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Editorial Results (free)

1. How to Speed Up Innovation -

A keynote presentation at the Back End of Innovation 2017 Conference by Fred Tavan, global head of innovation lab, reinsurance and insurance risk, Sun Life Financial

“My main concern is speed to market,” starts Fred, “as I have seen many innovators lose hope. The antidote to losing hope is insisting on speed. Speed is how I can impact the culture.”

2. How Betting On the 76ers Paid Off -

A talk by Rhyan Truett, director of Innovation Lab operations, Philadelphia 76ers. Rhyan Truett is the director of operations at the Sixers Innovation Lab crafted by Kimball. The Sixers Innovation Lab supports rapidly growing, early-stage companies in the consumer product space and provides speed and flexibility; individualized, industry-leading consulting; and investment opportunities to startups with potential.
Alongside managing director Seth Berger, Rhyan manages the day-to-day operations of the Innovation Lab, currently supporting four companies in the esports, digital media, pet care and daily fantasy sports industries.

3. Out of the Lab, Into the Marketplace -

A keynote presentation by Rachel Antalek, vice president, concept innovation, Starbucks, at the Back End of Innovation 2017 Conference.

Rachel Antalek has been at Starbucks for almost 12 years.

4. Seeing the Future With ‘Macroforces’ -

A keynote talk from the 2017 Back End of Innovation Conference by Tom LaForge, founder and CEO, Macroforces LLCTom LaForge begins the conference asking, “What is a macroforce and why should they be important to you?”

5. Witnessing Real Change -

We host several Innovation Bootcamps each month. After doing this work for years, you expect a predictable pattern at each session. Surprisingly, it’s not in the transformational new thinking about the enterprise and the potential value that is created.

6. Unlocking Daily Creativity -

A Day of Innovation session led by Monica Kang, founder & CEO, InnovatorsBox. How can you face your fear and use it as a strength?

7. Steele Joins Southern Growth Studio’s Anthropology Team -

April Steele has joined Southern Growth Studio as a business anthropologist, responsible for collecting and analyzing data to evaluate existing and potential products and services. Steele’s hire comes as the Memphis-based innovation consulting firm grows its applied anthropology practice. Using qualitative social research methods like ethnography, the anthropology team steers the innovation process, conducting primary research to distill and communicate key insights to clients.

8. Using Innovation Inside the Enterprise -

Increasingly people with job functions that serve an enterprise but have no customer-facing roles are filling up our Innovation Bootcamps. They are being sent to learn new methods, mindsets and approaches to problem solving. They don’t know what to expect when they arrive, but have plans to apply what they learned to create value for their firms upon leaving.

9. Execution Anxiety: Facing the Back End -

After the thrill of a successful front end of innovation project, a company gains valuable insights and perspective. They also receive a portfolio of market-tested concepts that range from easy-to-launch to some that are totally new, a breakthrough for them as a company and their market.

10. Don’t Give Me That Data-tude -

Humans are a limited species. We cannot with any certainty, given the dynamic nature of life, predict the future.

In some cases you have better odds when running models and scenarios based on judging the future by analyzing past behaviors and patterns, such as insurance actuary tables or credit scores; however, most predictions are wrong.

11. Is Business Killing Our Creative Sprits? -

This week there was an article in Inc. magazine that was wildly popular on social media. Elon Musk named his favorite books and there was only one business book out of 10. The rest were science fiction, classics, great books. Many were surprised to learn that Musk finds inspiration in the arts and other fields and finds the canon of management literate uninspired, clichéd, even boring.

12. Mindset is Greater Than Process -

When organizations first experiment with innovation, they tend to be anxious. They are unsure of the unknowns. What has to change? How can we measure the return? What does innovation even mean? How do we do it?

13. Bravery Overcomes Internal Barriers -

It never fails; the same stories and struggles pop up midway through an innovation session.

Picture this typical scenario: Three engineers from different countries of origin, a global and a domestic product manager, a salesperson, someone from the nebulously defined brand department (nebulous because the discipline means something different at every organization we’ve encountered), and someone who serves as a diplomat or relationship manager to an important segment of the business.

14. Know the Strata -

Both innovation and strategy work include methods of problem solving. When organizations make mistakes, it is often because they suffer some form of myopia and have too narrow a perspective.

This error of not seeing the full context of moves that can be taken in a given situation causes a loss of market share, brand erosion, and shortsighted decisions and ill-informed actions to be made.

15. Countercultural Secrets of Successful Innovators -

Successful innovators may seem cavalier, but really they are vast and complex beings. As the great American poet Walt Whitman said of the prophetic role of a poet, “They contain multitudes.”

16. Inviting a New Vision for Memphis Region -

Memphis has been blessed to give birth to the modern grocery store, rock ‘n’ roll, and such corporate category leaders as Holiday Inn, FedEx and AutoZone. These native inventions became the basis of our regional economy after the slow demise of the agrarian culture when cotton was king.

17. Sense of Purpose Drives Entrepreneurs -

Editor’s note: This column is the third in a three-part series. If you are struggling to decide if being an entrepreneur versus a person who prefers a corporation or organization, ask yourself this question: Why do you work?

18. Honor Your Muse, Part 2 -

Editor’s note: This is the second in a three-part series. Full of fear my friend stares into the unknown, wondering whether or not to launch her own business. Only dark silence answers her unvoiced pleas. Like so many professionals in a monolithic system, she yearns for meaning and purpose in her daily work, which is lacking for her in health care social work.

19. Honor Your Muse, Part 1 -

Editor’s note: Part one in a three-part series. Recently, more and more people ask me about launching their own business. They see something liberating about leaping into the unknown, owning their own destiny and not having to make compromises they are forced to make in their current situation.

20. Events -

POTS@TheWorks will present the world premiere of “Victory Blues,” a winner of the 2015 NewWorks@TheWorks playwriting competition, Friday, July 7, through July 30 at TheatreWorks, 2085 Monroe Ave. Visit playhouseonthesquare.org.

21. 3 Modes of Innovation: A New Strategic Framework -

Every client assumes they have to disrupt or be disrupted, but that is often the wrong innovation recipe for them. Disrupting their culture at times of growth may be the worst advice you could offer.

22. The Green Rush & Tokyo Smoke -

Alan Gertner gave a keynote presentation for the Front End of Innovation 2017 Conference and his talk was about the emerging Green Rush, legalized cannabis, the birth of a brand and an industry.

Alan’s calling is coffee, clothing and cannabis. When he took the stage, you saw the radiant archetype of a hipster: beard, boots, swagger and a yet venerable-looking like a guy who worries about taking risks but takes them anyway after anxious consideration.

23. Creating That Headspace -

Some notes from Panos Panay, Berklee College of Music, that your organization can absorb in seeking to innovate.

24. Events -

The Memphis Juneteenth Jobs & Career Fair will be held Tuesday, June 13, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at St. Andrew AME Church, 867 South Parkway E. Human resources directors and executives from more than 25 Memphis and Mid-South companies will be on hand to discuss opportunities; attendees are encouraged to bring resumes. For more information, contact Telisa Franklin at memphisjuneteenth@gmail.com or 901-281-6337.

25. Unlock the Value of Failure -

A Front End of Innovation 2017 keynote by Soon Yu. This talk spoke of the emotional toll of being a professional innovator. The candor and transparency of the speaker made it one of the most engaging keynotes in a stellar year of speakers. Essentially, when we innovate things, we too are being remade. These are tips to handle this process mindfully.

26. Events -

The Memphis Juneteenth Jobs & Career Fair will be held Tuesday, June 13, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at St. Andrew AME Church, 867 South Parkway E. Human resources directors and executives from more than 25 Memphis and Mid-South companies will be on hand to discuss opportunities; attendees are encouraged to bring resumes. For more information, contact Telisa Franklin at memphisjuneteenth@gmail.com or 901-281-6337.

27. Events -

The Memphis Area Transit Authority will participate in the 12th annual National Dump the Pump Day Thursday, June 15, by offering free rides in Memphis, Shelby County and West Memphis on its paratransit vehicles, fixed-route buses and rubber-tired trolley buses. For details and route maps, visit matatransit.com.

28. Women Are Not Robots -

A Front End of Innovation Conference talk by Erica Eden, director, Global Design Innovation, PepsiCo“We don’t treat women like people,” Erica begins this talk. “If you look across multiple categories, the overall hypothesis is that the men’s brands cast a shadow over the women’s brands.”

29. Emotional Innovation -

A Front End of Innovation Conference talk by Craig Dubitsky, founder, Hello Products. Hello Products is disrupting a $30 billion daily use global category by asking the right questions and delivering delight.

30. Internal Disruption: How to Create a Culture for Innovation -

A Front End of Innovation Conference talk by Terry Bradwell, AARP chief innovation officer, and Anne Marie Kilgallon, AARP vice president, innovation. We “have been in a major transformation journey at AARP for three years,” says Terry Bradwell. “We are living longer and it changes how we think about retirement, work, love and everything about life.”

31. Science Behind Empathy and Storytelling -

A talk by Tim Urmston, Seek Co. founder and CEO, from the Front End of Innovation Conference 2017. Connecting brands with people they serve through insights, story, ideas and strategy – this is what supercharges a project.

32. Little Things Matter Most -

The success of an organization’s innovation program has a direct correlation to how deeply senior leadership supports it.

If senior leadership gives innovation lip-service but doesn’t embody any of the necessary mindsets, methods or tools, or if leaders continue giving energy to the day-to-day default behaviors of a place, beware. Paraphrased from Gandhi, they need to be the change they want to see in the world.

33. Exit Now: 9 Signs of a Bad Client -

Not all client-consultant relationships are equal. Like a good marriage, both parties must be capable and willing to work together. Listening respectfully to one another is key to success, as is being able to perform at the highest potential capacity on the scope of work without adding unnecessary obstacles. Being able to accept and capitalize on ongoing feedback is also a two-way street.

34. Using Customer Reviews as Consumer Insights -

Many companies waste some of their most valuable, intimate customer data. They may hire a firm or a few internal people to deliver responsive customer service and respond to online reviews and questions. However, they tend to neglect this treasure trove of field data for insights on how to improve their business or innovate on a new set of needs. 

35. Wisdom in the Workplace -

Maybe you’ve been in this meeting or one like it. Competing agendas fly like bullets. The pace of conversation speeds up. Interruptions pounce out the façade of civility. People anxiously wait to talk, heads burning with desire, rather than listen.

36. Upsetting the Category -

After years of battling over market share and swapping customers back and forth, many companies lose perspective of their market. They know their market too well, ironically, which cripples their vision of new ways their categories could potentially grow or be disrupted. 

37. Pivot For Innovation -

Pivoting your way to profitability, Somik Raha, SmartOrg. There are many unforeseen hazards between concept and launch. Pivoting provides a unique opportunity to learn from experience and to change course at key development stages, making the difference between attaining mediocre results and achieving astounding success.

38. Winning the Scale-Up Game -

A Back End of Innovation talk by Daniel Friedman, chief revenue officer for Imaginatik. The Back-End Innovation Game “I am going to focus on how,” says Daniel. “It all starts with asking the right questions.”

39. Two Highlights From the Back End of Innovation -

“A Systems Approach to Creating an Innovation Funding Board,” Craig Wirkus, Cisco. Cisco’s five-pillar strategy for innovation: Build, buy, partner, invent and co-develop.

40. 5 Keys to Good Collaboration -

Back End of Innovation Conference keynote by Daniel Shapiro, associate professor of psychology, Harvard Medical School/McLean Hospital, and associate director of Harvard International Negotiation Project

41. Keurig’s Journey into Connected Appliances -

A talk by Rachael Schwartz, general manager and senior director innovation, Keurig Green Mountain, given at the Back End of Innovation conference. 

Schwartz began with two main points: 

42. Becoming A Partner of Choice -

A talk by Johnson & Johnson executives Janette Edelstein, director external innovation, and Chris Ryan, director innovation sourcing.

43. Mold the Future Of Unplanned Purchases -

A Back End of Innovation Conference talk by Melissa Crompton, senior manager, New Model Innovation, The Hershey Co. In this changing retail landscape where trips in-store are down, how does a highly impulsive category remain relevant? And how do we become relevant to new audiences who are not going in stores? 

44. ‘Love is The Answer’ -

A talk at the Back End of Innovation conference by Christy Amador, senior communications manager, Global Public Affairs and Communications for The Coca-Cola Co., highlights how one company engages its employees more deeply.

45. Follow These Guidelines To Innovate Well -

A talk at the Back End of Innovation conference by 3M Healthcare’s Heather Webb discusses how the company manages to innovate in a complex business.

46. Innovation Inside the Box -

2016 Back End of Innovation Conference keynote by Drew Boyd, executive director of the Master of Science in marketing, University of Cincinnati.

The thesis of this talk is that creativity is a skill, not a gift. This practical advice starts with a promise from Boyd: “I’m going to teach you how to use your brain to innovate any way you want.”

47. The Innovation Trajectory Leads To Collaboration -

Talk by Tamara St. Claire, CIO, Xerox Healthcare. We use three key methods at innovation in my group, started St. Claire:

1. Lean Startup model: Based on a non-conventional approach to management to act more like a startup, not assuming you know what the market wants. Build. Measure. Learn – this is the cycle of Lean Startup. Then, build MVP, minimally viable product, which is a way to test customer reactions. Develop criteria for success. Should you pivot or persevere? This process manages the chaos and uncertainty of new product development. 

48. Back End Of Innovation Is The Hard Part -

The Back End of Innovation Conference this year was in the perfect setting: New Orleans. The dynamic culture that gave the world Jazz and a North American culinary culture continues to inspire innovation and serve as a model for how to pivot and re-launch itself more powerfully than before after an epic tragedy, such as Katrina.

49. Human Evolution of Innovation -

A Back End of Innovation Conference keynote by Kevin Ashton. Ashton opened his innovation talk at the Back End of Innovation Conference by taking a picture of the crowd and publishing it on Twitter, which he remarked was revolutionary a decade ago. 

50. The Role Of Conscious Corporations -

Denial of a human-centric world and its impact on the planet since the industrial revolution is no longer an acceptable worldview.

In March, we reached the point of no return, the point where most credible international scientists agree that damage will be unprecedented and relentless. As we have surpassed global CO2 concentrations at 400 parts per million (PPM), let’s make this alarm a time for changing the purpose of business.

51. Give Us Your Lions! -

Command-and-control, top-down organizations have the most trouble innovating. In particular, the fearful mindsets that review, align and sign off on “decks” to be presented to vice president-level colleagues often edit out the insights and recommendations that have the power to grow the business in new ways. 

52. Embedding Innovation In An Organization -

It takes two factors to make innovation real at an organization: concepts and culture. Work on both at the same time and the rest will emerge as a byproduct of the process.

If you outsource your innovation efforts, you will end up with concepts that will not be accepted by your existing culture. Some concepts might be potent enough to generate a lot of sales. Others will be even stronger, allowing your company to reframe what a category means to consumers and positioning you as the leader – think of the famous examples: Swiffer, iPhone and Tesla.

53. Innovation And The Tech World -

While the world of technology has filled the world with tools of productivity and connection, it has its drawbacks. Many people today suffer from the shadow side of technology.

Droves of burned out, screen-addicted zombies sign up for Digital Detox weekends. Families schedule a family night without cellphones at the table once a week or only allow their preschoolers to play games after reading. Technology has imploded many of the societal norms we once held sacred: look how online dating has disrupted generations of rituals.

54. Reboot a Sluggish Brand, Part 2 -

Editor’s Note: Part-two in a two-part series. In last week’s column, we explored the corporate psychological journey that happens to accept the fact that a once-leading brand needs to be transformed and relaunched.

55. Declining Sales Call for Brand Reboot -

Editor’s note: Part one of a two-part series. Once market share dwindles and revenue targets are missed year after year (despite category growth), it may be time to reboot a once-beloved brand.

56. When to Call An Innovation Firm -

Change is difficult, and changing for the better rarely happens out of virtue. When prospects reach out we know only one fact: They want to change something in their organizational mix and grow and want help. Often the need is an unexpressed and even unconscious urge for the company or nonprofit.

57. Back to Basics: Elements in the Product Story -

Many companies and people confuse what they mean when discussing value propositions, benefits and features. Be clear with your product marketing. 

Value Proposition. Definition: A value proposition is the concise statement of the overarching solution to your customer’s problem. The solution, then, is not your product or its technical details, but the solution your product or service provides; i.e., the end result, the value given to the customer.

58. Healthy Visionaries -

If you want to create a high-growth company or transform a slow- or flat-growth organization into a category-dominating leader, you cannot manage this type of growth with an MBA-styled leader who wants to function like a strategic CFO by mainly cutting costs and managing profit and loss.

59. Brand Essence: The Rock ‘n’ Roll of Business, Part 3 -

Editor’s note: Part three in a three-part series. Your marketers either need to create a fire or be fired. If you have uninspired and uninspiring marketing professionals on your team, be warned. Give him or her one chance to kick into high gear. Then act decisively. Fire them if they cannot change tempo.

60. Brand Essence: The Rock ‘n’ Roll of Business, Part 2 -

Editor’s note: Part two in a three-part series. One real power of a brand is that it serves as a tuning fork for an organization, helping them quicken strategic decisions, vetting new opportunities and making hard choices when projections are slipping away from the target.

61. Brand Essence: The Rock ‘n’ Roll of Business, Part 1 -

Editor’s note: Part one of a three-part series. Like famous musicians, effective brands maintain a certain sway over those who come into contact with them, a sense of awe and authority that translates talent, focus and hard work into an essence that communicates instantly.

62. Innovation Is Potent Leadership Development -

You can’t outsource the important things. After working with more than 100 clients, we have noted one of the most critical factors in the success of an innovation project: If you outsource all of the work on your innovation projects, they will fail.

63. What Drives Your Organization? -

As strategy and innovation consultants, we get called in when organizations are exhausted from trying to grow significantly and not meeting their goals. In most cases, the organization is trying to do too many things without a way to tie them into a coherent meaning.

64. Gray Hair: White Space -

Geritol. AARP. RVs. These symbols of retirement are losing their relevance, empty shells of another generation’s concept of how to spend the remainder of your life once you have worked your last day.

65. Real Magic: The Power of Words -

Editor’s note: Second in a two-part series. In part one, we explored how language and our relationship with words has limited the growth and development of organizations and human capacity. Now, we discover why expanding these things make a positive impact.

66. The Power of Words -

Editor’s note: Part one of a two-part series.

The life of an organization is defined and redefined by the language it chooses to use. More than any other factor, compliance around words conveys the values of a place where people work. Indeed, words are magic, carrying so much weight that they demand careful, conscious attention.

67. Sign This Pledge, Innovator -

Congratulations, you’ve been hired as an innovator. This is the apex of applied creativity, the rock ‘n’ roll of industry; you are hired to rock the boat. Steady your Warby Parker’s. Hit pause on your audible copy of “Abundance.” Fill your closets with Robert Graham and PrAna, and get some crazy socks; it’s time to work.

68. Do the Right Things -

So many people focus on the tiny details of their jobs. They are rewarded to sweat the details. In some fields the details are critical, such as medical care, clinical research, nuclear energy; in many fields, however, this focus on details impedes authentic growth.

69. Tell Compelling Stories to Connect -

A talk by William Greenwald, founder and chief neuroleaderologist, Windsor Leadership Group

William began with a story. This one was about air travel. Something happens. The plane makes an odd noise then nose dives.

70. Blended Reality: Riding the Waves Of Innovation -

A talk given by Shane Wall, CTO, HP. “Innovation is culture,” says Wall to start his keynote in high gear. 

 The way you get insight is to understand culture, he suggests, and to look at societal change. Not technology. 

71. Tethering the Void to Moonshot Ideas -

This talk was given by Donna Sturgess, executive in residence, Carnegie Mellon University, at the annual Front End of Innovation Conference in Boston this month.

“I’ve been spending a lot of time in the future,” is how Sturgess opened this evocative session. “Things get funded at Carnegie Mellon for big, breakthrough ideas, exponential innovations.”

72. Innovation From The Inside-Out -

A talk from Karen Hersherson, clay street project leader, Proctor & Gamble. Innovation for P&G is about platforms and pipelines that create long-lasting value. To get these types of results, the company had to build an incubator for project teams, named “clay street.”

73. Better, Faster Insight-Based Innovation -

Better & Faster Workshop at the Front End of Innovation Conference

A masterclass with Jeremy Gutsche, the CEO of Trend Hunter and the best-selling author of “Better & Faster: The Proven Path to Unstoppable Ideas.”

74. What’s Your Innovation Definition? -

So many organizations set out to innovate but lose their way close to the finish line. All of the time, money and energy invested loom over them like an ominous shadow of failure ready to overtake the whole scene.

75. Essential Tactics For Innovation Intrepreneurs -

For authentic innovation to occur at an organization, you have to craft the culture of a place to accept and embrace new ways of working together and being in the market.

More often than not, teams or outsourced agencies follow an innovation method, create many concepts that are new to the market and certain to create new value, but are crushed by the cultural antibodies of a place while still an embryonic idea.

76. Radical Team Dynamics for The Highly Productive -

Investing in people means the conventional and expected things. You can send high performers to leadership development, provide access and time for seminars and online learning. You can reward with money, praise and attention. Yet, three aspects of people investment tend to get overlooked, leaving the most driven and brightest unmotivated and rudderless, looking for the door.

77. The Evolving Role of Design, Part Two -

Editor’s note: Part two of a two-part series. We are talking about Big Design, Big D, Meta D. Designing the energetics, level of interaction, the culture of work, and the methods of inquiry, creation and production – the invisible infrastructure of how all pieces and parts of an organization and the world interrelate.

78. The Evolving Role of Design, Part One -

Editor’s note: Part one in a two-part series. The role of design evolves at the speed of innovation, the dizzying, dynamic speed of the market. Design now has a seat at executive and board tables across the globe. More than ever, a holistic sense of design is valued as a legal means of significant competitive advantage.

79. Lip Service or Real Metamorphosis? -

When we get called into a company it is often because a very expensive innovation effort failed.

One of the huge global innovation firms was called in to create a new platform and what happens next is very much like a bad action movie – you know the story. No surprises.

80. Storytelling, The Brain & Work Culture -

I love the quote by the poet Muriel Rukeyser that says, “The universe is made of stories, not atoms.” Humans live for stories. We learn from stories at home, school, from friends and also very compellingly at work. 

81. Toward a Better Definition Of ‘Innovation Process’ -

Innovation is one of those words that means something different to each person that hears it. When you describe the whole framework as an innovation process, the confusion compounds exponentially. The word process is more misleading than the word innovation

82. Birth of A Product Company, Part 4 -

Editor’s note: Part four in a four-part series. “After you have a solid business plan and actual market feedback on your product concepts, including revenue,” I continued, “you’ll want to think about raising capital.”

83. Birth of a Product Company, Part 3 -

Editor’s note: Part three of a four-part series. At this point in the dialogue, I felt the need to break down the conversation into helpful actions in two main categories: test marketing and business planning.

84. Birth of a Product Company, Part 2 -

Editor's note: Part two in a four-part series. In the last column I profiled a too-common scenario. A person with passion, drive and talent created a handful of products without considering the many factors of launching a new company in a complex, overcrowded market.

85. Birth of a Product Company, Part 1 -

Editor’s note: Part one of a four-part series. A friend of mine is a stylist to the stars. If there is a movie or TV show shooting in the region, she’s on the set, making hair magic. She gets flown around the world at times. She’s in demand.

86. Innovation: A Journey Of Discovery -

Innovation gets defined so many ways that it can be confusing. While there is a repeatable framework for creating new value, the iterative nature of front end discovery work can perplex those who believe that work should be linear.

87. For Whom Do You Create New Products? -

According to AcuPoll more than 95 percent of new products fail each year. This harrowing statistic should sound an alarm, one that says, the way we approach the conceptualization and launch of new products does not work

88. The Gift Of Writing A Book -

Running any business day-in and day-out can bring active contemplation to halt. The pace of work stays at such a staggering speed, leaving you inspired, exhausted and bewildered.

With such demands on your time, it’s hard to make sense of life and work, and even harder to extract wisdom out of the many experiences that constitute a workday.

89. Value Stream Discovery & True Grit -

Aaron Eden, former Innovation Catalyst at Intuit before founding Moves the Needle.

Value Stream Discovery is a framework for unlocking value for enterprises, in a scalable manner.

Lean Innovation: How do we eliminate waste in the discovery of new value?

90. Practices For Today’s Consumer Reality -

Sandra Kang, Director, Brand Insights, Digital Insights & Consumer Affairs, Clorox

Not so long ago, we could take out a TV ad, take out a newspaper ad – and win with consumers. Now, it’s all different for the CPG industry. The, retailers led.

91. How To Innovate Like A Startup -

Ann Thompson, The Garage Group; Kristi Zuhlke, Knowledge Hound; Tarrae Schroeder, Kellogg; Kristine Greiwe, LYFT; Luana Nichifor, Proctor & Gamble

 Ann Thompson began the talk about her big company background, at Proctor and Gamble. Then, switched to her life now at a startup. The garage group helps enables corporations to innovate and grow like startups. 

92. Thrive in The Expectation Economy -

Maxwell Luthy’s keynote begins with a warm-up. Luthy, director of Trends and Insight, showed two innovations and asked if they were good or bad. The first has a real-time countdown of your life expectancy. The second innovation is an emoji-based room service.

93. Q&A With Seth Godin -

Seth Godin is the author of 18 books. His blog is one of the most popular in the world. After a keynote about the Connection Economy, Godin made time for a Q&A for 50 people.

At the foundation of the Connection Economy lies weirdness and art, an authentic humanness.

94. The Hearts And Minds Of Unicorns -

A Back End of Innovation 2015 Talk
Porter Gale, Former VP of Virgin America

Porter started with a few questions, “Is it easy or hard to innovate in your company?” “Can you recognize unicorns?”

95. Why Relationships Are Essential To Research -

Beth Werner, Head of Retail Research and Vision at Bose

So, why are relationships essential for research? Let me begin by telling you a little about myself, and then tell you about why relationships are scary for Bose.

96. Accelerate Growth By Integrating Research -

Stephanie Cunningham, Associate Director, Global Insights Business Lead – Specialty Division, The Clorox Co.; Jody McInerney, Senior Vice President, Burke Inc.

97. New Consumer Research & Brand Measurement -

New Frontier of Consumer Research, Olga Diamandis, Senior Manager, Open Innovation, Mattel. Three key things are happening that are changing research: Crowdsourcing, big data and artificial intelligence. We will mine these dimensions, but first let’s take a brief look at the history of marketing research.

98. Two Innovation Talks That Noted Telemedicine -

A Journey Toward Commercialization: A Case Study in Xerox’s Venture into Telemedicine, a talk given by Denise Fletcher, Xerox

99. Overlooking the Obvious: Why Innovation Fails -

This column was based on a presentation by Scott Jenkins, SVP of Innovation and Product Development of Deckers.

100. Creating A Commercialization Culture -

How to Create a Culture Where You Can Capitalize on Innovation: A presentation by Jay Morgan, VP Global Innovation Bayer Consumer Care, given at the Back end of Innovation Conference, October 2015.