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Editorial Results (free)

1. Last Word: Bell at the Grammys, Old Dominick's Return and Luttrell & Strickland -

Memphis at the Grammys: William Bell was performer, presenter and winner at the Grammys Sunday evening. Gary Clark Jr. joined Bell to perform Bell’s calling card, “Born Under A Bad Sign” and the duo then presented a Grammy to Beyonce. In the non-televised Grammy awards, Bell won for Best Americana album for his Stax effort “This Is Where I Live.”

2. The Week Ahead: February 13-19 -

Music is a common theme this week, which is nice to know, isn’t it, Memphis? And the sounds of other balls – not the dribbling kind – will take the stage again as the Memphis Open gets into swing and the University of Memphis throws its first real pitch of the 2017 season. Check out this week's list of need-to-know happenings...

3. Last Word: Little Chairs in Longview, Police Pay Raise and Tiger Football Schedule -

The toys are in their cubbyholes. No stray Legos yet. The little chairs tucked neatly under little tables. The tall trees with their bare branches are much in need of little eyes inspecting their twisted branches and the shadows they make on the winter ground.

4. Hayes Honors Memphis History, Looks Forward -

In Memphis, two pieces of previously neglected history are gaining some well-deserved recognition. The first is Clayborn Temple, a historic hub of economic justice that sheltered Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. during the sanitation workers strike of 1968. The second is the Lynching Sites Project, which honors places around town where extreme racial violence has occurred.

5. Norris Plans White House Trip To Discuss Refugee Resettlement -

NASHVILLE – State Sen. Mark Norris is planning a White House visit to discuss the direction of refugee resettlement despite a federal judge’s ruling blocking President Trump’s immigration and refugee moratorium.

6. Ford CEO Hopeful That Trump Will Ease Gas Mileage Standards -

DEARBORN, Mich. (AP) – Ford Motor Co.'s top executive is hopeful that President Donald Trump could ease government fuel economy requirements and reduce corporate taxes to help the auto industry grow and create jobs.

7. Trump Announces 'Major' Voter Fraud Investigation -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Donald Trump tweeted early Wednesday that he is ordering a "major investigation" into voter fraud, revisiting unsubstantiated claims he's made repeatedly about a rigged voting system.

8. New Study: Trump to Inherit $559B Deficit, Stable Economy -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Donald Trump has inherited a stable economy but a government that faces a worsening debt and deficit picture, congressional analysts said Tuesday.

The estimates from the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office say the economy will hold relatively steady, with economic growth rising slightly to 2.3 percent this year and unemployment averaging less than 5 percent for the duration of Trump's term. It expects the budget deficit for the current year to register $559 billion, roughly the same as last year's.

9. Saban Dominance Bad for SEC? Not Buying It -

I keep reading that Nick Saban is ruining SEC football because his Alabama program is so dominant.

And I just don’t get it.

The misguided Saban-as-Satan logic goes this way:

10. Lynching Centennial Observance Nears in May -

Leaders of an effort to mark the sites of 32 lynchings in Shelby County have hired a project director for the upcoming centennial of the 1917 lynching of Ell Persons.

John Ashworth recently led efforts in Brownsville, Tennessee, to remember Elbert Williams, the organizer of an NAACP chapter in Haywood County. Williams was murdered in 1940 and his body found in the Hatchie River. He was ordered buried the same day his body was found.

11. Trump’s Turn -

If the election of Donald Trump was a mystery, there are even more questions about what will he do once he takes office Jan. 20. The clues may or may not be in the conduct of his campaign.

“Donald Trump campaigned without being tied to the traditional parameters of conservative-liberal dialogue that we’ve come to know over the past 20 or 30 years,” said Memphis attorney John Ryder, who is legal counsel to the Republican National Committee. “The hopeful part about that is that allows him to move past those divisions and enter new territory.”

12. Last Word: Booksellers Options, New Parking Spaces and The Memphis Open -

Somewhere in the back of our minds, I think most of us knew there were probably some circumstances under which Booksellers at Laurelwood might remain open. And as it turns out there are some terms the owner is talking about just past the post-New Year’s shock of work that the store will close in February.

13. Final Goodbye: Roll Call of Some of Those Who Died in 2016 -

Death claimed transcendent political figures in 2016, including Cuba's revolutionary leader and Thailand's longtime king, but also took away royals of a different sort: kings of pop music, from Prince and David Bowie to George Michael.

14. Presidential Election Tops Busy Year for Memphis Voters -

2016 was an eventful election year in Shelby County, ending with the most popular voting cycle in Shelby County politics: the U.S. presidential general election in November. Slightly more than 60 percent of the county’s voters cast a ballot either during early voting in October or on the Nov. 8 Election Day.

15. Sazerac Taking Plunge Into Tennessee Whiskey Production -

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) – Sazerac is plunging into Tennessee whiskey production, lining up veteran distillers to run things while continuing an expansion strategy highlighted by its earlier purchase of Southern Comfort.

16. County Commission Approves Specific Minority Contract Percentages -

Shelby County Commissioners gave final approval Monday, Dec. 19, to a resolution that sets specific percentages for specific minority and other groups for getting a share of county government contracts.

17. Tigers’ Bowl Trip About Getting – and Keeping – That Winning Feeling -

The head coach who rebuilt the program, Justin Fuente, had left for Virginia Tech. The star quarterback, Paxton Lynch, was awful in his final game as a Tiger. And it rained … and rained.

18. With Fed Expected to Hike, Attention Turns to What It Says -

WASHINGTON (AP) – There isn't much doubt about what the Federal Reserve will do when its latest policy meeting ends Wednesday: It's all but certain to raise its benchmark interest rate – its first increase in a year.

19. Last Word: The Return of Stubby Clapp, Poplar & Ridgeway for Pedestrians and Mice -

The death toll in the Sevier County-Gatlinburg wildfires is at seven. Authorities believe a fire at The Chimney Tops in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park was what started the disaster and had consumed 15,563 acres as of Wednesday evening. At that point, the fire was 10 percent contained.

20. State Rep. Mark White Joins Public Strategy Firm -

Tennessee State Rep. Mark White has joined the executive team at Caissa Public Strategy as a senior director.

White has more than 30 years of experience working in education, political and business circles in Memphis, and his focus at Caissa will be on complex project management and strategic planning.

21. State Rep. Mark White Joins Public Strategy Firm -

Tennessee State Rep. Mark White has joined the executive team at Caissa Public Strategy as a senior director.

22. Norris, Others Take Next Step After Election -

State Senate Republican leader Mark Norris of Collierville ran for re-election this year the way just about any incumbent prefers to run – unopposed.

23. Last Word: Election Day Arrives, Compass Changes Course and Downtown Dining -

…Some notes and observations on Election Eve from someone who does this for a living…

Most of you – around 60 percent of the total number of people who will cast ballots in Shelby County in this election cycle – have already voted if past Presidential election cycles in Shelby County are any indication. You voted early.

24. Election Day Ends Contentious Presidential Contest -

In a contentious national campaign for president that has tested the boundaries of what is considered proper political discourse and what should be public, local Democratic and Republican partisans have mostly been spectators as the 2016 presidential campaign comes to an end Tuesday, Nov. 8.

25. Last Word: Pants Suits On the River, Early Vote Numbers & Chandler Parsons' Debut -

A busy last weekend for the Presidential campaigns in Shelby County where we have seen neither Hillary Clinton nor Donald Trump in the flesh since the primary campaign season and haven’t even seen their surrogates in the general election campaign.

26. Last Word: The Curses, Early Voting's Last Day and Midtown Kroger's First Day -

The goat, the curse, whatever you choose to call it – it’s over for the Cubs who are baseball’s world champions. And even in this basketball town, there is something about the tradition of baseball that commands attention. But alas October belongs to the political surprise in Presidential races exclusively as once again the World Series is decided in November.

27. Open and Shut -

The office of the future hacks down cubicle walls in favor of modular furniture that encourages collaboration. As many business sectors, from banking to legal services, move to a tech-first approach, companies are turning away from traditional office configurations to attract the next generation of talent.

28. Last Word: After The Fire, Hard Changes at Fred's and Durham Doesn't Go Quietly -

The immediate questions have simple answers. It was a short in an air conditioner cord that caused the fire that killed 9 people – three adults and six children – before dawn Monday morning in South Memphis.

29. Trust Marketing Mantra: It Takes Villagers to Reach the People -

Even if you have not heard of Trust Marketing & Communications Inc., you’ve seen their work.

30. 2 More Universities Furl Confederate-Themed Mississippi Flag -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) – Two more Mississippi universities have stopped flying the state's flag, which prominently features the Confederate battle emblem.

Mississippi State University and the Mississippi University for Women confirmed Tuesday that they had taken down the state's flag from outdoor flagpoles over the summer. The universities' actions came after state lawmakers failed to act on changing the flag this year.

31. Last Word: Mike McLean's Campaign, Jimmy Carter and Beyond Disparity Studies -

Mike McLean is running one heckuva campaign for Clerk of the Courts. Some of you are thinking, “Why haven’t I heard of that position before?” “Who is the incumbent?”

32. Luttrell Has "Concern" About Charter Referendum On County Attorney -

Shelby County Commissioners have approved a ballot question for the Nov. 8 elections that would give them the final say if the county mayor moves to fire the county attorney.

But before the vote Monday, Aug. 29, by commissioners, Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell indicated he might veto the referendum, saying he has a “concern” about what would be a limit on the power of mayors with the proposed amendment to the Shelby County charter.

33. Luttrell Has "Concern" About Charter Referendum On County Attorney -

Shelby County Commissioners have approved a ballot question for the Nov. 8 elections that would give them the final say if the county mayor moves to fire the county attorney.

But before the vote Monday, Aug. 29, by commissioners, Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell indicated he might veto the referendum, saying he has a “concern” about what would be a limit on the power of mayors with the proposed amendment to the Shelby County charter.

34. What Would It Take for Trump to Lose Tennessee Voters? -

Murfreesboro Realtor Larry Sims almost closes his ears when Donald Trump speaks.

“He gets out of bounds. Of course, the press, they love it because they get to exploit his sayings and doings,” says Sims, who traveled to Cleveland, Ohio, as a Trump delegate for the Republican National Convention. 

35. Haslam Drops $150K Into PAC for Tennessee Legislative Races -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Republican Gov. Bill Haslam has opened his wallet for state legislative campaigns throughout the state.

According to the final campaign finance reports to be filed before the Aug. 4 primary, Haslam gave $150,000 to his political action committee, Jobs4TN. The committee then contributed all but $4,000 of that amount to the campaigns of 44 lawmakers.

36. Last Word: A Robust 2nd Quarter, Marshall and Union and the Code Crew -

Last Word is more like First Word because of a blink of the computer overnight at around 11 p.m. that left us able to create and report but not to post. But not to worry, we will resume our night owl habits Sunday into Monday after this brief reminder of the way things used to be when the deadline was when the presses stopped.

37. Last Word: Regrouping, Freedom Awards and The View From Another Bridge -

It will be a year come Sunday – a year since Darrius Stewart, a passenger in a car pulled over by Memphis Police in Hickory Hill was shot and killed by Officer Conner Schilling.

38. Last Word: Dallas, Baton Rouge and Minneapolis -

As I write this, I’m wondering if something else will happen once it goes up on our website that will render this irrelevant by the time you read it.

This time the datelines are Dallas, Baton Rouge and Minneapolis.

39. Death Sparks 'Autopilot' Car Probe; Man Had Speeding Tickets -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The first American death involving a car in self-driving mode presents a dilemma: How aggressively to embrace the potentially life-saving technology after a fatal crash. The driver's history of speeding complicates the question.

40. Chamber Names Simmons Director of Public Policy -

Haley Simmons has joined the Greater Memphis Chamber as the director of public policy, a new position in the chamber’s community development department. In this role, Simmons will be focused on enhancing the chamber’s advocacy efforts to inform and engage its members on important policy issues, and he’ll also be responsible for growing the chamber’s role in education initiatives.

41. Insure Tennessee Advocates on the Road -

The state House’s task force on Insure Tennessee is nearing a June report to federal health regulators on its work. And a Tennessee Hospital Association advocacy group is ramping up its appeal for legislative passage of either the Medicaid expansion alternative or some similar program that might come out of the task force.

42. Last Word: As The Wheel Tax Turns, New Zoo Poll and Once Every Dozen Years -

When the school year ends, that’s not necessarily when leaders of school systems can take it easy.

That’s because the business of school systems is about looking months if not years ahead on your mental calendar.

43. 1917 Lynching Recalled, Marker Planned at Site -

In a year, a group of religious leaders hopes to draw at least 5,000 Memphians to an area off Summer Avenue by the Wolf River where 3,000 gathered nearly a century ago as a man was burned alive.

The Lynching Sites Project of Memphis gathered Sunday, May 22, in a field by a Wolf River oxbow, 99 years to the day that Ell Persons was lynched at an event that was covered by local newspapers in advance.

44. New Schools Giving Memphis Suburbs More Autonomy -

Some of the trees along East Shelby Drive on the 158 acres at Sycamore Road are in rows. It’s the unmistakable sign of a tree nursery. And before that it was considered a prime dove hunting location.

45. The Week Ahead: May 16-22 -

With a barbecue-filled weekend behind us, it’s time to get this week started, Memphis! Here’s our roundup of local happenings you need to know about, from the Memphis in May Triathlon (where you can work off that pork belly) to the city’s first Palestine Festival (where, yes, there will be even more food).

46. Wilson Urges Family Philanthropic Efforts at Dunavant Awards -

When most people think of the Kemmons Wilson family, there is an image that comes to mind. It’s a black and white photo from the 1950s of the five children – three boys and two girls – of the Holiday Inn founder cutting the ribbon on the very first Holiday Inn at 4925 Summer Ave.

47. The Week Ahead: May 9-15 -

Alright, Memphis, grab your calendars! Whether you want to book it over to the Ruby Bridges Reading Festival or just baste in the scent of barbecue, there’s plenty to do this week. Here’s our roundup...

48. Massacre: 1866 and the Battles Over How Memphis History is Told -

At the end of March with much secrecy, Rev. Keith Norman took delivery and responsibility for a large, heavy crate that stayed in his office for the next month.

“Don’t tell anybody, don’t let anybody get it, if they come in and say they work for the park commission or anybody, tell them to show identification,” were the instructions said Norman, who is president of the Memphis Branch NAACP.

49. Last Word: The Bible Veto Override Vote, Grizz Nostalgia and Kroger Goes Online -

The Tennessee Legislature hoped to end its 2016 session Wednesday at the end of an eventful day that included a failed attempt to override Gov. Bill Haslam’s veto of the bill that would have made the Bible the official state book.
But into Wednesday evening, the state House was still debating the Hall tax on dividends – specifically further roll backs of it. And the Senate had gone home for the night.
So Thursday looks like a good bet for the adjournment for the year and the formal start of the election season for incumbents.

50. Insure Tennessee: In Like A Lion, Out With A Committee -

What started with a roar is ending with a whimper.

On the first day of the 2016 legislative session, dozens of Insure Tennessee supporters rallied, shouted and sang songs outside the House chamber.

51. Last Word: Budget Basics, A Peak At Greensward Mediation and Elvis & Nixon -

Spurs 94 – Grizzlies 68 in game 2 of the NBA playoffs. The TNT post-game show just showed the highlights of the game while Shaq and Charles Barkley talked about how big the women are in San Antonio. I’m not making this up. They didn’t even try to talk about the game. This is just grim.

52. Hamilton & Holliman Bringing Mixed Upscale Housing to South Main -

What was once Downtown’s industrial and rail district is now one of the most densely populated residential neighborhoods in Memphis. Over 2,000 units are under development in the South End, and the current population is expected to double over the next two to three years, according to the Downtown Memphis Commission.

53. Legislators Playing Expensive Game With LGBT Issues -

The silly season is in full swing on Capitol Hill, but the “bathroom bill” and any jokes surrounding it are no laughing matter anymore. It’s getting downright expensive.

Tennessee Attorney General Herbert Slatery said this week the bill dealing with transgender student use of restrooms could cost the state more than $1.2 billion in federal funds for K-12 and higher education.

54. Redbirds Outfielder Tilson Reminds of Cardinals Past -

When Charlie Tilson speaks of the big-league players that have impacted him most, he does so with one eye trained on their past and one eye focused on his future.

“I grew up in Chicago and the guy I loved in 2005 with the White Sox was Scott Podsednik,” said Tilson, in his first year playing center field for the Memphis Redbirds, and a second-round draft pick (79th overall) by the St. Louis Cardinals back in 2011.

55. Shelby County Commission Releases Disparity Study -

In a unanimous vote, Shelby County commissioners waived their legal privilege Wednesday, April 6, and approved the public release of a disparity study that is expected to show minority businesses get a low percentage of county government contracts.

56. Last Word: Basketball Intervention, Medical Inventory and Memphis in the 1960s -

Five games left for the Grizzlies to win three and then get to play more in the NBA playoffs. And what seemed to be a foregone conclusion is now not such a sure thing based on the Grizz performance in Sunday’s 119-107 loss to the Orlando Magic in Orlando.

57. Amended Senate De-annexation Bill Faces More Debate -

The de-annexation bill whose defeat became City Hall’s top priority in March is off the political frontburner.

But Memphis Democrats in the Tennessee Legislature who opposed the de-annexation by referendum measure expect that this isn’t the end of the concept or the move to make it law.

58. Tied 4-4 After Scalia's Death, High Court Gives Unions A Win -

WASHINGTON (AP) – In the clearest sign yet of the impact of Justice Antonin Scalia's death, U.S. labor unions scored a major victory Tuesday with a tie vote in a high-profile Supreme Court case they had once seemed all but certain to lose.

59. Amendments Cloud Issue of De-Annexation -

Tennessee state senators go back to work Tuesday, March 29, in Nashville on a modified de-annexation bill.

The Senate State and Local Government Committee will be reviewing a set of amendments to their version of the bill, which changed substantially from the House version in a committee session last week.

60. Time On The Porch -

ON PORCHES. Whatever porches are about, the best ones are about time. Time for swings and rocking chairs and reflection. Time spent alone with your thoughts or time shared with others sharing space and experience. Time to be very quiet. Or very loud. Life in real time.

61. Transgender Bathroom Bill Dies in Subcommittee -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A bill that would require transgender students to use bathrooms that match their sex at birth has failed.

The bill died in a House Education Administration and Planning Committee meeting Tuesday that was packed with transgender youth who opposed the measure.

62. 1866 Massacre Author Says Riot Has Important Lessons -

When historian Stephen V. Ash went looking for source material on that most difficult of events to piece back together – three days of mob violence in a 19th century Southern city – he expected a challenge.

63. The Week Ahead: March 21-27 -

How was your weekend, Memphis? Here’s our weekly roundup of local happenings you need to know about, from the first Great River Indoor Food Truck Festival to a celebration of late Memphis wrestler Sputnik Monroe.

64. Free Speech Bill Withdrawn After Islamic State Comments -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A Republican lawmaker on Thursday defended his comments that free speech rights on Tennessee college campuses should apply to everyone – even recruiters for the Islamic State group.

65. Bill Would Require Students to Use Bathroom of Birth Sex -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A bill that would require transgender students to use bathrooms that match their sex at birth is gaining momentum in the Tennessee legislature after passing in a House subcommittee.

66. Politics of Deannexation Proposal Grows More Complex -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland is heading to Nashville Wednesday, March 16, to talk with legislators about what he considers City Hall’s highest priority in the 2016 session of the Tennessee Legislature – defeating a deannexation proposal.

67. Strickland Makes Defeating Deannexation Bill Top Priority -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland is downplaying but not ruling out a move toward local government consolidation as a response to a deannexation proposal in the Tennessee legislature.

68. Strickland Downplays Consolidation Response to Deannexation Bill -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland is downplaying a move toward local government consolidation as a response to a deannexation proposal pending in the Tennessee legislature.

69. Last Word: Cubits Anyone, The G-Word and The TV News Crime Block -

How long is a cubit? After a day in which many of you got about four to five inches of rain and more to come Thursday, it seems an appropriate and timely question.
And yes, there is a cubit conversion chart on line for converting that and other really old units of measurement no longer in use like the mina, drachma or the synodic month.
So the average cubit, which is supposed to be the length of a forearm, is 18 inches or a foot and a half. That’s 0.4572 of a meter, which might as well be an ancient unit of measurement.
Someone had to say it.
According to biblehub.com – I’m not making up websites – the book of Genesis sets God’s instructions to Noah as an arc with the dimensions of 300 cubits long, 50 cubits wide and 30 cubits tall. And it was to be made out of gopher wood and covered inside and out with pitch.
The New Living Translation and Holman Christian Standard Bibles convert that to an arc 450 feet long, 75 feet wide and 45 feet high.

70. Health Law Fines Double for Many Uninsured at Tax Time -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Many people who went without health insurance last year are now seeing fines more than double under President Barack Obama's health care law, tax preparation company H&R Block said Tuesday.

71. Last Word: Presidential Distractions, Dude Perfect and The Kirby Farm House -

When it comes to political surprises, the presidential contenders may be the next group on the ballot locally. But they need to up their game if they are going to hold the attention of Memphis voters.
With three of the Republican contenders on their way to Shelby County this weekend and probably more making plans, the attention Tuesday shifted dramatically to the open 8th District Congressional seat that isn’t on the ballot until the August primaries.

72. Cutting taxes, school choice, tort reform drive Sen. Kelsey -

State Sen. Brian Kelsey calls himself “a proud conservative who likes to get results.”

73. Four Beale Street Proposals Feature Different Backgrounds -

Jeff Sanford fielded inquiries from 17 or 18 companies, local and out of town, expressing some level of interest in the contract to manage the Beale Street entertainment district.

74. Luttrell, Strickland Attend Obama’s State of the Union -

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell and Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland both attended the Tuesday, Jan. 12, State of the Union address, the final State of the Union address by President Barack Obama

75. 4 Applicants Up for Beale Street Gig -

A Fortune 500 corporation, the Memphis-based company behind the Delta Fair, a Memphis real estate management firm with office experience, and a newly formed group of Memphians with experience in real estate, entertainment and restaurants as well as commercial development and financing. Those are the four companies that have applied to manage the Beale Street entertainment district.

76. Luttrell, Strickland To Attend Obama’s State of the Union -

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell and Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland will both be attending the Tuesday, Jan. 12, State of the Union address, the final State of the Union address by President Barack Obama

77. An Emotional Obama Unveils His Plan to Cut Gun Violence -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama, at one point wiping tears from his cheek, unveiled his plan Tuesday to tighten control and enforcement of firearms in the U.S., using his presidential powers in the absence of legal changes he implored Congress to pass.

78. Measure Increasing Seat Belt Fines Among New Tennessee Laws -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Motorists in Tennessee who don't buckle up could face stiffer fines under one of many new Tennessee laws taking effect Friday.

The tougher seat belt law increases the fine for first-time offenders from $10 to $25 and from $20 to $50 for repeat offenders.

79. Greenprint Summit Shows Region’s Possibilities -

Trails and bike lanes aren’t the only path to regional success, but they’re playing a growing role in partnerships among communities that sometimes find themselves competing for jobs.

To date, 19 of those communities have adopted a 25-year, green-centric plan that was introduced earlier this year and has been endorsed by more than 50 organizations.

80. Time for Tuition Equality in Tennessee -

Tennessee has a unique opportunity to help the state economy and support education. Passage of the “Tuition Equality” bill in the upcoming state legislative session will provide a critical chance to educate thousands of Tennessee youth and narrow the skills gap that exists for Tennessee employers.

81. Fred Davis Looks Back on Long Career -

Fred Davis can laugh about it now, but the founder of the Fred L. Davis Insurance Agency – which opened its doors back in 1967, the year before Davis was elected to the Memphis City Council – wasn’t always as sanguine about the color of his hair.

82. Early Voting Numbers Tell Still-Moving Story in Memphis Election -

Before the votes are counted Thursday, Oct. 8, there are some other numbers – which are already being counted – to tell the story of the 2015 Memphis elections.

Close to 15 percent of Memphis voters cast early ballots in advance of Thursday’s election day in the races for Memphis mayor, Memphis City Council and City Court clerk.

83. Early Voting Numbers Tell Still-Moving Story -

Before the votes are counted Thursday, Oct. 8, there are some other numbers – which are already being counted – to tell the story of the 2015 Memphis elections.

Close to 15 percent of Memphis voters cast early ballots in advance of Thursday’s election day in the races for Memphis mayor, Memphis City Council and City Court clerk.

84. Memphis Early Vote Turnout Higher Than 2011 and 2009 -

Nearly 15 percent of the voters in Memphis cast early ballots in advance of Thursday's election day in the races for Memphis Mayor, Memphis City Council and City Court Clerk.

Through the final day of the early voting period Saturday, Oct. 3, 51,848 citizens voted early, according to Shelby County Election Commission statistics.

85. Memphis Early Vote Turnout Higher Than 2011 and 2009 -

Nearly 15 percent of the voters in Memphis cast early ballots in advance of Thursday's election day in the races for Memphis Mayor, Memphis City Council and City Court Clerk.

Through the final day of the early voting period Saturday, Oct. 3, 51,848 citizens voted early, according to Shelby County Election Commission statistics.

86. Little Rock Officials Vote to Rename Confederate Boulevard -

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — Little Rock planning officials are recommending changing the name of a stretch of road called Confederate Boulevard.

The Little Rock Planning Commission voted Thursday to strip the name from the four-block section and make it an extension of Springer Boulevard. The recommendation came on the 58th anniversary of the day when federal troops arrived to escort nine black students into Central High School.

87. Memphis Early Voting Turnout Up 76 Percent So Far -

Early voting in the 2015 Memphis elections is running ahead of the pace from four years ago but behind the pace from 2007 and the special mayoral election of 2009.

The early voting period in advance of the Oct. 8 election day runs through Saturday, Oct. 3, at 16 locations across the city.

88. Little Rock Officials Weigh Renaming Confederate Boulevard -

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — Though only a short stretch of Little Rock's Confederate Boulevard remains, to some it is a glaring reminder of the city's checkered racial past.

City officials are expected to consider a petition Thursday to rename the boulevard's last few blocks after one of the area's first black property owners. Coincidentally, the planning commission's vote comes 58 years to the day that 1,200 troops arrived to escort nine black students to their first day of class during the integration of Central High School.

89. Bona Fide -

When the Bona Fide Blues Festival takes a set of stages in Overton Square and the Cooper-Young neighborhood next month, it will mark a return that’s been a long time coming.

But it also will offer something new.

90. Editorial: The Triumphant Return of Tigers Football -

Fifty years after the University of Memphis’ first season at the Liberty Bowl, and 52 years since the 1963 undefeated season, the annual return of Tigers football feels triumphant.

Maybe you don’t completely trust the tide from last year’s winning season – the first since 2007, the first conference championship since 1971 and the first bowl appearance since 2008. Your head tells you to assert your confidence in Tigers football. But in your heart, it feels like this may be at the expense of Tigers basketball.

91. Civil Rights Museum Names 2015 Freedom Awards Recipients -

Ava DuVernay, the director of the movie “Selma,” Freedom Rider Joan Trumpauer Mulholland and Ruby Bridges-Hall, who as a 6-year-old integrated schools in New Orleans, are the recipients of the 2015 National Civil Rights Museum Freedom Awards.

92. Welcome Back -

When Shelby County’s public schools open for the first day of the 2015-16 school year, it will mark the first time in three years that there will be no historic, structural changes to the systems themselves.

93. Ramsey Clear in Push to Politicize Supreme Court -

Republican Lt. Gov. Ron Ramsey has a penchant for igniting flames of partisanship, and the retirement of Tennessee Supreme Court Justice Gary Wade is no exception.

94. Tax Filing Problems Could Jeopardize Health Law Aid for 1.8 Million -

WASHINGTON (AP) – About 1.8 million households that got financial help for health insurance under President Barack Obama's law now have issues with their tax returns that could jeopardize their subsidies next year. Administration officials say those taxpayers will have to act quickly.

95. Improving Access -

With Hispanics expected to make up 31 percent of the nation’s population by 2060, Christian Brothers University is investing in its growing community by pledging $12.5 million to go toward scholarships for immigrant students whose legal residency status may be in question.

96. Clinton to Propose Increasing Capital Gains Taxes -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Hillary Rodham Clinton plans later this week to propose raising capital gains taxes for some investors, part of a larger campaign effort to encourage greater focus on longer-term economic growth rather than more immediate gains for investors.

97. Mark Mosteller Joins Evolve Bank & Trust -

Mark E. Mosteller Sr. recently joined Evolve Bank & Trust as executive vice president, accounting and finance.
The new role includes a variety of responsibilities, including management of the accounting and finance department team, accounting internal controls, internal and external financial reporting, budgeting and forecasting, taxes and treasury management. Mosteller also works with senior and executive management and the board on accounting, finance and operational issues.

98. White House: Action Needed Now to Slow Climate Change -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Failure to act on climate change could cause an estimated 57,000 deaths in the United States from poor air quality by 2100, the Obama administration argued in a new report Monday that warns of dire effects of global warming.

99. Harris Pushes For Insure Tennessee Comeback -

State Senate Democratic leader Lee Harris of Memphis will be on the campaign trail this summer.

Harris and other Democratic leaders in the majority Republican Tennessee legislature will campaign across the state this summer for the comeback of the Insure Tennessee proposal in the 2016 legislative session.

100. Students Not Giving Up on Tuition Equality -

Tennessee students without citizenship say they’ll continue the battle for in-state tuition in 2016 after a measure to help them overcome the financial hurdle of out-of-state tuition barely failed on the House floor.