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Editorial Results (free)

1. Last Word: The Zoo's Proposal, Health and Ed In Limbo and Annexation's Effect -

A busy weekend on several fronts not the least of which was Overton Park and the Greensward controversy.
The Greensward itself was pretty subdued on a chilly Saturday.
The action was to be found in an email the zoo sent out Saturday making some proposals and offering some thoughts on the traffic and parking study the Overton Park Conservancy released last week.
Here is our summary
of what the zoo is offering in what may be a new effort in the public discussion.
Of course, the private discussion which is the mediation effort continues. But it sounds like some of the mediation discussions may be finding their way into the public discussion.
The public discussion has been sporadically active but very muted so far. For instance there has been talk before of zoo parking on the eastern side of the park in what until recently was a city maintenance yard.
The proposal by the zoo was shot down pretty quickly because it included running a tram through the Old Forest.
But there are some scenarios that wouldn’t take such a tram through the Old Forest.
The zoo email from Saturday isn’t specific on how the folks who would park at the maintenance yard would get from there to the zoo.
Presumably that is grounds for some type of discussion.

2. Klondike Wants Plan To Stave Off Gentrification -

With multimillion-dollar investments growing up around it in the Crosstown and Uptown neighborhoods, the Klondike/Smokey City Community Development Corp. is working with the University of Memphis on a grassroots action plan to stave off gentrification.

3. Italian Bike Maker Opens Binghampton Service Shop -

The professional biking world is looking to put Memphis on the map. Victory Bicycle Studio has been tapped to serve as the first U.S. service center for 3T, a Milan, Italy-based manufacturer of high-end bike components.

4. Midtown Memphis Ready for Apartment Building Boom -

It’s been more than a decade since new apartments were built in Midtown, and that’s poised to change in a big way with a wave of new multifamily construction stretching from Binghampton to Crosstown.

5. Last Word: Post Caucus, Fincher's Exit, 1919 Handwriting and Your Rolodex -

That close (very little light between index finger and thumb) between Clinton and Sanders in Iowa Monday evening.
Both live to fight another day in another state—New Hampshire.
And because it is Iowa – they each get to declare victory as long as they don’t go into a lot of detail about the totals.
This is one of those cases where it is like horsehoes and hand grenades – close does count.

6. Save-A-Lot to Anchor New Sam Cooper Shopping Center -

Southeast Corner of Sam Cooper
Boulevard and Tillman Street
Memphis, TN 38104

Tenant: Save-A-Lot

Size: 16,300 square feet

Tenant’s Agent: Frank Dyer, Loeb Realty Group

7. Save-A-Lot to Anchor Binghampton Retail Center -

Save-A-Lot Food Stores is the anchor tenant for the Binghampton Grocery Center, a new shopping complex at the corner of Sam Cooper Boulevard and Tillman Street developed by the Binghampton Development Corp.

8. Last Word: New Minority Business Numbers, The House Affair and The Heights -

The recently revived discussion on minority business in Memphis is about to go back on the front burner again. Fueling the intensity are new U.S. Census numbers. They show the percentage of business receipts in Memphis produced by black-owned businesses has dropped since the 2007 census numbers showed a 1.08 percent share of those receipts by black-owned businesses. That in a city whose population is 63 percent African-American.
The drop to below one percent is even though the overall receipts in 2012 were higher than they were in 2007.
Madeline Faber is the first to report the new numbers as part of a cover story in our weekly, The Memphis News, that will be on the streets and in the racks Saturday, on-line Friday afternoon.
The numbers are such a telling story and such an important indicator that we broke it out as its own story in advance of the cover story.

9. Highland Heights CDC Rehabs Five More Homes -

On his desk at Treadwell Middle School, Jared Myers keeps a colorful map marked by green, red and blue shapes.

10. Save-A-Lot to Anchor Binghampton Retail Center -

Save-A-Lot Food Stores is the anchor tenant for the Binghampton Grocery Center, a new shopping complex at the corner of Sam Cooper Boulevard and Tillman Street developed by the Binghampton Development Corp.

11. Editorial: Neighborhoods are the Battleground in Grocery Wars -

The development of grocery clusters in Germantown and Midtown raises some important questions about supermarkets in other parts of the city.

If these clusters of retailers, each aimed at different segments of a larger, overlapping market, are the reality of a supermarket business that was dominated by one chain not too long ago, how will Memphis’ food deserts be affected?

12. Memphis' Grocery Wars -

After Sprouts became one of the newest grocery chains to enter the Memphis market by opening stores in Lakeland and Germantown earlier this year, company spokesman Diego Romero described the chain’s arrival as practically a no-brainer.

13. Makowsky Ringel Greenberg Buys 8 Acres Near Broad Avenue -

The bids have been opened. Memphis-based multifamily housing manager and developer Makowsky Ringel Greenberg won the eight acres of vacant Sam Cooper right-of-way announced for sale early last month.

14. Bids Are In For Sam Cooper Real Estate -

Bids came due Monday, Nov. 30, for eight acres adjacent to Sam Cooper Boulevard and owned by the Tennessee Department of Transportation.

15. New Tech901 Expands City’s Tech Field -

A new nonprofit has launched in Memphis to help guide technology job growth, while showing outside companies advantages of doing business in the Bluff City.

Tech901’s mission is to train current and potential Memphians for a variety of technology jobs while working with employers to increase the local technology job base.

16. Retail Market Boosted by Groceries, Small Business -

The third quarter of 2015 was a busy one for the retail sector with a lot of activity derived from grocery stores and small businesses.

Fundamentals are trending favorably with the total vacancy rate down to 12.6 percent compared to 12.9 percent in second quarter 2015. Net absorption rose from 134,251 square feet in second quarter to 160,229 square feet in the most recent quarter, and the rental rate increased from $8.62 to $8.72 per square foot, according to CB Richard Ellis Memphis data.

17. Binghampton, Uptown Grocery Projects Win Tax Breaks -

Two community development groups are the first recipients of Community Builder PILOTS, a payment-in-lieu-of-taxes incentive housed at the Memphis-Shelby County Economic Development Growth Engine.

Binghampton and Uptown are both USDA-Certified Food Deserts, and that could change with Community Builder PILOT incentives intended to attract grocery stores.

18. Memphis Retail Market Boosted by Groceries, Small Business -

The third quarter of 2015 was a busy one for the retail sector with a lot of activity derived from grocery stores and small businesses.

Fundamentals are trending favorably with the total vacancy rate down to 12.6 percent compared to 12.9 percent in second quarter 2015. Net absorption rose from 134,251 square feet in second quarter to 160,229 square feet in the most recent quarter, and the rental rate increased from $8.62 to $8.72 per square foot, according to CB Richard Ellis Memphis data.

19. EDGE Still Explaining Itself To Memphis, Shelby County Elected Leaders -

Four years into its existence, Reid Dulberger is still explaining the basics of a group created by Memphis Mayor A C Wharton and Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell to streamline local economic development efforts.

20. New Tax Breaks Attract Grocers to Memphis Food Deserts -

Two of Memphis’ prominent food deserts are on the mend with possible tax breaks to attract grocery stores.

Binghampton and Uptown are set to receive Community Builder PILOTs, a new payment-in-lieu-of-taxes incentive granted by the Memphis and Shelby County Economic Development Growth Engine.

21. Vet Clinic Proposed For Binghampton Corner -

A new veterinary clinic at the northwest corner of Sam Cooper Boulevard and Tillman Street will keep the lights on 24/7 and hopefully direct activity to Memphis’ less-trafficked Binghampton core.

22. New Tax Incentive Aims to Boost Declining Memphis Neighborhoods -

Just north of Interstate 40, the commercially empty gateways to the Frayser neighborhood between North Hollywood Street and North Watkins Street are hardly fit to accommodate the thousands of vehicles that pass by every day.

23. Council Approves Tax Hike, Binghampton Retail Center -

The Memphis City Council gave final approval Tuesday, Sept. 1, to a tax-hike ordinance that will help fund a $57 million renovation of the Memphis Cook Convention Center.

The ordinance raises the hotel-motel bed tax from 1.7 percent to 3.5 percent.

24. Learning in Action -

For the past three years, the Carpenter Art Garden has worked to unite and uplift a Binghampton neighborhood and keep kids engaged with the community.

But with a new expansion into job training, the Binghampton Development Corp. and the leaders of the Carpenter Art Garden aim to send the kids on local apprenticeships to compete in a national job market.

25. Council Approves Tax Hike, Binghampton Retail Center -

The Memphis City Council gave final approval Tuesday, Sept. 1, to a tax-hike ordinance that will help fund a $57 million renovation of the Memphis Cook Convention Center.

The ordinance raises the hotel-motel bed tax from 1.7 percent to 3.5 percent.

26. Council Explores Retirees Return To Police Ranks -

Memphis City Council members are exploring the idea of encouraging already-retired police officers to get back in uniform as reserve officers to keep the police force from slipping to less than 2,000 officers.

27. Council Continues Talks on Deferred Retirement Freeze -

Two months into the city of Memphis’ new fiscal year and after a year of decisions on changes to pension and health insurance benefits for city employees and retirees, the Memphis City Council is still making adjustments.

28. Georgia-Pacific Invests $20M in Memphis Mill -

Two years after Atlanta-based Georgia-Pacific acquired Memphis-based Buckeye Technologies in a $1.4 billion deal, the combined company, GP Cellulose, has invested $20 million in capital construction and maintenance projects at its Memphis facilities.

29. Georgia-Pacific Invests $20M in Memphis Mill -

Two years after Atlanta-based Georgia-Pacific acquired Memphis-based Buckeye Technologies in a $1.4 billion deal, the combined company, GP Cellulose, has invested $20 million in capital construction and maintenance projects at its Memphis facilities.

30. Georgia-Pacific Invests $20 Million in Memphis Mill -

Two years after Atlanta-based Georgia-Pacific acquired Memphis-based Buckeye Technologies in a $1.4 billion deal, the combined company, GP Cellulose, has invested $20 million in capital construction and maintenance projects at its Memphis facilities.

31. Binghampton Retail Plan Goes to Land Use Board -

Neighborhood retail in Binghampton tops the Thursday, Aug. 13, agenda of the Memphis-Shelby County Land Use Control Board.

Among the 25 items on the board’s agenda is Binghampton Development Corp.’s request for a planned development to accommodate a retail center with grocery store on 4.87 acres at Sam Cooper Boulevard and Tillman Street.

32. Binghampton Retail Plan Goes to Memphis Land Use Board -

Neighborhood retail in Binghampton tops the Thursday, Aug. 13, agenda of the Memphis-Shelby County Land Use Control Board.

Among the 25 items on the board’s agenda is Binghampton Development Corp.'s request for a planned development to accommodate a retail center with grocery store on 4.87 acres at Sam Cooper Boulevard and Tillman Street.

33. Cadence Bank Supports Memphis Organizations with Direct, Indirect Aid -

Banks are important community institutions not just for the services they provide – consumer loans, small business financing, etc. – but also for the investment they make in communities.

Such investments include the one announced by Cadence Bank recently, a six-figure equity-equivalent investment to River City Capital to support its Small Business Loan Fund.

34. Cadence Announces Support for River City Capital -

Cadence Bank has announced a $200,000 equity-equivalent investment to River City Capital Investment Corp. to support its Small Business Loan Fund.

35. Details Emerge on Planned Binghampton Retail Center -

The Binghampton neighborhood is inching closer to landing a grocery store as plans for a neighborhood retail center there come into clearer focus.

The Binghampton Development Corp. has signed a “letter of intent” with an unidentified national supermarket chain to build a store at the corner of Sam Cooper Boulevard and Tillman Street. It also is pursuing other retailers for the planned development that will bring more goods and jobs to the community.

36. Robert Montague Leaving Binghampton Development -

After 11 years of leading the charge to revive the Binghampton community, Robert Montague is leaving the top post at the Binghampton Development Corp.

37. Robert Montague Leaving Binghampton Development -

After 11 years of leading the charge to revive the Binghampton community, Robert Montague is leaving the top post at the Binghampton Development Corp.

38. Christian Brothers Students Help Secure Tax Refunds -

As an outgrowth of a new Christian Brothers University course on poverty in America, a group of IRS-certified students brought some major relief to a few hundred Memphis-area families this tax season.

39. Goldman Sachs ‘Confident’ in Memphis -

In April, Rachel Diller, managing director of the urban investment group at Goldman Sachs, received a phone call in her New York office from officials at Phoenix-based Dudley Ventures.

The executives at Dudley Ventures, which specializes in large tax-credit supported projects, were arranging financing for the $200 million effort to transform the old Sears Crosstown property and wanted to know if the New York-based investment bank was interested.

40. Community Building -

Almost three years ago, former elementary school art teacher Erin Harris saw a video about children in Memphis who were working with an artist to start a sculpture garden. She still recalls the happy sight of a few boys in the video throwing balloons filled with paint at an old fence, as well as the reaction the footage generated from her.

41. Creative Destruction -

For about three years Veronica Skinner called the two-story, 24-unit apartment building at 480 Tillman St. in the Binghampton neighborhood home.

42. Bigger LIFT -

The former Cadence Bank branch on Court Avenue Downtown is the new and bigger home for Community LIFT, the local intermediary with community development corporations founded by a coalition of nonprofits and the city of Memphis four years ago.

43. Education Secretary Praises Local Schools Leaders -

Sustainability is a term associated with environmental efforts, though innovation is a much more popular term across causes from economic development to education reform.

But when U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan came to Memphis this month as the last stop on a three-state bus tour of school districts, it was the word sustainability that came up more often than innovation.

44. A Funder’s View of Sustainability -

Editor’s Note: This column will appear Tuesdays through April in honor of Sustainability Month for Memphis and Shelby County.

As the Mid-South’s philanthropic partner since 1969, the Community Foundation of Greater Memphis is clearly here to stay. That’s why we are interested in initiatives that make our area more livable and connected right now and for future generations.

45. Reversing Sprawl Through Connectivity -

Editor’s Note: This column will appear Tuesdays through April in honor of Sustainability Month for Memphis and Shelby County.

Last week, Smart Growth America released “Measuring Sprawl 2014,” a report examining development in 221 major metropolitan areas in the U.S. and evaluating development on a national index. With a score of 71, the greater Memphis region ranks near the bottom of the list at number 196 out of 221. Furthermore, Memphis ranks as the sixth most sprawled large metropolitan area.

46. CDC Leaders Have Challenges in Communities -

Community development corporations are designed to help create more housing in areas where investors and banks might not normally invest without incentives.

But the CDCs, as they are known, are increasingly in the business of adding business development to the housing in a combination of community building.

47. Restaurant Row -

If you blink, you might miss a new restaurant opening along the Poplar Avenue corridor in East Memphis.

Over the last few months, several new restaurants have opened or are on the way around the heavily traveled Poplar corridor between Perkins Road and Kirby Parkway.

48. Williams Honored by Tennessee Urban Forestry Council -

Laurie Williams, adult education coordinator at Memphis Botanic Garden, was recently awarded the Tennessee Urban Forestry Council’s President’s Award for her contribution to establishing and maintaining viable community forests in Tennessee. Williams was one of seven individuals the urban forestry council honored this year.

49. Organizations Honored For Homebuyer Education -

United Housing Inc. and the Binghampton Development Corp. have been recognized by the state for their role in creating homebuyer education programs.

50. Organizations Honored for Homebuyer Education -

United Housing Inc. and the Binghampton Development Corp. have been recognized by the state for their role in creating homebuyer education programs.

51. GiVE 365 Grants $88,000 to 12 Nonprofits -

The Community Foundation of Greater Memphis made it easier for a dozen Memphis nonprofits to continue the good they do in the community when it announced the recipients of this year’s GiVE 365 grantees last week.

52. City Council Considers Tax Incentive Changes -

Memphis City Council members will be parsing contract terms and clauses during a busy Tuesday, Sept. 13, set of committee meetings and the afternoon voting meeting of the full council.

They review a lease agreement for Handy Park in the Beale Street entertainment district and revisit a new solid waste plan agreed to by Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr.’s administration and the union representing sanitation workers.

53. Neighborhood Vitality -

The history at the Four-Way Restaurant is as rich and soulful as the food.

The walls of the South Memphis institution are decorated with photographs of politicians, athletes, entertainers, business leaders and civil rights icons – including the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. – who made the famous restaurant at Mississippi Boulevard and Walker Avenue a “home away from home.”

54. Green Shoots -

The busiest time of the year along the Shelby Farms Greenline is also the busiest time of the year for Cheffie’s, an example of a business that is a direct beneficiary of being near the Tillman Street end of the greenline that extends east to Shelby Farms Park.

55. Grant Turns Broad Avenue Dock Into Dance Stage -

The concrete surface of the loading dock at Power & Tel on Broad Avenue isn’t good for ballet dancing.

So the dancers with Collage Dance Collective went with modern dance instead Wednesday, May 22, as the Broad Avenue Arts District formally announced a $350,000 grant from ArtPlace America that will turn part of the loading dock into a dance performance stage.

56. Bearing Down -

The old adage “loaded for bear” is fitting for a new full-service branding agency that’s emerged on the Memphis advertising landscape.

“We came up with Loaded for Bear after stepping back and looking at the Memphis creative landscape and what our goals were, which are to prove that great creative can happen in a ‘creative wilderness’ such as Memphis, but also to help our clients be prepared for anything,” said managing director Joel Halpern. “That is where the term came from, an old hiker’s saying that means going off in the prepared for the worst case scenario, or a bear.”

57. Brothers to Open Brewery on Broad -

A new craft brewery is coming to one of Memphis’ up-and-coming areas – the Broad Avenue Historic District.

Wiseacre Brewing Co., a concept from brothers Kellan Bartosch and Davin Bartosch, has leased 13,000 square feet at 2783 Broad Ave. and is planning to open by late 2013. They chose the old warehouse for its “big open space” and the Binghampton neighborhood for its community appeal.

58. Creative Space -

By the time Crosstown Arts occupies space in the 1.5 million-square-foot Sears Crosstown building, it will have completed a solid test run of promoting arts-based community and economic development in Midtown.

59. MemShop Latest Boon for Overton Square -

A year ago, Loeb Properties Inc. was granted the green light from Memphis City Council for the funds necessary to construct a parking lot and detention pond west of Cooper Street – the last component in the more than $30 million public/private partnership to revitalize the once thriving Overton Square district.

60. Grassroots Effort -

Approaching the second anniversary of “New Face for an Old Broad” and the Historic Broad Avenue Business Association’s painting of its own bike lanes, the Binghampton district has seen activity increase exponentially on several fronts.

61. Food Awareness -

On a recent humid September morning, a group of casually dressed students sat cross-legged in a field on the Rhodes College campus, deeply engaged in a discussion about the various preparation methods and cultural associations of yams.

62. Planning Continues for Broad, Binghampton -

As after-school traffic made its way north and south on Tillman Street last week, a crossing guard whistled children across one of the narrow streets by Lester Community Center.

The traffic was mostly cars, but the occasional bicycle from the nearby western terminus of the Shelby Farms Greenline whizzed by as well.

63. Federal Funds to Aid Efforts in Binghampton, Frayser -

Two Memphis neighborhood revitalization efforts will split $225,000 in federal funds awarded Monday, Aug. 6, to the Greater Memphis Partnership – a coalition of local agencies.

The grants are through the Building Neighborhood Capacity Program, a White House initiative directed at distressed neighborhoods. The Greater Memphis Partnership will match the federal funding for a total of $450,000 that goes for technical assistance on revitalization plans in Binghampton and Frayser.

64. City Kicks Off Neighborhood Innovation Effort -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr.’s administration is set to begin a concerted effort to bring back neighborhood retail in three parts of the city.

Wharton and his Innovation Delivery Team, funded by the Bloomberg Philanthropies of New York, rolled out the first moves Monday, July 2, for parts of South Memphis, Binghampton and the Madison and Cleveland area.

65. Granting Wishes -

Make-A-Wish Foundation of the Mid-South plans to grant 220 wishes to children with life-threatening medical conditions this year.

On Thursday, May 24, the Memphis Area Association of Realtors Commercial Council was able to witness one of those wishes being granted firsthand at Windyke Country Club, as well as donate enough funds to share the power of three additional wishes.

66. Access to Healthy Foods Center of HMCT Meeting -

Healthy Memphis Common Table held its annual meeting Tuesday, May 22, at the University of Memphis to discuss health-related challenges facing citizens.

The organization is a nonprofit, regional health collaborative working to improve the quality of primary care; empower patients and caregivers; fight childhood obesity; reduce the rate of chronic diseases; and eliminate food deserts in low-income neighborhoods.

67. MED Forms Committee to Examine Minority-Owned Biz Dealings -

The board governing The Regional Medical Center at Memphis has formed an ad hoc committee to review and make recommendations regarding the amount of business the hospital conducts with minority-owned companies.

68. Awards Just One Facet Of Comm. Council -

This year marks a decade of existence for the Memphis Area Association of Realtors’ Commercial Council, the trade organization for the commercial real estate profession and its related sectors.

The council has about 325 members whose professions include commercial developers, brokers, property managers and other related CRE careers. Two of the council’s main events each year are the Commercial Property Forecast Summit, held in February, and the Pinnacle Awards, which honor the highest-producing commercial brokers each spring.

69. Kobernus Takes Reins of MAAR Commercial Council -

When Aubrie Kobernus goes home at night, she has a new hat to hang by her door. The 33-year-old was recently promoted to director of the Memphis Area Association of Realtors’ Commercial Council.

70. Spring Break Service -

Like many college students, Annie Marcum and Lisa Stockdale of South Carolina’s Clemson University had planned to spend spring break enjoying the beach.

71. GrowMemphis to Award Garden Project Grants -

Nonprofit GrowMemphis has teamed up with Memphis Housing and Community Development to grant $5,000 to new community garden projects in 2012. Applications for the grants will be accepted through Jan. 31. New garden projects can apply for as much as $1,500 in equipment and supplies and as much as $1,500 for site improvements.

72. City of Memphis Adopts Overgrown Lot Pilot Program -

The city of Memphis has a $50-a-lot strategy for mowing vacant lots in eight parts of the city through community development corporations in those parts of town.

The city’s Division of Community Enhancement began working with neighborhood associations across the city this summer to identify more than 300 overgrown lots. Each association identified such lots in a 25-square-block area to clear them in one concentrated effort.

73. Schutt Excels As Volunteer, Outdoorsman, Businessman -

When Peter Schutt bought The Daily News Publishing Co. Inc. from his father John Paul “Jack” Jones in 1994, it marked the fourth generation of ownership for the family-run business whose story dates back more than a century.

74. Open Door -

By 2050, it’s projected all minorities combined will represent more than 50 percent of the U.S. population, and as the United States moves closer to becoming a minority-majority nation, the growing Hispanic population is increasingly becoming a major power player in the new economy.

75. Faith-Based Orgs Revitalize Binghampton -

Operation: Safe Community, launched by the Memphis Shelby Crime Commission, began in 2006 with a goal to decrease blight and increase neighborhood restoration. That goal is now being reached after replacing dilapidated buildings and opening a farmers market in an abandoned gas station. Organizations such as First Baptist Church – Broad, led by Pastor Keith Norman, have also played an important role in Binghampton’s transformation.

76. Greenhouse Donated to Urban Farms -

Stringer Nursery and Garden Center has donated its 23,000-square-foot greenhouse to Urban Farms in Binghampton. The greenhouse was scheduled to be disassembled and transported to the Urban Farms’ location on 198 Wills St. Saturday, July 16, according to Urban Farms’ Facebook page. Barnhart Crane and Rigging provided equipment to help volunteers and project management move the greenhouse to its new location.

77. Advocates Push Overton-Greenline Link -

When the group of architects and planners working on a bicycle-pedestrian path connecting the Shelby Farms Greenline with Overton Park went beyond the end of the Greenline onto Tillman Street recently, they had a Memphis Police bicycle escort.

78. Hyde Takes Reins Of Alco Management -

After starting at Alco Management Inc. in 2002, Robert Hyde has been named president of the company that has become a national leader in affordable housing during the past 35 years.

79. A New Home -

On a humid late May afternoon that signaled the imminent arrival of a sweltering Memphis summer, Burundi native Sedekia Imanairakiza seemed to be in his element, skillfully nurturing the soil and sowing the seeds that will yield fruitful summer crops at Urban Farms, a community garden in the heart of the city.

80. Dressing Up Dinner -

The emergence of the Broad Avenue Arts District as a hub of arts, culture and community continues to take shape, and the latest focal point is a former abandoned gas station at Broad and Tillman Street.

81. New Farmers Markets Hit Needy Areas -

Farmers markets have typically been seen as the domain of middle-class, college-educated, health-conscious consumers concerned about reducing their carbon footprint, knowing the origin of their food and supporting local farmers committed to sustainable practices.

82. Grant Encourages Food Stamps at Markets -

Farmers markets throughout Shelby County have no trouble attracting middle- and upper-class patrons who are health-conscious, but this year the push is to bring poorer populations to the table.

A grant awarded to GrowMemphis will provide economic incentives for food stamp users to buy fresh, local produce.

83. Green Jobs’ Role in Social Justice Topic for MSPJC Gala -

A national figure in the growing discussion of the American green economy will speak about green jobs serving all races and classes in Memphis Saturday.

Van Jones, who is best known as the author of “The Green-Collar Economy” and as President Barack Obama’s former green jobs adviser, will give the keynote address at the 29th anniversary gala of the Mid-South Peace and Justice Center (MSPJC) to be held at First Congregational Church at 6 p.m.

84. CCHS, Donlon Help City’s Underserved -

When Rick Donlon and three other newly minted doctors came to Memphis in the mid-1990s, they were attracted by circumstances most might not find so attractive: the largest concentration of medically-underserved communities in the state.

85. Broad Ambitions -

Its title may sound like a Woody Allen movie, but an innovative, two-day street festival in a resurging Midtown neighborhood may draw in new businesses via bike traffic.

“A New Face for an Old Broad,” to be held from 3 p.m. to 10 p.m. Friday and from 8 a.m. to 10 p.m. Saturday, will temporarily exhibit Broad Avenue as a connector between the terminus of the Shelby Farms Greenline and Overton Park.

86. O’Conner Vying for ‘Feeding Dreams’ Honor -

Donald O’Conner may not be running for office, but he wants your vote. In fact, he would like your vote every day now through Halloween.

O’Conner, director of Watoto Memphis Performing Arts Academy, is the Memphis nominee for Feeding Dreams, a contest put on by General Mills Corp. to recognize black community leaders who work to create better neighborhoods.

87. Binghampton Farmers Market Prepares for Sept. 4 Opening -

The Binghampton Development Corp. needs volunteers to help prepare for the opening of the city’s first farmers market linked to a commercial-scale, community gardening enterprise.

88. City Council Delays UDC Vote Until August -

The Memphis City Council Tuesday put off a third and final vote on a Unified Development Code (UDC) until its first meeting in August.

Several council members said they wanted a full briefing on the rewrite of both the city and county codes. The Shelby County Commission is preparing for its final vote on the same code.

89. Stimulus Funds New Christ Community Dental Clinics -

Federal stimulus money financed the construction of two dental clinics for Christ Community Health Services, but the 24 permanent positions created by the project will carry on after that funding has run its course.

90. City Council Rejects Cap On Tuition Reimbursement -

Memphis City Council members rejected a plan by the Wharton administration Tuesday to cap tuition reimbursement for city employees at $1,400 per worker.

The council move came after funding for the city’s tuition reimbursement program was cut from $1.4 million last fiscal year to $500,000 in the fiscal year that began July 1.

91. Renaissance Avenue -

When Larry Schmitt bought a two-story building on the corner of Broad Avenue and Collins Street in 1993, he knew the place needed some TLC.

92. Farmers Markets Planned for Under-Served Areas -

Two nonprofit organizations will be seeking government approval Thursday to open farmers markets in Binghampton and South Memphis as part of an effort to make city residents healthier.

St. Andrew AME Church and the Binghampton Development Corp. are on the agenda for the 10 a.m. meeting of the Memphis and Shelby County Land Use Control Board.

93. Allen’s Legal Expertise Takes Him Places -

Cannon Allen grew up with an idea that he might end up in the legal field, but a broad range of cases in commercial litigation paved the way for far-reaching experiences in entrepreneurship, transportation and logistics, and community building.

94. Nonprofit Orgs Create Garden for Binghampton -

Land that lay fallow and forgotten for decades has been cleared and tilled for a garden to nourish Binghampton residents with fresh vegetables and provide them with jobs.

More than 30 volunteers shoveled mulch, planted seeds and built a hoop house on a 1.5-acre plot alongside Cypress Creek on Friday.

95. Back to Basics -

Urban gardening efforts in Binghampton have prompted city officials to consider revising proposed land use ordinances that could stymie the greening of Memphis.

Planning officials spotted holes in the proposed laws when the Binghampton Development Corp. and Christ Community Health Services approached the city about starting a commercial gardening operation, which would create jobs and provide fresh foods in Binghampton, an area with a high poverty rate and no grocery store.

96. Funding Boost Moves Kroc Center Closer to Reality -

No matter what happens with the overall redevelopment of the Mid-South Fairgrounds – a project that could be scaled back in light of the economy – the plan to build the Kroc Center of Memphis is gaining steam.

97. City to Recognize Broad Ave. Arts Area -

Business owners and volunteers who have worked to showcase the artists of Broad Avenue are looking forward to Tuesday’s meeting of the Memphis City Council.

City Council member Jim Strickland is sponsoring a resolution to officially recognize the Broad Avenue Arts District.

98. City Program Seeks Minority Developers -

Creating more minority developers means getting them to see blight differently.

That’s what the director of a two-year old effort by the city of Memphis to build diversity in the development community said last week about the effort.

99. Federal Reserve Economists Discuss Crime Study -

A new study by a Federal Reserve economist indicates the common belief that crime increases with recessions may not hold true.

“Generally, we find little evidence that short-run changes in economic conditions induce greater criminal activity,” said Thomas A. Garrett, an assistant vice president for the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, whose territory includes Memphis.

100. New Binghampton Senior Facility Planned -

Two generations ago, Darrell Cobbins’ grandfather developed one of Memphis’ first black middle-income communities called Lakeview Gardens.

Over the next couple of years, Cobbins, a commercial real estate developer and broker, will bring a 133-unit senior housing facility to Binghampton, and he’ll pay homage to his real estate lineage by calling it Lakeview Estates.