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Editorial Results (free)

1. Last Word: Suburban Elections, Charter Changes and Aretha Franklin -

Almost there for the November ballot with Thursday’s qualifying deadline for the contenders in the five sets of elections in five of the six suburban towns and cities. Three mayor’s races – all contested -- in Germantown, Lakeland and Bartlett. 11 races decided at the deadline with candidates running unopposed. Something of a surprise in one of the Millington alderman races.

2. Riverline to Make ‘Big Jump’ South of Crump -

The Riverline bike and pedestrian trail along the Mississippi River’s edge will be jumping to Crump Boulevard into South Memphis.

And that’s what a Big Jump launch event Aug. 23 will mark – planning of the southernmost segment of the Riverline from Big River Crossing to Martin Luther King/Riverside Park.

3. Inspired by Unlikely Hero, Robertson Fulfilling Needs -

When thinking of “heroes” or “role models” for African-American males, the first names that come to mind might be sports phenoms or our immediate past president, Barack Obama. But wherever your mind wanders, I doubt it lands on Bayard Rustin.

4. Memphis Sports Hall of Fame Will Be One-of-a-Kind -

To get an idea of what the future Memphis Sports Hall of Fame might look like, you can travel Interstate 40, stop in at Bridgestone Arena on Broadway in downtown Nashville, and see the Tennessee Sports Hall of Fame. But you can also go just around the corner, to 421 S. Main St., and visit the Blues Hall of Fame.

5. The Roads To and From Memphis -

It’s true, all roads lead to and from Memphis. I have experienced it too many times not to believe it. Most recently, I experienced it this summer.

A few weeks ago, a group of 11 students, their principal, and three teachers from LaSalle College High School, a Christian Brothers school in Philadelphia came to Memphis on a mission trip to serve and to learn. They left changed by the experience, and the interconnectedness of all who seek to serve.

6. Last Word: T.O. Jones, One Beale's Launch and De-Annexation in Trouble -

You might call it the final act of the MLK 50 observances around our city this year. With very little fanfare at the start of Tuesday’s city council session, the council honored T.O. Jones, the leader of the union representing city sanitation workers and the leader of the 1968 strike by those workers. Jones was a pivotal figure in the strike who soon after lost his position with the local union in the internal politics of AFSCME as the local became a powerful political symbol.

7. Civil Rights Legend Meredith Says He's on a Mission From God -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — James Meredith is a civil rights legend who resists neatly defined narratives.

8. Pastor Dr. James Netters Sr. Receives Spirit of ALSAC Award -

ALSAC, the fundraising and awareness organization for St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, has awarded its annual Spirit of ALSAC award to Dr. James LaVirt Netters Sr., pastor emeritus at Mt. Vernon Baptist Church-Westwood.

9. Clayborn Temple Names First Executive Director -

The co-writer and producer of a musical about the 1968 sanitation workers strike is the first executive director of Clayborn Temple.

Anasa Troutman was named Thursday, July 5, to lead the effort to fully renovate and find a new use for the historic church south of FedExForum.

10. Last Word: Kyle Anderson's Apartment Search, Tate vs. Robinson and Finding Capital -

Keedran Franklin, an activist who has been a visible part of the rise in local protests and other actions over the last two years or so is free on bond pending a first court appearance Monday morning after being arrested by Memphis Police on a variety of misdemeanor and felony charges Friday night.

11. Troutman Named Executive Director of Clayborn Temple -

The co-writer and producer of a musical about the 1968 sanitation workers strike is the first executive director of Clayborn Temple.

Anasa Troutman was named Thursday, July 5, to lead the effort to fully renovate and find a new use for the historic church south of FedExForum.

12. Around Memphis: July 9, 2018 -

The Daily News offers a weekly roundup of Memphis-related headlines from around the web, adding context and new perspectives to the original content we produce on a daily basis. Here are some recent stories worth checking out…

13. State to Provide $40k Grant for Clayborn Temple Restoration -

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) — A church that served as headquarters for the 1968 sanitation workers strike that brought Martin Luther King Jr. to Memphis, Tennessee, is getting a $42,000 restoration grant.

14. Joe Jackson, patriarch of musical Jackson family, dies at 89 -

NEW YORK (AP) — Joseph Jackson, the fearsome stage dad of Michael Jackson, Janet Jackson and their talented siblings, who took his family from poverty and launched a musical dynasty, has died. He was 89.

15. Bike Share, Greenway and Bike Lane Efforts Point Toward Common Goal -

Four years after it made its tentative debut with the opening of the Overton Park Bike Gate, the Hampline, across East Parkway from the eastern end of Overton Park, is about to become permanent.

“The Hampline that exists today is about to be changed,” city bikeway and pedestrian program manager Nicholas Oyler said on WKNO-TV’s “Behind The Headlines.”

16. Last Word: One for Graceland, Randy Boyd in Millington and Green Eyeshades -

From the distance of 50 years – half a century – it’s hard to relate what it was like to grow up in the 1960s – in particular the year 1968 in a city that figured prominently in the year’s turbulent trajectory.

17. Last Word: After The Tom Lee Storm, Tiger Lane Changes and Crosstown Growth -

A year ago many of you were without power in the wake of a sudden and violent storm that has come to be known as the Tom Lee Storm. It is the third most powerful storm, according to Memphis Light Gas and Water Division, in terms of those without power and the damage done. It’s called the Tom Lee storm because the 1950s-era Tom Lee memorial in Tom Lee Park – the obelisk – was toppled and shattered as the obelisk fell from the base. A year later, the base that proclaims Tom Lee “a worthy Negro” remains and the obelisk is in storage.

18. MIFA Marks 50 Years of Interfaith Activism -

When a group of Memphis religious leaders marched from St. Mary’s Episcopal Cathedral to City Hall the day after Dr. Martin Luther King’s assassination in 1968, they were in the middle of a pivotal year for an ecumenical movement whose impact is still being felt.

19. One Beale Developers Present New Plan to DMC -

The developer of the ambitious One Beale project has again reworked its plans and is seeking a deadline extension from the Downtown Memphis Commission to close on the nine-figure deal.

Carlisle Corp.’s latest proposal to the Center City Revenue Finance Corp. comes more than a decade after its founder, the late Gene Carlisle, first proposed the massive mixed-use project.

20. Copenhagen Provides Good Example Of Bike Safety -

While there may be something rotten in Denmark, as Shakespeare wrote in “Hamlet,” it sure isn’t in the bicycling realm. And as Memphis embarks on its new Explore Bike Share initiative, a look at the Scandinavian country of 5.7 million people certainly offers a positive tale of cycling safety.

21. Peabody Place Gets Restriped at End of Year-Long Experiment -

The two-way bike lanes and a pedestrian promenade with tables and chairs on Peabody Place between Front Street and B.B. King Boulevard are on the way out as a year-long trial run for the changed streetscape ends.

22. Civil Rights Activist Andrew Young Hospitalized With Illness -

ATLANTA (AP) – Civil rights activist Andrew Young is being transferred to a hospital in Atlanta after falling ill over the weekend while in Tennessee.

23. From Enduring to Thriving -

By fall 1967, Memphis had a diverse group of people of faith working on a plan to better the community. Diversity, back then, mainly meant black and white, and Christians and Jews. The notion of them working together was considered bold.

24. MLK-Inspired -

What today is known as the Community Foundation of Greater Memphis was born out of the city’s fallout from the Memphis sanitation workers’ strike and Dr. Martin Luther King’s assassination on April 4, 1968.

25. Memphis Army Depot, CA Building Get New Owners -

2028 Memphis Depot Pkwy.
Memphis, TN 38114

Sale Amount: $50 million

26. Building Heritage -

The basement of the Universal Life Insurance building, a Memphis landmark at Danny Thomas Boulevard and Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Avenue, is still defined by the intersection of overhead ventilation shafts and pipes.

27. Events -

The Voices of the South Writing Cabaret will meet Monday, April 23, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at TheatreSouth, 1000 S. Cooper St. (in the First Congregational Church basement). At the start of the evening, participants receive a writing prompt and write for an hour, then everyone is given the opportunity to share what they have written. Cost is free; one drink minimum. Visit voicesofthesouth.org.

28. Events -

Circuit Playhouse will present the regional premiere of “Stupid F#!&ing Bird” Friday, April 20, through May 13 at 51 S. Cooper St. Visit playhouseonthesquare.org for times and tickets.

29. Opioid Litigation, FedExForum NonCompete Top Local Law Developments -

Here are some of the legal issues making news in recent months.

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Tennessee Attorney General Herbert Slatery says lawsuits by local prosecutors over the opioid epidemic are complicating his efforts to reach a multistate settlement with drug companies. In response, the prosecutors, who represent about half of Tennessee's counties, say local communities lose out when lawsuits like theirs are rolled into one settlement.

30. Civil Rights Cold Case Bill Nears Passage -

Years of work behind her, state Rep. Johnnie Turner is making the final push for creation of a state body designed to initiate investigations into civil rights cold cases, potentially solving decades-old murders or giving people the opportunity to put a heinous act behind them.

31. Airport to Unveil Photos Of King’s Last Flights -

Memphis International Airport is set to unveil a photography exhibition Thursday, April 12, that commemorates the last trip taken by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

32. Around Memphis: April 16, 2018 -

The Daily News offers a weekly roundup of Memphis-related headlines from around the web, adding context and new perspectives to the original content we produce on a daily basis. Here are some recent stories worth checking out…

33. April 13-19, 2018: This week in Memphis history -

1968: Striking Memphis sanitation workers vote to accept a pay raise of 15 cents an hour from the city, ending their strike after 64 days. Ten cents of the raise will go into effect in May, with the other 5 cents being added on Sept. 1.
The amount has come up before in the negotiations, which are being watched closely by The White House and federal labor officials following the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. on April 4. Memphis Mayor Henry Loeb balks at the proposal presented by his team, saying he would agree to a raise effective with the new fiscal year beginning July 1 and not before. He also says the raise will be less than 15 cents an hour. Philanthropist Abe Plough secretly agrees to pay the difference needed for the entire pay raise starting May 1, contributing a total of $60,000 to cover the cost. Plough’s role remains a secret until his death in 1984.

34. Airport to Unveil Photos Of King’s Last Flights -

Memphis International Airport is set to unveil a photography exhibition Thursday, April 12, that commemorates the last trip taken by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

35. Religious Leaders Recount Catechism of 1968 Memphis -

Rev. James Lawson, the architect of nonviolent resistance who counseled Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. on it, walked in a circle last week around the new “I Am A Man” bronze and stainless steel sculpture. As he walked with his head down, still and video photographers scrambled for the best angle to capture the seminal strategist of the civil rights era, seemingly deep in thought.

36. Duran Arrest Highlights Uncertain Immigration Nexus -

Nine people were arrested by Memphis Police last week during MLK50 protests. One of those arrests has focused new attention on the nexus between federal immigration policies and local law enforcement.

37. Activist Lawson Presented Honorary Humanities Degree from Rhodes -

Rhodes College on April 5 awarded longtime civil rights activist Rev. James Lawson an honorary Doctor of Humanities degree.

38. Strickland Jeered Over Duran Arrest During MLK50 Event -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland was jeered Saturday, April 7, and called a “coward” and “liar” at a rally as part of a “Cathedral to City Hall” MLK50 event outside City Hall.

39. Herenton Acknowledges New Generation Politics, Criticism in Mayoral Bid -

Eight years and counting since he resigned as mayor of Memphis, Willie Herenton says he has heard the discussions about the city’s economic stagnation when it comes to growing black prosperity and wealth. Especially the part about how that remains the case despite having “black leadership.”

40. Around Memphis: April 9, 2018 -

The Daily News offers a weekly roundup of Memphis-related headlines from around the web, adding context and new perspectives to the original content we produce on a daily basis. Here are some recent stories worth checking out…

41. Editorial: Universal Life a Blueprint For Building Black Wealth -

While many of us were thinking about and remembering the turbulent events of 1968, this week brought another significant nod to the past with a commitment to the future.

The Universal Life Insurance Co. building isn’t a Pyramid, though its architecture has an Egyptian theme. It’s not the tallest building in the city, but then again, the tallest building in the city is boarded up these days.

42. Last Word: I Am A Man Plaza, Graceland Clears EDGE and Filing Deadline Action -

Sometimes the simplest concepts say more than an elaborate explanation can – even when the history it depicts is complex. A plaza dedicated to the 1,300 city sanitation workers who went on strike in 1968 formally opened Thursday on what had been a vacant lot just across Pontotoc from the south side of Clayborn Temple. And the occasion included more of the small moments that have made this week so compelling. Watching civil rights icon Rev. James Lawson walk around the plaza and discover it includes one of his quotes from the 1968 strike.

43. A Dream Remembered -

With the world honoring the memory of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. this week, Memphis artist Martha Kelly depicts the National Civil Rights Museum at the Lorraine Motel, where King was assassinated 50 years ago. Kelly, who illustrates local life and culture each month for The Daily News, can be reached at marthakellyart.com. (Martha Kelly)

...

44. MLK50 Observances Come With Appeals, Memories -

The way National Civil Rights Museum president Terri Lee Freeman described it as the MLK50 commemorations began this week, the church bells would cascade when they rang Wednesday, April 4, starting at 6:01 p.m. – the moment Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was shot 50 years ago.

45. Events -

Art by Design, a designer showcase benefiting ArtsMemphis, is underway through Sunday, April 8, in the Pipkin Building at the Mid-South Fairgrounds. More than a dozen interior design team have created custom “vignettes” within a chic gallery showroom, with special presentations each day. Single-day tickets are $20. Visit artsmemphis.org for details and hours.

46. Last Word: MLK50s Big Day, Hotel Changes and Murica on Capitol Hill -

The peak of the MLK50 events came Wednesday with a chill but some sunshine and lots to consider. Understand -- this isn’t over. There are still a few more events to go through the weekend and even into next week. If nothing else, a lot more Memphians and visitors got a good look at most of South Main in the best way possible – on foot. And if the Beale Street District ever expands east to Danny Thomas, the intersection there makes a really good place for a party.

47. AP Was There: The Assassination of Martin Luther King Jr. -

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) – In the spring of 1968, the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. had won victories on desegregation and voting rights and had been planning his Poor People's Campaign when he turned his attention to Memphis, the gritty city by the Mississippi River. In his support for striking sanitation workers, King wanted to lead marches and show that nonviolent protest still worked.

48. AP Journalists Recall Covering MLK Assassination -

Nancy Shipley was working in a news office in Nashville, Tennessee, when the call came 50 years ago. Gene Herrick was in Chicago routing photos to newspapers when his phone rang. Jack Thornell got the call in New Orleans; Kathryn Johnson heard the news in Atlanta.

49. Tracing Civil Rights Struggle Through Travel -

Attention is on Memphis this year with the MLK50 commemoration to honor Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. on the 50th anniversary of his assassination on April 4, 1968. Keeping this focused on travel, I believe it’s a good time to point out some of the newer civil rights sites across the U.S., along with a few that have been around for a while – all opportunities to honor King’s legacy while trying to better understand the struggle.

50. Events -

The city of Memphis dedicates I Am A Man Plaza with a ceremony and open house Thursday, April 5, from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the plaza, which is adjacent to Clayborn Temple at Hernando Street and Pontotoc Avenue. The city plaza is dedicated to the 1,300 city sanitation workers that went on strike in 1968 and includes a wall with the names of the strikers. Thursday’s event will also feature food trucks and live performances. Cost is free. Visit iammemphis.org.

51. Universal Life Insurance Building Reopens With New Hope for Black Economic Growth -

There is still some build-out to be done on the Universal Life Insurance building at Danny Thomas Boulevard and Martin Luther King Jr. Avenue. But Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland and other dignitaries cut the ribbon Tuesday, April 3, on the formal reopening on the 1920s Egyptian-themed landmark in black business enterprise.

52. Anniversary of King's Assassination Marked With Marches, Rallies -

Several thousand people marching under the banners of unions and civil rights organizations marched peacefully Wednesday, April 4, from the headquarters of the American Federal of State County and Municipal Employees at Beale Street and Danny Thomas Boulevard to Mason Temple Church of God in Christ.

53. Last Word: Mason Temple 50 Years Later, Medical Pot Dies in Nashville and Fire -

Mason Temple still looks pretty much the same as it did in 1968 when Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. came there to give what would be his last speech – the Mountaintop speech – the night before his assassination. Tuesday evening, 50 years to the day that King gave that speech, the Church of God In Christ sanctuary was awash and aglow in multi-colored lights as a capacity invitation-only crowd gathered to mark the occasion.

54. King's Children See New Movements, Same Challenges 50 Years After Mountaintop -

The bright and multi colored lights at Mason Temple Church of God In Christ gave way for a few minutes Tuesday, April 3, to a single white spotlight on the empty pulpit of the South Memphis church and a recording of part of the speech Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. delivered from the pulpit 50 years ago Tuesday.

55. Data Back Up AP Poll: Little Progress on Civil Rights Issues -

Fifty years after the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr., American perceptions of progress toward racial equality remain largely divided along racial lines, a recent AP-NORC poll shows.

The majority of African-Americans surveyed saw little to no progress toward equal treatment in key areas that the civil rights movement sought to address. White respondents frequently portrayed a rosier picture. A review by the Associated Press shows that the available data more often align with African-Americans' less optimistic reflection of their reality.

56. Rekindling of King's 'Poor People's Campaign' Takes Shape -

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) – Civil rights leaders are reviving an economic justice campaign that the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. was planning when he was killed 50 years ago.

57. Events -

The Withers Collection Museum and Gallery will stage an “I Am A Man” Reenactment Photo Shoot Wednesday, April 4, with the lineup starting at 8 a.m. at Fourth and Beale streets. The picture will re-create photojournalist Ernest C. Withers’ iconic “I Am A Man” photo from the 1968 sanitation workers’ strike. Register in advance at the Withers Collection, 333 Beale St., or online at 2018mlk50.com.

58. ‘Revolutionary Times’ -

The youngest child of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. hopes to prove him wrong in only one respect. The Rev. Bernice King has been talking about the quote from one of her father’s now institutionalized speeches for at least the last two years.

59. Last Word: Holder in Memphis for MLK 50, EDGE Sets a Date and South City Moves -

The week of MLK50 commemorations began Monday with a speech by former U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder and the arrival Monday afternoon of Rev. Bernice King, the youngest child of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Meanwhile, Monday's day of free admission to the museum, underwritten by FedEx drew a long line. It also drew some remote trepidation that tends to make the situation seem worse than it is once you actually go there for yourself.

60. Universal Life Building To Reopen Tuesday -

Memphis government and business leaders are preparing to reopen the Universal Life Insurance Co. building, 480 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd., following its renovation through a public-private partnership with the city of Memphis.

61. Analysis: Blacks Largely Left Out of High-Paying Jobs -

BOSTON (AP) – Jonathan Garland's fascination with architecture started early: He spent much of his childhood designing Lego houses and gazing at Boston buildings on rides with his father away from their largely minority neighborhood.

62. Commitment to King's Unfinished Work Remains 50 Years Later -

ATLANTA (AP) – Tyrone Brooks was 22 years old and 400 miles away, seeking clues to an unsolved lynching as old as he was, when he got the news that Martin Luther King Jr. was dead. Stunned, Brooks dropped everything and drove to Memphis, crying all the way.

63. 'This Was Like A War': Witnesses Remember Day MLK Was Shot -

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) – Clara Ester's eyes were fixed on the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. as he stood on the concrete balcony of the Lorraine Motel.

64. Events -

The American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees holds the I AM 2018 “Mountaintop” Speech Commemoration Tuesday, April 3, from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. at Mason Temple. The program will include Bernice King and Martin Luther King III, the children of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.; ambassador Andrew Young; COGIC bishop Charles Blake; AFSCME president Lee Saunders; and other dignitaries. Seating at Mason Temple is by invitation only; overflow seating at Temple of Deliverance, 369 G.E. Patterson Ave., is available on a first-come, first-served basis. Visit iam2018.org.

65. Philanthropic Investments in the Black Community -

As Memphis and the world marks the anniversary of the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., there is much to reflect on and much to look forward to. Our reflections can be a source of inspiration for what we can accomplish together moving forward into the future. We can embrace the “fierce urgency of now” that King spoke of.

66. Holder: After King, Political System is 'Far From Fair' -

Former U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder told a University of Memphis and National Civil Rights Museum symposium Monday, April 2, that Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. helped create “a new country” in 39 years of life but that “it is necessary to be indignant and be impatient” 50 years after King’s death.

67. NCRM Admission Free Monday Thanks to FedEx -

Admission to the National Civil Rights Museum will be free on Monday, April 2, in honor of MLK50, the 50th anniversary of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s assassination at the Lorraine Motel in 1968.

68. Heritage Trail Loops Open Amidst MLK50 Preparations -

As city crews were moving the Mountaintop sculpture into place at the new MLK Reflection Park and the nearby I Am A Man Plaza was getting one last patch of cement Friday, March 30, a tour bus came through as preparations were being made for the city’s MLK50 observances.

69. Around Memphis: April 2, 2018 -

The Daily News offers a weekly roundup of Memphis-related headlines from around the web, adding context and new perspectives to the original content we produce on a daily basis. Here are some recent stories worth checking out…

70. AP-NORC Poll: 50 Years After MLK, Civil Rights Goals Unmet -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Fifty years after the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr., only 1 in 10 African Americans think the United States has achieved all or most of the goals of the civil rights movement he led, according to a new poll by the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research.

71. The Week Ahead: April 2-8 -

Hello, Memphis! We celebrate the courage of a man this week who improved the lives of so many. The somber occasion of remembering his death 50 years ago should not overshadow the admiration we have for someone who refused to not speak up against obvious injustices in spite of the danger it put him in.

72. The Aftermath: Memphis' Political Journey Since 1968 -

For 50 years and counting, April 4 has been an important day in the life of Memphis.

To some Memphians, it is a holy day; to others, it’s a day of reflection, or perhaps one of action and service.

73. MLK50 Events: A Roundup of Memphis Happenings -

Here's a selection of events in Memphis marking the 50th anniversary of the 1968 sanitation workers' strike and the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. April 3 is the 50th anniversary of King’s last speech – the “Mountaintop” speech at Mason Temple, while April 4 is the 50th anniversary of his assassination on the balcony of the Lorraine Motel.

74. March 30-April 5, 2018: This week in Memphis history -

1968: “I looked down at Martin’s face. His eyes wobbled, then for an instant focused on me. ‘Martin, It’s all right. Don’t worry. This is Ralph. This is Ralph.’ His eyes grew calm and he moved his lips. I was certain he understood and was trying to say something. Then in the next instant, I saw the understanding drain from his eyes and leave them absolutely empty.”

75. Editorial: 50 Years After King's Death, What Have We Learned? -

When sanitation workers Echol Cole and Robert Walker were crushed by a garbage truck compactor on Feb. 1, 1968, it sparked a 64-day strike that reverberated throughout Memphis and beyond.

76. Last Word: Opening Day, Slowing the Flow and 30 Years of Shangri-La -

There is something about opening day of the Major League Baseball season – especially when it is opening day for just about every team at the same time. Just seeing the green fields with a solitary outfielder, the low brick walls behind the symmetry of batter, catcher and umpire renews my love for the game. I don’t really pay attention to players – don’t know any of their names. And how and when did the Astros wind up in the American League and the Brewers in the National League? I just like watching the game in a sport where the team and the individual coexist as in no other sport.

77. MLK 50 Years Later -

Bernard Lafayette remembers being in Memphis April 3, 1968, and a dejected Martin Luther King Jr. being roused from his room at the Lorraine Motel to speak at Mason Temple on a rainy night.

78. Visiting Memphis 50 Years After King's Assassination -

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) – Fifty years ago, the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. was killed while standing on the balcony of the Lorraine Motel in Memphis, Tennessee. The civil rights leader's shocking murder on April 4, 1968, marked one of the most significant moments in U.S. history.

79. Strickland Talks of Work To Be Done 50 Years After Strike -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland says the hardest part of growing black-owned business, and thereby black wealth in the city, is increasing the number of minority-owned firms in certain sectors.

80. Last Word: Graceland Responds, The Hustle's First Season and Memphis Rent -

Sun Studio getting a fresh coat of paint Tuesday as city road crews were redoing some lines on Downtown streets including turning arrows in the left curb lane that always need pointing out to visitors baffled by the Memphis enigma that is one-way streets.

81. Events -

Hattiloo Theatre and The Orpheum Theatre will present “The Mountaintop” Wednesday through Sunday, March 28-April 1, at the Orpheum, 203 S. Main St. Written by playwright Katori Hall, “The Mountaintop” is a fictional depiction of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s last night, set entirely in room 306 of the Lorraine Motel on the eve of his assassination in 1968. Tickets start at $35. Visit orpheum-memphis.com.

82. Last Word: The RDC's New Leader, Potter on 100 North Main and FedEx Moves -

Is Memphis big enough for FedExForum and some kind of event space on the Graceland campus in Whitehaven? The city administration thinks that could be the case. But it requires an “honest broker” between Graceland and the Grizz – who run the forum for the city and county – to quote city chief legal officer Bruce McMullenif there is a deal to be had.

83. Events -

Rhodes College will host an MLK50 panel discussion Tuesday, March 27, from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. in McNeill Concert Hall on Rhodes’ West Campus, 613 University St. Alumni and community leaders will discuss significant events they experienced leading up to and immediately following Dr. Martin Luther King’s death. Visit rhodes.edu/content/mlk50 for details.

84. Gun Violence March About More Than School Safety -

The Memphis “March For Our Lives” that drew several thousand people Downtown Saturday, March 24, focused on gun violence beyond the Parkland, Florida, school massacre that prompted the national movement about a month ago.

85. Historic MLK Speech, Handwritten Notes Unveiled at U of M -

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s iconic speech ending with the three words most often associated with him and the civil rights movement – “We Shall Overcome” - are now on display inside the University of Memphis’ Ned R. McWherter Library.

86. Last Word: Graceland's New Lawsuit, Memphis March For Our Lives and Trolley Test -

Remember the comment from last week’s EDGE meeting by EDGE board member Tom Dyer who said the economic development body was likely to be sued no matter what it did on Graceland’s application for tax breaks on its “convention center” plan in Whitehaven? At week’s end, Graceland followed through with a lawsuit in Chancery Court against EDGE for delaying a decision on the matter. The lawsuit contends EDGE has no intention of making a decision on incentives and that Graceland is entitled to those incentives.

87. The Week Ahead: March 26-April 1 -

Happy Easter Week, Memphis! The anniversary of an event at the Lorraine Motel that forever changed the civil rights movement and the world is quickly approaching. Events preceding the 50th anniversary of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s assassination April 4 are gearing up around town. Details on some of those and other Memphis happenings are below.

88. Events -

Remington College will hold its 3 Lives blood drive for Lifeblood on Monday, March 26, from 8 a.m. to noon at its Memphis campus, 2710 Nonconnah Blvd. The drive is part of a national effort highlighting the need for minority blood donors to help patients with sickle cell and other blood disorders. Visit 3lives.com.

89. Thousands March In Local Version of 'March For Our Lives' -

Several thousand people marched Saturday, March 24, from Clayborn Temple to the National Civil Rights Museum in the Memphis version of the national March For Our Lives.

The group, led by students from Memphis schools, called for the passage of federal gun control measures as well as more mental health counseling at schools with chants of “The NRA has got to go” and “Vote them out.”

90. Soulsville Climbing Wall Drops MLK 50 Tie-In After Criticism -

The Memphis Rox climbing wall gym in Soulsville has changed its plans for an April 3 MLK50-inspired opening to an immediate soft opening after criticism of the tie-in with the 50th anniversary of the sanitation workers strikes and the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

91. Events -

The Overton Park Conservancy will host a Park Fun Day and Science Fair Sunday, March 25, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. in Overton Park’s East Parkway Pavilion. Events include a science fair with research partners from the University of Memphis, Rhodes College and Christian Brothers University; an 11:30 a.m. mini-BioBlitz, a tour of the Old Forest with conservancy staff to record as many species as possible; the finals of the International Society of Arboriculture Southern Chapter's tree-climbing contest; and games and food trucks. Cost is free. Visit overtonpark.org.

92. Council Makes First Moves On Prekindergarten Funding -

Memphis City Council members took first votes Tuesday, March 20, approving the city’s move toward funding $6 million of a $16 million expansion of local prekindergarten programs.

Ordinances approved on the first of three readings establish a city account for prekindergarten with funding coming from one penny on the city property tax rate and incremental city property tax revenue that comes when tax abatements provided for economic development projects expire.

93. Shelby County Schools Plans Wage Increase -

Shelby County Schools superintendent Dorsey Hopson will have a formal proposal in about a month to raise the pay of all Shelby County Schools employees to at least $15 an hour.

Hopson announced the plan Tuesday, March 20, at a Shelby County Schools board work session citing a National Civil Rights Museum-University of Memphis study on poverty in Memphis since 1968.

94. Last Word: SCS Plans For $15, IRIS Matinees and The Hard Hit Fund -

“From a financial standpoint, we need our fans back and we need them back now.” University of Memphis president David Rudd breaking the university’s silence on the basketball coaching change that was made formal Tuesday with the announcement that Penny Hardaway is indeed the new coach. And Hardaway had a lot to say that Tigers fans and Memphians wanted to hear.

95. Hopson Proposes $15 An Hour Minimum Wage for All SCS Employees -

Shelby County Schools superintendent Dorsey Hopson will have a formal proposal in about a month to raise the pay of all Shelby County Schools employees to at least $15 an hour.

Hopson announced the plan Tuesday, March 20, at a Shelby County Schools board work session citing a National Civil Rights Museum-University of Memphis study on poverty in Memphis since 1968.

96. City Council Gives Preliminary Approval to Pre-K Funding -

Memphis City Council members took first votes Tuesday, March 20, approving the city’s move toward funding $6 million of a $16-million expansion of prekindergarten locally.

The ordinances approved on the first of three readings an establish the city fund for prekindergarten and the funding with the equivalent of a penny on the existing city property tax rate and incremental city property tax revenue as economic development projects begin paying a higher tax rate when their tax abatements expire.

97. Around Memphis: March 19, 2018 -

The Daily News offers a weekly roundup of Memphis-related headlines from around the web, adding context and new perspectives to the original content we produce on a daily basis. Here are some recent stories worth checking out...

98. Making Art Work -

After he’d finished his part in a Memphis Symphony Orchestra performance a few weeks ago that included Leonard Bernstein’s Serenade for Violin, guest violinist Charles Yang came out on stage and did something unexpected.

99. A Look Back At UT’s History In NCAA Tourney -

Basketball coach Rick Barnes was fired by Texas in late March of 2015 when he refused to fire members of his coaching staff.

100. Last Word: The Memphis Hub Modernization, Gun Protests and MLK 50 Plans -

Back in January, the FedEx board approved a $3.2 billion package that had pay raises, bonuses and similar items that have become the corporate reaction to federal tax reform that set a lower rate of taxation for companies that repatriate money they have overseas. There was a mention of $1.5 billion for the Indianapolis hub and unspecified plans for the Memphis hub to come later. And later was yesterday in a pretty modest announcement at Signature Air given the scope of what FedEx has planned for its Super Hub here.