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Editorial Results (free)

1. Conservative Revolt Over Immigration Sinks House Farm Bill -

WASHINGTON (AP) – House Republican leaders suffered an embarrassing setback Friday when conservatives scuttled an ambitious farm bill, part of a high-stakes power play as they once again exert their oversized sway in the House.

2. From Enduring to Thriving -

By fall 1967, Memphis had a diverse group of people of faith working on a plan to better the community. Diversity, back then, mainly meant black and white, and Christians and Jews. The notion of them working together was considered bold.

3. Last Word: Veto Override Drama, Iran Reaction & Rise of the Rest Meets Soundways -

Shelby County Commissioners have a busy committee day Wednesday with a budget presentation – county mayor Mark Luttrell’s final one as the county’s chief executive, more discussions about the Graceland plan and a veto override.

4. Harris, Lenoir to Battle for County Mayor -

Republican David Lenoir and Democrat Lee Harris will meet in the Aug. 2 county general election to decide who will be the next Shelby County mayor. Lenoir and Harris won their respective primaries easily Tuesday, May 1, 2018.

5. Sprint, T-Mobile Have to Sell $26.5B Deal to Antitrust Cops -

NEW YORK (AP) – To gain approval for their $26.5 billion merger agreement, T-Mobile and Sprint aim to convince antitrust regulators that there is plenty of competition for wireless service beyond Verizon and AT&T.

6. Opioid Treatment Gap in Medicare: Methadone Clinics -

One in three older Americans with Medicare drug coverage is prescribed opioid painkillers, but for those who develop a dangerous addiction there is one treatment Medicare won't cover: methadone.

Methadone is the oldest, and experts say, the most effective of the three approved medications used to treat opioid addiction. It eases cravings without an intense high, allowing patients to work with counselors to rebuild their lives.

7. Our College Athletes Are Americans, Too, So Let’s Treat Them That Way -

If you spilled an entire carton of milk on your kitchen table, you could count on the 12-member Commission on College Basketball to rush in and … not actually clean it up, just dab around the edges and leave a large and smelly stain in the center of your table cloth.

8. Last Word: TNReady Blinks Again, Gov. Debate Thoughts and Mud Island's Museum -

There was a point Thursday morning during the troubled TNReady testing at some Tennessee school districts when there was a “brief” slow down in the online testing, according to the Tennessee Education commissioner’s office. By noon that had been resolved and more than 250,000 completed tests had been submitted since testing began Monday. One can only imagine what some of the thoughts were in the office during the slow down and the gap between how long the slow down seemed and how long it actually was.

9. GOP's Regulatory Fight Goes to Another Level Over Car Loans -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The GOP-led Senate voted Wednesday to block Obama-era guidance a consumer protection agency issued five years ago to help ensure lenders don't charge blacks and Hispanics higher interest rates on car loans.

10. Sex Week Seems Tame Compared to Session Antics -

Why should UT Knoxville be limited to its annual Sex Week when Tennessee legislators are celebrating year-round?

Based on the scurrilous reports published in these parts over the last couple of years, state legislators are doing more than collecting per diems in Nashville, and there’s plenty of evidence to prove it.

11. Civil Rights Cold Case Bill Nears Passage -

Years of work behind her, state Rep. Johnnie Turner is making the final push for creation of a state body designed to initiate investigations into civil rights cold cases, potentially solving decades-old murders or giving people the opportunity to put a heinous act behind them.

12. Last Word: Mud Island Changes, Zoo Parking and Capitol Hill Revolt On UT Board -

This could be your last chance to see the Mississippi River Museum at Mud Island River Park as it has been for about the last 30 years. The park on the southern half of Mud Island opens for the season Saturday. The museum will be open only through July 4 is what is billed as a “limited run” followed by a public engagement process for “reimagining how we tell the story of the Mississippi River in a 21st century way,” according to park general manager Trey Giuntini in a Thursday press release.

13. UT Board of Trustees Appointees Go Awry -

NASHVILLE – One of Gov. Bill Haslam’s main legislative pushes ran afoul of a Legislature angry about everything from Sex Week at the University of Tennessee to the handling of the football coach hiring at the Knoxville campus.

14. UT Board of Trustees Appointees Go Awry -

NASHVILLE – One of Gov. Bill Haslam’s main legislative pushes ran afoul of a Legislature angry about everything from Sex Week at the University of Tennessee to the handling of the football coach hiring at the Knoxville campus.

15. Trump Says All Calm at White House, Vents About Russia Probe -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Donald Trump insisted that all was "very calm and calculated" at the White House, even as he vented Wednesday about the Russia probe, complained about Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein and served noticed that "nice and new and 'smart'" missiles will be coming down on Syria.

16. Analysis: Tax Cuts, Spending to Raise Deficit to $1T by 2019 -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The combined effect of President Donald Trump's tax cuts and last month's budget-busting spending bill is sending the government's budget deficit toward the $1 trillion mark next year, according to a new analysis by the Congressional Budget Office.

17. Duran Arrest Highlights Uncertain Immigration Nexus -

Nine people were arrested by Memphis Police last week during MLK50 protests. One of those arrests has focused new attention on the nexus between federal immigration policies and local law enforcement.

18. Strickland Jeered Over Duran Arrest During MLK50 Event -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland was jeered Saturday, April 7, and called a “coward” and “liar” at a rally as part of a “Cathedral to City Hall” MLK50 event outside City Hall.

19. Out of Flowers? Flour? Businesses Contend With Supply Crises -

NEW YORK (AP) – When heavy rain pelted Central America, Shane Pliska couldn't get shipments of taupe-colored roses he needed for clients' weddings.

"Of course, this was the season when everyone wanted champagne- and gold-themed weddings, and the champagne part was all taupe roses," says Pliska, owner of Planterra, a commercial florist and owner of a wedding venue where the decor is all about flowers and plants.

20. AP Was There: The Assassination of Martin Luther King Jr. -

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) – In the spring of 1968, the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. had won victories on desegregation and voting rights and had been planning his Poor People's Campaign when he turned his attention to Memphis, the gritty city by the Mississippi River. In his support for striking sanitation workers, King wanted to lead marches and show that nonviolent protest still worked.

21. Last Word: Mason Temple 50 Years Later, Medical Pot Dies in Nashville and Fire -

Mason Temple still looks pretty much the same as it did in 1968 when Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. came there to give what would be his last speech – the Mountaintop speech – the night before his assassination. Tuesday evening, 50 years to the day that King gave that speech, the Church of God In Christ sanctuary was awash and aglow in multi-colored lights as a capacity invitation-only crowd gathered to mark the occasion.

22. Trump Signs $1.3 Trillion Budget After Threatening Veto -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump signed a $1.3 trillion spending measure Friday, averting a midnight government shutdown just hours after declaring he was considering a veto.

Trump said he was "very disappointed" in the package, in part because it did not fully fund his plans for a border wall with Mexico and did not address some 700,000 "Dreamer" immigrants who are now protected from deportation under a program that he has moved to eliminate.

23. Prescription for Tragedy -

He has his own GPS, an internal shield that keeps him from driving anywhere near 637 Poplar Ave. Home to the Memphis morgue. That’s where they showed Jerry Davidson his 22-year-old son, Oliver, his eyes closed and his lips purple.

24. Mueller Examining Cambridge Analytica, Trump Campaign Ties -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Special counsel Robert Mueller is scrutinizing the connections between President Donald Trump's campaign and the data mining firm Cambridge Analytica, which has come under fierce criticism over reports that it swiped the data of more than 50 million Facebook users to sway elections.

25. Parkinson to Introduce Bill Phasing Out State’s Achievement School District -

NASHVILLE – Rep. Antonio Parkinson is set to make a push to remove Memphis schools from the state’s Achievement School District and dissolve the state district because of its failure to pull them out of Tennessee’s bottom 5 percent for performance.

26. Facebook Crisis-Management Lesson: What Not to Do -

NEW YORK (AP) – The crisis-management playbook is pretty simple: Get ahead of the story, update authorities and the public regularly, assume responsibility and take decisive action. Crisis-management experts say Facebook is 0-for-4.

27. Trump Opioid Plan Includes Death Penalty for Traffickers -

MANCHESTER, N.H. (AP) – President Donald Trump's plan to combat opioid drug addiction calls for stiffer penalties for drug traffickers, including the death penalty where appropriate under current law, a top administration official said. It's a fate for drug dealers that Trump has been highlighting publicly in recent weeks.

28. Last Word: The Memphis Hub Modernization, Gun Protests and MLK 50 Plans -

Back in January, the FedEx board approved a $3.2 billion package that had pay raises, bonuses and similar items that have become the corporate reaction to federal tax reform that set a lower rate of taxation for companies that repatriate money they have overseas. There was a mention of $1.5 billion for the Indianapolis hub and unspecified plans for the Memphis hub to come later. And later was yesterday in a pretty modest announcement at Signature Air given the scope of what FedEx has planned for its Super Hub here.

29. Tennessee In-State Immigrant Tuition Bill Clears 1st Hurdle -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A Tennessee House subcommittee has approved legislation with in-state tuition for public college students whose parents brought or kept them in the country illegally.

30. Digest -

Memphis Grizzlies Suffer 15th Consecutive Loss

The Grizzlies lost their 15th straight game, 119-110 at Chicago, on Wednesday, March 7.

The team has not won since defeating the Phoenix Suns at FedExForum on Jan. 29.

31. Last Word: On The EDGE, Tubby Smith and Timing and TVA Keeps Its Wells Off -

Remember when the Memphis City Council and the Shelby County Commission got together a week ago at Beale Street Landing? Here’s a refresher. Among those watching the discussion was Richard Smith, the chairman of the Greater Memphis Chamber, who responded to the criticism of the local approach to economic development this week with an email to members of both bodies that could prompt some changes to the approach and specifically to EDGE.

32. For Many Factory Towns, White Collar Job Loss Hurts the Most -

ERIE, Pa. (AP) – With the abandoned smokestacks off the bay and ramshackle factories along 12th Street, it's easy to pin the blame for this industrial city's plight on the loss of manufacturing jobs to China and Mexico.

33. What’s Best for State, Education or Punishment? -

Carlos Reyes, a graduate of Murfreesboro Oakland High School’s Class of 2017, would be in his second semester at MTSU majoring in business administration – if he could afford it.

34. Forrest Slave Market Site to Get New Marker In April -

A new historical marker to be unveiled April 4 on the southwest corner of Adams Avenue and B.B. King Boulevard will note what the existing 63-year old marker doesn’t – that it was not only an early home of Confederate general, slave trader and Ku Klux Klan Grand Wizard Nathan Bedford Forrest. It was also the site of the slave market that Forrest owned and operated for six years.

35. Ex-Trump Campaign Aide Agrees to Guilty Plea in Russia Probe -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A former top adviser to President Donald Trump's campaign is scheduled to plead guilty on Friday in the special counsel's Russia investigation to federal conspiracy and false statements charges.

36. Events -

Hattiloo Theatre will perform “Selma: A Musical Tribute to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.” Friday, Feb. 23, through March 18 at Hattiloo, 37 S. Cooper St. The dramatic musical captures prominent moments such as the Montgomery Bus Boycott and the crossing of the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Alabama. Visit hattiloo.org for showtimes and tickets.

37. Trump Endorses Raising Minimum Age to 21 for More Weapons -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Donald Trump on Thursday endorsed a higher minimum age for buying certain rifles and tighter background checks for purchasers, saying "there's nothing more important than protecting our children," amid a public outcry for action after the Florida school shooting.

38. Events -

Hattiloo Theatre will perform “Selma: A Musical Tribute to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.” Friday, Feb. 23, through March 18 at Hattiloo, 37 S. Cooper St. The dramatic musical captures prominent moments such as the Montgomery Bus Boycott and the crossing of the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Alabama. Visit hattiloo.org for showtimes and tickets.

39. Last Word: Patio Test, St. Jude's Edge and Bredesen Runs For the Center -

All across the city Monday afternoon into the evening, the city was tested just about a month away from spring by the calendar. And I am happy to report that the dry run for the patio season proved Memphis is vigilant and prepared. The test, in extreme temperatures that reached 77 degrees – breaking the record of 76 degrees set in 1986, prompted some of you to break out the running gear and give it a spin just before the early sunset. Others among you were spotted on patios pondering what ever became of Mr. Mister and Glass Tiger.

40. Trump Revives Push for Limits on Immigrants Bringing Family -

NEW YORK (AP) — When the U.S. government approved Ricardo Magpantay, his wife and young children to immigrate to America from the Philippines, it was 1991. By the time a visa was available, it was 2005, and his children could not come with him because they were now adults.

41. Harris Proposes Bill to Fund Pre-K with Sunday Wine Sales -

State tax revenue from the Sunday sale of wine in stores could be used to fund prekindergarten access for low-income families.

State Senate Democratic Leader Lee Harris of Memphis announced Monday, Feb. 19, that he is sponsoring the bill, which would figure prominently in the local push for more prekindergarten classrooms in the city of Memphis.

42. Harris Proposes Bill To Fund Pre-K with Sunday Wine Sales Revenue -

State tax revenue from allowing the Sunday sale of wine in grocery stores and supermarkets and other stores could be used to fund prekindergarten access for low income families.

State Senate Democratic leader Lee Harris of Memphis announced Monday, Feb. 19, that he is sponsoring the bill, which would figure prominently in the local push for more prekindergarten classrooms in the city of Memphis.

43. Harris Proposes Bill To Fund Pre-K with Sunday Wine Sales Revenue -

State tax revenue from allowing the Sunday sale of wine in grocery stores and supermarkets and other stores could be used to fund prekindergarten access for low income families.

State Senate Democratic leader Lee Harris of Memphis announced Monday, Feb. 19, that he is sponsoring the bill, which would figure prominently in the local push for more prekindergarten classrooms in the city of Memphis.

44. Monument Bills Create State Heritage Battlegrounds -

Legislative battles are looming over a spate of bills designed to hammer Memphis and any other cities accused of violating the Tennessee Heritage Protection Act.

Lawmakers filed several pieces of legislation aimed at punishing local governments in the wake of the Memphis City Council move to topple the Nathan Bedford Forrest statue in Health Sciences Park and two other Confederate monuments in another park by selling the property to a newly created nonprofit organization.

45. Dreamers Deferred -

You never really get to the point where you can stand at a particular moment in time and forecast with any certainty how your life is going to turn out, how things are going to look or what’s going to be different over a long time horizon. That’s certainly the way it’s been, and still is, for Mauricio Calvo and Memphians like him.

46. Rotating Forrest Bust Out of Capitol Gains Momentum -

Confederate Lt. Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest’s days in the State Capitol could be numbered. Lt. Gov. Randy McNally, an Oak Ridge Republican, says he could support a move to rotate Forrest’s bust out of the Capitol and make sure Capitol displays are “more reflective of the entire history of Tennessee.”

47. Orgel, Caldwell Prepare For School Board Races -

Incumbent Shelby County Schools board members Billy Orgel and Chris Caldwell have pulled qualifying petitions to seek re-election to the nonpartisan positions in the August elections.

Caldwell faces a challenge in District 1 from Michael Scruggs, a motivational speaker, and Katherine Ayers, who have each pulled a petition for the race.

48. Orgel, Caldwell Pull Petitions In School Board Races -

Incumbent Shelby County Schools board members Billy Orgel and Chris Caldwell have pulled qualifying petitions to seek re-election to the nonpartisan positions in the August elections.

49. New Trump Office Would Protect Conscience Rights of Doctors -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Reinforcing its strong connection with social conservatives, the Trump administration announced Thursday a new federal office to protect medical providers refusing to participate in abortion, assisted suicide or other procedures on moral or religious grounds.

50. Q&A: What Facebook's Shift Could Mean to Users, Businesses -

NEW YORK (AP) – In coming days, Facebook users will see fewer posts from publishers, businesses and celebs they follow. Instead, Facebook wants people to see more stuff from friends, family and other people they are likely to have "meaningful" conversations with – something the company laments has been lost in the sea of videos, news stories (real and fake), and viral quizzes on which "Big Bang Theory" character you are.

51. Trump Suggests 2-Phase Immigration Deal for 'Dreamers' -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Seeking a bipartisan compromise to avoid a government shutdown, President Donald Trump suggested Tuesday that an immigration deal could be reached in two phases – first by addressing young immigrants and border security with what he called a "bill of love," then by making comprehensive changes that have long eluded Congress.

52. Weekend Monuments Protests, Response Suggest Shift -

Memphis Branch NAACP president Deidre Malone may have had the most concise description of what has changed since the city’s two most visible Confederate monuments came down Dec. 20.

“What we want happened. The monuments are down,” Malone said Friday, Jan. 5, as the NAACP and other groups called on Memphians to ignore plans for protests in the city the next day by groups opposed to the removal of the monuments.

53. Memphis Experts See Economic Growth Building Off 2017 Into 2018 -

With resolutions made and the new year now, another annual exercise rises to the forefront – predictions on what Memphis and its economy can expect in 2018.

If 2017 taught us anything, it’s that there’s so much we won’t be able to even remotely see coming, from Memphis bidding to become the potential home for Amazon’s second headquarters to action finally being taken on the Confederate monuments in city parks and so much more.

54. Attorney, Former Political Activist Lewis Donelson Dies at 100 -

In a century of life that began in Memphis, Lewis Donelson was many things including an attorney, politician and strategist. In all of those pursuits and others, he was one of the city’s most influential citizens and a force in some of the most historic moments in the city’s history as well as the state’s history.

55. Final Goodbye: Roll Call of Some Who Died in 2017 -

They made music that inspired legions of fans. Rock 'n' roll founding fathers Chuck Berry and Fats Domino, rockers Tom Petty and Gregg Allman, grunge icon Chris Cornell, country superstar Glen Campbell and jazz great Al Jarreau were among the notable figures who died in 2017, leaving a void in virtually every genre of music.

56. Panel Finds Juvenile Court Standards Lacking -

There is a lack of guidance from the state to juvenile courts across the state and a lack of consistency among those courts in how they deal with juveniles, according to a 25-page report issued this month by a joint ad hoc Tennessee Blue Ribbon Task Force of the Tennessee Legislature.

57. Last Word: Grizz Speculation, SCS Grade Floors and Cedar Heights -

Grizz lose to the Wizards 93-87 in Washington. And ESPN columnist Zach Lowe says the team has lost its identity as well as a lot of games. CBSSports reports Marc Gasol is open to a trade but will not request one. And if you are looking to go far afield with the theories, here’s one from a Dallas Mavericks fansight, mavsmoneyball, that includes a really good graphic on the salaries of Grizz players.

58. Mayor’s Critics Have Their Own Plans for Strike Anniversary -

When the 1968 sanitation workers strike ended in April 1968, Cleophus Smith didn’t feel like the formal city recognition and a minimal pay raise he and other sanitation workers had gained was something to be celebrated.

59. Franken Announces Resignation From Senate Amid Allegations -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Minnesota Sen. Al Franken announced Thursday he will resign from Congress in the coming weeks following a wave of sexual misconduct allegations and the collapse of support from his Democratic colleagues, a swift political fall for a once-rising Democratic star.

60. Trump Says Government Shutdown Possible, Blames Democrats -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Donald Trump warned Wednesday that a government shutdown was possible this weekend because Democrats were demanding to have "illegal immigrants pouring into our country," tossing incendiary rhetoric onto a partisan showdown that had been showing signs of easing.

61. GOP Leaders Delay Budget Vote As Internal Disputes Linger -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Top Republicans delayed a planned House vote on a short-term budget bill Tuesday to give themselves time to quell party divisions and avert a partial government shutdown by the weekend.

62. NBC Fires Matt Lauer Over 'Inappropriate Sexual Behavior' -

NEW YORK (AP) – NBC News fired "Today" show host Matt Lauer for what it said Wednesday was "inappropriate sexual behavior" with a colleague, making him perhaps the most familiar figure in America brought down so far by the misconduct accusations that have swept through Hollywood and the media over the past two months.

63. Justices Reject Appeal Over Mississippi Confederate Emblem -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) – The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday rejected an appeal from an African-American attorney who called the Confederate battle emblem on the Mississippi flag "an official endorsement of white supremacy."

64. Bush Administration Alums Rising in Trump's Orbit -

WASHINGTON (AP) – For all the lingering tensions between President Donald Trump and former President George W. Bush, Trump's White House shares one thing in common with his Republican predecessor's: People.

65. The Next Four Years -

A week before candidates for the 2018 Shelby County elections could pull qualifying petitions to run, Shelby County Commissioner David Reaves was thinking out loud on Facebook.

“Next four years,” was how it began.

66. Despite Massive Turnover, GOP Owns Legislature -

2018 will be a year of change for the Tennessee General Assembly, and 2019 will bring even more, especially in leadership – much depending on the popularity of President Donald Trump.

Not only is the Legislature moving to the Cordell Hull Building, vacating the Legislative Plaza after 45 years or so, a number of legislative faces are changing, too, even before next year’s election.

67. Harris Cites Effects of ‘Trump Approach’ on County Races -

Three weeks into his run for Shelby County mayor on the 2018 ballot, state Sen. Lee Harris told a group of 30 supporters in Victorian Village Wednesday, Nov. 1, that he is running as a response to the “Trump approach.”

68. Justice Department Changes Police Review and Juvenile Court Terms -

In two weeks’ time, the U.S. Justice Department has substantially changed the terms of its collaborative review of the Memphis Police Department and left in place the terms of a settlement agreement with Memphis-Shelby County Juvenile Court involving disproportionate minority contact.

69. Last Word: Beyond Amazon, Marking The RiverLine and Whimsy Grows -

Grizz and Hornets Monday at the Forum. And Tigers football is on the road for a Friday game at Tulsa. On Tuesday, though there will be much attention to the first of six weekly rankings of college football teams by the new College Football Playoff committee. And the Tigers expect to make the rankings. The players are saying that. That will be followed closely, of course, by another series of interviews about how the team is focused only on the next game as they keep hitting refresh on the playoff committee rankings site. The rankings also promise to be interesting for the SEC teams that are part of the local and regional sports mix here.

70. Justice Department Drops Some But Not All Juvenile Court Oversight -

The U.S. Justice Department has dropped more but not all of the measures it put in place five years ago at Memphis-Shelby County Juvenile Court.

The reforms and monitoring in the 2012 settlement agreement between the Justice Department and the court, Shelby County government and the Shelby County Sheriff’s Office covered a wide range of areas in a scathing review of court practices, particularly in due process issues and a racial disparity in how the court treats African-American children in the court for the same offenses or problems as white children.

71. JFK Files: Thousands Released But Trump Holds Back Others -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump has blocked the release of hundreds of records on the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, bending to CIA and FBI appeals, while the National Archives came out Thursday night with a hefty cache of others.

72. Making the List -

With black-and-white images from Memphis in conflict circa 1968 projected larger than life on a video screen behind him, Kirk Whalum stood in the sanctuary of Clayborn Temple earlier this week talking about growing up in Memphis in that era.

73. Fats Domino Dies at 89; Gave Rock Music a New Orleans Flavor -

NEW ORLEANS (AP) — Fats Domino, the amiable rock 'n' roll pioneer whose steady, pounding piano and easy baritone helped change popular music while honoring the traditions of the Crescent City, has died. He was 89.

74. White House: $4,000 More for Families With Business Tax Cuts -

WASHINGTON (AP) – By slashing corporate tax rates, the Trump administration said Monday, the average U.S. household will get an estimated $4,000 more a year.

This stunning 5 percent increase was met with skepticism from tax experts and Democratic lawmakers who said the math was flawed. Spread across every U.S. household, the White House analysis claims it would generate "conservatively" an income jump totaling $504 billion, or about $200 billion more than the revenues currently generated by the corporate income tax.

75. AP-NORC Poll: Most Don't Want Young Immigrants Deported -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Just 1 in 5 Americans want to deport young immigrants brought to the United States as children and now here illegally, the focus of a politically fraught debate between the White House and Congress.

76. Last Word: The Corker Tweets, Market Stabilization and The Rise of the Landshark -

In the “That Didn’t Take Long” department, whatever diplomacy there was in the relationship between President Donald Trump and U.S. Senator Bob Corker of Tennessee vanished over the weekend – vanished in the course of several tweets starting with one from Trump claiming he refused an endorsement of Corker in a re-election bid next year and that resulted in Corker’s decision not to seek re-election. He claims Corker “begged” for his endorsement. “Said he could not win without my endorsement,” Trump added. “He also wanted to be Secretary of State, I said, ‘NO THANKS.’ He is also largely responsible for the horrendous Iran Deal.”

77. Haslam Won't Run for Corker's Senate Seat; Blackburn Joins Race -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – U.S. Rep. Marsha Blackburn announced her campaign for U.S. Sen. Bob Corker's seat on Thursday in a video that slams the "totally dysfunctional" Senate and Republicans in particular for their failure to repeal the Affordable Care Act.

78. Crosstown Crossroads -

For the past 90 years, Crosstown has seen its share of ups and downs. In the beginning, it was a shining beacon for the city’s eastward expansion; at its height, it anchored several vibrant and diverse neighborhoods; and at its lowest, Crosstown became the poster child for once-great inner-city areas of Memphis that had deteriorated.

79. Haslam Less Clear Than Usual On Run for US Senate -

Gov. Bill Haslam usually gives an answer to every question, even if his subjects and verbs don’t agree. But when it comes to a potential run for the U.S. Senate, he stumbles.

In fact, his response was almost inaudible just a week before his pal U.S. Sen. Bob Corker said he wouldn’t seek another term at the end of 2018.

80. Adams Gets Life Without Parole For Bobo Murder in Sentencing Deal -

UPDATE: After a jury in Savannah, Tennessee convicted Zachary Adams Friday of first degree murder, kidnapping and rape, prosecutors and the defense announced a sentencing agreement Saturday that means Adams will serve life in prison without parole plus 50 years for the 2011 murder of Holly Bobo.

81. Are Achievement Schools a Problem or the Solution? -

Forgiveness or farewell: What should be the fate of the Achievement School District?

Among Memphis legislators, it just depends.

State Rep. Mark White calls the task to pull Shelby County’s poorest performing schools out of the state’s bottom 5 percent a “heavy lift.”

82. Juvenile Court Outcomes Still Questioned -

Rev. Keith Norman says just about every time federal monitors in the settlement agreement with Juvenile Court come to Memphis they meet with him and want to hear from a broad cross section of Memphians with no filtering of those they encounter.

83. Senate Confirms Dunavant As U.S. Attorney -

The U.S. Senate has confirmed Tipton County prosecutor Mike Dunavant as the new U.S. attorney for the Western District of Tennessee, based in Memphis with offices in Jackson, Tennessee.

84. Colleges Offering Legal Tips, Hotlines Amid DACA Uncertainty -

BERKELEY, Calif. (AP) – Mixed signals from Washington over a possible agreement to preserve protections for young immigrants are increasing anxiety and confusion on college campuses, where the stakes are high.

85. Tennessee Sen. Corker Meets With Trump Following Spat -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Republican Bob Corker, who has yet to say whether he will seek a third term representing Tennessee in the U.S. Senate next year, met with President Donald Trump on Friday for the first time since their public spat.

86. Dunavant Confirmed As U.S. Attorney -

The U.S. Senate has confirmed Tipton County prosecutor Mike Dunavant as the new U.S. Attorney for the Western District of Tennessee, based in Memphis with offices in Jackson, Tennessee.

87. Activist Announces Bid for Corker's Tennessee Senate Seat -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Conservative activist Andy Ogles announced Thursday he will run for the U.S. Senate seat held by Tennessee Republican Bob Corker, who has so far refused to divulge whether he will seek a third term.

88. Juvenile Court Resisting Remedies, Says Former Settlement Coordinator -

The coordinator overseeing the Memphis and Shelby County Juvenile Court settlement with the U.S. Department of Justice resigned in June as a reaction to the letter County Mayor Mark Luttrell, Juvenile Court Judge Dan Michael and Sheriff Bill Oldham sent U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions requesting an end to federal oversight of the court.

89. The Week Ahead: Sept. 11-18 -

Hey, Memphis! This week we’re gearing up for the Cooper Young Festival and a packed house at the Tigers vs. UCLA game. Plus, Uptown Funk heads Downtown and The Joker hits East Memphis. Here’s what else you need to know about in The Week Ahead…

90. Juvenile Court Judge Calls Federal Oversight and Monitors a ‘Distraction’ -

Five years ago when the U.S. Justice Department concluded years of review with a scathing report about due process and equal treatment issues in Memphis-Shelby County Juvenile Court, then Judge Curtis Person Jr. and his staff had to make a decision.

91. Commission Votes Down Health Coverage Change -

Shelby County Commissioners voted down a switch Monday, Aug, 28, of the county’s health insurance administration contract from Cigna to an $11 million, two-year contract with two one-year renewal options with Aetna.

92. County Commission Votes Down Health Coverage Change -

Shelby County Commissioners voted down a switch Monday, Aug, 28, of the county’s health insurance administration contract from Cigna to Aetna in an $11 million two-year contract with two renewals of one year each.

93. Trump Expected to Decide Soon on Fate of Young Immigrants -

WASHINGTON (AP) – After months of delays, President Donald Trump is expected to decide soon on the fate of young immigrants who were brought into the country illegally as children as he faces a looming court deadline and is digging in on appeals to his base.

94. Looks Like Another 8-4 Season for Tennessee -

Oops. I goofed last year. So did lots of other people who thought Tennessee’s football team would win the SEC East Division and go to the league championship game for the first time since 2007.

95. The Latest: University Barricades Confederate Statue -

The Latest on efforts to remove Confederate monuments and the nationwide fallout from a white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia (all times local):

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2:30 p.m.

Workers in a Florida city have started taking down a memorial to Confederate soldiers at a city-owned cemetery.

96. Ryan to Face Voters Following Trump Nationwide Address -

MADISON, Wis. (AP) — House Speaker Paul Ryan will be taking questions from Wisconsin voters during a nationally televised town hall meeting Monday night immediately following President Donald Trump's address on Afghanistan.

97. University of Texas in Austin Removes Confederate Statues -

AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — The University of Texas quickly removed statues of Robert E. Lee and other prominent Confederate figures overnight from the main area of the Austin campus, a spokesman said Monday morning, just hours after the school's president ordered they be taken down.

98. Deadly Rally Accelerates Removal of Confederate Statues -

In Gainesville, Florida, workers hired by the Daughters of the Confederacy chipped away at a Confederate soldier's statue, loaded it quietly on a truck and drove away with little fanfare.

In Baltimore, Mayor Catherine Pugh said she's ready to tear down all of her city's Confederate statues, and the city council voted to have them destroyed. San Antonio lawmakers are looking ahead to removing a statue from a prominent downtown park.

99. New Life for Medicaid After GOP's Health Care Debacle -

WASHINGTON (AP) – It may not equal Social Security and Medicare as a "third rail" program that politicians touch at their own risk, yet Medicaid seems to have gotten stronger after the Republican failure to pass health care legislation.

100. Local Leaders React To Charlottesville Violence -

Violence in Charlottesville, Virginia, over the weekend drew more than 100 people to Health Sciences Park Saturday, where they gathered around the statue of Confederate general, slave trader and Ku Klux Klan grand wizard Nathan Bedford Forrest.