the Downtown Memphis Commission have been instrumental in the renewed interest, with noteworthy projects including the Clayborn Temple, the Universal Life Building and the demolition of Foote Homes.

39. Crosstown Concourse Opens With High Hopes -

With the First Baptist Church – Broad choir singing “Amazing Grace,” the $200 million mixed-use Crosstown Concourse development opened Saturday, Aug. 19, 90 years to the month that the building opened as a Sears, Roebuck & Co. store and distribution center.

40. Comedian, Civil Rights Activist Dick Gregory Dies at 84 -

LOS ANGELES (AP) – Dick Gregory, the comedian and activist and who broke racial barriers in the 1960s and used his humor to spread messages of social justice and nutritional health, has died. He was 84.

41. Crosstown Concourse Opens in 'Resurrection' -

With the First Baptist Church – Broad choir singing “Amazing Grace,” the $200-million mixed-use Crosstown Concourse development opened Saturday, Aug. 19, 90 years to the month that the building opened as a Sears-Roebuck store and distribution center.

42. August 18-24, 2017: This week in Memphis history -

1968: James Brown at the Mid-South Coliseum. Brown is touring the nation against a backdrop of two political assassinations – Martin Luther King Jr. in April and Robert Kennedy in June – racial and generational turmoil, and a heightened police response to gatherings like concerts where authorities believe the chance of violence is greater as a result.
By the time he arrives backstage in Memphis, Brown’s April 4 concert in Boston, televised live there the night of King’s assassination, has become a legendary chapter in the entertainer’s career. Brown isn’t resting on that, recording the breakthrough “Say It Loud, I’m Black and Proud” the same month the tour reached Memphis. By a year later, the anthem is gone from his set, with Brown later saying it had become obsolete in times that were changing fast.

43. South City Redevelopment Heats Up With Renovations, New Construction -

The up-and-coming South City neighborhood is enjoying a resurgence of redevelopment activity lately, with the restoration of several historic properties, new multifamily construction and talk of bringing in a grocery store. The city and the Downtown Memphis Commission have been instrumental in the renewed interest, with noteworthy projects including the Clayborn Temple, the Universal Life Building and the demolition of Foote Homes.

44. No Special Session to Take Rebel Symbol Off Mississippi Flag -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) – A spokesman says Mississippi Gov. Phil Bryant won't call legislators back to the Capitol to consider removing the Confederate battle emblem from the state flag.

The Legislative Black Caucus says Bryant should set a special session because white supremacists marched with the battle flag last weekend in Virginia.

45. Elvis Vigil Features Changes, Including Admission Fee -

Elvis Week was already going to be different this year with Graceland’s recent $137 million expansion and a new landscape across the boulevard from the Whitehaven mansion.

The candlelight vigil Tuesday, Aug. 15 – the high point of Elvis Week – was much different, and not all of the thousands of Elvis fans thought it was for the better.

46. Elvis Vigil Features Changes Including Admission Fee -

Elvis Week was already going to be different this year with Graceland’s recent $137 million expansion and a new landscape across the boulevard from the Whitehaven mansion.

The candlelight vigil Tuesday, Aug. 15 – the high point of Elvis Week – was much different and not all of the thousands of Elvis fans thought that change was for the better.

47. Deadly Rally Accelerates Removal of Confederate Statues -

In Gainesville, Florida, workers hired by the Daughters of the Confederacy chipped away at a Confederate soldier's statue, loaded it quietly on a truck and drove away with little fanfare.

In Baltimore, Mayor Catherine Pugh said she's ready to tear down all of her city's Confederate statues, and the city council voted to have them destroyed. San Antonio lawmakers are looking ahead to removing a statue from a prominent downtown park.

48. Last Word: Night in the Park, Hattiloo Goes Bigger & Cohen on the Republican Soul -

A gathering in Health Science Park a little before 11:30 Monday evening by a group of protesters who Facebooked that their intent was to take down the statue of Nathan Bedford Forrest. Memphis Police showed up quickly and the police supervisor told those around the statue that the park is a private park and that no one can be in the park after 8 p.m. No arrests but the police did ask for identification from those in the park.

49. Black Names Ramsey, Fincher Co-Chairs of Tennessee Gov's Bid -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Republican U.S. Rep. Diane Black has named two prominent former politicians from either end of Tennessee as co-chairman for her gubernatorial bid.

50. Hattiloo Plots a Bigger Stage for Its Audience -

The founder of Hattiloo Theatre says the black theater company is ready to become more regional and professional in its approach and influence. “Now it’s time for Hattiloo to become a major regional theater,” said Ekundayo Bandele before an opening-night performance of “Ruined.”

51. Charting a Course -

Daphne Large, founder, CEO and president of Data Facts Inc., didn’t have her company certified as a woman-owned business for 25 years. “I don’t want to be chosen because I’m a woman, but because I’m the best,” Large said, voicing a sentiment that many women business owners agree with.

52. GOP's Bill Lee Calls for More School Choice in Tennessee -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Republican gubernatorial candidate Bill Lee is voicing support for more school choice in Tennessee, an issue that has divided lawmakers within his own party.

Debate over the introduction of vouchers to provide parents with public money to pay for private school tuition has roiled the Tennessee General Assembly in recent years. Even limited proposals have been defeated by a bipartisan coalition of urban and rural lawmakers who fear they would siphon money away from public schools.

53. Hooks Institute Lands $20K For HAAMI Program -

The Benjamin L. Hooks Institute at the University of Memphis has received a $20,000 grant from the SunTrust Foundation to support the Hooks African-American Male Initiative (HAAMI).

The institute launched HAAMI in 2016 to increase the retention and graduation rates of black male students at the University of Memphis. Current data shows that for first-time, full-time students who graduated within a four-year period, black males have an average graduation rate of 10.6 percent, significantly less than all other groups. The Hooks Institute’s efforts with HAAMI are intended to help create prosperity for African-American males, which in turn helps to collectively benefit the lives of all Memphians and create positive social change.

54. Last Word: Collierville's New School, New Cops and Z-Bo's Bust -

Collierville Schools superintendent John Aitken knew the crowd at the Collierville Chamber of Commerce Wednesday wanted to see how the city’s new $90 million high school was coming along a year before its scheduled opening. And he brought plenty of aerials to show the progress. But Aitken also came to talk about what is to happen in the new Collierville High School once the construction is done.

55. Women-Owned Businesses Chart Progress of Diversity Contracting Efforts -

Daphne Large, founder, CEO and president of Data Facts Inc., didn’t get her company certified as a woman-owned business for 25 years.

56. Editorial: Back-to-School Stability Includes Unresolved Issues -

Another school year is underway in Memphis, and it’s arguably the most stable for the Shelby County Schools system in the last seven years – maybe longer. Yet, there is much about education in our community that remains unresolved.

57. Beware at the Pump: Black Market Fuel is Making Millions -

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (AP) – A black market for diesel and gasoline has rapidly spread around the nation, with organized crime gangs using fraudulent credit cards to syphon millions of dollars in fuel from gas stations into large tanks hidden inside pickup trucks and vans.

58. Prosecutor: Police Justified in Shooting of Arkansas Teen -

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) – A black teenager pointed a BB gun that looked like a handgun at police before he was fatally shot by officers outside an emergency youth center in eastern Arkansas, a prosecutor said in announcing no charges would be filed against the officers.

59. Watches Tell Time, And Stories -

IT’S ABOUT TIME. It’s an old 700 series Rolex watch – stainless steel with a small military-style black face, hands and numbers that once glowed in the dark, a simple stainless steel band and a small brass rivet for a fastener – nothing special by Rolex standards.

60. Kelly, Legacy Teammates Ready for Final Season With Vols -

Todd Kelly Jr. can’t believe it’s his last hoorah. The senior safety from Webb School of Knoxville enters his final season at Tennessee with thoughts of how it all started in fall of 2014.

61. Separated at Birth: Defensive Backs & Wide Receivers -

The wide receiver and the defensive back are exactly the same – until that point when the ball is in the air and then they are totally different.

The wideout wants to catch passes, run free, score touchdowns, and prance and dance. The DB wants to knock down passes, intercept passes, deliver teeth-jarring hits, and posture and strut.

62. Last Word: Bakery Questions, Komen Name Change and the Price of A Run For Gov. -

City Hall opens a set of four public meetings on the Fairgrounds Thursday evening at 5 p.m. at the Salvation Army Kroc Center to start the movement again toward another master plan for Fairgrounds redevelopment. And it’s hard to tell at the outset what this will look like because there are so many possibilities. There are also so many fault lines in these discussions.

63. Hooks Institute Lands $20K To Support HAAMI Program -

The Benjamin L. Hooks Institute at the University of Memphis has received a $20,000 grant from the SunTrust Foundation to support the Hooks African-American Male Initiative (HAAMI).

The institute launched HAAMI in 2016 to increase the retention and graduation rates of black male students at the University of Memphis. Current data shows that for first-time, full-time students who graduated within a four-year period, black males have an average graduation rate of 10.6 percent, significantly less than all other groups. The Hooks Institute’s efforts with HAAMI are intended to help create prosperity for African-American males, which in turn helps to collectively benefit the lives of all Memphians and create positive social change.

64. A Million Reasons Not to Jump Into the Tennessee Governor’s Race -

Republican gubernatorial candidate Mae Beavers is banking on the idea wealthy candidates won’t be able to buy voters in 2018.

65. Give Rudy Gay An Assist on Origin Of ‘Grit and Grind’ -

Did Tony Allen say too much? That’s the question after The Grindfather – yes, he retains the title even if he signs elsewhere as a free agent – answered a question about the origin of “grit and grind” in an interview with MassLive.com.

66. Netflix Makes 1st Acquisition: Comic Book Maker Millarworld -

NEW YORK (AP) – Netflix says it made its first acquisition, comic book publisher Millarworld, with plans to turn its characters into new films and shows for the video streaming service.

67. Google Exec Denounces Employee's Views on Female Workers -

NEW YORK (AP) – Silicon Valley's efforts to promote workforce diversity haven't yielded many results – unless you count a backlash at Google, where a male engineer blamed biological differences for the paucity of female programmers.

68. Democrat Craig Fitzhugh Joins Race for Tennessee Governor -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Democrat Craig Fitzhugh is joining the race for Tennessee governor.

69. American Paper Optics, St. Jude Promote Safe Solar Eclipse -

In anticipation of the historic solar eclipse Aug. 21, Bartlett-based American Paper Optics (APO) is partnering with St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital to educate the public on safe solar eclipse viewing.

70. CBIZ MHM Adds Team Of Audit, Tax Professionals -

The Memphis office of CBIZ MHM LLC has hired several new professionals from accounting firm Elliott Davis Decosimo.

71. FedEx, in Online Pivot, Backs Away From Holiday Surcharges -

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) – FedEx will skip special charges for most packages shipped during the holiday season this year as it seeks to undercut rival UPS in a fight for a larger share of the millions of items now bought online.

72. CBIZ MHM Adds Team Of Audit, Tax Professionals -

The Memphis office of CBIZ MHM LLC has hired several new professionals from accounting firm Elliott Davis Decosimo.

73. Last Word: St. Jude School, More Gannett Moves and Maida Pearson Smith -

For most, the school year starts next week. But classes are already underway at St. Jude’s new Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, an idea 15 years in the making, according to the physician who had that idea. The school is a big step in higher education in Memphis and its road to research center status.

74. TPA Honors The Daily News for 2016 Coverage -

The Daily News recently earned six awards, including two first-place wins, at the Tennessee Press Association’s 2017 newspaper contest, co-sponsored by the University of Tennessee.

The newspaper won first place in its division for Best Business Coverage, a category for which the criteria included the impact, originality and news value of stories; excellence in writing; visual impact, such as photography; and editing and display.

75. IRIS Orchestra Fellows Program Bridges Gap to Professional Career -

They get to play in an orchestra next to world-class musicians. They will have mentors and be mentors for children in the Shelby County Schools system. During their 10-month fellowship, they are paid a stipend and housing is provided at artist friendly Crosstown Concourse.

76. Republican US Rep. Diane Black to Run for Tennessee Governor -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Republican U.S. Rep. Diane Black is running for governor in Tennessee.

77. Last Word: Kustoff at Rotary, Royal's Vibe and The Terms of MEMPOWER -

The investment group that renovated the Chisca resurfaced Tuesday evening with a plan for the Wonder Bread factory, vacant for the last four years. But don’t look for a return of the bread smell to the Edge area. And if you look at what has started to happen in that particular corridor since Wonder Bread shut down, the mixed-use plan has some precedent. Throw in the move to sell The Commercial Appeal property just a few blocks away and if the economy remains this good, the transformation in this area could be radical in another four years.

78. Wilkins Launches MEMPOWER For Black Political Empowerment in Memphis -

Ricky E. Wilkins says he’s not upset about his 2014 loss in the Democratic congressional primary. He calls his loss to incumbent U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen “an education.”

79. HealthChoice Promotes Henning To Director of Population Health -

Sarah Henning has been promoted to director of population health programs at HealthChoice. Henning previously served as manager of the department. In her new role, Henning is responsible for designing, implementing and managing population health and wellness initiatives and programs for the HealthChoice network.
She also collaborates with stakeholders to promote and support these programs and to ensure they meet the needs of the affected populations and adapt with the changing health care environment.

80. HBO Programming Stolen In Cyberattack -

NEW YORK (AP) – HBO has had some of its programming stolen in what is being described as a cyber incident.

The company says that it is working with law enforcement and cybersecurity firms.

81. Best in Black Awards Voting Wraps Up This Week -

This week marks your last chance to vote in the Best In Black Awards, an annual awards program hosted by the New Tri-State Defender that spotlights outstanding local African-American businesses, community organizations, entrepreneurs and individuals.

82. FDA to Target Addictive Levels of Nicotine in Cigarettes -

For the first time, the federal government is proposing cutting the nicotine level in cigarettes so they aren't so addictive.

U.S. Food and Drug Administration chief Scott Gottlieb on Friday directed the agency's staff to develop new regulations on nicotine. The FDA has had the power since 2009 to regulate nicotine levels but hasn't done so. Stocks of cigarette makers plunged after the announcement.

83. Man Sentenced to 25 Years in Memphis Officer Shooting -

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) – A judge sentenced a Tennessee man to 25 years in federal prison Friday on charges connected to the fatal shooting of a police officer in 2015.

U.S. District Judge Sheryl Lipman sentenced Tremaine Wilbourn, 31, during a hearing in Memphis federal court.

84. Boyd Says Luttrell Endorsement is ‘Partnership’ -

Republican contender for Tennessee governor Randy Boyd says his endorsement this week by Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell is more like a partnership.

85. Trump Says Transgender People Should be Barred From Military -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Donald Trump said Wednesday he wants transgender people barred from serving in the U.S. military "in any capacity," citing "tremendous medical costs and disruption."

86. Events -

Memphis Black Arts Alliance will present “Annie: The Musical” Thursday through Saturday, July 27-29, at the Kroc Center, 800 East Parkway S. Visit mbaafirehouse.org for details and tickets.

87. Bad Leadership or Politics? Motlow President’s Fall -

One day he was the golden boy, touting Motlow State’s success and posing with the governor for the signing of the Reconnect Act. The next, seemingly, he was gone with the wind.

At least publicly, everything was grand as Anthony “Tony” Kinkel helped Gov. Bill Haslam meet his Drive to 55 effort to put certificates or degrees in the hands of half of Tennessee adults by 2025. With limited space and resources, Kinkel pushed the Tennessee Promise scholarship at Motlow, the state’s fastest-growing community college, bolstering student retention, graduation and fundraising.

88. Civil Rights Marker Rededicated on Birthdate of Lynch Victim -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) – A Mississippi historical marker about a notorious lynching that galvanized the civil rights movement was rededicated Tuesday, weeks after it was vandalized and repaired.

89. Luttrell to Join Boyd At Campaign Appearance -

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell makes a campaign appearance Wednesday, July 26, with Republican candidate for Tennessee governor Randy Boyd.

90. Events -

Talk Shoppe will meet Wednesday, July 26, from 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. in NovaCopy’s conference room, 7251 Appling Farms Parkway. The topic is The MasterMind Principle, based on the book “Think and Grow Rich” by Napoleon Hill. Cost is free. Visit talkshoppe.com.

91. Events -

Church Health Nutrition will kick off a pair of free community cooking class series Tuesday, July 25 (10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.) and Thursday, July 27 (5 p.m. to 7 p.m.) at Crosstown Concourse, 1350 Concourse Ave. In each six-week class series, participants learn how to make delicious and nutritious meals, and get to eat the meals made in class. Pre-registration is required; visit churchhealth.org/events for details and enrollment.

92. Michael Calls Out Juvenile Court Critics -

Memphis-Shelby County Juvenile Court Judge Dan Michael acknowledged Monday, July 24, that the court still has a problem with disproportionate minority contact. That is African-American youth who not only show up in the court more often than white youth, but get disproportionately harsher punishments and are more likely to be transferred for trial as adults than white children charged with the same offenses.

93. Michael Talks About Move to End Federal Oversight of Juvenile Court -

Memphis-Shelby County Juvenile Court Judge Dan Michael acknowledged Monday, July 24, that the court still has a problem with disproportionate minority contact. That is African-American youth who not only show up in the court more often than white youth, but get disproportionately harsher punishments and are more likely to be transferred for trial as adults than white children charged with the same offenses.

94. Events -

Church Health will host a Living Life Deliberately: Mindfulness Meditation in Daily Life class Monday, July 24, at noon in the Church Health Meditation Chapel, 1350 Concourse Ave. Rob Dove from Rhodes College Counseling will discuss how to practice meditation in ways that foster the ability to live deliberately. The class will be offered again July 31 at noon. Email slateryj@churchhealth.org with any questions.

95. Events -

Church Health will host a Saturday Morning Unwind Session on July 22 at 9:30 a.m. in its meditation chapel at Crosstown Concourse, 1350 Concourse Ave. Unwind and refocus with mindfulness expert Greg Graber. Free and open to the public. Visit churchhealth.org/events for details.

96. Last Word: Closing the Door, Midtown Rents and Red West's Many Roles -

It didn’t take the Shelby County Commission very long Wednesday to close the door on its budget season – about 20 minutes in the day’s special meeting to approve a county property tax rate of $4.11 on third and final reading. That’s not a quick up or down vote. And it took just a bit longer because there is still some discussion about whether this was a reduction in the tax rate or a tax cut in the sense that a homeowner in Shelby County would understand the term.

97. Events -

Nick Black will perform as part of Stax Museum’s Live in Studio A summer concert series Tuesday, July 18, from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. at 926 E. McLemore Ave. The concert is free for Shelby County residents (who get free museum admission with ID on Tuesday afternoons), and free with paid admission for out-of-towners. Visit staxmuseum.com.

98. Dean Touts ‘Middle Of the Road’ Focus For Democrats -

Former Nashville Mayor Karl Dean is making exactly the same observation in his bid for the Democratic nomination for Tennessee governor that Republicans are making on their side of the 2018 race.

99. Events -

A NASA Contracting Outreach Forum will be held Tuesday, July 18, from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. in Southwest Tennessee Community College’s Nursing, Natural Sciences and Biotechnology Building, 675 Union Ave. Representatives from NASA’s Johnson Space Center, Marshall Space Flight Center and Shared Service Center will share how local and regional business owners can become NASA suppliers, subcontractors or service providers. Cost is free; registration required. Register at tsbdc.org/swtcc or call 901-333-5085 for details.

100. Tennessee Democrat Mackler Raises $451K in US Senate Bid -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Nashville attorney and former Army helicopter pilot James Mackler says he has raised $451,000 in his Democratic bid for the U.S. Senate.

Mackler's campaign says the total accounts for all fundraising since launching his 2018 campaign for Sen. Bob Corker's seat on April 17.