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Editorial Results (free)

1. From Penny Press To Snapchat: Parents Fret Through The Ages -

NEW YORK (AP) — When Stephen Dennis was raising his two sons in the 1980s, he never heard the phrase "screen time," nor did he worry much about the hours his kids spent with technology. When he bought an Apple II Plus computer, he considered it an investment in their future and encouraged them to use it as much as possible.

2. Why do so many digital transformations fail? -

According to a McKinsey and Company article cited in CIO magazine more than 70% of corporate digital transformations fail.

On paper it’s an equal playing field. The failing entities have the same technology as everyone else, certainly are drowning in very big data sets, and assuredly have a large number of very bright professionals eager for purposeful tasks.

3. White House Faces Brain Drain at Perilous Moment -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Increasingly convinced that the West Wing is wholly unprepared to handle the expected assault from Democrats if they win the House in November, President Donald Trump's aides and allies are privately raising alarm as his circle of legal and communications advisers continues to shrink.

4. Trump: White House Counsel Don McGahn to Depart in the Fall -

WASHINGTON (AP) — White House counsel Don McGahn, who has maintained a front row seat in Trump administration controversies and accomplishments, will be leaving in the fall after the expected Senate confirmation vote for Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh, President Donald Trump announced Wednesday.

5. Last Word: Rallings Talks Bridge, Bird at U of M and Spec Industrial -

Part of the unofficial job description of an activist can be to be as provocative as possible. And provocative is what the attorneys and the judge in the Memphis Police surveillance lawsuit trial in federal court got Wednesday from Keedran Franklin. Franklin is one of the activists/protesters in the recent wave of protests locally in the last two to three years who was being watched closely by Memphis Police.

6. It’s Lee’s to Win Unless He Makes a Rookie Mistake -

When Bill Lee drove a tractor through tiny Eagleville last October, hardly anyone noticed. Only a handful of supporters milled around in the parking lot of the Farmers Co-op in southwest Rutherford County that morning where Lee spent a few minutes talking to people inside the store before emerging to ride to another town as part of a statewide tour, a precursor to an RV ride he would take later in the Republican primary race.

7. Last Word: Day Two in Federal Court, Cohen on Manafort and Saturation Concerns -

Memphis Police Director Michael Rallings on the witness stand Tuesday in Memphis Federal Court for day two of the trial on police surveillance of protesters.

And Rallings testified that he had only a “vague” knowledge of the 1978 federal consent decree banning such surveillance prior to the lawsuit filed in 2017 by protesters put on the City Hall security list. As a supervisor at the police training academy, Rallings also testified that the rules set by the decree to prevent political surveillance of protesters were not taught to police officers to his knowledge.

8. Conscious Innovation a Necessity -

Readers of this column understand how the role of business itself is morphing. Technology has met customer preference and disrupted many categories. Think of Airbnb, Lyft and Uber, as well as UberEats. Look at the unimaginable growth of Apple and Amazon. Examine, too, the function of innovation as a formal discipline and the rise of Conscious Capitalism.

9. Trump Appears to Change Story on Meeting with Russian Lawyer -

BRIDGEWATER, N.J. (AP) — President Donald Trump appears to have changed his story about a 2016 meeting at Trump Tower that is pivotal to the special counsel's investigation, tweeting that his son met with a Kremlin-connected lawyer to collect information about his political opponent.

10. Jury Tells Pork Giant to Pay $473.5M in Nuisance Lawsuit -

RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — A federal jury decided Friday that the world's largest pork producer should pay $473.5 million to neighbors of three North Carolina industrial-scale hog farms for unreasonable nuisances they suffered from odors, flies and rumbling trucks

11. 50 years on, McDonald's and fast-food evolve around Big Mac -

NEW YORK (AP) — McDonald's is fighting to hold onto customers as the Big Mac turns 50, but it isn't changing the makings of its most famous burger.

The company is celebrating the 1968 national launch of the double-decker sandwich whose ingredients of "two all-beef patties, special sauce, lettuce, cheese, pickles, onions and a sesame seed bun" were seared into American memories by a TV jingle. But the milestone comes as the company reduces its number of U.S. stores. McDonald's said Thursday that customers are visiting less often. Other trendy burger options are reaching into the heartland.

12. The Week Ahead: July 23-29 -

Good morning, Memphis! Get ready to stock up on back-to-school gear during Tennessee’s sales tax holiday is this weekend. Plus, swoop in for a superhero double feature and boogie down on National Dance Day. Here’s the lowdown on all those and more hot happenings in The Week Ahead…

13. Fashion Firms Upend Design Routine to Focus on Speed, Trends -

NEW YORK (AP) – Prototypes? Passe. Fashion company Betabrand saw that knitwear was a hot style in sneakers and wanted to quickly jump on the trend for dressier shoes. It put a poll up on its website asking shoppers what style they liked, and based on that had a shoe for sale online in just one week.

14. Shelby County Early Voting Tops 4,300 -

A total of 4,324 citizens had voted early through Monday, July 16, the last day of the 14-day voting period confined to five sites. Early voting expanded Tuesday to 22 additional sites across Shelby County.

15. Take a Break from Social Media -

A lot of professionals I know relieve stress with a few minutes on Facebook after they finish a phase of a project or need a break from their tasks.

Welcome to facebook.com, where you can bliss out on cute kitten photos, catch up with an old friend, find a novel product, or play defense from aggressive people who pounce on your character to make a point. It’s weird. On one hand you get connection; on the other you get discord.

16. How Much All-seeing AI Surveillance is Too Much? -

BOSTON (AP) — When a CIA-backed venture capital fund took an interest in Rana el Kaliouby's face-scanning technology for detecting emotions, the computer scientist and her colleagues did some soul-searching — and then turned down the money.

17. Man Who Destroyed Ten Commandments Display Ordered Released -

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — A judge has ordered the release of a man who destroyed Arkansas' Ten Commandments following his acquittal on mental health grounds.

Pulaski County Circuit Judge Vann Smith approved the conditional release Friday of Michael Tate Reed from the state hospital to live with his mother in Alma, Arkansas. Smith said that Reed must receive treatment from the Valley Behavioral Health System, and is prohibited from driving a vehicle.

18. Conscious Capitalism: Conversation With Raj Sisodia, Part Four -

Raj Sisodia is the Professor of Global Business, Babson College, Co-founder & Co-Chairman, Conscious Capitalism, Inc. Raj has written ten books and over 100 academic articles.

19. Fewer US teens smoking, doing drugs ... and drinking milk -

NEW YORK (AP) — Fewer U.S. teens are smoking, having sex and doing drugs these days. Oh, and they're drinking less milk, too.

Less than one-third of high school students drink a glass of milk a day, according to a large government survey released Thursday. About two decades ago, it was nearly half.

20. Microsoft follows Amazon in pursuit of cashier-less stores -

Microsoft is working on automated checkout technology that could help retailers compete with Amazon's new cashier-less stores.

One firm building automated checkout systems, Ava Retail, said Thursday it is working with Microsoft on the technology for physical stores. Both companies have headquarters in Redmond, Washington.

21. Fred’s Completes Sale Of Specialty Pharmacy Unit -

Memphis-based Fred’s Inc. has completed the sale of its specialty pharmacy unit, EntrustRx, to CVS Health Corp.

22. Last Word: The Commutation, Tuition Freeze and Blackburn and Sundquist -

Alice Marie Johnson walked out of a federal prison in Alabama Wednesday after serving 21 years of a life prison sentence for dealing drugs and laundering money as part of a Memphis drug ring with Texas connections in the 1990s. Johnson’s release came the same day that President Donald Trump commuted her life sentence less than a week after he met with reality television personality Kim Kardashian West who appealed for Johnson’s release. Here is the Associated Press story.

23. Fred’s Completes Sale Of Specialty Pharmacy Unit -

Memphis-based Fred’s Inc. has completed the sale of its specialty pharmacy unit, EntrustRx, to CVS Health Corp.

24. For CEOs, $11.7 Million a Year is Just Middle of the Pack -

NEW YORK (AP) – Chief executives at the biggest public companies got an 8.5 percent raise last year, bringing the median pay package for CEOs to $11.7 million. Across the S&P 500, compensation for CEOs is often hundreds of times higher than typical workers.

25. Businesses Need Purpose -

A talk from Haley Rushing, chief purposologist, The Purpose Institute, from the 2018 Conscious Capitalism Annual Conference.

Why purpose? Humans need purpose and meaning in life. For every venture there are both extrinsic and intrinsic aspirations. Purpose is an intrinsic aspiration. Years of research has shown that those who have only extrinsic goals suffer from anxiety and depression. Yet, those who have intrinsic goals have very low levels of depression and anxiety.

26. Council Gives Administration Nod, Honors 1968 Workers -

The painted image of the late Henry Loeb was mostly ignored Tuesday, May 22, at City Hall as the Memphis City Council honored surviving city sanitation workers from 1968 with its 25th annual Humanitarian of the Year Awards.

27. Grizzlies’ Poor Draft History In Focus With Lottery Pick -

When the NBA Draft Lottery is held on Tuesday, May 15, in Chicago, Grizzlies point guard Mike Conley will be watching on TV. The lottery show will air at 6:30 p.m. on ESPN, should you be inclined to join Conley and root along.

28. US Panel Leaves Prostate Screening Up to Men, Their Doctors -

CHICAGO (AP) – Whether to get screened for prostate cancer is a question that men aged 55 to 69 should decide themselves in consultation with their doctors, according to finalized guidance issued Tuesday by an influential panel of health care experts.

29. Fred’s CEO Resigns, Replaced By CFO -

The CEO of Memphis-based discount retailer Fred’s Inc. has left the company, less than two years into his run as the top executive and on the heels of a particularly volatile period for Fred’s that has seen other management shuffles, an uncertain turnaround strategy and a plummeting stock price.

30. Robot Fast-Food Chefs: Hype or a Sign of Industry Change? -

BOSTON (AP) – Robots can't yet bake a souffle or fold a burrito, but they can cook up vegetables and grains and spout them into a bowl – and are doing just that at a new fast casual restaurant in Boston.

31. Last Word: Trolleys Roll, Primary Election Day and The Rise of South City -

MATA CEO Gary Rosenfeld likes to joke that the new trolleys are quieter since the transit authority decided to change from using square wheels. Transit humor. They really are quieter. And that may be because MATA wasn’t doing much of anything in the way of maintenance on them four years ago and even less in the way of record keeping when a second trolley car burst into flames causing MATA to shut down everything it ran on rails. So the trolley that rolled out of the MATA barn on North Main Street Monday morning and into service was symbolic of more than getting a trolley or three ready for service. It was about building a new system around the operation of the trolleys.

32. Sprint, T-Mobile Have to Sell $26.5B Deal to Antitrust Cops -

NEW YORK (AP) – To gain approval for their $26.5 billion merger agreement, T-Mobile and Sprint aim to convince antitrust regulators that there is plenty of competition for wireless service beyond Verizon and AT&T.

33. Fred’s CEO Resigns, Replaced By CFO -

The CEO of Memphis-based discount retailer Fred’s Inc. has left the company, less than two years into his run as the top executive and on the heels of a particularly volatile period for Fred’s that has seen other management shuffles, an uncertain turnaround strategy and a plummeting stock price.

34. Bill Cosby Convicted of Drugging and Molesting a Woman -

NORRISTOWN, Pa. (AP) – Bill Cosby was convicted Thursday of drugging and molesting a woman in the first big celebrity trial of the #MeToo era, completing the spectacular late-life downfall of a comedian who broke racial barriers in Hollywood on his way to TV superstardom as America's Dad.

35. A Work Home Found -

Growing up in Texas, just south of Houston, Michael Phillips always had been around people speaking Spanish. He took Spanish classes (and German, too) in high school and always liked the language.

36. Another Conscious Company: Which Wich -

Editor’s note: Columnist Michael Graber interviewed Jeff Sinelli, founder and “chief vibe officer” at Which Wich, about the sandwich chain’s focus on conscious capitalism. 

37. Local Experts: Health Care So Far Immune to Simplification and Lower Costs -

That Walmart may be close to acquiring the health insurer Humana is one signal that we’re in not just a period of change for the health care industry, but a fundamental reshaping of the landscape and a shifting of the players involved.

38. Experts To Weigh In On Health Care Landscape -

Eight years after the Affordable Care Act was signed into law, the cost of health insurance premiums bought in marketplace exchanges locally has seen a big spike so far in 2018.

That’s according to a new report out from the Urban Institute, which notes among other things an average 32 percent jump nationwide between 2017 and 2018 for the exchanges’ lowest-priced “silver” plans.

39. Prescription for Tragedy -

He has his own GPS, an internal shield that keeps him from driving anywhere near 637 Poplar Ave. Home to the Memphis morgue. That’s where they showed Jerry Davidson his 22-year-old son, Oliver, his eyes closed and his lips purple.

40. Can Zuckerberg's Media Blitz Take the Pressure Off Facebook? -

NEW YORK (AP) – In the wake of a privacy scandal involving a Trump-connected data-mining firm, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg embarked on a rare media mini-blitz in an attempt to take some of the public and political pressure off the social network.

41. The 2018 NBA Draft Might be Deep, But It’s Not Mistake-Proof for Grizzlies -

In one analysis before the 2009 NBA Draft, nbadraftnet.com decided the pro player most comparable to Connecticut big man Hasheem Thabeet was Dikembe Mutombo. Each of them was at least 7-foot-2. Each played basketball. That’s where the similarities ended.

42. August State and Federal Primary Ballot Taking Shape -

With less than a month to file for the August state and federal primary elections, there are still a few decisions to be made by would-be candidates working in the shadows of those running in the May 1 county primary elections.

43. The Bigger the Back End, The Stronger the Backlash -

Be careful. When innovation gets real, people react in unpredictable ways.

People whom you thought were forward thinking recoil in reactionary conservatism. Others are willing to move a step forward, but vigilantly cautious. The more concrete you get in detail, the stronger the reaction you receive internally.

44. Glassman to Tax Pros: Take a Lesson From the Tortoise, Not the Hare -

Richard Glassman’s spacious office in Downtown Memphis is cluttered like a closet, but holds the history of a museum. Everything from a cap signed by actor Tom Cruise back when “The Firm” was being filmed in Memphis, to a framed and autographed No. 45 Michael Jordan Chicago Bulls jersey, to a stuffed cobra positioned under his desk, looking ready to pounce.

45. Twitter Makes Money for First Time Ever, But Problems Remain -

NEW YORK (AP) – Twitter made money for the first time in its nearly 12-year history, a milestone that satisfied investors in the short term but might not resolve the company's broader problems any time soon.

46. The Aging Process -

The team behind Old Dominick Distillery, which started filling its first barrels of Tennessee whiskey around this time last year, remains full steam ahead and is barely stopping to take note of their one-year anniversary.

47. US Economy Grew at Solid 2.6 Percent Rate in Fourth Quarter -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The U.S. economy grew at a solid rate of 2.6 percent in the final three months of last year, helped by the fastest consumer spending since the spring of 2016 and a big rebound in home construction.

48. Jubilee Schools Closing After 20 Years -

The Catholic Diocese of Memphis is ending its operation of nine Jubilee Schools and St. Michael School at the end of the 2018-2019 school year and is working with a charter organization to form a network of charter schools to replace them.

49. Catholic Diocese Ending Jubilee Schools After 2018-2019 School Year -

The Catholic Diocese of Memphis is ending its operation of a set of nine Jubilee schools and St. Michael School at the end of the 2018-2019 school year and appears to be working with a charter organization forming a network of charter schools.

50. Tesla Proposes Big Payout If Musk Meets Lofty Goals -

Elon Musk is known for his bold predictions on electric and self-driving cars. Now his pay could depend on whether those predictions come true.

Under a new all-or-nothing pay package, Musk would remain at Tesla Inc. for the next decade and see his compensation tied to ambitious growth targets.

51. Q&A: What Facebook's Shift Could Mean to Users, Businesses -

NEW YORK (AP) – In coming days, Facebook users will see fewer posts from publishers, businesses and celebs they follow. Instead, Facebook wants people to see more stuff from friends, family and other people they are likely to have "meaningful" conversations with – something the company laments has been lost in the sea of videos, news stories (real and fake), and viral quizzes on which "Big Bang Theory" character you are.

52. Walmart Boosts Starting Pay, Closing Dozens of Sam's Clubs -

NEW YORK (AP) – Walmart confirmed Thursday that it is closing dozens of Sam's Club warehouse stores across the country – a move that seems sure to cost jobs – on the same day it announced that it was boosting its starting salary for U.S. workers and handing out one-time bonuses to others.

53. Retail Workers Feel Disruption From Shifting Shopper Habits -

NEW YORK (AP) – With new options and conveniences, there's never been a better time for shoppers. As for workers ... well, not always.

The retail industry is being radically reshaped by technology, and nobody feels that disruption more starkly than 16 million American shelf stockers, salespeople, cashiers and others. The shifts are driven, like much in retail, by the Amazon effect – the explosion of online shopping and the related changes in consumer behavior and preferences.

54. Memphis Experts See Economic Growth Building Off 2017 Into 2018 -

With resolutions made and the new year now, another annual exercise rises to the forefront – predictions on what Memphis and its economy can expect in 2018.

If 2017 taught us anything, it’s that there’s so much we won’t be able to even remotely see coming, from Memphis bidding to become the potential home for Amazon’s second headquarters to action finally being taken on the Confederate monuments in city parks and so much more.

55. Pruitt Makes Most of Early Signing Date -

Tennessee coach Jeremy Pruitt could have done a lot worse during the Dec. 20-22 early signing period, the first-ever for high school recruits in college football.

It was a recruiting whirlwind for Pruitt, named UT’s coach Dec. 7 while still serving as Alabama’s defensive coordinator.

56. Final Goodbye: Roll Call of Some Who Died in 2017 -

They made music that inspired legions of fans. Rock 'n' roll founding fathers Chuck Berry and Fats Domino, rockers Tom Petty and Gregg Allman, grunge icon Chris Cornell, country superstar Glen Campbell and jazz great Al Jarreau were among the notable figures who died in 2017, leaving a void in virtually every genre of music.

57. US Industries Can Start Counting Their Benefits From Tax Law -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Craft breweries are raising a glass to the Republicans' new tax overhaul: It cuts the excise tax on beer. Retailers, long saddled with heavy tax bills, will get relief. So will some high-profile names in corporate finance, led by Wells Fargo.

58. Leaps and Bounds -

Memphis’ health care industry was packed with activity in 2017, everything from a slew of new hires and personnel changes to new facility openings, major research announcements and expansions.

59. UnitedHealth Ventures Deeper Into Care With Nearly $5B Deal -

The nation's biggest health insurer is spending nearly $5 billion to buy hundreds of clinics, just three days after rival Aetna announced a bigger tie up with CVS Health Corp.

60. Last Word: 'Coach Killer', Collierville's Industrial Growth and Ice Cream & Soup -

Lots of discussion the day after his firing about David Fizdale’s value off the court for the city and just where that fits with whether the Grizz win or lose and who is held responsible when they lose too much. Losing too much is what the Grizz front office said caused the change and not Marc Gasol being a “coach-killer” to quote Grizz GM Chris Wallace. And this is not just a Memphis discussion. LeBron James on the Fizdale firing via CBSSports. This was before James got ejected from a game Tuesday evening for the first time in his career.

61. Apocalypse Not -

Much has been said about the so-called “Retail Apocalypse,” a frightening term that conjures images of a desolate landscape littered with boarded-up malls and shopping centers representing the death of American capitalism. 

62. CBS News, PBS Cut Ties to Rose Following Sex Allegations -

NEW YORK (AP) – CBS News and PBS both cut ties to Charlie Rose on Tuesday, less than 24 hours after several women who worked with him on his PBS interview show alleged a pattern of sexual misconduct, including groping and walking naked in front of them.

63. US Air Force Official: Missile Targeting Saudis Was Iranian -

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — Iran manufactured the ballistic missile fired by Yemen's Shiite rebels toward the Saudi capital and remnants of it bore "Iranian markings," the top U.S. Air Force official in the Mideast said Friday, backing the kingdom's earlier allegations.

64. FBI Again Finds Itself Unable to Unlock a Gunman's Cellphone -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Texas church massacre is providing a familiar frustration for law enforcement: FBI agents are unable to unlock the gunman's encrypted cellphone to learn what evidence it might hold.

65. Justice Department Changes Police Review and Juvenile Court Terms -

In two weeks’ time, the U.S. Justice Department has substantially changed the terms of its collaborative review of the Memphis Police Department and left in place the terms of a settlement agreement with Memphis-Shelby County Juvenile Court involving disproportionate minority contact.

66. Last Word: Beyond Amazon, Marking The RiverLine and Whimsy Grows -

Grizz and Hornets Monday at the Forum. And Tigers football is on the road for a Friday game at Tulsa. On Tuesday, though there will be much attention to the first of six weekly rankings of college football teams by the new College Football Playoff committee. And the Tigers expect to make the rankings. The players are saying that. That will be followed closely, of course, by another series of interviews about how the team is focused only on the next game as they keep hitting refresh on the playoff committee rankings site. The rankings also promise to be interesting for the SEC teams that are part of the local and regional sports mix here.

67. US Consumer Confidence Takes a Hit From Hurricanes -

WASHINGTON (AP) – American consumers feel a bit less confident this month, their spirits pulled down by Hurricanes Harvey and Irma.

The Conference Board says its consumer confidence index fell to 119.8 in September from 120.4 in August. Conference Board economist Lynn Franco says that confidence "decreased considerably" in hurricane-hit Florida and Texas.

68. Is Business Killing Our Creative Sprits? -

This week there was an article in Inc. magazine that was wildly popular on social media. Elon Musk named his favorite books and there was only one business book out of 10. The rest were science fiction, classics, great books. Many were surprised to learn that Musk finds inspiration in the arts and other fields and finds the canon of management literate uninspired, clichéd, even boring.

69. Titans Begin Season With Questions At Wide Receiver -

For most of their two decades in Tennessee, the wide receiver position has been a glaring hole for the Titans.

Other than the years when Derrick Mason and Drew Bennett were among Steve McNair’s primary targets, and an occasional quality free agent signing like Nate Washington, there have been many swings and misses when it comes to the Titans and the wide receiver position.

70. US Job Growth Slowed in August But Economy Still Looks Solid -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The U.S. job market hit a lull in August, with employers adding a solid but less-than-robust 156,000 jobs and holding back on meaningful pay raises for most workers.

Friday's jobs report from the government pointed to an economy that is still steadily generating jobs, though more slowly than it did earlier in its recovery from the Great Recession. With the economy now in its ninth year of expansion and unemployment near a 16-year low, fewer people are looking for work and fewer jobs are being filled.

71. Artist Cat Peña Named Director Of CBU’s Ross Gallery -

Cat Peña, a Memphis-based artist, arts administrator and independent public art consultant, has been named director of the Beverly & Sam Ross Gallery at Christian Brothers University. As an artist, Peña’s work in recent years has centered on public art installations, including “There’s More To Be Proud Of,” a canopy of metallic streamers on display in the Edge District through next February. In addition, she is the founder of Collabortory, a creative platform that expands public art practices through collaborative and social practices.

72. American Paper Optics, St. Jude Promote Safe Solar Eclipse -

In anticipation of the historic solar eclipse Aug. 21, Bartlett-based American Paper Optics (APO) is partnering with St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital to educate the public on safe solar eclipse viewing.

73. Employer-Based Health Coverage Likely to Stay Awhile -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Get your insurance through your employer? The ongoing political turmoil around "Obamacare" all but guarantees you'll still be able to do that.

Ask Walt Rowen, whose business is etching glass but whose experience managing century-old, family-owned Susquehanna Glass makes him something of an expert on health care. He's provided coverage to employees, then canceled it, steering them to the health insurance exchange. But with those premiums rising, Rowen this year is again covering his 70 or so workers under the umbrella of employer-sponsored health insurance.

74. Wall Street's Goldman Sachs Moves Quietly Into Main Street -

NEW YORK (AP) – More homeowner, less hedge fund titan. Goldman Sachs, long known for its super-rich clients and well-connected executives, is starting to act a lot more like a neighborhood bank.

75. Summer in the City -

Saturday night on Beale Street is more than a catch phrase for businesses there.

It is chapters in old, out-of-print books like Lt. George W. Lee’s “Where The Blues Began” that you can only see in the Memphis-Shelby County Room of the Central Library. You can’t check the book out because of its rarity and age. But you can also find references to the lore of Saturday nights on Beale Street on plaques in the entertainment district that current patrons walk past without even noticing.

76. Bridge Protest Anniversary Draws More Action, Reflection -

A year after the spontaneous protest march that ended with more than 1,000 people shutting down the Hernando DeSoto Bridge for several hours, the leader of that effort was again moving north along B.B. King Boulevard on Sunday, July 9.

77. Man Destroys New Ten Commandments Statue at Arkansas Capitol -

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — A man yelled "Freedom!" as he crashed his vehicle into Arkansas' new Ten Commandments monument early Wednesday, nearly three years after he was arrested in the destruction of Oklahoma's monument at its state Capitol, authorities said.

78. City Council Pushes Back at Administration -

Sometimes there are seven votes. Other times there aren’t. But Memphis City Council debates increasingly point to different thoughts about the city’s course as outlined by the administration of Mayor Jim Strickland.

79. Boyd Talks Gaps In Higher Ed During Whitehaven Stop -

Republican contender for governor Randy Boyd says there is a gap in the state’s Tennessee Promise plan and its reality.

80. Amazon Deal for Whole Foods Could Bring Retail Experiments -

NEW YORK (AP) – Online retail giant Amazon is making a bold expansion into physical stores with a $13.7 billion deal to buy Whole Foods, setting the stage for radical retail experiments that could revolutionize how people buy groceries and everything else.

81. Unlock the Value of Failure -

A Front End of Innovation 2017 keynote by Soon Yu. This talk spoke of the emotional toll of being a professional innovator. The candor and transparency of the speaker made it one of the most engaging keynotes in a stellar year of speakers. Essentially, when we innovate things, we too are being remade. These are tips to handle this process mindfully.

82. Trump Pushes for Privatizing US Air Traffic Control -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Donald Trump made his case Monday for privatizing the nation's air traffic control system, arguing that it will enhance safety and reduce wait times for consumers.

83. Final Budget, Tax-Rate Votes Lead Council Agenda -

Memphis City Council members are poised to end their budget season Tuesday, June 6, with a set of votes on four resolutions and six ordinances that are up for third and final reading.

The resolutions and ordinances would approve a roughly $680 million city operating budget and a $77.8 million capital budget, hikes in stormwater and sewer fees and take the city property tax rate from $3.40 to $3.27.

84. Frayser Recovery Efforts Before Storm Continue Afterward -

Recovery efforts in Frayser aren’t just about the weather and they didn’t just start after the Memorial Day weekend storm that did plenty of damage in neighborhoods with old, large trees.

85. Winds of Change -

Humans have been harnessing the power of the wind since the first Egyptians began to use sails to move their boats along the Nile. More than 7,000 years later, wind power capacity in the U.S. alone has surpassed 82 gigawatts, or enough energy to power 20 million homes, making it the largest renewable generation capacity in the country.

86. Baseball Brawl: It’s in the DNA Of Players, Part of Unwritten Rules -

Memphis Redbirds manager Stubby Clapp and his family were out to dinner the other night when the replay of the San Francisco Giants-Washington Nationals brawl flashed across the television screen.

87. White House Communications Director Resigns Amid Tensions -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A top White House communications staffer has resigned as President Donald Trump considers a major staff overhaul amid intensifying inquiries into his campaign's dealings with Russia.

88. Vaco Risk Solutions' Brian Prentice Talks Data Breaches, Safety -

Vaco Memphis has added Brian Prentice as managing partner of Vaco Risk Solutions, a national consulting firm that works with organizations that have IT security, risk or compliance needs; have had a recent breach; are moving data centers; require a penetration test; or have any other project-based risk management needs.

89. Roger Ailes, Media Guru and Political Strategist, Dies at 77 -

NEW YORK (AP) – Roger Ailes, the communications maestro who transformed television news and America's political conversation by creating and ruling Fox News Channel for two decades before being ousted last year for alleged sexual harassment, died Thursday, according to his wife, Elizabeth Ailes. He was 77.

90. Comey Sought More Russia Probe Resources Before Firing -

WASHINGTON (AP) – In the days before his firing by President Donald Trump, FBI Director James Comey told U.S. lawmakers he had asked the Justice Department for more resources to pursue the bureau's investigation into Russia's interference in last year's presidential election, three U.S. officials said Wednesday.

91. US Jobs Data Show Some Scars From Recession Finally Healing -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A burst of hiring in April provided reassurance for the U.S. economy after a slow start to the year: Job growth returned to a healthy pace. Unemployment hit a decade low. And the number of part-time workers who want full-time jobs reached its lowest point in nine years.

92. Boyd’s Move for Police Overtime Cut Has Deeper Roots -

Of 10 Memphis City Council members present Thursday, May 4, for the ongoing review of the city budget proposal, half favored a move to cut police overtime and half did not.

Two efforts by council chairman Berlin Boyd to cut the $22.4 million line item – first by $5 million and then by $2.7 million – failed on tie votes both times, with some council members switching sides from one vote to the next.

93. Boyd Police Overtime Cut Approved -

Of 10 Memphis City Council members present Thursday, May 4, for the ongoing review of the city budget proposal, half favored a move to cut police overtime and half did not.

The two efforts by council chairman Berlin Boyd to cut the $22.4 million line item – first by $5 million and then by $2.7 million – failed on tie votes both times with some council members switching sides from one vote to the next.

94. Influencer Marketing To Dominate in 2017 -

I am part of Generation X – the last generation that ever scheduled their childhood evenings around when a beloved TV program was set to air. It was a time when television created celebrities that brands coveted as spokespeople to promote their products. Think of Michael Jordan for Nike, Suzanne Somers for the ThighMaster or Michael Jackson for Pepsi.

95. Farmers Fear Losing Immigrant Workers Under Trump Crackdown -

SALEM, Ore. (AP) – The head of Bethel Heights Vineyard looked out over the 100 acres of vines her crew of 20 Mexicans had just finished pruning, worried about what will happen if the Trump administration presses ahead with its crackdown on immigrants.

96. Newspaper Decline Continues to Weigh on AP Earnings -

NEW YORK (AP) – Earnings at The Associated Press shrank substantially last year compared with 2015, when the news organization enjoyed a large tax benefit that skewed its results. Reve-nue also edged downward, reflecting continued contraction in the newspaper industry and a stronger U.S. dollar that reduced the value of overseas sales.

97. East Memphis Office Sells for $17 Million -

6055 Primacy Pkwy.
Memphis, TN 38119

Sale Amount: $17 million 

Sale Date: April 11, 2017

98. Butler Snow's Commercial Litigation Group Grows -

The Memphis office of Butler Snow LLP has added three attorneys to its commercial litigation group.

Clifton Lipman, Robert Crawford and Michael Less are the latest attorneys to join the full-service law firm in recent months.

99. Lawyer: Dragged Passenger Lost 2 Teeth and Broke His Nose -

CHICAGO (AP) – The passenger dragged from a United flight lost two front teeth and suffered a broken nose and a concussion, his lawyer said Thursday, accusing the airline industry of having "bullied" its customers for far too long.

100. Butler Snow Grows Its Commercial Litigation Group -

The Memphis office of Butler Snow LLP has added three attorneys to its commercial litigation group.

Clifton Lipman, Robert Crawford and Michael Less are the latest attorneys to join the full-service law firm in recent months.