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Editorial Results (free)

1. Some Tennessee Lawmakers Living the Life -

Early in his U.S. Senate campaign, former governor Phil Bredesen shied away from talking about his opponent, Republican U.S. Rep. Marsha Blackburn, preferring to focus instead on ideas.

2. Labrador Dog Named Lucy Saves Oregon Man from Sex-Abuse Conviction -

SALEM, Ore. (AP) — The discovery of a black Labrador named Lucy led to the unraveling of a criminal case Monday against an Oregon man who had begun serving a 50-year prison sentence.

Joshua Horner, a plumber from the central Oregon town of Redmond, was convicted on April 12, 2017, of sexual abuse of a minor.

3. Hurricane Lane Soaks Hawaii's Big Island With Foot Of Rain -

HONOLULU (AP) — Hurricane Lane soaked Hawaii's Big Island on Thursday, dumping 12 inches of rain in as many hours as residents stocked up on supplies and tried to protect their homes ahead of the state's first hurricane since 1992.

4. Last Word: Day Two in Federal Court, Cohen on Manafort and Saturation Concerns -

Memphis Police Director Michael Rallings on the witness stand Tuesday in Memphis Federal Court for day two of the trial on police surveillance of protesters.

And Rallings testified that he had only a “vague” knowledge of the 1978 federal consent decree banning such surveillance prior to the lawsuit filed in 2017 by protesters put on the City Hall security list. As a supervisor at the police training academy, Rallings also testified that the rules set by the decree to prevent political surveillance of protesters were not taught to police officers to his knowledge.

5. Startup Founders from Four Industries Target Investor Dollars -

Biodegradable birth control implants, a lawn sensor that automates lawn service once grass reaches the owner’s desired height, a smart device that attaches to rodent traps, a scalable STEM education kit and a total ankle replacement product.

6. Nashville’s Metro Council Reeling with Money Woes -

The Metro Nashville City Council is “just worn out,” councilman Robert Swope says.

“All of us are completely beat up. We’ve had more elections in the last three months than we’ve had in the last five years. We’re all sick of it,” Swope says. “We’ve got the MLS soccer stadium thing going crazy. Look at it, transit, property taxes, budget. This is a part-time gig for us. I’m spending 70 hours a week working on my part-time gig.

7. Inspector Warned duck boat Company of Design Flaws Last Year -

A private inspector said Saturday that he warned the company operating duck boats on a Missouri lake about design flaws putting the watercraft at greater risk of sinking, less than a year before the accident that killed 17 people during a sudden storm.

8. 2 Lawyers Representing Ex-wife of Slain NBA Player Withdraw -

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) — Two lawyers who were representing the ex-wife of slain former NBA player Lorenzen Wright withdrew from the case Wednesday, citing a deteriorating relationship with their high-profile client.

9. Early-Voting Challenge Touches On Other Issues of Open Government -

The local Democratic Party’s political and legal challenge of early-voting sites and hours is also part of a larger challenge of how decisions are made in city and county government.

In one of the two Chancery Court lawsuits over early voting filed Friday, July 6, former city council member Myron Lowery and Shelby County Democratic Party chairman Corey Strong claim the election commission violated the state’s open-meetings law by meeting in secret to plan the addition of more sites for the July early-voting period.

10. Hickory Hill Strip Club Ordered Closed as Public Nuisance Following Two Deaths -

The main event of Memphis rapper Yo Gotti’s birthday was a Thursday, June 28, show at FedExForum featuring numerous special guests. But an after party scheduled for a strip club in Hickory Hill was cancelled.

11. Hickory Hill Strip Club Ordered Closed As Nuisance -

The main event of Memphis rapper Yo Gotti’s birthday was a Thursday, June 28, show at FedExForum featuring numerous special guests. But an after party scheduled for a strip club at Mendenhall and Winchester in Hickory Hill was cancelled.

12. Seivers in College Hall? Yeah, Sure, Why Not? -

Don’t look for any campaign propaganda to be mailed out. There won’t be any personal stumping. Heck, Larry Seivers even refused to fluff up his own bio.

If the former University of Tennessee two-time All-America wide receiver finds his way into the College Football Hall of Fame, it will happen because of the numbers and the memories that made him one of the game’s best in the 1970s.

13. Last Word: Almost Fixed, Early Voting Flap and New Chandler Numbers -

Less than 500 MLGW customers still without power Tuesday evening going into Wednesday when the utility’s goal is to have all power outages from the weekend storms fixed. Right after the storm and when this recovery effort began, 35,000 customers were without power.

14. Last Word: Bird Is The Word, Governors Quartet and Charlie Morris's Secret -

Former Vice President Joe Biden plays the Orpheum Friday evening. Maybe that isn't the right way to put it -- unless there's a drum solo no one is talking about. Free Bird?

I'll take it as further evidence of the new American politics that is evolving and is far from settled at this point. Politicians do paid speaking gigs all the time. And at times it is controversial. But the gigs are usually some kind of speaking fee to make remarks at a corporate function -- not selling individual tickets on line. This is ostensibly to promote Biden's new book and book deals and politicians go way back. But in a lot of cases, those are free events in a book store. When Biden was last here, it was as vice president at the Norfolk Southern intermodal rail yard in Rossville.

15. Justices strike down Minnesota voter clothing restrictions -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court on Thursday struck down Minnesota's broad restrictions on voters wearing "political" hats, T-shirts and pins to the polls, but said states can place limits on such apparel.

16. Last Word: The Commutation, Tuition Freeze and Blackburn and Sundquist -

Alice Marie Johnson walked out of a federal prison in Alabama Wednesday after serving 21 years of a life prison sentence for dealing drugs and laundering money as part of a Memphis drug ring with Texas connections in the 1990s. Johnson’s release came the same day that President Donald Trump commuted her life sentence less than a week after he met with reality television personality Kim Kardashian West who appealed for Johnson’s release. Here is the Associated Press story.

17. Tackling Transit, Reappraisal at Once Not Smart -

Nashville’s Metro Council is taking the hit for falling asleep at the wheel in a period of unprecedented prosperity and waking up to a budget shortfall in mid-2018.

“We’ve been drunken by our growth and the label of the It City,” Councilwoman Tanaka Vercher admits. “But this is what happens in growth. It stabilizes.”

18. Supreme Court Makes Sports Betting a Possibility Nationwide -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Supreme Court on Monday gave its go-ahead for states to allow gambling on sports across the nation, striking down a federal law that barred betting on football, basketball, baseball and other sports in most states.

19. Last Word: New Football League, Drone Testing and New Chandler Numbers -

The Alliance of American Football announces its presence in Memphis Thursday afternoon at the Liberty Bowl. And so begins another chapter in the city’s colorful history of start-up leagues. It is a long history dominated by football with a good stretch of the timeline taking in the city’s pursuit of an NFL franchise. Sometimes the rules are a bit different and the leagues have a history of not lasting very long. But they are fondly remembered.

20. Memphis Startup Soundways Wins $200,000 in Rise of the Rest Competition -

Memphis startup company Soundways, which helps professionals in the music industry collect unpaid royalties, won a $100,000 investment from Steve Case and other entrepreneurs as part of the Rise of the Rest tour that stopped in the Bluff City Tuesday, May 8.

21. Memphis Startup Soundways Wins $200,000 in Rise of the Rest Competition -

Memphis startup company Soundways, which helps professionals in the music industry collect unpaid royalties, won a $100,000 investment from Steve Case and other entrepreneurs as part of the Rise of the Rest tour that stopped in the Bluff City Tuesday, May 8.

22. Last Word: Veto Override Drama, Iran Reaction & Rise of the Rest Meets Soundways -

Shelby County Commissioners have a busy committee day Wednesday with a budget presentation – county mayor Mark Luttrell’s final one as the county’s chief executive, more discussions about the Graceland plan and a veto override.

23. Last Word: BSMF Notes, Political Dominoes and The Teacher Pipeline -

Yes, it rained. There was even hail for a brief period. None of that appeared to make a dent in the run of the Beale Street Music Festival. We are still waiting on exact box office numbers. The park was sold out – Ticketfly and at the gate -- early Sunday evening. It wasn’t a sellout Friday and Saturday but ticket supplies were tight for Tom Lee Park with the festival estimating there were thousands more people Saturday than there were Friday. Much to be said for a lineup this year that managed to strike a balance between hipster, cutting edge nobody-knows-about-this-yet new and used-to-be-big-not-so-long-ago nostalgia.

24. Week Ahead: May 7-13 -

Happy Monday. This weekend is the one between the Beale Street Music Festival and the World Championship Barbecue Cooking Contest, but there are still Memphis in May International events to attend. Great month to be in Memphis!

25. Memphis Lawmakers React to House Pulling $250,000 Bicentennial Funding -

NASHVILLE – The state House of Representatives declined to reconsider its decision to pull $250,000 from Memphis to fund a bicentennial celebration as it stiffened penalties this week for potential violations of the Tennessee Heritage Protection Act.

26. Tennessee Inmate Arrested in Little Rock Concert Shooting -

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — An inmate in Tennessee is the third person suspected of firing shots in a Little Rock nightclub last year, according to authorities.

The Little Rock Police Department said Thursday that Cordero Kadeem Ragland faces charges in connection with the July 1 shooting at Power Ultra Lounge that left more than two dozen people injured. Online records show Ragland has been held in a Tennessee jail since November on separate charges.

27. US Publishers Worry About Pricier Newsprint With New Tariffs -

MILWAUKEE (AP) – Newspaper publishers across the U.S. already strapped by years of declining revenue say they're dealing with an existential threat: Recently imposed tariffs on Canadian newsprint driving up their business costs.

28. Herenton Acknowledges New Generation Politics, Criticism in Mayoral Bid -

Eight years and counting since he resigned as mayor of Memphis, Willie Herenton says he has heard the discussions about the city’s economic stagnation when it comes to growing black prosperity and wealth. Especially the part about how that remains the case despite having “black leadership.”

29. Three Incumbents Unopposed at August Primary Ballot Deadline -

Three incumbent Democratic state House members in the Shelby County delegation to the Tennessee Legislature were effectively re-elected Thursday, April 5, at the noon deadline for candidates in the Aug. 2 state and federal primaries to file their qualifying petitions.

30. Memphis Lawmakers Helped Advance Medical Marijuana Bill in House -

NASHVILLE – Three Shelby County lawmakers played key roles in helping a medical marijuana bill move through the Legislature, supporting its passage in the House Criminal Justice Committee before the bill was pulled Tuesday, April 3, by its Senate sponsor, Democratic state Sen. Steve Dickerson of Nashville.

31. Three Incumbents Unopposed at August Primary Ballot Filing Deadline -

Three incumbent Democratic state House members in the Shelby County delegation to the Tennessee Legislature were effectively re-elected Thursday, April 5, at the noon deadline for candidates in the Aug. 2 state and federal primaries to file their qualifying petitions.

32. Last Word: MLK50s Big Day, Hotel Changes and Murica on Capitol Hill -

The peak of the MLK50 events came Wednesday with a chill but some sunshine and lots to consider. Understand -- this isn’t over. There are still a few more events to go through the weekend and even into next week. If nothing else, a lot more Memphians and visitors got a good look at most of South Main in the best way possible – on foot. And if the Beale Street District ever expands east to Danny Thomas, the intersection there makes a really good place for a party.

33. Don't Like Medical Marijuana Bill? Just Wait for Next Version -

Legislation decriminalizing medical marijuana in Tennessee could return to its original form, setting up a state commission to oversee use of the drug to treat debilitating illnesses. Any such move also could bring lobbyists back into the fold after they dropped support of the bill when its sponsor, Rep. Jeremy Faison, abruptly changed the bill and left onlookers flabbergasted.

34. No Death Penalty Option In Lorenzen Wright Murder -

The ex-wife of former University of Memphis standout and NBA player Lorenzen Wright won’t face the death penalty if convicted of killing him more than seven years ago in Tennessee.

Shelby County prosecutor Paul Hagerman said before a hearing Monday, March 19, that Sherra Wright won’t face death if found guilty of first degree murder in her ex-husband’s shooting death. She has pleaded not guilty and is being held without bond.

35. Lorenzen Wright’s Ex-Wife Won't Face Death If Convicted -

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) – The ex-wife of former NBA player Lorenzen Wright won't face the death penalty if convicted of killing him more than seven years ago in Tennessee, a prosecutor said Monday.

36. Holmes Surrenders Theranos, Pays $500K After ‘Massive Fraud’ -

NEW YORK (AP) – Elizabeth Holmes, a Stanford University dropout once billed as the "next Steve Jobs" has forfeited control Theranos, the blood testing startup she founded, and will pay $500,000 to settle charges that she oversaw a "massive fraud."

37. US May Tie NATO Contributions to Tariff Exemptions -

WASHINGTON (AP) – U.S. allies seeking to avoid the steel and aluminum tariffs approved by President Donald Trump might be asked to step up their financial commitments to NATO.

Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin told CNBC in a Friday interview that the president will consider national security, noting that Trump wants to be sure that NATO gets more funding from European allies who Trump has previously criticized for not contributing enough.

38. Monuments Bill Would Establish Felony Charge for Some Votes -

NASHVILLE – A state legislator is set to seek the attorney general’s advice on legislation enabling the state to charge local elected officials with a felony for “knowingly” casting votes in conflict with state law.

39. Last Word: Filing Deadline, Case & Vance In May and Paul Manafort at the Rivermont -

By our count, when the noon Thursday deadline for candidates in the May county primaries has come and gone, there could be -- could be -- four incumbent county commissioners who are effectively re-elected to their seats for another four-year term. And we already know the commission will have at least seven new faces in September. More interesting is that there are only four sets of primaries – all for countywide offices – that have multiple contenders in each primary. That’s out of 23 offices on the primary ballot.

40. Case, Vance Bringing 'Rise of the Rest' Startup Fund to Memphis This May -

The co-founder of America Online is coming to Memphis this May with his investment fund to hear pitches from local startup companies and award $100,000 in seed funding to one of them.

Steve Case, the chairman and CEO of the Washington, D.C.-based venture capital firm Revolution, and venture capitalist and author J.D. Vance are leading the second leg of the current Rise of the Rest bus tour. Rise of the Rest is also the name of the seed fund.

41. Last Word: The Mural Takedown, Corker's Calculation and Beale Crowd Control -

Cue the organ music from the old-fashioned television soap operas: As the weekend began, city public works crews had painted over – either completely or partially – a lot of the Paint Memphis program murals on the west side of Willett near Lamar. That would be the ones city council members complained about and others that no one complained about.

42. Shipping Shakeup? Amazon May Deliver Its Own Packages -

Amazon has already shown that it can rattle the retail, grocery and health insurance industries, and now it is doing the same in the delivery business.

The online retailer is reportedly planning a new service to pick up packages from businesses and deliver them to consumers.

43. Casino Mogul Steve Wynn Resigns Amid Sex Misconduct Claims -

LAS VEGAS (AP) – Facing investigations by gambling regulators and allegations of sexual misconduct, billionaire casino mogul Steve Wynn has stepped down as chairman and CEO of the resorts bearing his names.

44. Rotating Forrest Bust Out of Capitol Gains Momentum -

Confederate Lt. Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest’s days in the State Capitol could be numbered. Lt. Gov. Randy McNally, an Oak Ridge Republican, says he could support a move to rotate Forrest’s bust out of the Capitol and make sure Capitol displays are “more reflective of the entire history of Tennessee.”

45. Last Word: Wiretaps in the Wright Case, Target Layoffs and SCS Looks To Move -

Democratic Congressman Steve Cohen of Memphis among those boycotting the State of the Union address Tuesday evening by President Donald Trump. “The president is unworthy of the podium, the position and the power.” Republican Congressman David Kustoff of Germantown among those not boycotting SOTU. “Just one year after president Trump took the oath of office, our economy is the strongest it has been in decades. … We passed historic tax reform and we bolstered our military and support our veterans. Last year, the president kept his promises and tonight, he told the American people that he is not done.”

46. Changing Plans: Tax Law Makes Small Businesses Rethink Ideas -

NEW YORK (AP) – As Congress debated a new tax law at the end of last year, Jerell and Elissa Klaver began revising their company's plans for 2018.

The Klavers crunched the numbers, estimating how a lower tax rate and bigger deductions on equipment purchases could help increase their sales of bath soaps and other personal care products. They've already hired an engineer to create new manufacturing machinery for their company, Fort Collins, Colorado-based SALUS.

47. Last Word: The Snow Split, Amazon Post-Mortem and Intermodal Comeback -

A split verdict on Snow Day 4. Some school systems and colleges and universities are out again Friday, others are not and still others are opening later in the day. Shelby County Schools, which is out, says it has 13 extra days built into its schedule for just such an event or events – that is 13 days extra beyond the 180 days the state requires as the bare minimum for a school year.

48. Last Word: Liberty Bowl Post Mortem, Confederate Protest Plans and Absorption -

As soon as it was confirmed the Tigers would play in the AutoZone Liberty Bowl, there was some concern locally about the impact that would have on tourism at the holidays with only one of the bowl teams – Iowa State – being from out of town. The exact dollar figures aren’t in just yet. But the game was enough of a success out of the box that the executive director of the game is talking about a more constant presence in the bowl game for the Tigers now that they’ve made their first appearance in the 59-year history of the game which began in Philadelphia. And there is some precedent in college football for what Steve Ehrhart is talking about.

49. County Commission Renews Opioid Legal Skirmish with County Administration -

Shelby County Commissioners voted Monday, Dec. 4, to hire another attorney to represent it in an ongoing legal battle with county mayor Mark Luttrell over opioid litigation. And the commission approved a resolution declaring opioid abuse a “public nuisance” as an opening to legal depositions of opioid manufacturers and distributors.

50. Last Word: Lake District Recycling, The New First and The AAC 'Glass Ceiling' -

The U.S. Senate vote on a tax reform plan is now set for 10 a.m. our time Friday morning following more debate in D.C. that began Thursday as the trigger provision to raise tax rates if economic growth from the proposed tax cuts doesn't materialize was ruled out of order by the Senate parliamentarian. This was the provision on which the support of U.S. Senator Bob Corker of Tennessee hinged. And Corker is leading a group of deficit hawks whose block of votes is considered crucial in what happens to a proposal that was being reshaped as midnight approached. Here's Politico with comments from Corker as of late Thursday

51. Council Moves Toward Alcohol on Main Street -

Memphis City Council members delayed a final vote Tuesday, Nov. 21, on an ordinance that sets out options for the removal of statues of Nathan Bedford Forrest and Jefferson Davis in city parks, but moved forward on a proposal to allow open alcohol containers and consumption on Main Street.

52. County Primary Filing Opens With Paperwork Flurry -

A total of 37 prospective candidates in the May 2018 county primaries pulled qualifying petitions last week on the first day of the filing period Friday, Nov. 17.

And the first contenders through the doors at the Shelby County Election Commission in a period that extends to a February deadline confirms a few trends.

53. Last Word: 2018 Head Start, Tax Reform Bill Votes and Tigers Basketball in Decline -

Can you smell the paper? Friday is the first day that candidates in the 2018 elections can start picking up qualifying petitions for their place on the ballot – in this case the May county primary elections in Shelby County. Here is the scene setter.

54. Grab a Gun, Go See Your State Representative -

When legislative leaders started to allow guns in the Legislative Plaza nearly two years ago, the Sierra Club’s Scott Banbury had his daughter take pictures of him wearing his holstered Ruger and lobbyist ID card to put on lawmakers’ desks with the question: “Is this what you want?”

55. Medical Marijuana Might Finally Get Past Objections -

Medical marijuana legislation is evolving, not to ease people’s debilitating pain but to help it pass the General Assembly, where it’s giving some lawmakers heartburn.

State Rep. Jeremy Faison, an East Tennessee Republican ferrying the bill through the House, is offering several changes to a bill he is sponsoring with Sen. Steve Dickerson, a Nashville Republican, to soothe the nerves of state bureaucrats and lawmakers who get shaky when the word marijuana is mentioned.

56. DMC Acquires Main Street Building, Will Issue RFP -

Members of the Center City Development Corp. have approved an option contract to purchase a 29,000-square-foot building at 18 S. Main St. with the hopes issuing an RFP (request for proposal) to prospective developers interested in buying and renovating the property.

57. DMC Acquires Main Street Building, Will Issue RFP -

Members of the Center City Development Corp. have approved an option contract to purchase a 29,000-square-foot building at 18 S. Main St. with the hopes issuing an RFP (request for proposal) to prospective developers interested in buying and renovating the property.

58. Louisville Places Rick Pitino, AD on Administrative Leave -

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) – Rick Pitino couldn't survive another scandal, as an angry interim Louisville president Wednesday placed the head men's college basketball coach and his boss on administrative leave amid a federal bribery investigation.

59. Adams Gets Life Without Parole For Bobo Murder in Sentencing Deal -

UPDATE: After a jury in Savannah, Tennessee convicted Zachary Adams Friday of first degree murder, kidnapping and rape, prosecutors and the defense announced a sentencing agreement Saturday that means Adams will serve life in prison without parole plus 50 years for the 2011 murder of Holly Bobo.

60. Opioid Committee on Right Track, Obstacles Remain -

Smyrna Police Chief Kevin Arnold can remember the first time his detectives brought a heroin case to him three or four years ago.

“Of course, my reaction immediately was, ‘I thought that went away in the late 70s.’ But we’re seeing it. In fact, we are averaging approximately five heroin overdoses a month just in the town of Smyrna,” adds Arnold, whose city about 10 miles southeast of Nashville has a population of nearly 48,600.

61. Touliatos Set To Make Run For Shelby County Mayor -

Since her office is not term limited, Juvenile Court Clerk Joy Touliatos could stay for a while in the clerk’s position she has held for nearly two terms.

Instead, Touliatos is running as a Republican for Shelby County Mayor in 2018 on a platform calling for cooperation among elected officials, lower taxes and smaller government.

62. Season 3: Time for QB Mariota To Become a Star -

If Year 1 was a good start and Year 2 was another step in the right direction, what should we expect of Marcus Mariota in Year 3?

How about a playoff berth for the team he quarterbacks.

Granted, there are many other factors in play that will determine the success, failure or return to mediocrity of the Titans in 2017. Has the defensive backfield been successfully retooled? Can the offensive line remain one of the best in the NFL? Will the additions at wide receiver pay the expected dividends?

63. Tech Companies Banishing Extremists After Charlottesville -

NEW YORK (AP) – It took bloodshed in Charlottesville to get tech companies to do what civil rights groups have been calling for for years: take a firmer stand against accounts used to promote hate and violence.

64. Crosstown High School Gets $2.5 Million XQ Institute Grant -

A year from opening, organizers of Crosstown High School have secured a $2.5 million, five-year grant from a national education reform group focused specifically on high schools.

“It puts us in a much greater financial position,” said Chris Terrill, Crosstown High executive director. “But more important than the financial revenue is the connection we make to the XQ network of people.”

65. Beware at the Pump: Black Market Fuel is Making Millions -

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (AP) – A black market for diesel and gasoline has rapidly spread around the nation, with organized crime gangs using fraudulent credit cards to syphon millions of dollars in fuel from gas stations into large tanks hidden inside pickup trucks and vans.

66. Last Word: Kustoff at Rotary, Royal's Vibe and The Terms of MEMPOWER -

The investment group that renovated the Chisca resurfaced Tuesday evening with a plan for the Wonder Bread factory, vacant for the last four years. But don’t look for a return of the bread smell to the Edge area. And if you look at what has started to happen in that particular corridor since Wonder Bread shut down, the mixed-use plan has some precedent. Throw in the move to sell The Commercial Appeal property just a few blocks away and if the economy remains this good, the transformation in this area could be radical in another four years.

67. Flying Ace Sully Makes Case Against Privatization -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Who are you going to trust when it comes to what's best for the flying public? Members of Congress or the hero of the Miracle on the Hudson, retired Capt. Chesley "Sully" Sullenberger?

68. HealthChoice Promotes Henning To Director of Population Health -

Sarah Henning has been promoted to director of population health programs at HealthChoice. Henning previously served as manager of the department. In her new role, Henning is responsible for designing, implementing and managing population health and wellness initiatives and programs for the HealthChoice network.
She also collaborates with stakeholders to promote and support these programs and to ensure they meet the needs of the affected populations and adapt with the changing health care environment.

69. Last Word: 'Secular Stagnationists', CRE's Big Year in Memphis and Lakeland Prep -

Protests over the weekend in Martyr’s Park and at the federal prison facility in Mason, Tennessee for those rounded up in the ICE – Immigration and Customs Enforcement -- raids here in Memphis that began a week ago. Latino Memphis is also offering legal advice to those who believe they may be caught up in the new push. There are also several efforts to support families that find mothers and/or fathers in federal custody in the sweeps. And over the weekend, Memphis Police issued an arrest warrant for a bounty hunter who turned up on YouTube video in an apartment complex with a large Latino tenant base wearing some kind of badge and vest.

70. Paying Fulmer $100K A Deal for UT Athletics -

What does Phillip Fulmer’s hiring as special adviser to University of Tennessee president Joe DiPietro have to do with Vols football coach Butch Jones?

71. County Commission Reviews Juvenile Court Moves as Monitors Say Issues Remain -

The call to end a 5-year-old U.S. Justice Department memorandum of agreement governing conditions and due process at Memphis-Shelby County Juvenile Court goes before a group Wednesday, June 2, that has consistently had a lot of questions about the court.

72. Shelby County Commission to Probe Juvenile Court Moves -

The call to end a 5-year-old U.S. Justice Department memorandum of agreement governing conditions and due process at Memphis-Shelby County Juvenile Court goes before a group Wednesday, June 2, that has consistently had a lot of questions about the court.

73. Last Word: Recovery Day 6, Trezevant Allegations Resurface and Memphis Is Hard -

There is some debate about how the Memorial Day weekend storm compares to the Ice Storm of 1994 and Hurricane Elvis in 2003. A city public works supervisor who is a veteran of both earlier incidents weighed in this week as Mayor Jim Strickland stopped by Collins Yard to rally the city’s troops in the recovery effort. Rodney Wakefield also had a lot to say about what motivates city workers to tackle this hard work in a sweltering spring and do it as quickly and as safely as possible.

74. Past, Present Converge at Lynching Centennial -

The only thing that runs through the area where the Macon Road bridge stood 100 years ago are power lines on wooden poles that take them over the oxbow lake, thick kudzu and two bridge supports almost overtaken by undergrowth on the edge of a thickly-wooded area.

75. View From the Hill: Haslam Credits GOP ‘Experiment’ for Tennessee’s Success -

If you ask Gov. Bill Haslam, Republican government is the best thing since sliced bread.

Not only is GOP leadership responsible for a myriad of tax cuts leading to record surpluses and a $37 billion budget funding better K-12 and higher education, shoring up the rainy day and TennCare funds, shrinking state debt and building an economic environment for job creation, Haslam says. It’s even bringing us the cleanest air since before the industrial revolution.

76. Unfair Labor Practices Charged at Volkswagen's US Plant -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – The National Labor Relations Board has filed another unfair labor practices complaint against Volkswagen for hiking health insurance premiums and changing working hours of employees who voted for union representation at the German automaker's only U.S. plant.

77. Blight Summit to Mark Progress, Challenges -

When the leaders of the city’s anti-blight effort gather at Clayborn Temple for their second annual summit Wednesday, May 17, on the next block south of the church will be an example of work still to be done.

78. Last Word: Council Day Issues, 'A Man Of Color' and East Memphis 'Novel' -

A busy day at City Hall Tuesday by the City Council agenda and by at least one completely unplanned moment during council budget committee sessions. It was so busy that at the start of Tuesday’s council session, chairman Berlin Boyd couldn’t find his gavel and technical glitches prompted him to ask for a can of WD-40. Throw in a visit to City Hall by civil rights leader Rev. Jesse Jackson and you have our comprehensive same night rundown of how it went and for whom it went.

79. University of Memphis, UTHSC May Soon Face Outsourcing Decisions -

Forty-one state lawmakers signed a letter requesting the state put a hold on its outsourcing plans until the General Assembly can scrutinize its effect on state workers and services.

The state is set to sign a contract April 28 with Chicago-based JLL for facilities management work that could be used by universities and departments statewide. Even local government jobs could be doled out to the contractor.

80. First Budget Moves, Minority Business Measures Top Commission Session -

Shelby County Commissioners set the tone for the upcoming county government budget season Monday, April 17, with approval of a refinancing of county debt with up to $120 million in bonds over time.

81. First Budget Moves, Minority Business Measures Top Commission Session -

Shelby County Commissioners set the tone for the upcoming county government budget season Monday, April 17, with approval of a refinancing of county debt with up to $120 million in bonds over time.

82. Last Word: Milhaus Sells, Voucher Debate Gets Heated and Boyd's Fly Around -

Highland Row isn’t fully open yet and it is already up for sale as part of a real estate portfolio. The owner, Milhaus, based in Indianapolis, is a development, construction and property management company that works in mixed use development. And the portfolio being on the market could turn into a recapitalization.

83. State Panel Says No Censure of Prosecutor in Noura Jackson Case -

A panel of the Tennessee Board of Professional Responsibility says a Shelby County assistant district attorney did not intentionally hide evidence that might have helped the defense in the 2009 murder trial of Noura Jackson.

84. State Panel Says No Censure of Prosecutor In Noura Jackson Case -

A panel of the Tennessee Board of Professional Responsibility says a Shelby County Assistant District Attorney did not intentionally hide evidence that might have helped the defense in the 2009 murder trial of Noura Jackson.

85. State Panel Says No Censure of Prosecutor In Noura Jackson Case -

A panel of the Tennessee Board of Professional Responsibility says a Shelby County Assistant District Attorney did not intentionally hide evidence that might have helped the defense in the 2009 murder trial of Noura Jackson.

86. View From the Hill: House Leaders Still Figuring Out Sexual Harassment Policy -

In a case of déjà vu all over again, Democratic state Rep. Bo Mitchell isn’t willing to give Republican House leaders a break on their handling of former Rep. Mark Lovell’s resignation for alleged sexual misconduct.

87. Former Southaven Mayor's Retrial Moved Out of DeSoto County -

A judge has decided that former Southaven, Mississippi, Mayor Greg Davis will be retried four counties away on felony fraud and embezzlement charges.

88. As Rookie NBA Head Coach, Grizzlies’ David Fizdale Earns Acclaim -

He has been forthright – with his players and when speaking with the media. First-year Grizzlies head coach David Fizdale doesn’t go in for verbal gymnastics or political double-talk.

Nor does he worry about appearances. He cancelled shoot-arounds on game days multiple times right before the All-Star break because he believed his veteran guys could use the rest. A more paranoid coach, a less assured man, might have worried about the fallout if the results were not good.

89. Editorial: Redistricting Reform Deserves Better -

Before he left Congress at the end of 2010, U.S. Rep. John Tanner of Union City, Tennessee, talked a lot about how the way district lines were being redrawn, usually by state legislatures, was affecting our politics.

90. Planned Parenthood Vote Draws On Political Divide -

Shelby County Commissioner Steve Basar looked out at the audience in the commission’s chambers Monday, Feb. 6, and saw something the commission only sees once or twice a year – a standing room-only crowd with every seat taken and most there for a single issue.

91. Last Word: State of the State React, Reverse Logistics and Speed Limiters -

As the work week began, U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen of Memphis joining House Democrats in sponsoring a bill that would bar the use of any federal funds to carry out President Trump’s order barring refugees from seven majority Muslim countries.

92. Last Word: The March & Crowd Estimates and Country Records in Memphis -

Twice now in the last six months, very different protests have drawn thousands of people to the streets in the largest demonstrations we’ve seen since the 1970s – and more importantly, demonstrations that are an entry point for a new generation to many of these issues.

93. College Football Bowl Scene Changes, But AutoZone Liberty Bowl Endures -

Step inside the East Memphis offices of the AutoZone Liberty Bowl and the 58-year history of the game is captured in long, mirrored display cases featuring the helmets of every team to play in the game – from the simple crimson-and-white helmet of Alabama to the golden dome of Notre Dame.

94. Last Word: Valero Protest Arrests, Anticipating Trump's Impact & Saving Booksellers -

A busy King holiday weekend that reflects what the week as a whole will probably be like at least politically. The weather is anyone’s guess. A group of about 40 people protested at the entrance to the Valero refinery in South Memphis Monday afternoon and a dozen were arrested by Memphis police.

95. View From the Hill: Taxing Online Sales Not Such an Easy Fix -

Cumberland Transit owner Allen Doty isn’t sure if a rule requiring major out-of-state retailers to collect Tennessee sales taxes will create more equity for his shop.

But Doty, who has been selling everything from bicycles to kayaks and camping gear for 34 years in Nashville, is definitely tired of people shopping in his store for hours, snapping a picture of shoes they like, then going home and buying them online “just to avoid sales tax.”

96. Elvis' Home-Away-From-Home Could Be Razed for Car Wash -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – As a teenager growing up in the 1950s, Steve North would look for the pink Cadillac outside a stone house on the outskirts of Nashville. If the car was there, Elvis was in the building.

97. Reactionaries, Evidence Vie on Medicinal Pot -

Three-year-old Josie Mae Mathis of Greene County used to suffer hundreds of seizures daily from epilepsy and infantile spasms. Aden Vogus, a pre-teen from Brentwood, has seen his seizures all but disappear.

98. Final Goodbye: Roll Call of Some of Those Who Died in 2016 -

Death claimed transcendent political figures in 2016, including Cuba's revolutionary leader and Thailand's longtime king, but also took away royals of a different sort: kings of pop music, from Prince and David Bowie to George Michael.

99. Riding Momentum -

Around this time each year, everyone tends to start fetishizing the blank slate a bit, with its attendant allure of reinvention and that sweeping away of the old order to make way for what comes next.

100. New Year, New Resolutions for Legislators -

Some Tennesseans recall the days when the state Legislature met every other year and wonder if it should revert to that schedule. Considering the General Assembly pushes most of its work into 3 1/2 months, it might be worth a try.