» Subscribe Today!
More of what you want to know.
The Daily News
X

Forgot your password?
Skip Navigation LinksHome > Name & Property Search
Search results for 'Better Markets' | Search again
DeSoto Public Records:0
Shelby Public Records:0
Editorial:100
West Tennessee:0
Middle Tennessee:0
East Tennessee:0
Other:0

You must be a subscriber to see the full results of your search.

Please log in or subscribe below if you are not already a subscriber.

The Daily News subscribers get full access to more than 13 million names and addresses along with powerful search and download features. Get the business leads you need with powerful searches of public records and notices. Download listings into your spreadsheet or database.

Learn more about our services | Search again


Editorial Results (free)

1. New Rules for Emergency Funds -

Ray’s Take The old rule of thumb for an emergency savings account was three to six months of living expenses. It was created at a time when the workforce experience was more monolithic and predictable. This was when there more likely was a single breadwinner who worked at the same company their entire life and retired with a gold watch and a big send-off party. 

2. Fields Out at Ford; New CEO Hackett Known for Turnarounds -

DEARBORN, Michigan (AP) – Ford is replacing CEO Mark Fields as it struggles to keep its traditional auto-manufacturing business running smoothly while remaking itself as a nimble, high-tech provider of new mobility services.

3. Prospect of NAFTA Rewrite Gives US Farmers a Case of Jitters -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A sizable majority of rural Americans backed Donald Trump's presidential bid, drawn to his calls to slash environmental rules, strengthen law enforcement and replace the federal health care law.

4. Wunderlich Securities Acquired by LA Firm in $67M Deal -

Memphis-based investment firm Wunderlich Securities Inc. will be acquired by a publicly traded Los Angeles-based financial services firm, B. Riley Financial, in a $67 million deal expected to close in June.

5. View From the Hill: Haslam Credits GOP ‘Experiment’ for Tennessee’s Success -

If you ask Gov. Bill Haslam, Republican government is the best thing since sliced bread.

Not only is GOP leadership responsible for a myriad of tax cuts leading to record surpluses and a $37 billion budget funding better K-12 and higher education, shoring up the rainy day and TennCare funds, shrinking state debt and building an economic environment for job creation, Haslam says. It’s even bringing us the cleanest air since before the industrial revolution.

6. Cai to Lead Memphis Chamber’s International Business Efforts -

Jinliang (Jin) Cai has joined the Greater Memphis Chamber as vice president of international business development. In that role, Cai will be directing efforts both to grow foreign direct investment in Memphis and Shelby County and to increase the volume of local exports to foreign markets. 

7. Last Word: Council Day Issues, 'A Man Of Color' and East Memphis 'Novel' -

A busy day at City Hall Tuesday by the City Council agenda and by at least one completely unplanned moment during council budget committee sessions. It was so busy that at the start of Tuesday’s council session, chairman Berlin Boyd couldn’t find his gavel and technical glitches prompted him to ask for a can of WD-40. Throw in a visit to City Hall by civil rights leader Rev. Jesse Jackson and you have our comprehensive same night rundown of how it went and for whom it went.

8. Last Word: BSMF, Budget Books and Milli Vanilli -

Three days of sun and mild temperatures for the Beale Street Music Festival. Not to be all “Dawn Lazarus” about the weather. Of course, it wasn’t just that way over Tom Lee Park. And many of us continue to find there is life outside after you have determined your festival days may be behind you. We were all over the place this weekend including Tom Lee Park and Shelby Farms Park and backyards and trails and on a rising river. Can you still claim you were at BSMF if you were within earshot of it?

9. Vining Sparks Chief Economist: Economy in Period of ‘Uncertain Optimism’ -

The same day the U.S. Senate sent a $1.1 trillion spending bill to President Trump – the first major legislation of his presidency which averts a Friday, May 5, government shutdown – Craig Dismuke was telling a Memphis audience how much his economic forecasts hinge on the new president.

10. Eighteen Startup Teams Set to Begin ‘Summer of Acceleration’ in Memphis -

Eighteen startup teams this week have kicked off the “Summer of Acceleration,” the season of joint accelerator programming across six startup accelerators overseen by the EPIcenter, Memphis Bioworks and Start Co.

11. Last Word: Budget Books and Line Items, Top of the Road List and Silencers -

The comforting thud of reams of bound printed paper hitting a wooden table top. The sound of pages turning as Power Points are read aloud. Yes, fellow citizens of the republic, it is budget season in Shelby County. The gavel fell on Memphis City Council budget hearings Tuesday at City Hall. And Wednesday morning Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell takes his budget proposal to the County Commission. A note about the city budget deliberations. Tuesday’s opening session saw the return of council member Janis Fullilove to City Hall after being out for a while due to an extended illness.

12. Economy In Flux -

With apologies to Dickens’ “A Tale of Two Cities,” for the professionals who follow economics for a living this is very much the best of times and the worst of times.

The moment is one of abundant optimism and rampant uncertainty. “Directionally,” they like to say, things look positive. And yet so much could still go very, very wrong.

13. Bohannon Joins Cumulus Media As Memphis Market Manager -

Morgan Bohannon recently joined Cumulus Media as vice president/market manager for its four-station group in Memphis, which includes KIX 106, 98.1 The Max, 98.9 The Vibe and 103.5 WRBO. Bohannon comes to Cumulus from iHeartMedia-Memphis, where he most recently served as area president. He worked for iHeartMedia/Clear Channel Radio for more than 20 years in various capacities and markets.

14. How Trump Insurance Changes Could Affect Coverage Next Year -

A much tighter sign-up deadline and coverage delays will be waiting for some health insurance customers now that President Donald Trump's administration has finished a plan designed to stabilize shaky insurance markets.

15. Initiatives Geared at Boosting Owner-Occupied Housing -

Nearly a third of all homes in Shelby County are owned by investors, a fact which has state and city leaders looking for ways to stem the tide and encourage locals to buy into their communities through owner-occupied homeownership.

16. Binghampton’s Diverse Culture On Display at Kaleidoscope Festival -

With nearly 20 nationalities calling Binghampton home, the neighborhood possibly is the most culturally diverse in Memphis.

That diversity will be celebrated Saturday, April 15, at Wiseacre Brewing Co. with Kaleidoscope, a multicultural food festival that will present a variety of food entrepreneurs serving up unique goodness from their homes. The food festival is the culmination of work over the past year to support refugee and immigrant food entrepreneurs in the Binghampton community.

17. Wells Fargo Claws Back $75M From Top Execs in Sales Scandal -

NEW YORK (AP) – The problems at Wells Fargo and its overly aggressive sales culture date back at least 15 years, and management had little interest in dealing with the issue until it spiraled out of control resulting in millions of accounts being opened fraudulently, according to an investigation by the company's board of directors.

18. Trump's SEC Pick, an Ex-Goldman Lawyer, to Face Skepticism -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Goldman Sachs may be about to get another friend in Washington.

Jay Clayton, a well-connected Wall Street lawyer who is President Donald Trump's pick to lead the Securities and Exchange Commission, is sure to face sharp questions from Democrats at his confirmation hearing Thursday over his years of work for Goldman and other financial giants.

19. What’s Wrong With the 4 Percent Strategy? -

Ray’s Take: When you finally reach your retirement date, one of your first questions will be: How much of my savings can I spend?

The seat-of-the-pants guideline for retirement withdrawals has been 4 percent for many years. That’s all well and good when 10-year treasuries were yielding 6 percent. Now they are under 2.5 percent so that approach and the rule are less clear. Retirement readiness is too complex to be bound by a simple rule of thumb. Further, that rule doesn’t necessarily take into account investment expenses.

20. Will Mortgage Rates Rise? What to Know About Fed Rate Hike -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Are mortgage rates headed up? How about car loans? Credit cards?

How about those nearly invisible rates on bank CDs – any chance of getting a few dollars more?

21. Chamber’s MWBE Loan Program Helps Companies Secure ISO Certification -

A cohort of minority-owned businesses have used a new Greater Memphis Chamber loan program to complete ISO 9001 certification, which opens them up to new federal contracting opportunities where the certification is required.

22. US Trade Deficit Jumps to 5-Year High of $48.5 Billion -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The U.S. trade deficit jumped in January to the highest level in nearly five years as a flood of mobile phones and other consumer products widened America's trade gap with China. The result underscores the challenges facing President Donald Trump in fulfilling a campaign pledge to reduce America's trade deficits.

23. McDonald's Lays Out Plan It Hopes Can Reverse Drop in Visits -

NEW YORK (AP) – McDonald's acknowledged on Wednesday that it lost 500 million customer transactions in the U.S. since 2012 and laid out its plans to get more people back into its restaurants – including by letting them order and pay on their mobile phones by the end of the year.

24. CRE Brokers Speculate on Future of Commercial Appeal Headquarters -

When USA Today Network executive and president of The Tennessean newspaper Laura Hollingsworth came into town the day after The Commercial Appeal announced printing operations will be moving to Jackson, Tennessee, she told the staff that while no immediate plans were in place, selling the daily paper’s iconic building was certainly a possibility down the road.

25. Cities, Developers Reaping Rewards of Mixed-Use Shift -

Commercial real estate is shifting to mixed-use developments designed to create a sense of place for homeowners longing for the community of days gone by, and the trend is profiting many parties as commercial developers see stronger returns and cities undergo revitalization in their core.

26. Attorney Harkavy Named To Wyatt’s Executive Committee -

Lee A. Harkavy is one of two attorneys from the Memphis office of Wyatt, Tarrant & Combs LLP to be named to the regional law firm’s executive committee. Harkavy is a commercial transactional attorney focused primarily on representing businesses in their external growth endeavors or exit strategies. In that capacity, he advises clients on mergers, acquisitions and dispositions, and capital-raising transactions.

27. Aetna, Humana Call Off $34 Billion Deal -

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) – Major health insurers Aetna and Humana called off their $34 billion combination after a federal judge, citing concerns about prices and benefits, rejected the deal.

28. Yellen Expects Gradual Pace for Hikes But Sees Risk in Delay -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen said Tuesday that the central bank still expects to raise interest rates gradually this year. But she said the Fed also recognizes the dangers of waiting too long to tighten credit.

29. Fed Board Member Tarullo Announces Resignation -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Federal Reserve board member Daniel Tarullo, a key official guiding bank regulation efforts, will resign this spring, the Fed said Friday.

Tarullo's decision will clear the way for President Donald Trump to select a candidate for the bank supervision position. Trump is likely to choose someone more in line with his desires to roll back the regulations put in place by the Dodd-Frank Act, which overhauled bank supervision in the wake of the 2008 financial crisis.

30. Mortgage Market Shows Strength In January -

2017 may be another busy stretch for mortgage bankers in Shelby County, if the atypically busy start to the year is any indication.

Purchase mortgage volume came out of the gate strong in January, rising 28 percent to a little more than $112 million compared with $87.4 million in the year-ago period, according to the latest figures from real estate information company Chandler Reports, chandlerreports.com.

31. Retail Group: Sales to Grow 3.7 Percent to 4.2 Percent -

NEW YORK (AP) – Despite a bumpy holiday season, chains like The Limited shutting down and department stores such as Macy's closing stores, the largest retail trade group says it's still optimistic that sales will grow this year – especially online.

32. Trump Moves to Scale Back Financial Regulations -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Donald Trump is taking his first steps aimed at scaling back financial services regulations, and the Republican-run Congress cast a vote early Friday signaling that it's eager to help.

33. AP-NORC Poll: Broad Worries About Potential Health Care Loss -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Though "Obamacare" still divides Americans, a majority worry that many will lose coverage if the 2010 law is repealed in the nation's long-running political standoff over health care.

34. Dow 20,000: What Does It Mean and Where Does It Go? -

With the Dow Jones industrials above 20,000, it's natural to ask what's going on and what, if anything, investors should do. Here are some answers to common questions that people have about the stock market.

35. Dow Jones Industrial Average Breaks Through 20,000 Milestone -

The Dow Jones industrial average crossed the 20,000 mark for the first time Wednesday, the latest milestone in a record-setting drive for the stock market.

Strong earnings from Boeing and other big companies helped push the Dow past the threshold early on and had U.S. stocks solidly higher in late-afternoon trading. The Standard & Poor's 500 index and Nasdaq composite were on course for record highs of their own after each closed at all-time highs on Tuesday.

36. Memphis Residential Market Growing, But Slower Than Most Metros, Study Finds -

Memphis ranks last among the nation’s 50 largest markets in a new report assessing current and forecasted housing fundamentals.

Ten-X, a national online real estate transaction platform, complied annual Census data to create its Top Single-Family Housing Markets Report for Winter, which takes into account traditional housing data like sales and permits and combines them with economic data such as population growth, unemployment rates, job growth and wages.

37. Memphis Economists: Trump Tweets Turn the Page on GOP Playbook -

It’s long been a cornerstone of Republican political orthodoxy that government should “get out of the way” of businesses, and that the fewer mandates and regulations, well, the better.

38. Bucket List Now Guiding The Way -

I found myself earlier this week Googling “travel bucket lists.” I was helping my wife, Stacey, research bucket lists related to her fourth novel that was set to come out the next day. Her book, “This is 35,” follows a character who has become famous in part because of her bucket lists.

39. Mortgage Rates, Home Sales and Prices Seen Rising in 2017 -

Nate Lowenstein has been shopping for a home in Los Angeles, on and off, for more than a year.

His search has been stymied by a stubbornly low roster of homes on the market and the hurdles that come with it: multiple competing bids and higher prices.

40. US Economy Grew at Strong 3.5 Pct. Annual Rate Last Quarter -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The U.S. economy grew at a 3.5 percent annual rate in the July-September quarter, the fastest pace in two years and more than the government had previously estimated. But the growth spurt isn't expected to last.

41. With Fed Expected to Hike, Attention Turns to What It Says -

WASHINGTON (AP) – There isn't much doubt about what the Federal Reserve will do when its latest policy meeting ends Wednesday: It's all but certain to raise its benchmark interest rate – its first increase in a year.

42. Evolving PILOT Programs in Memphis Look to Restore Competitive Balance -

When the Memphis-Shelby County Economic Development Growth Engine approved its Fast Track payment-in-lieu-of-taxes (PILOT) program earlier this year, it was with the hopes of bringing back a competitive balance between Memphis and North Mississippi.

43. Innovation or Monopoly? Panel Looks at ATT-Time Warner Deal -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Senators questioning the logic of a proposed merger between AT&T and Time Warner turned their focus to the nickels and dimes of the issue, at least as to how the $85.4 billion mega-deal would affect Americans. OK, you say this huge merger will enhance, not quash, competition and benefit consumers. Will it actually reduce prices that consumers pay?

44. Platform for Property -

Airbnb is revolutionizing the hospitality industry causing legislators worldwide to scramble to regulate it, but the Memphis City Council is gaining state and national attention for its hands-off attitude.

45. US Economy Grew at 3.2 Percent in Third Quarter -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The U.S. economy in the third quarter grew at the fastest pace in two years, with a revised report showing stronger consumer spending than first estimated.

The gross domestic product, the country's total output of goods and services, expanded at an annual rate of 3.2 percent in the July-September period, the Commerce Department reported Tuesday. That is up from a previous estimate of 2.9 percent.

46. Last Word: Pants Suits On the River, Early Vote Numbers & Chandler Parsons' Debut -

A busy last weekend for the Presidential campaigns in Shelby County where we have seen neither Hillary Clinton nor Donald Trump in the flesh since the primary campaign season and haven’t even seen their surrogates in the general election campaign.

47. Prepping for the Next Market Correction -

Ray’s Take Stock market corrections are an inevitable part of investing. Since 1932, declines of 10 to 20 percent have occurred every two years on average. It might happen next week, three months from now, or next year. 

48. BCBS Bombshell Leaves Insurance Seekers in Bind -

Nashville resident Jennifer Murray is caught in the snare of uncertainty looming over Tennessee health insurance coverage.

Self-employed as a health care consultant, the single 48-year-old bought individual coverage through BlueCross BlueShield Tennessee’s marketplace plans each year since the Affordable Care Act took effect in 2014. The company offered the widest range of physicians, and its insurance was accepted in most places.

49. Last Word: Mud Island Round 3, Newsmakers Notes and North Midtown -

Cue the organ. You know, the one from those old soap operas or radio dramas. And prepare for the latest episode of Island of Mud. When last we looked in on Mud Island River Park, the city had two finalists to redevelop all or a part of the southern half of the island that is really a peninsula.

50. Green Renaissance -

As director of Shelby Farms Park Conservancy, Jen Andrews has been on the front lines of what can fairly be called a green revival in Memphis. And she is amazed at how much change has occurred over the last decade, a rebirth that spans not just across the miles but now seems embedded in the city’s psyche.

51. Google Gets Aggressive With New Phones, Other Gadgets -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) – Google launched an aggressive challenge to consumer electronics giants like Apple and Samsung on Tuesday, introducing a new line of smartphones called Pixel and other gadgets designed to showcase a digital helper the company calls "Google Assistant."

52. In a Tight Market, Stores Lure Holiday Workers With Perks -

NEW YORK (AP) – Retailers are dangling perks like higher pay, extra discounts and more flexible schedules to lure temporary holiday workers in a tighter labor market.

They're also more determined to lock in their workers earlier. Macy's and Target are holding their first nationwide recruitment fairs, and others like consumer electronics chain Hhgregg Inc. are making it easier to apply for temporary holiday jobs via mobile devices.

53. Open and Shut -

The office of the future hacks down cubicle walls in favor of modular furniture that encourages collaboration. As many business sectors, from banking to legal services, move to a tech-first approach, companies are turning away from traditional office configurations to attract the next generation of talent.

54. First Tennessee Bank Opens First Local Branch in a Decade in Arlington -

After a decade of acquisitions and renovations of existing branches, Memphis-based First Tennessee Bank has opened its first new West Tennessee branch in Arlington.

55. Shelby County Mortgage Market Up 17 Percent in August -

Bankers like Scott Stafford are watching for the Federal Reserve to raise interest rates soon and, at least for the moment, expect the usual mortgage market cool-down heading towards the end of the year.

56. New Type of Subdivision to Replace Foote Homes -

Memphis’ last traditional public housing complex is coming down and a new kind of subdivision will rise in its place.

The Land Use Control Board formally accepted the site plan for the South City development at its Thursday, Sept. 8, meeting. With the help of a $30 million federal Choice Neighborhoods grant, the Memphis Housing Authority plans to raze the 420 units of Foote Homes that date back to the 1940s to make way for Memphis’ first sustainable subdivision.

57. Editorial: The Prosperity Mix in Memphis -

There are jobs you have to take and jobs you want to take. As in other places, Memphis’ economy is a mix of the two, and our effort to have more of the jobs that allow for careers and growth is seen by most if not all of our civic leadership as the way to build prosperity.

58. Red-Hot Jobs -

With unemployment low and falling and competition stiff and rising, accounting firm DHG Memphis is putting the full-court press on recruiting and hiring.

The full-service firm, which has been in Memphis for 60 years, is growing at a double-digit clip and has increased its staff to 110 people.

59. Redbirds’ Home Attendance Still a Rebuilding Project -

On the last Saturday night of the summer at AutoZone Park, the Memphis Redbirds sold the place out and then some. The announced attendance of 11,041 represented the highest mark since the ballpark was renovated and reconfigured after the 2014 season.

60. Volkswagen Stakes Hopes of US Sales Revival on Tennessee-Made SUV -

CHATTANOOGA, Tenn. (AP) – Volkswagen's new SUV comes with a feature that automatically controls braking to each wheel as the seven-seater descends on slippery off-road terrain. The German automaker is staking its hopes on the new model being just as adept at arresting the company's sales woes in the United States.

61. DMC Continues to Adorn Downtown with Events, Art -

A two-block alley will be the latest site for a Downtown art gallery. The Downtown Memphis Commission plans to install up to 10 different art projects along Barboro Alley, which stretches from Second Street to Front Street.

62. Smith Helps Mayor Pick the Right Team -

As chief human resources officer for the city of Memphis, Alexandria Smith is responsible for the HR strategy and talent management for the city as an employer. She provides advice to the mayor and senior leadership team, a role that has played an important part in shaping the city’s future, including leading the recent search for a police chief.

63. French Truck Coffee Making Splash in Memphis -

Jimmy Lewis said that when he agreed to move his Relevant Roasters concept into Crosstown Concourse, he was taking a risk. His coffee-roasting operation is only 2 years old, and the in-house coffee shop element at 584 Tillman St. is even newer.

64. Pera’s Ubiquiti Networks at Pivotal Moment -

Big tech companies like Google and Facebook have been generating news headlines and public interest for a while now over their plans to bring internet connectivity to the large swaths of the world that still don’t have it, or that need a better offering of some kind.

65. Wal-Mart Raises Annual Profit Outlook, Reports Strong Sales -

NEW YORK (AP) – Wal-Mart's vast fleet of stores and its online business are starting to click together.

The company raised its earnings outlook for the year on Thursday and delivered strong profit and sales for the second quarter, as moves to improve the store and online experience are winning over customers.

66. Target Cuts Outlook as It Sees Fewer Customers in Stores -

NEW YORK (AP) – Target Corp. cut its profit forecast and a key sales outlook Wednesday as it saw fewer customers in its stores and acknowledged it didn't push the second part of its "Expect More, Pay Less" slogan.

67. Macy's Plans to Close 100 Stores, Boost Online Investment -

NEW YORK (AP) – Macy's plans to close about 100 stores next year and boost its online investments, the nation's largest department store chain said Thursday, as it tries to become more nimble in an increasingly fierce market. The closures represent close to 14 percent of its stores under the Macy's brand.

68. Health Insurer Aetna Backs Off ACA Expansion Plans -

Aetna became the latest health insurer to cast doubt upon its future in the Affordable Care Act's insurance exchanges after it called off a planned expansion Tuesday and suggested it could abandon that market completely.

69. Dollar General Moving Into Former Wal-Mart Express Stores -

TUPELO, Miss. (AP) — Dollar General has bought 41 former Wal-mart Express stores in 11 states for an undisclosed sum.

Included in the purchase are five locations in Mississippi: Belmont, Derma, Mantachie, Nettleton and Sardis. Dollar General has existing stores in these communities and will move into the larger locations that were once Wal-mart Express. Dollar General did not buy the location in Walnut, but it does have a store there and in nearby Falkner.

70. Gannett to Restructure Commercial Appeal -

The union that covers newsroom employees at The Commercial Appeal has begun the process of formally challenging a new series of cost-cutting and efficiency measures in the works at the paper, comparing the moves to “The Hunger Games.”

71. Gannett Plans Restructure of Commercial Appeal Newsroom -

The union that covers newsroom employees at The Commercial Appeal has begun the process of formally challenging a new series of cost-cutting and efficiency measures in the works at the paper, comparing the moves to “The Hunger Games.”

72. As Fed Meets, No Rate Hike is Expected Until Late This Year -

WASHINGTON (AP) – On again. Off again. On again?

Anyone trying to peg the likelihood of a Federal Reserve interest rate hike this year has been subject to a topsy-turvy shift of expert opinion the past few months. And when the Fed holds its latest policy meeting this week, few think it will provide much more clarity.

73. Progress in Closing the Digital Divide -

When I worked in financial services I saw the information technology sector quickly grow to be the second largest sector, making up over 20 percent of the capital markets.

Now that I am back in Memphis and working to build high-growth entrepreneurial technology companies, I see firsthand how the lack of embracing information technology earlier here in Memphis hit us like a sledgehammer.

74. Tennessee Lagging On Alternative Energy -

Tennessee has never been at the forefront of alternative energy. If California is the cool kid tapped in on all the latest advances, we could be considered the behind-the-times cousin always trying to play catch up.

75. US Consumer Confidence Slips for Second Month -

U.S. consumer confidence fell for a second month in May to the lowest level since November.

The Conference Board said Tuesday, May 31, that its index of consumer confidence slipped to 92.6 from 94.7 in April. The May reading matched the level in November. Both months were the lowest since last July.

76. Wal-Mart Testing Uber, Lyft for Online Grocery Delivery -

BENTONVILLE, Ark. (AP) – Wal-Mart Stores Inc. says it will be testing its grocery delivery service with ride-hailing companies Uber and Lyft in the next two weeks in Denver and Phoenix.

77. US Consumer Confidence Slips for Second Month -

U.S. consumer confidence fell for a second month in May to the lowest level since November.

The Conference Board said Tuesday, May 31, that its index of consumer confidence slipped to 92.6 from 94.7 in April. The May reading matched the level in November. Both months were the lowest since last July.

78. US Consumer Spending Scores Biggest Jump in 6 Years -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Consumer spending surged in April by the largest amount in more than six years, led by a big jump in purchases of autos and other durable goods.

Consumer spending rose 1 percent last month after a flat reading in March, the Commerce Department reported Tuesday. Incomes were up a solid 0.4 percent, matching the March gain. Wages and salaries, the most important component of incomes, gained 0.5 percent.

79. US Economy Showing Signs of Life After Slow Start to Year -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The U.S. economy is showing signs of more life after a less-than-stellar start to the year.

The government said Friday that first-quarter growth, while disappointing, wasn't as bad as first thought. And a number of more recent indicators are showing decent gains in key areas like consumer spending and housing.

80. First-Quarter Results Show Fred’s on Rebound -

Especially for a company like Memphis-based discount retailer Fred’s Inc., quarterly earnings results are about more than the numbers.

Fred’s – which grew total sales 8 percent during the quarter ended April 30 over the same period last year and earned $1.3 million in net income – is in the midst of a broad strategic and operational realignment. On the heels of new additions to management last year, plus new strategic imperatives and a big acquisition, changes the company is pushing this year include positioning itself as more of a health care company.

81. Say Goodbye to Time Warner Cable: Sale Leads to Name Change -

NEW YORK (AP) – Soon you'll have a new cable company to hate. It'll take some practice, but in time you'll get used to swearing at Spectrum.

Time Warner Cable, the largest cable provider in New York and Los Angeles, among other markets, was just bought by Charter Communications Inc., which has mostly operated in the Midwest. The Stamford, Connecticut-based company also bought Bright House Networks Wednesday. That makes Charter the second-largest home Internet provider and third-largest video provider in the U.S. Over the next year and a half, Charter will phase out the Time Warner Cable and Bright House names in favor of its own brand, Spectrum.

82. Tennessee Leads the Nation in Bankruptcies -

Tennessee has a model program for financial literacy in its public schools. All high school students must pass a personal finance course to graduate, and even kindergartners are learning about money under a new initiative to extend the curriculum to primary school.

83. Last Word: BSMF Looks Up, Overton Park Respite and Slow Economic Growth -

The Beale Street Music Festival box office numbers won’t be in for a bit yet. But it looks like the three-day event that ended Sunday evening with Beck and Paul Simon weathered the weather very well, maybe better than usual.

84. Grinding Recovery -

Michael Drury is watching the current U.S. presidential season with a combination of professional detachment and an air of resignation.

Detachment, because part of his job as chief economist at Memphis-based McVean Trading & Investments is to keep abreast of what makes economies around the world tick. Part of that, of course, means at least some degree of focus on the man – or, possibly a few months from now, the woman – who sits astride the dominant global economy.

85. Lay Off The Sauce, Maker Says -

LONDON (AP) — Mars Food, the maker of Dolmio and Uncle Ben's, says some of its sauces will soon carry labels suggesting they should be eaten only occasionally - a decision praised by health campaigners seeking to reduce the amount of salt, sugar and fat in processed food.

86. Moving Dirt -

The Memphis development community is looking inward and upward to increase density in the urban core. New construction is happening across all four commercial real estate sectors, with long-anticipated projects like Trader Joe’s and the redevelopment of Central Station finally coming to fruition. Construction and operating costs continue to be a challenge as new projects hit the top of their class to command higher rents.

87. Vancouver Features Tastes For All Senses -

Every place has a food.

Canada has poutine. Sure, the country probably has a few other things, too. But Canada has poutine.

And never mind that the gooey mess of fries, gravy and cheese curds actually has origins in Quebec, on the far eastern end of Canada. A few hours into our family’s first visit to Canada in Vancouver – yes, on the far western edge of the country – the first meal had to include poutine.

88. Household Spending, Home Building Fuel Modest US Growth -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Consumer spending and home construction are helping sustain modest U.S. economic growth despite problems caused by a strong dollar, low oil prices and an excess of business stockpiles.

89. Dodging a Disaster With Volkswagen? -

Next month will mark five years since the first Passat rolled off the assembly line at Chattanooga’s Volkswagen plant. Most anniversaries are a cause for celebration.

But as Chattanoogans blow out the candles on this particular milestone they’ll be hoping that Volkswagen’s diesel emissions troubles will soon be extinguished, too, and that the new SUV model they’ll start producing this year will help VW emerge from the crisis a better and stronger company than before.

90. FedEx CEO Downplays Amazon ‘Industry Disruption’ -

FedEx Corp. founder and CEO Fred Smith never said the word “Amazon,” but the e-commerce giant was clearly on his mind Wednesday.

Smith addressed speculation about “industry disruption” by Amazon from the outset of Memphis-based FedEx’s quarterly earnings conference call. He also defended the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade agreement, noting that both of the frontrunners for the Democratic and Republican presidential nominations are opposed to it.

91. With No Rate Hike Seen, Fed's Outlook on Economy is Awaited -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The financial world is awaiting the Federal Reserve's response to a critical question: How stable are the world's economies and financial markets?

Whatever picture the Fed sketches will help shape expectations of when it will resume the interest rate increases it began in December. That's when the Fed raised its key rate from record lows to reflect an economy finally strong enough 6½ years after the Great Recession ended to withstand higher loan rates.

92. Strong US Job Growth in February Helps Dispel Recession Fears -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A robust February jobs report showcased a resilient U.S. economy just as fears of a new recession had begun to surface.

Economic reports in recent weeks had fueled anxieties about a looming downturn: Manufacturers were slumping. Stocks had plummeted. China was slowing sharply along with other emerging markets. The rising dollar had crushed exports.

93. Survey: US Companies Added 214,000 Jobs In February -

WASHINGTON (AP) – U.S. businesses added a healthy 214,000 jobs last month, another sign that the U.S. job market remains resilient despite economic weakness overseas and tumult in financial markets.

94. Numbers Show Memphis’ Commercial Real Estate Market Stable in 2015 -

Across all sectors, the Memphis market was stable in 2015.

That’s according to the latest data from Integra Realty Resources, a national appraisal and advisory firm. At its annual Viewpoint local market presentation Wednesday, Feb. 24, local Integra leaders spoke on the industrial sector’s banner year, multifamily’s expansion cycle, what’s next for an office market without any remaining Class A space, and growth in the retail sector.

95. US Retail Sales Rise as Consumers Shrug Off Stock Price Drop -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. retail sales rose modestly in January, evidence that Americans kept shopping despite sharp drops in stock prices.

The Commerce Department said Friday that retail sales increased a seasonally adjusted 0.2 percent last month, the same as in December. Excluding the effect of falling gas prices, sales rose 0.4 percent.

96. Real Estate Vet: Kroger Looking to Spread its Wings -

Jimmy Lewis isn’t surprised by word that emerged in recent days about Kroger, the nation’s largest grocery chain, eyeing an acquisition of specialty grocer Fresh Market.

97. US Businesses Post More Open Jobs; Quits Rise to 9-Year High -

WASHINGTON (AP) – U.S. companies advertised more available jobs in December and more Americans quit, trends that could lift wages in the coming months.

The number of job openings jumped 4.9 percent to 5.6 million, the most since July, the Labor Department said Tuesday. And quits increased 6.9 percent to nearly 3.1 million, the highest in more than nine years.

98. Many See Cause for Optimism Despite Slower US Job Growth -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Consider looking past January's so-so job growth.

At first glance, Friday's government report on U.S. hiring was a downer — 151,000 added jobs, well below the pace of the previous few months.

99. First Horizon CEO: 2015 Was a ‘Very Good Year’ -

The top brass at First Tennessee Bank’s parent company kicked off their first quarterly earnings presentation to analysts in 2016 with frequent allusion to some favorite themes.

100. US Employers Hire at Robust Pace, Defying Global Trends -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. economy is motoring ahead despite slowing global growth that caused upheavals in financial markets around the world this week.

Employers added a robust 292,000 jobs last month, and the unemployment rate stayed low at 5 percent, the Labor Department said Friday. Job gains in the October-December quarter averaged 284,000, the best three-month increase since last January.