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Editorial Results (free)

1. First Tennessee’s Walker Leading Push To Infuse Diversity Throughout Bank -

Memphis-based First Tennessee Bank is already the biggest bank in the state and award-winning for its work atmosphere. But the company isn’t resting on its laurels, instead forging ahead with unique strategies to better reflect the communities it is serving through a top-down, baked-in approach to ensuring diversity at every level of the organization.

2. Web Market Delivers Fresh From The Farm -

An online farmers market service launched in September by an Arkansas judge and his wife has expanded with the addition of a Thanksgiving-themed meal kit product.

Adam and Tasha Weeks are the owners of Powhatan Farms in Powhatan, Arkansas, and the couple behind the business SingBean.com. That’s their service that lets customers log on from Saturday until Monday night and fill up their online cart with items from a group of farms the service works with.

3. Tenet Healthcare To Lay Off 1,300 Workers -

The parent company of Saint Francis Hospital in Memphis and Bartlett has announced a company-wide cost reduction effort intended to lower operating expenses by $150 million and will include cutting about 1,300 positions, including contractors.

4. Clicking on All Cylinders -

Memphis is a city on the precipice of change as projects that were once deemed impossible – like ServiceMaster’s Downtown headquarters or Crosstown Concourse – have emboldened developers and city officials to shoot for the moon.

5. First Tennessee Parent Company Reports Positive “Stress Test” Results -

First Horizon National Corp. has submitted the results of its annual Dodd-Frank Act Stress Test to regulators, which show that the company’s management and board believes it “would maintain capital well in excess of regulatory adequate levels under severely adverse economic and financial conditions.”

6. Site of Amazon's HQ2 Has Much to Learn From Seattle -

SEATTLE (AP) – Memo to the many places vying for Amazon's second headquarters: It ain't all food trucks and free bananas.

For years, much of downtown Seattle has been a maze of broken streets and caution-taped sidewalks. Dozens of enormous cranes tower overhead as double-length dump trucks hauling excavated dirt rumble past pedestrians and bicyclists. The crashing and clanging of construction is the city's soundtrack on a perpetual loop.

7. Pettit Joins Food Bank As Chief Development Officer -

Attorney Peter Pettit has joined Mid-South Food Bank as chief development officer following his recent retirement as a partner in the Memphis office of Bass, Berry & Sims PLC. In his new role, Pettit works closely with food bank leaders to develop strategies and relationships with major gift donors, and specifically is working to complete the $12.5 million “Hunger to Hope” capital campaign.

8. The Magic Numbers -

Ray’s Take: Saving for retirement doesn’t just happen by accident. It takes meaningful thought, discipline, and action to create and execute a plan that will sustain you in your golden years. Yet, according to the Employee Benefit Research Institute, only 18 percent of U.S. workers say they are very confident of having enough money to live comfortably during their retirement years. There seems to be a big disconnect going on between knowledge and execution.

9. Here Comes Earnings Season: Brace for a Slowdown in Growth -

NEW YORK (AP) – Earnings reporting season is getting underway, and Wall Street is getting ready to be underwhelmed.

Profit growth likely slowed sharply in the summer for U.S. companies after hurricanes and other natural disasters caused big damage. Analysts are forecasting weaker earnings for several areas of the market from a year ago, a sharp turnaround from earlier this year, when earnings were soaring by more than 10 percent and helping to drive the stock market to record heights.

10. Honeywell Spins Off Homes, Distribution Operations -

MORRIS PLAINS, N.J. (AP) – Honeywell is spinning off businesses with annualized sales of more than $7 billion, but holding on to its lucrative aerospace division.

Becoming two separate and publicly traded companies, Honeywell said Tuesday, are its homes product portfolio and ADI global distribution business, along with its transportation systems business.

11. Full Steam Ahead: Funds of All Types Rose Again Last Quarter -

NEW YORK (AP) – Utopia is still in effect for fund investors. Funds of all types again powered higher in the third quarter, as stocks and bonds around the world rose in unison. Not only did investors get strong returns from their funds, they also got them with remarkably few headaches along the way.

12. Realistic Returns -

Ray’s Take: It’s common among investors to fall into the “short-term mindset” with investments. The financial media tends to make things worse. If you do not see the returns you want on cue, you decide to move your funds around to the ones that are showing higher short-term returns.

13. From Ownership to the Roster, Grizzlies Full of Questions -

Chandler Parsons’ knees. There are two well-documented concerns.

Depth at point guard. This isn’t just an annual concern, it’s a Grizzlies tradition as much as Zach Randolph throwing his headband into the crowd … oh, yeah, bad example.

14. Don’t Give Me That Data-tude -

Humans are a limited species. We cannot with any certainty, given the dynamic nature of life, predict the future.

In some cases you have better odds when running models and scenarios based on judging the future by analyzing past behaviors and patterns, such as insurance actuary tables or credit scores; however, most predictions are wrong.

15. Republicans Unveil Long-Shot Effort on Health Care -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Senators on Wednesday rolled out competing plans for the nation's health care system, with a group of GOP senators making a last, long-shot effort to undo Barack Obama's Affordable Care Act and independent Sen. Bernie Sanders proposing universal government-run coverage.

16. Grizzlies’ Grind City Media Expands Into Football Coverage -

Last September, the Memphis Grizzlies launched their new in-house digital news and information platform: Grind City Media.

Now, Grind City Media is trying to drive that initiative farther down the field, as it were, by adding college football coverage.

17. Best Buy Rolls Out Consulting Service at People's Homes -

NEW YORK (AP) – Best Buy is rolling out a free service next month where salespeople will sit with customers at their own homes to help make recommendations on TVs, streaming services and more.

18. Yellen Defends Bank Regulations Passed After 2008 Crisis -

JACKSON HOLE, Wyoming (AP) – Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen on Friday emphatically defended the web of regulations the Fed helped enact after the 2008 financial crisis, saying it helped restore the banking system's health and disputing criticism that the rules have hurt lending.

19. Philips to Build Health Technology Center in Tennessee -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Dutch giant Royal Philips plans to build a health technology center in Tennessee that officials expect will create more than 800 jobs in the Nashville area over the next two years.

20. How Many Funds Make a Good Mix? -

Ray’s Take: When it comes to building a portfolio for retirement, your goal shouldn’t be to load up with as many different types of investments as you can in the hopes that you’ll outsmart any fluctuations in the market. Diversification, like all things, has its limits.

21. One Decade Later: Effects of Financial Crisis Still Linger -

Ten years removed from the worst financial crisis since the Great Depression, the banking industry has transformed itself and wealth managers say investors remain leery.

Among other things, First Tennessee Bank jettisoned its national mortgage operation in the wake of the crisis. It refocused its attention and efforts around being a strong regional bank, as opposed to one with aggressive national ambitions. It trimmed headcount, boosted investment in technology and began to specialize, creating new industry-specific teams in verticals like health care and music-industry banking.

22. US Trade Deficit Narrowed to $43.6 Billion in June -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The U.S. trade deficit narrowed in June as exports hit the highest level in 2 1/2 years.

The Commerce Department said Friday that the trade gap slid 5.9 percent in June to $43.6 billion.

23. Memphis, Other Secondary Markets Poised for Industrial Growth -

When it comes to logistics, the primary distribution center markets like Atlanta, Chicago and Los Angeles have led the way in terms of warehouse development. But as more companies look to tighten their supply chain, secondary markets – including Memphis; Louisville, Kentucky; and Cleveland, Ohio – have found themselves in a better position to absorb growth.

24. Jernigan Capital Hits Investment Milestones -

Jernigan Capital – a publicly traded, Memphis-based provider of capital to self-storage entrepreneurs – is on a tear at the moment.

The company in recent days has closed three new self-storage development investment commitments totaling almost $50 million, including a co-investment of $26.5 million for a proposed 1,424-unit facility in Manhattan. The other investments are for facilities in Knoxville and in the Boston metro area, and construction on all three facilities is set to be finished by the end of second quarter 2018.

25. Volvo Goes Electric, Ditches Cars Powered Solely by Gas -

HELSINKI (AP) – Volvo plans to build only electric and hybrid vehicles starting in 2019, making it the first major automaker to abandon cars and SUVs powered solely by the internal combustion engine.

26. Fed Debating When to Unwind $4.5 Trillion in Bond Holdings -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Federal Reserve is figuring out when to start unloading much of its $4.5 trillion in bond holdings – a major turning point for an economy still healing from the 2008 financial crisis.

27. Analyst: Fred’s Not Seen as Viable Buyer of Rite Aid Stores -

Nick Mitchell, managing director and research analyst with Northcoast Research, didn’t have to do much work or analysis in the wake of news that Memphis-based Fred’s Inc. has been cut out of a deal between Walgreens and Rite Aid.

28. Amazon Deal for Whole Foods Could Bring Retail Experiments -

NEW YORK (AP) – Online retail giant Amazon is making a bold expansion into physical stores with a $13.7 billion deal to buy Whole Foods, setting the stage for radical retail experiments that could revolutionize how people buy groceries and everything else.

29. Fed Raises Key Rate and Unveils Plan to Reduce Bond Holdings -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Federal Reserve has raised its key interest rate for the third time in six months, providing its latest vote of confidence in a slow-growing but durable economy. The Fed also announced plans to start gradually paring its bond holdings later this year, which could cause long-term rates to rise.

30. Medicaid Cuts Could Hit Rural Children Hardest -

As Congress fiddles with an Obamacare replacement, one likely to cut billions in Medicaid spending, health care experts warn a decrease in funding could be hard on Tennessee.

During a recent forum in Jackson, Andy Schneider of the Georgetown Center on Children and Families reported that 50 percent of Tennessee’s children in small towns and rural areas are covered by Medicaid, a higher percentage than the rest of the nation, and more than in Tennessee’s urban areas where 39 percent have Medicaid.

31. Fed Survey Finds Tight Labor Markets, Rising Wages -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The economy kept growing in April through late May, with more regions citing worker shortages across a widening range of occupations, the Federal Reserve reported Wednesday.

32. New Rules for Emergency Funds -

Ray’s Take The old rule of thumb for an emergency savings account was three to six months of living expenses. It was created at a time when the workforce experience was more monolithic and predictable. This was when there more likely was a single breadwinner who worked at the same company their entire life and retired with a gold watch and a big send-off party. 

33. Fields Out at Ford; New CEO Hackett Known for Turnarounds -

DEARBORN, Michigan (AP) – Ford is replacing CEO Mark Fields as it struggles to keep its traditional auto-manufacturing business running smoothly while remaking itself as a nimble, high-tech provider of new mobility services.

34. Prospect of NAFTA Rewrite Gives US Farmers a Case of Jitters -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A sizable majority of rural Americans backed Donald Trump's presidential bid, drawn to his calls to slash environmental rules, strengthen law enforcement and replace the federal health care law.

35. Wunderlich Securities Acquired by LA Firm in $67M Deal -

Memphis-based investment firm Wunderlich Securities Inc. will be acquired by a publicly traded Los Angeles-based financial services firm, B. Riley Financial, in a $67 million deal expected to close in June.

36. View From the Hill: Haslam Credits GOP ‘Experiment’ for Tennessee’s Success -

If you ask Gov. Bill Haslam, Republican government is the best thing since sliced bread.

Not only is GOP leadership responsible for a myriad of tax cuts leading to record surpluses and a $37 billion budget funding better K-12 and higher education, shoring up the rainy day and TennCare funds, shrinking state debt and building an economic environment for job creation, Haslam says. It’s even bringing us the cleanest air since before the industrial revolution.

37. Cai to Lead Memphis Chamber’s International Business Efforts -

Jinliang (Jin) Cai has joined the Greater Memphis Chamber as vice president of international business development. In that role, Cai will be directing efforts both to grow foreign direct investment in Memphis and Shelby County and to increase the volume of local exports to foreign markets. 

38. Last Word: Council Day Issues, 'A Man Of Color' and East Memphis 'Novel' -

A busy day at City Hall Tuesday by the City Council agenda and by at least one completely unplanned moment during council budget committee sessions. It was so busy that at the start of Tuesday’s council session, chairman Berlin Boyd couldn’t find his gavel and technical glitches prompted him to ask for a can of WD-40. Throw in a visit to City Hall by civil rights leader Rev. Jesse Jackson and you have our comprehensive same night rundown of how it went and for whom it went.

39. Last Word: BSMF, Budget Books and Milli Vanilli -

Three days of sun and mild temperatures for the Beale Street Music Festival. Not to be all “Dawn Lazarus” about the weather. Of course, it wasn’t just that way over Tom Lee Park. And many of us continue to find there is life outside after you have determined your festival days may be behind you. We were all over the place this weekend including Tom Lee Park and Shelby Farms Park and backyards and trails and on a rising river. Can you still claim you were at BSMF if you were within earshot of it?

40. Vining Sparks Chief Economist: Economy in Period of ‘Uncertain Optimism’ -

The same day the U.S. Senate sent a $1.1 trillion spending bill to President Trump – the first major legislation of his presidency which averts a Friday, May 5, government shutdown – Craig Dismuke was telling a Memphis audience how much his economic forecasts hinge on the new president.

41. Eighteen Startup Teams Set to Begin ‘Summer of Acceleration’ in Memphis -

Eighteen startup teams this week have kicked off the “Summer of Acceleration,” the season of joint accelerator programming across six startup accelerators overseen by the EPIcenter, Memphis Bioworks and Start Co.

42. Last Word: Budget Books and Line Items, Top of the Road List and Silencers -

The comforting thud of reams of bound printed paper hitting a wooden table top. The sound of pages turning as Power Points are read aloud. Yes, fellow citizens of the republic, it is budget season in Shelby County. The gavel fell on Memphis City Council budget hearings Tuesday at City Hall. And Wednesday morning Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell takes his budget proposal to the County Commission. A note about the city budget deliberations. Tuesday’s opening session saw the return of council member Janis Fullilove to City Hall after being out for a while due to an extended illness.

43. Economy In Flux -

With apologies to Dickens’ “A Tale of Two Cities,” for the professionals who follow economics for a living this is very much the best of times and the worst of times.

The moment is one of abundant optimism and rampant uncertainty. “Directionally,” they like to say, things look positive. And yet so much could still go very, very wrong.

44. Bohannon Joins Cumulus Media As Memphis Market Manager -

Morgan Bohannon recently joined Cumulus Media as vice president/market manager for its four-station group in Memphis, which includes KIX 106, 98.1 The Max, 98.9 The Vibe and 103.5 WRBO. Bohannon comes to Cumulus from iHeartMedia-Memphis, where he most recently served as area president. He worked for iHeartMedia/Clear Channel Radio for more than 20 years in various capacities and markets.

45. How Trump Insurance Changes Could Affect Coverage Next Year -

A much tighter sign-up deadline and coverage delays will be waiting for some health insurance customers now that President Donald Trump's administration has finished a plan designed to stabilize shaky insurance markets.

46. Initiatives Geared at Boosting Owner-Occupied Housing -

Nearly a third of all homes in Shelby County are owned by investors, a fact which has state and city leaders looking for ways to stem the tide and encourage locals to buy into their communities through owner-occupied homeownership.

47. Binghampton’s Diverse Culture On Display at Kaleidoscope Festival -

With nearly 20 nationalities calling Binghampton home, the neighborhood possibly is the most culturally diverse in Memphis.

That diversity will be celebrated Saturday, April 15, at Wiseacre Brewing Co. with Kaleidoscope, a multicultural food festival that will present a variety of food entrepreneurs serving up unique goodness from their homes. The food festival is the culmination of work over the past year to support refugee and immigrant food entrepreneurs in the Binghampton community.

48. Wells Fargo Claws Back $75M From Top Execs in Sales Scandal -

NEW YORK (AP) – The problems at Wells Fargo and its overly aggressive sales culture date back at least 15 years, and management had little interest in dealing with the issue until it spiraled out of control resulting in millions of accounts being opened fraudulently, according to an investigation by the company's board of directors.

49. Trump's SEC Pick, an Ex-Goldman Lawyer, to Face Skepticism -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Goldman Sachs may be about to get another friend in Washington.

Jay Clayton, a well-connected Wall Street lawyer who is President Donald Trump's pick to lead the Securities and Exchange Commission, is sure to face sharp questions from Democrats at his confirmation hearing Thursday over his years of work for Goldman and other financial giants.

50. What’s Wrong With the 4 Percent Strategy? -

Ray’s Take: When you finally reach your retirement date, one of your first questions will be: How much of my savings can I spend?

The seat-of-the-pants guideline for retirement withdrawals has been 4 percent for many years. That’s all well and good when 10-year treasuries were yielding 6 percent. Now they are under 2.5 percent so that approach and the rule are less clear. Retirement readiness is too complex to be bound by a simple rule of thumb. Further, that rule doesn’t necessarily take into account investment expenses.

51. Will Mortgage Rates Rise? What to Know About Fed Rate Hike -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Are mortgage rates headed up? How about car loans? Credit cards?

How about those nearly invisible rates on bank CDs – any chance of getting a few dollars more?

52. Chamber’s MWBE Loan Program Helps Companies Secure ISO Certification -

A cohort of minority-owned businesses have used a new Greater Memphis Chamber loan program to complete ISO 9001 certification, which opens them up to new federal contracting opportunities where the certification is required.

53. US Trade Deficit Jumps to 5-Year High of $48.5 Billion -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The U.S. trade deficit jumped in January to the highest level in nearly five years as a flood of mobile phones and other consumer products widened America's trade gap with China. The result underscores the challenges facing President Donald Trump in fulfilling a campaign pledge to reduce America's trade deficits.

54. McDonald's Lays Out Plan It Hopes Can Reverse Drop in Visits -

NEW YORK (AP) – McDonald's acknowledged on Wednesday that it lost 500 million customer transactions in the U.S. since 2012 and laid out its plans to get more people back into its restaurants – including by letting them order and pay on their mobile phones by the end of the year.

55. CRE Brokers Speculate on Future of Commercial Appeal Headquarters -

When USA Today Network executive and president of The Tennessean newspaper Laura Hollingsworth came into town the day after The Commercial Appeal announced printing operations will be moving to Jackson, Tennessee, she told the staff that while no immediate plans were in place, selling the daily paper’s iconic building was certainly a possibility down the road.

56. Cities, Developers Reaping Rewards of Mixed-Use Shift -

Commercial real estate is shifting to mixed-use developments designed to create a sense of place for homeowners longing for the community of days gone by, and the trend is profiting many parties as commercial developers see stronger returns and cities undergo revitalization in their core.

57. Attorney Harkavy Named To Wyatt’s Executive Committee -

Lee A. Harkavy is one of two attorneys from the Memphis office of Wyatt, Tarrant & Combs LLP to be named to the regional law firm’s executive committee. Harkavy is a commercial transactional attorney focused primarily on representing businesses in their external growth endeavors or exit strategies. In that capacity, he advises clients on mergers, acquisitions and dispositions, and capital-raising transactions.

58. Aetna, Humana Call Off $34 Billion Deal -

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) – Major health insurers Aetna and Humana called off their $34 billion combination after a federal judge, citing concerns about prices and benefits, rejected the deal.

59. Yellen Expects Gradual Pace for Hikes But Sees Risk in Delay -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen said Tuesday that the central bank still expects to raise interest rates gradually this year. But she said the Fed also recognizes the dangers of waiting too long to tighten credit.

60. Fed Board Member Tarullo Announces Resignation -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Federal Reserve board member Daniel Tarullo, a key official guiding bank regulation efforts, will resign this spring, the Fed said Friday.

Tarullo's decision will clear the way for President Donald Trump to select a candidate for the bank supervision position. Trump is likely to choose someone more in line with his desires to roll back the regulations put in place by the Dodd-Frank Act, which overhauled bank supervision in the wake of the 2008 financial crisis.

61. Mortgage Market Shows Strength In January -

2017 may be another busy stretch for mortgage bankers in Shelby County, if the atypically busy start to the year is any indication.

Purchase mortgage volume came out of the gate strong in January, rising 28 percent to a little more than $112 million compared with $87.4 million in the year-ago period, according to the latest figures from real estate information company Chandler Reports, chandlerreports.com.

62. Retail Group: Sales to Grow 3.7 Percent to 4.2 Percent -

NEW YORK (AP) – Despite a bumpy holiday season, chains like The Limited shutting down and department stores such as Macy's closing stores, the largest retail trade group says it's still optimistic that sales will grow this year – especially online.

63. Trump Moves to Scale Back Financial Regulations -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Donald Trump is taking his first steps aimed at scaling back financial services regulations, and the Republican-run Congress cast a vote early Friday signaling that it's eager to help.

64. AP-NORC Poll: Broad Worries About Potential Health Care Loss -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Though "Obamacare" still divides Americans, a majority worry that many will lose coverage if the 2010 law is repealed in the nation's long-running political standoff over health care.

65. Dow 20,000: What Does It Mean and Where Does It Go? -

With the Dow Jones industrials above 20,000, it's natural to ask what's going on and what, if anything, investors should do. Here are some answers to common questions that people have about the stock market.

66. Dow Jones Industrial Average Breaks Through 20,000 Milestone -

The Dow Jones industrial average crossed the 20,000 mark for the first time Wednesday, the latest milestone in a record-setting drive for the stock market.

Strong earnings from Boeing and other big companies helped push the Dow past the threshold early on and had U.S. stocks solidly higher in late-afternoon trading. The Standard & Poor's 500 index and Nasdaq composite were on course for record highs of their own after each closed at all-time highs on Tuesday.

67. Memphis Residential Market Growing, But Slower Than Most Metros, Study Finds -

Memphis ranks last among the nation’s 50 largest markets in a new report assessing current and forecasted housing fundamentals.

Ten-X, a national online real estate transaction platform, complied annual Census data to create its Top Single-Family Housing Markets Report for Winter, which takes into account traditional housing data like sales and permits and combines them with economic data such as population growth, unemployment rates, job growth and wages.

68. Memphis Economists: Trump Tweets Turn the Page on GOP Playbook -

It’s long been a cornerstone of Republican political orthodoxy that government should “get out of the way” of businesses, and that the fewer mandates and regulations, well, the better.

69. Bucket List Now Guiding The Way -

I found myself earlier this week Googling “travel bucket lists.” I was helping my wife, Stacey, research bucket lists related to her fourth novel that was set to come out the next day. Her book, “This is 35,” follows a character who has become famous in part because of her bucket lists.

70. Mortgage Rates, Home Sales and Prices Seen Rising in 2017 -

Nate Lowenstein has been shopping for a home in Los Angeles, on and off, for more than a year.

His search has been stymied by a stubbornly low roster of homes on the market and the hurdles that come with it: multiple competing bids and higher prices.

71. US Economy Grew at Strong 3.5 Pct. Annual Rate Last Quarter -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The U.S. economy grew at a 3.5 percent annual rate in the July-September quarter, the fastest pace in two years and more than the government had previously estimated. But the growth spurt isn't expected to last.

72. With Fed Expected to Hike, Attention Turns to What It Says -

WASHINGTON (AP) – There isn't much doubt about what the Federal Reserve will do when its latest policy meeting ends Wednesday: It's all but certain to raise its benchmark interest rate – its first increase in a year.

73. Evolving PILOT Programs in Memphis Look to Restore Competitive Balance -

When the Memphis-Shelby County Economic Development Growth Engine approved its Fast Track payment-in-lieu-of-taxes (PILOT) program earlier this year, it was with the hopes of bringing back a competitive balance between Memphis and North Mississippi.

74. Innovation or Monopoly? Panel Looks at ATT-Time Warner Deal -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Senators questioning the logic of a proposed merger between AT&T and Time Warner turned their focus to the nickels and dimes of the issue, at least as to how the $85.4 billion mega-deal would affect Americans. OK, you say this huge merger will enhance, not quash, competition and benefit consumers. Will it actually reduce prices that consumers pay?

75. Platform for Property -

Airbnb is revolutionizing the hospitality industry causing legislators worldwide to scramble to regulate it, but the Memphis City Council is gaining state and national attention for its hands-off attitude.

76. US Economy Grew at 3.2 Percent in Third Quarter -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The U.S. economy in the third quarter grew at the fastest pace in two years, with a revised report showing stronger consumer spending than first estimated.

The gross domestic product, the country's total output of goods and services, expanded at an annual rate of 3.2 percent in the July-September period, the Commerce Department reported Tuesday. That is up from a previous estimate of 2.9 percent.

77. Last Word: Pants Suits On the River, Early Vote Numbers & Chandler Parsons' Debut -

A busy last weekend for the Presidential campaigns in Shelby County where we have seen neither Hillary Clinton nor Donald Trump in the flesh since the primary campaign season and haven’t even seen their surrogates in the general election campaign.

78. Prepping for the Next Market Correction -

Ray’s Take Stock market corrections are an inevitable part of investing. Since 1932, declines of 10 to 20 percent have occurred every two years on average. It might happen next week, three months from now, or next year. 

79. BCBS Bombshell Leaves Insurance Seekers in Bind -

Nashville resident Jennifer Murray is caught in the snare of uncertainty looming over Tennessee health insurance coverage.

Self-employed as a health care consultant, the single 48-year-old bought individual coverage through BlueCross BlueShield Tennessee’s marketplace plans each year since the Affordable Care Act took effect in 2014. The company offered the widest range of physicians, and its insurance was accepted in most places.

80. Last Word: Mud Island Round 3, Newsmakers Notes and North Midtown -

Cue the organ. You know, the one from those old soap operas or radio dramas. And prepare for the latest episode of Island of Mud. When last we looked in on Mud Island River Park, the city had two finalists to redevelop all or a part of the southern half of the island that is really a peninsula.

81. Green Renaissance -

As director of Shelby Farms Park Conservancy, Jen Andrews has been on the front lines of what can fairly be called a green revival in Memphis. And she is amazed at how much change has occurred over the last decade, a rebirth that spans not just across the miles but now seems embedded in the city’s psyche.

82. Google Gets Aggressive With New Phones, Other Gadgets -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) – Google launched an aggressive challenge to consumer electronics giants like Apple and Samsung on Tuesday, introducing a new line of smartphones called Pixel and other gadgets designed to showcase a digital helper the company calls "Google Assistant."

83. In a Tight Market, Stores Lure Holiday Workers With Perks -

NEW YORK (AP) – Retailers are dangling perks like higher pay, extra discounts and more flexible schedules to lure temporary holiday workers in a tighter labor market.

They're also more determined to lock in their workers earlier. Macy's and Target are holding their first nationwide recruitment fairs, and others like consumer electronics chain Hhgregg Inc. are making it easier to apply for temporary holiday jobs via mobile devices.

84. Open and Shut -

The office of the future hacks down cubicle walls in favor of modular furniture that encourages collaboration. As many business sectors, from banking to legal services, move to a tech-first approach, companies are turning away from traditional office configurations to attract the next generation of talent.

85. First Tennessee Bank Opens First Local Branch in a Decade in Arlington -

After a decade of acquisitions and renovations of existing branches, Memphis-based First Tennessee Bank has opened its first new West Tennessee branch in Arlington.

86. Shelby County Mortgage Market Up 17 Percent in August -

Bankers like Scott Stafford are watching for the Federal Reserve to raise interest rates soon and, at least for the moment, expect the usual mortgage market cool-down heading towards the end of the year.

87. New Type of Subdivision to Replace Foote Homes -

Memphis’ last traditional public housing complex is coming down and a new kind of subdivision will rise in its place.

The Land Use Control Board formally accepted the site plan for the South City development at its Thursday, Sept. 8, meeting. With the help of a $30 million federal Choice Neighborhoods grant, the Memphis Housing Authority plans to raze the 420 units of Foote Homes that date back to the 1940s to make way for Memphis’ first sustainable subdivision.

88. Editorial: The Prosperity Mix in Memphis -

There are jobs you have to take and jobs you want to take. As in other places, Memphis’ economy is a mix of the two, and our effort to have more of the jobs that allow for careers and growth is seen by most if not all of our civic leadership as the way to build prosperity.

89. Red-Hot Jobs -

With unemployment low and falling and competition stiff and rising, accounting firm DHG Memphis is putting the full-court press on recruiting and hiring.

The full-service firm, which has been in Memphis for 60 years, is growing at a double-digit clip and has increased its staff to 110 people.

90. Redbirds’ Home Attendance Still a Rebuilding Project -

On the last Saturday night of the summer at AutoZone Park, the Memphis Redbirds sold the place out and then some. The announced attendance of 11,041 represented the highest mark since the ballpark was renovated and reconfigured after the 2014 season.

91. Volkswagen Stakes Hopes of US Sales Revival on Tennessee-Made SUV -

CHATTANOOGA, Tenn. (AP) – Volkswagen's new SUV comes with a feature that automatically controls braking to each wheel as the seven-seater descends on slippery off-road terrain. The German automaker is staking its hopes on the new model being just as adept at arresting the company's sales woes in the United States.

92. DMC Continues to Adorn Downtown with Events, Art -

A two-block alley will be the latest site for a Downtown art gallery. The Downtown Memphis Commission plans to install up to 10 different art projects along Barboro Alley, which stretches from Second Street to Front Street.

93. Smith Helps Mayor Pick the Right Team -

As chief human resources officer for the city of Memphis, Alexandria Smith is responsible for the HR strategy and talent management for the city as an employer. She provides advice to the mayor and senior leadership team, a role that has played an important part in shaping the city’s future, including leading the recent search for a police chief.

94. French Truck Coffee Making Splash in Memphis -

Jimmy Lewis said that when he agreed to move his Relevant Roasters concept into Crosstown Concourse, he was taking a risk. His coffee-roasting operation is only 2 years old, and the in-house coffee shop element at 584 Tillman St. is even newer.

95. Pera’s Ubiquiti Networks at Pivotal Moment -

Big tech companies like Google and Facebook have been generating news headlines and public interest for a while now over their plans to bring internet connectivity to the large swaths of the world that still don’t have it, or that need a better offering of some kind.

96. Wal-Mart Raises Annual Profit Outlook, Reports Strong Sales -

NEW YORK (AP) – Wal-Mart's vast fleet of stores and its online business are starting to click together.

The company raised its earnings outlook for the year on Thursday and delivered strong profit and sales for the second quarter, as moves to improve the store and online experience are winning over customers.

97. Target Cuts Outlook as It Sees Fewer Customers in Stores -

NEW YORK (AP) – Target Corp. cut its profit forecast and a key sales outlook Wednesday as it saw fewer customers in its stores and acknowledged it didn't push the second part of its "Expect More, Pay Less" slogan.

98. Macy's Plans to Close 100 Stores, Boost Online Investment -

NEW YORK (AP) – Macy's plans to close about 100 stores next year and boost its online investments, the nation's largest department store chain said Thursday, as it tries to become more nimble in an increasingly fierce market. The closures represent close to 14 percent of its stores under the Macy's brand.

99. Health Insurer Aetna Backs Off ACA Expansion Plans -

Aetna became the latest health insurer to cast doubt upon its future in the Affordable Care Act's insurance exchanges after it called off a planned expansion Tuesday and suggested it could abandon that market completely.

100. Dollar General Moving Into Former Wal-Mart Express Stores -

TUPELO, Miss. (AP) — Dollar General has bought 41 former Wal-mart Express stores in 11 states for an undisclosed sum.

Included in the purchase are five locations in Mississippi: Belmont, Derma, Mantachie, Nettleton and Sardis. Dollar General has existing stores in these communities and will move into the larger locations that were once Wal-mart Express. Dollar General did not buy the location in Walnut, but it does have a store there and in nearby Falkner.