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Editorial Results (free)

1. Preparing For Park Without Brooks, MCA -

A new Memphis Brooks Museum of Art Downtown would open in 2022 at the earliest and cost $110 million along with an endowment.

“It’s going to be a little bit of a moving target. What we want to do is to build the endowment,” said Brooks director Emily Ballew Neff on the WKNO/Channel 10 program “Behind The Headlines.”

2. Landers Loss Factored Into Coliseum Not Being in Plan -

The probability of a repurposed Mid-South Coliseum running an operating deficit as part of a youth sports tournament complex at the Fairgrounds was what prompted Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland and his administration to put a renovation of the arena on hold for now.

3. Zoo Parking Redesign Faces Public Input -

A team designing options for a reconfigured Memphis Zoo parking lot has presented three options that each include a circular road that would run along the eastern edge of the Overton Park greensward just north of Veterans Plaza.

4. Mud Island Garage Ruled Out As Convention Center Hotel Site -

The city of Memphis continues to field proposals for a second convention center hotel Downtown, but it won’t be on the city-owned site of the Mud Island parking garage, which had been at the center of at least one proposal pitched to City Hall for such a hotel in the last year.

5. Memphis College of Art Closing Doors -

Memphis College of Art, the 81-year-old Overton Park institution, will close by May of 2020 after years of financial struggles.

The college’s board described the pending process as an “orderly dissolution of MCA’s real estate and other assets to fund the College’s debt obligations and other liabilities, including providing sufficient funding to serve existing students who remain at MCA.”

6. Memphis College of Art Closing Its Doors -

The Memphis College of Art will close by May of 2020 in what the board of the 81-year old Overton Park institution is describing as an "orderly dissolution of MCA’s real estate and other assets to fund the College’s debt obligations and other liabilities, including providing sufficient funding to serve existing students who remain at MCA."

7. Publisher of New Tri-State Defender Dies -

Bernal E. Smith II, president and publisher of The New Tri-State Defender newspaper, died Sunday, Oct. 22, at his home, according to Smith’s family.

Smith, 45, oversaw the resurrection of the legacy African-American owned newspaper starting in 2010.

8. Mayor Stands By Decision On Sewer Connections -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland says if he had it to do over again, he would probably give more advance notice that the city was ending city sewer connections for developments outside the limits of Memphis.

9. Steele Joins Southern Growth Studio’s Anthropology Team -

April Steele has joined Southern Growth Studio as a business anthropologist, responsible for collecting and analyzing data to evaluate existing and potential products and services. Steele’s hire comes as the Memphis-based innovation consulting firm grows its applied anthropology practice. Using qualitative social research methods like ethnography, the anthropology team steers the innovation process, conducting primary research to distill and communicate key insights to clients.

10. Collins Says Smart Grid Era Will Improve MLGW Service -

At Memphis Light, Gas and Water Division, storms causing power outages that affect more than 30,000 homes and businesses are considered major storms.

There were five major storms by that standard in 2011, making it the worst on record for the utility. So far in 2017 there have been four major storms.

11. City Announces 10-Member Zoo Parking Advisory Team -

A 10-member city advisory panel will be part of the process for settling on a specific design for expansion and reconfiguration of Memphis Zoo parking in Overton Park.

The city administration announced Thursday, Oct. 5, the names of 10 people to the panel, which will first offer feedback on the preliminary work of designers and then select a concept plan.

12. City Announces 10-Member Zoo Parking Advisory Team -

A 10-member city advisory panel will be part of the process for settling on a specific design for expansion and reconfiguration of parking for the Memphis Zoo in Overton Park.

The city administration announced Thursday, Oct. 5, the names of 10 people to the panel, which will first offer feedback on the preliminary work of designers and then select a concept plan.

13. New AD Fixing Hart’s Errors – Is Jones Next? -

What does John Currie’s decision to reinstitute the name “Lady Vols” for all women’s sports at the University of Tennessee have to do with Butch Jones?

14. Fairgrounds Proposal Coming Into Focus -

Aaron Shafer saw the writing on the wall, so to speak, at the second public gathering toward a redevelopment plan for the Fairgrounds last week.

15. Doubts About Congress Cloud DACA Debate -

With Washington’s attention on the vote count of the Republican Cassidy-Graham health care coverage bill, those on all sides of the immigration reform issue are watching the outcome of Cassidy-Graham closely.

16. Last Word: Pantographs & Catenaries, Grizz Uncertainty and Tuesdays Without Morrie -

After three years off the rails, the first significant indications that the trolleys are about to return. It was just a two-block ride that includes the Memphis Area Transit Authority trolley barn on North Main and one very new trolley. But it is a start through what is a very technical and bureaucratic process involving lots of safety vests, clipboards and video cameras.

17. September 22-28, 2017: This week in Memphis history -

1933: George Barnes, better known as “Machine Gun Kelly,” and three other people were arrested at a house on East Rayner Street for the kidnapping of oil millionaire Charles Urschel. Barnes was the first nationally known fugitive to be captured by the FBI. On the run from the FBI, Barnes returned to Memphis, the city where he had grown up and attended Central High School.
The house on Rayner Street belonged to his former brother-in-law. After a restless night that probably involved a lot of drinking, Barnes heard the next day’s newspaper hit the front porch and unlocked and opened the door to retrieve it. He didn’t lock the door.
Confronted by agents with their guns drawn, Barnes allegedly said, “Don’t shoot, G-men,” according to accounts of the capture over the decades. The FBI’s own website acknowledges that didn’t happen, attributing the “G-men” name for FBI agents to a comment Barnes made after he was in jail. Still other research shows it was Kelly’s wife and accomplice, Kathryn, who used the term.
Most Memphians didn’t know Barnes was Machine Gun Kelly until the national publicity about the arrest and Barnes, in the Shelby County jail, began recognizing and calling out the names of police officers he knew.

18. Overton Park Conservancy Embarks On Master Plan -

As leaders of the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art announced this month they are considering a move to a newly built facility elsewhere in the city, the Overton Park Conservancy was beginning to develop a master plan for the Midtown park, including the museum, Memphis Zoo, Memphis College of Art and Levitt Shell.

19. Juvenile Court Outcomes Still Questioned -

Rev. Keith Norman says just about every time federal monitors in the settlement agreement with Juvenile Court come to Memphis they meet with him and want to hear from a broad cross section of Memphians with no filtering of those they encounter.

20. Juvenile Court Resisting Remedies, Says Former Settlement Coordinator -

The coordinator overseeing the Memphis and Shelby County Juvenile Court settlement with the U.S. Department of Justice resigned in June as a reaction to the letter County Mayor Mark Luttrell, Juvenile Court Judge Dan Michael and Sheriff Bill Oldham sent U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions requesting an end to federal oversight of the court.

21. City Hall Stands Ready to Assist Brooks Museum -

The Memphis Brooks Museum of Art’s first and only home is owned by the city of Memphis, and the institution is the state’s largest art museum. Those two facts make city government more than an interested onlooker in what happens next as the museum’s board explores possibly moving out of Overton Park to a newly built facility elsewhere in the city.

22. Promoters Exporting Authenticity Of Memphis Music in Another Way -

A new 5,000- to 6,000-seat concert venue at Graceland by early 2019 is competition. But it probably brings more customers to the overall market for concerts in the city, says the founder of Music Export Memphis, the city’s export office for the music business.

23. Juvenile Court Judge Calls Federal Oversight and Monitors a ‘Distraction’ -

Five years ago when the U.S. Justice Department concluded years of review with a scathing report about due process and equal treatment issues in Memphis-Shelby County Juvenile Court, then Judge Curtis Person Jr. and his staff had to make a decision.

24. Fairgrounds Plan Will Consider Familiar Items -

The Fairgrounds redevelopment plan forming on a fast track will probably look familiar as far as the elements proposed for it.

“We are starting with the premise that we are using the previous planning efforts as insight for how we move forward,” Paul Young, city of Memphis Housing and Community Development director said on the WKNO/Channel 10 program “Behind The Headlines.”

25. No Special Session to Take Rebel Symbol Off Mississippi Flag -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) – A spokesman says Mississippi Gov. Phil Bryant won't call legislators back to the Capitol to consider removing the Confederate battle emblem from the state flag.

The Legislative Black Caucus says Bryant should set a special session because white supremacists marched with the battle flag last weekend in Virginia.

26. Cohen Defines Gap Between Trump and Republicans -

There is a distinction to be made between the Republican majorities in the U.S. House and Senate and President Donald Trump, says U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen, one of Trump’s most vocal and virulent critics.

27. Tax Breaks Broaden For Residential, Retail Deals -

Some changes are coming in the rules surrounding incentives that the Economic Development Growth Engine for Memphis and Shelby County – or EDGE – can use for different kinds of development and for broader use of tax increment financing – or TIF – zones to sustain redevelopment.

28. Last Word: St. Jude School, More Gannett Moves and Maida Pearson Smith -

For most, the school year starts next week. But classes are already underway at St. Jude’s new Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, an idea 15 years in the making, according to the physician who had that idea. The school is a big step in higher education in Memphis and its road to research center status.

29. Barnes Tapped As New Tennessee Press Association President -

Eric Barnes, publisher and CEO of The Daily News Publishing Co. Inc., has become the next president of the Tennessee Press Association, the trade association for the state’s newspapers.

30. City Master Plan Development Aims To Reverse Random Development -

Not too far past a new generation of civic plans is the filter of reality – what is possible by a business bottom line.

At the outset of the still-forming Memphis 3.0 master development plan, the reality without a plan is striking.

31. Blight More Than Out-of-State LLCs -

The prominent role investors play in buying single-family homes in Memphis to rent them out is part of the city’s significant problem with blight.

But there are some property owners who live here who don’t even know that their loved one who died recently made them a property owner.

32. Foote Homes Last Vestige Of Public Housing -

As the last of the city’s large public housing developments is demolished, the oldest of the mixed-income communities that replaced them is about to turn 20.

College Park opened in 1998 on the site of what had been Lemoyne Gardens in the area of South Memphis now known as Soulsville.

33. Redshirt Season Helps Johnson Improve Game -

Jalen Johnson’s first season on Tennessee’s basketball team didn’t go as planned. Now, he’s better for it.

The 6-foot-5 wing from Durham, North Carolina, arrived on campus last fall barely 170 pounds and competing for minutes with the likes of Robert Hubbs III, who led the Vols in scoring (13.7) and minutes (31.6) as a senior last season.

34. Lawmakers: Talk, Action On Crime Don’t Match -

State Senate Minority Leader Lee Harris of Memphis says some of the rhetoric about criminal justice reform – not locking up as many nonviolent offenders for longer sentences – doesn’t match the push for legislation in Nashville.

35. Overton Park Conservancy Meets $1M Goal in Parking Compromise -

The Overton Park Conservancy raised $1 million by the June 11 deadline to move ahead with the Overton Park-Memphis Zoo parking compromise. The conservancy announced Sunday afternoon that it met the goal with hours to spare.

36. Luttrell, Commission Working Out Details of 3-Cent Property Tax Cut -

Shelby County Commissioners have talked for several years about cutting the county’s property tax rate. But it’s never been more than talk and never had close to the seven votes necessary to drop the tax rate.

37. Not a Very Good Year for UT Athletics -

It hasn’t been the greatest of years for Tennessee sports. From football to basketball to baseball, and several sports in between, the Vols – for the most part – fell short in 2016-17.

38. City Council Members: Beale Bucks Evolving -

Beale Street’s new $5 weekend night cover charge still has a few details to work out, says Memphis City Council chairman Berlin Boyd.

“We’re not putting a period there, we’re putting a comma because we are taking a pause,” Boyd said on the WKNO/Channel 10 program “Behind The Headlines.”

39. Black Caucus: White Rep Should Resign Over Lynch Comment -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — Black lawmakers in Mississippi are demanding the resignation of a white colleague who said Louisiana leaders should be lynched for removing Confederate monuments.

40. Hardy: EDGE’s MWBE Program Not Working -

The chairwoman of the Greater Memphis Chamber board said first indications are that minority business requirements in tax breaks awarded by the Economic Development Growth Engine – or EDGE – aren’t working.

41. Kustoff Talks Comey Missteps, Health Care -

The FBI investigation into possible Russian interference in the 2016 presidential campaign will continue without fired FBI director James Comey, says U.S. Rep. David Kustoff.

42. Events -

Mothers of the Nile will hold its ninth annual banquet Thursday, May 11, at 5:30 p.m. at First Baptist Church Broad, 2835 Broad Ave. Those sharing their perspectives include state Rep. Raumesh Akbari, Hope Academy principal Michael Smith and essay contest participants from Hope Academy, whose students are in detention at Juvenile Court. Visit mothersofthenileinc.org for details.

43. New Bookstore Called Novel Coming to Laurelwood in August -

It didn’t turn out exactly like Emmett Miskell hoped it would, but he nevertheless got what he and other book lovers in Memphis wanted in the end.

Miskell – a White Station High School senior who gathered signatures to try and save the doomed Booksellers at Laurelwood, Memphis’ largest independent bookstore that closed its doors a few months ago – said he’s thrilled with news that a replacement store of sorts is coming to the same space.

44. Economy In Flux -

With apologies to Dickens’ “A Tale of Two Cities,” for the professionals who follow economics for a living this is very much the best of times and the worst of times.

The moment is one of abundant optimism and rampant uncertainty. “Directionally,” they like to say, things look positive. And yet so much could still go very, very wrong.

45. Corker Sees Trump Foreign Policy Evolving, Not Moderating -

U.S. foreign policy should be to “keep the volume up” on North Korea’s progress in developing a nuclear capability and intercontinental ballistic missiles, says U.S. Sen. Bob Corker, “with the acknowledgement that what you could bring in is Russia, China, South Korea and Japan into a conflict.”

46. Mayors Say Region Needs New Mindset, More Density -

When Hernando West first surfaced in 2007, it was going to be a different kind of development south of the state line. But the recession that followed put the plans for the city’s first mixed-use development on hold – until recently.

47. Money Behind New Zoo Parking Terms -

In the third attempt to bring an end to the Overton Park Greensward controversy last summer, Memphis City Council member Bill Morrison decided it was best not to try to reach agreement on all points, but on most points.

48. Council Brokers New Zoo Parking Compromise, Abolishes Beale Authority -

The Memphis City Council went back into the terms for an expanded Memphis Zoo parking lot Tuesday, April 11, just nine months after brokering and approving a compromise on the project between the zoo and the Overton Park Conservancy.

49. Lenoir Calls for Property Tax Cut Beyond New Certified Tax Rate From Reappraisal -

Shelby County Trustee David Lenoir says there should be a cut in the county property tax rate beyond the new certified property tax rate to be set as a result of the 2017 countywide property reappraisal.

50. Council Faces Beale Street, Parking Decisions -

Memphis City Council members have an agenda full of hot spots Tuesday, April 11. They vote on a move to abolish the Beale Street Tourism Development Authority, check to see if both sides paying for a Memphis Zoo parking solution in Overton Park are on the same page and take a final vote to change on-street parking around FedExForum and The Orpheum Theatre to a flat fee of $10 for “special events.”

51. Investor Dominance in Residential Real Estate Shows Signs of Change -

Investors buying single-family homes to rent them out or have a management firm rent them out may be giving way to banks more willing to make loans on lower-priced homes to owner-occupants.

“I would say the most interesting and big dynamic is folks who come in and buy a house for $20,000 these days, fix it up – sometimes well, sometimes poorly – sell it to a person in California for $64,000 – keep the rental management. And sometimes that helps a street and a neighborhood and sometimes it’s destructive,” said Steve Lockwood, executive director of the Frayser Community Development Corp. on the WKNO/Channel 10 program “Behind The Headlines.”

52. Wiseacre Tables Plans to Build Brewery in Coliseum -

Wiseacre Brewing Co.'s plans to expand into the Mid-South Coliseum are off but could re-emerge somewhere down the road as the city administration renews discussions about a fuller renovation of the Mid-South Fairgrounds.

53. Rudd Says University Redirecting Neighborhood -

The railroad tracks between Highland Avenue and Zach Curlin Drive have been a fact of life and a border of sorts for as long as there has been a University of Memphis – even before it was called the University of Memphis.

54. Greensward Compromise Text, Discussion Differ on Cost Split -

At the end of a surprising day at City Hall, Memphis City Council member Worth Morgan was anticipating what might happen in the three weeks until the next council session to the compromise for zoo parking in Overton Park.

55. Greensward Compromise Unravels Over Who Pays What and When -

A Memphis Zoo parking plan appears to be in question after a Tuesday, March 21, city council committee session in which Memphis Zoo leaders said they will not put up half of the $500,000 to pay for planning and design work on the reconfigured and expanded zoo parking lot.

56. Zoo Parking Compromise In Doubt -

A Memphis Zoo parking plan appears to be off after a Tuesday city council committee session in which Memphis Zoo leaders said they will not put up half of the $500,000 to pay for planning and design work on the reconfigured and expanded zoo parking lot.

57. Hopson, Caldwell Plan for SCS Long-Term -

Five years into historic changes in public education locally, the rapid pace of change is starting to give way to longer-term views and plans.

“This has been the first year since the merger that we actually are in a position to do some strategic investments in our schools,” Shelby County Schools superintendent Dorsey Hopson said on the WKNO/Channel 10 program “Behind The Headlines.”

58. Conservancy Puts Up $250K For Zoo Parking Redesign -

The Overton Park Conservancy is turning over $250,000 to pay half of the cost for design and engineering work on the Memphis Zoo's reconfigured and expanded parking lot.

The conservancy board approved the release of the funding to the city this week and the funding goes to the Memphis City Council Tuesday, March 21, for approval.

59. Conservancy Puts Up Half of Money for Zoo Parking Redesign -

The Overton Park Conservancy is turning over $250,000 to pay half of the cost for design and engineering work on the Memphis Zoo's reconfigured and expanded parking lot.

The conservancy board approved the release of the funding to the city this week and the funding goes to the Memphis City Council Tuesday, March 21, for approval.

60. New AD Bad News for Struggling Vol Coaches -

The hiring of John Currie as the University of Tennessee’s athletics director conveys a number of messages. One of them: Butch Jones is officially on the clock.

Based on Currie’s history at UT, as well as his eight-year track record as Kansas State’s athletics director, it’s safe to say he isn’t afraid to pull the trigger when it comes to coaches – for better or worse.

61. Councilmen Draw Lines On Safety, Deannexation -

Attorneys for the city of Memphis have filed a motion to combine two federal court lawsuits over a City Hall surveillance list and have them brought before the same federal judge.

And U.S. District Judge Jon P. McCalla has granted the motion of the American Civil Liberties Union of Tennessee to intervene in the lawsuit on the plaintiff’s side.

62. Events -

Chandler Reports’ Real Estate Review Seminar will be held Wednesday, March 8, from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at Memphis Botanic Garden, 750 Cherry Road. A guest panel will provide their insights on the local market with projections for 2017. Breakfast will be provided. Visit bit.ly/REReviewMarch8 for details and registration.

63. Events -

Love Well 5K & Festival, hosted by Redeemers Group and benefiting Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Memphis, will be held Saturday, March 4, with the 5K starting at 8:30 a.m. in the Semmes-Murphey parking lot, 6325 Humphreys Blvd. Stick around after the race to enjoy food and shop vendors. Race-day registration begins at 7:30 a.m.; visit lovewell5k.racesonline.com for online registration and details.

64. Busiest Season for Sports Hits Big Orange Country -

It’s the busiest time of the year for Tennessee athletics. There’s even some football to whet your gridiron appetite.

The Vols begin spring football practices March 21, and the DISH Orange & White Game is April 22 at Neyland Stadium. By then, much will have happened in Big Orange Nation.

65. Real Estate Experts to Talk Market Trends, Projections -

With more than 30 years of expertise, second-generation homebuilder James Reid has seen a lot of ups and downs in West Tennessee’s real estate market.  

“While the market has obviously improved tremendously, last year in Shelby County we only pulled about 925 permits, which traditionally we’ve done in the neighborhood of 3,000 to 4,000,” Reid said. “So while we’ve recovered some, we’re still down from a typical year.”

66. Women Executives Share Business, Life Lessons -

Through several career stops, Susan Hunsberger learned that she didn’t like being a financial analyst, she did like engaging with people through recruiting and human resources, and that it was more than fine to let colleagues see that you don’t know it all.

67. Events -

Hands of Hope Auction Party, the largest annual fundraiser for the Exchange Club Family Center, will be held Saturday, Feb. 25, at 7 p.m. at the Halloran Centre, 225 S. Main St. The party will include silent and live auctions, live music provided by Earnestine and Hazel’s Band and Otis Faithful, dancing and gourmet food. Visit exchangeclub.net/handsofhope to buy tickets.

68. Events -

Stax Music Academy will perform a Black History Month tribute to the 1967 Stax/Volt European Tour Friday, Feb. 24, at 7:30 p.m. at Minglewood Hall, 1555 Madison Ave. The concert will feature the music of Otis Redding, Sam & Dave, Booker T. & the MGs, Eddie Floyd, Carla Thomas, and Arthur Conley. Tickets are $15 in advance or $20 at the door; call 901-946-2513, ext. 250, to buy advance tickets.

69. Luxury Apartments Begin $17 Million Expansion -

3333 Hacks Cross Road, Memphis, TN 38125: Fieldstone Apartment Homes, a gated community in southeast Memphis, is in the process of another massive expansion.

Permit Amount: $9.7 million (combined)

70. TVA Drilling Controversy May Change Well Actions -

The controversy over Tennessee Valley Authority drilling water wells into the Memphis aquifer for the new TVA power plant in southwest Memphis is becoming a push for more public notice of such plans and better mapping of the water supply under the city.

71. UT Seeks Multimillion-Dollar Building Permit -

The University of Tennessee has filed a $3.7 million building permit application with the city-county Office of Construction Code Enforcement.

The permit calls for a build-out of the sixth floor, and lists Barnes & Brower Inc. as the contractor.

72. Strickland Studies Options in Face of Immigration Travel Ban Order -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland has been getting a crash course in immigration policies – federal and local – in the last week.

73. Dixon Hughes Goodman Expects More Growth in Memphis in 2017 -

During periods of uncertainty and unexpected rule changes, business owners turn to the interpreters of those rules, practical advice givers who can help an enterprise find a clear path forward.

Given the period of regulatory upheaval of recent years – and the almost certainty of more change to come now that a new national administration has come to power – no wonder the Memphis office of accounting firm Dixon Hughes Goodman is on a tear at the moment.

74. Hart’s Tenure as AD Has Been Mostly Good for Vols -

While we wait – and wait and wait and wait – for the University of Tennessee to hire its next athletics director, let’s ponder the man who soon will walk out the door.

Dave Hart is leaving the UT athletics department better than he found it. He got things back on solid financial footing. He brought a measure of stability.

75. Ioby Helps Raise $600,000 for Community Restoration Projects -

When you walk into the Clayborn Temple in Downtown Memphis, it’s obvious that the 126-year-old church has seen better days, but also laying under the imposing ruins of its enormous pipe organ is a sense of hope.

76. Change Only Sure Thing In Sports, Panelists Say -

Almost five years ago, in his earliest days as athletics director at the University of Memphis, Tom Bowen had visions of a long and happy life in the Big East and as part of the BCS (Bowl Championship Series). But in short order, the league collapsed amid conference realignment and Bowen found himself guiding a university in a conference with no name.

77. State Leaders Invite Block Grant Funding -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam says a federal block grant to state government for health care under the right terms could allow the state to expand TennCare coverage.

“I think if they would give us that flexibility, we could take care of more people at lower cost. I just fervently believe that we could do that with the state,” Haslam said last week during a visit to Memphis. “But they have to give us the tools to do that with and give us the flexibility. Right now the federal government holds all the keys. … They don’t give us a lot of flexibility on how that works.”

78. Turning the Page -

When a bookstore decides to close its doors for good, the moment isn't always so immediate or possessive of the clean finality that comes with shutting a book at the end of the story.

In the case of The Booksellers at Laurelwood, it is a long goodbye. These final weeks of a liquidation sale that will stretch into February – the culmination of a decision that the store’s finances have become untenable – have meant the slow unwinding of a 32-year-old bookstore that’s closing up shop the same way you fall asleep, fall in love, get old – gradually, then all of a sudden.

79. Last Word: The Business of Local Sports, Garrison Leaves MATA and Broadband -

Marc Gasol makes the NBA’s Western Conference All Star team as a reserve, the first player in the history of the Grizz to make the All-Star Game three times.

Grizz business operations president Jason Wexler asked about Memphis hosting an NBA All-Star Game one of these days at The Daily News Sports Seminar Thursday at the Brooks. Wexler saying the city doesn’t have enough hotel rooms – the same barrier to drawing bigger conventions and meetings to the city.

80. Slow Pace of AD Hire Typical of How UT Works -

About the University of Tennessee’s athletics director search: What’s your hurry? It only took a little over five months after Dave Hart’s retirement announcement to start the process of hiring a search firm and finalizing a committee that will oversee the selection process. The last thing you want to do is rush things, right?

81. Last Word: The Grizz Farm Club Moves, Changing the NAACP and $15 An Hour -

How many of you knew the Iowa Energy was what amounts to a minor league team connected to the Grizz? How many of you knew that before Wade Baldwin and Troy Williams got sent there last month?

82. Tennessee Governor Taps Barnes to Head Human Services -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam is tapping Danielle Whitworth Barnes as the state Department of Human Services commissioner.

83. Events -

The Orpheum Theatre will present “The Bodyguard: The Musical” Tuesday through Sunday, Jan. 24-29, at the theater, 203 S. Main St. Visit orpheum-memphis.com for show times and tickets.

84. Deannexation Group Gets Dollar Figures on Leaving Memphis -

If South Cordova, Windyke and Southwind leave Memphis, the city should get to keep sales tax and property tax revenue generated by commercial properties in those three recently annexed areas.

That, says Shelby County Commissioner Terry Roland, is the deal to be had in ongoing deannexation discussions.

85. Events -

The Orpheum Theatre will present “The Bodyguard: The Musical” Tuesday through Sunday, Jan. 24-29, at the theater, 203 S. Main St. Visit orpheum-memphis.com for show times and tickets.

86. Events -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland and the Memphis Office of Youth Services will hold the first event in the “Hear Me Out” Youth Forum Series Saturday, Jan. 21, from 10 a.m. to noon at Greater New Liberty Missionary Baptist Church, 250 E. Raines Road. The series allows youths ages 14-21 the opportunity to share concerns and offer solutions to issues they’ve faced or observed to a panel of city leaders. Others forums will be held Jan. 28, Feb. 4 and Feb. 11 at different locations. Registration required; visit cityofmemphisyouth.org.

87. Freshman Bone Gives Vols Hope for Quicker Rebuild -

Tennessee coach Rick Barnes isn’t ready to proclaim Jordan Bone a rising star in SEC basketball, but he sure saw promising signs from his freshman point guard last Saturday night in Nashville.

88. U of M Adds Master Of Social Work At Lambuth -

The Department of Social Work at the University of Memphis will add the Master of Social Work (MSW) program to the U of M Lambuth campus beginning next fall. The new program will both address the need for the curriculum at the Jackson, Tennessee, campus and to better meet the demand for graduate-level social workers in the region.

89. The Week Ahead: January 17-23 -

Good morning, Memphis! This is a good week to be inspired, as we honor the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and his courage to motivate and inspire change. Plus, UrbanArt Commission celebrates its 20th anniversary and the Brooks Museum of Art unveils an exhibition sure to make you hoppy – err, happy. Here’s what else you need to know in The Week Ahead...

90. Burgess Suggests Fewer Deputies In Courtroom -

Shelby County Commission chairman Melvin Burgess wants to see a broader use of Shelby County Sheriff’s deputies within the city working with Memphis Police.

91. Zoo Parking Space Dimensions Emerge as Issue in Greensward Compromise -

Some members of the city’s Overton Park Parking Committee want to talk about changing one of the key ground rules for reconfiguring and expanding the Memphis Zoo’s parking area.

And the zoo’s representative on the committee that met Thursday, Jan. 5, is adamant that the requirement for parking spaces to be 10 feet by 20 feet should remain as it is.

92. Zoo Parking Space Dimensions Emerge as Issue In Greensward Compromise -

Some members of the city’s Overton Park Parking Committee want to at least talk about changing one of the key ground rules for the rearrangement and expansion of the Memphis Zoo’s parking area.

And the zoo’s representative on the committee that met Thursday, Jan. 5, is just as adamant that the requirement for parking spaces to be 10 feet by 20 feet should remain as it is.

93. The Week Ahead: January 3-9 -

Good morning, Memphis – and happy 2017! If you’ve made a new year’s resolution, chances are there’s an event this week to help you along the way. Want to get fit? Check out the Memphis Bike Swap. Vowing to read more? Try the BookTini Book Club launch. And that’s just a taste of what’s happening in The Week Ahead…

94. Lawmakers Address Prosecutors, ASD -

The majority and minority leaders of the Tennessee Senate say there is political pressure to break the link in funding for prosecutors and public defenders.

“I think it takes both efforts,” state Senate Republican Leader Mark Norris of Collierville said on ‘Behind The Headlines,’ the WKNO/Channel 10 program. “I think we need more prosecutors. I think we also need more public defenders.”

95. What Lies Ahead for UT Athletics in 2017 -

Hey Vols fans, Happy New Year. May your 2017 year in Tennessee sports be better than your 2016 year in Tennessee sports. Perhaps, a fresh start is what we all need. Let’s face it. The Music City Bowl wasn’t where Tennessee wanted the 2016 football season to end. The Vols were picked to win the SEC East Division in preseason and floundered to an 8-4 record in the regular season, 4-4 in the SEC. Their football season was about the norm for most UT sports in 2016: average. Here are some dates to mark in hope of better things ahead in 2017...

96. Arrests, Metal Barriers, Lawsuits All Played Role in Greensward Parking Compromise -

Spring at City Hall is budget season and it can be stormy for a new mayor, not to mention a city council with six new members. But that wasn’t the case in 2016.

The real spring political storm was the Overton Park Greensward – specifically overflow parking from the Memphis Zoo on the greenspace south of the zoo.

97. Memphis Adopts Version of Ceasefire -

A gun and gang violence program pioneered in Boston 20 years ago is coming to Memphis in the wake of a record year for homicides.

What is known nationally as Operation Ceasefire will be called the “Group Violence Initiative” in Memphis, said Memphis-Shelby Crime Commission president Bill Gibbons on the WKNO/Channel 10 program “Behind The Headlines.”

98. Christmas, Then and Now -

CHRISTMAS TIME. Every Christmas I tell this story, and in the telling Christmas comes home. It was my first time to England and overseas, and prime time for The Beatles, The Rolling Stones and Soho.

99. Grizzlies Get Some Love: Recognized Nationally For Being Top ‘Clutch’ Team -

Memphis Grizzlies fans, not without justification, often feel their team is overlooked. So you’ll be happy to know that on the morning of Tuesday, Dec. 20, at espn.com, a story posted with the following headline:

100. City Budget Season on the Way With Concerns -

One of the highlights of 2016 for the Memphis City Council that took office in January with six new members was a budget season in which there were no significant changes in the proposal by Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland, who also took office in January.