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Editorial Results (free)

1. Shelby County Government Wins Cigna Health Award -

Cigna has chosen Shelby County government as the winner of its annual Cigna Well-Being Award in Tennessee for demonstrating a commitment to improving the health and well-being of employees through workplace wellness programs.

2. Dark Money Ads Surface in 8th District Primary -

As Republicans were either at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland or watching it on TV last week, “dark money” entered the crowded Republican primary for Tennessee’s 8th Congressional district.

3. Last Word: A Robust 2nd Quarter, Marshall and Union and the Code Crew -

Last Word is more like First Word because of a blink of the computer overnight at around 11 p.m. that left us able to create and report but not to post. But not to worry, we will resume our night owl habits Sunday into Monday after this brief reminder of the way things used to be when the deadline was when the presses stopped.

4. Chism Readying 2018 Bid for County Mayor -

Former Shelby County Commissioner Sidney Chism wants to be the Democratic nominee for Shelby County mayor in 2018, and he plans to begin his campaign after the November presidential election.

5. Funds Rolling In for 8th Congressional District Race -

Five of the six major contenders in the Republican primary for the 8th Congressional District raised a total of $1.8 million from Jan. 1 to June 30 going into the critical last month of the campaign.

6. Shelby County Government Wins Cigna Health Award -

Cigna has chosen Shelby County government as the winner of its annual Cigna Well-Being Award in Tennessee for demonstrating a commitment to improving the health and well-being of employees through workplace wellness programs.

7. Commission Reverses Vote To Cap Life Insurance -

A $20,000 cap on life insurance coverage for Shelby County government employees and retirees was reversed Wednesday, July 6, as county commissioners met in special session.

The coverage cap saved the county $2 million in the operating budget for the new fiscal year that began July 1. Commissioners had approved the cap to pay for additions to the operating budget proposed by Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell.

8. Scramble in the 8th District -

You might call it the calm before the storm. The Aug. 4 election, for which early voting starts July 15, is calmer than usual for the election cycle before a November presidential general election – the only election that more than half of Shelby County voters regularly show up for.

9. County Commission Reverses Life Insurance Coverage Cap -

A $20,000 cap on life insurance coverage for Shelby County government employees and retirees was reversed Wednesday, July 6, as county commissioners met in special session.

The coverage cap saved the county $2 million in the operating budget for the new fiscal year that began July 1. Commissioners had approved the cap to pay for additions to the operating budget proposed by Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell.

10. Election Foes Clash Briefly About Budget -

For a few minutes last week you could see the 2018 race for Shelby County mayor as county commissioners were moving toward a resolution of their 2016 budget season.

It came as the commission began to compare what initially looked to be two different estimates of county revenues for the fiscal year that ended June 30 – one from the administration of county Mayor Mark Luttrell and the other from Trustee David Lenoir.

11. 4 Children Fatally Stabbed in Memphis; Mother Charged -

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) – Four young children were stabbed to death in a gated apartment complex in suburban Memphis on Friday, and the Shelby County Sheriff's Department has charged their mother, Shanynthia Gardner, with first degree murder as well as other charges.

12. Commission Ends Year With Grants Fund Balance -

Shelby County Commissioners ended the fiscal year Thursday, June 30, with more than $36,000 left in a fund of $1.3 million it set aside a year ago for grants to local nonprofits.

Commissioners approved five grants totaling $18,000 at their special meeting Wednesday, June 29, on the budget for the new fiscal year that starts July 1.

13. Roland Wants Revisit of Budget Cut -

The exact numbers always take a few weeks. That’s the nature of budgets forged by political compromise and groups of elected officials.

There are always changes and adjustments. And there are also second thoughts.

14. County Commission Ends Year With Balance In Grants Fund -

Shelby County Commissioners ended the fiscal year Thursday, June 30, with more than $36,000 left in a fund of $1.3 million it set aside a year ago for grants to local nonprofits.

Commissioners approved five grants totaling $18,000 at their special meeting Wednesday, June 29, on the budget for the new fiscal year that starts July 1.

15. Shelby County Budget Shuffle Endures -

By the end of Shelby County government’s budget season, a lot of paper was being passed around the County Commission chambers.

It was in keeping with the rules set by chairman Terry Roland going into the Wednesday, June 29, session that stretched on for seven hours: All amendments had to be put in written resolution form.

16. County Budget Done – Mostly -

Shelby County commissioners put most of their budget season to rest Wednesday, June 29, with $5 million from the county’s reserve fund after they added $13 million in amendments to the $1.1 billion county operating budget during a seven-hour session.

17. The Week Ahead: June 27-July 3 -

It's been a long time coming, but Friday is the kickoff for wine sales in grocery stores. While you're getting your corkscrews ready, check out what else is going on this week – from a deadline in the greensward mediation process to a special superhero stop at St. Jude...

18. 8th District Republican Contenders Highlight Differences -

Most of the 13 contenders in the August Republican primary in the 8th Congressional District agree on a lot. They think the country is going in the wrong direction. They believe the policies of a Democratic president are a factor in that, and they support Donald Trump as the Republican Party’s presidential nominee.

19. Lamar Avenue Grant Gets State’s Sole Focus -

The Lamar Avenue improvement project waiting for years to get started could be about to emerge from the planning stage to construction.

And if the state gets a $180 million federal grant in August, it could compress the timeline from a decade-long project to four or five years of construction. The state is currently acquiring rights of way.

20. Two of 'Three Gs' Surface Again in SCS-Germantown Talks -

When Germantown and Shelby County Schools leaders got together in May to talk about a new annual lease for the use of ballfields in Germantown by SCS schools within Germantown, the talks returned to a familiar topic – the three Gs.

21. Shelby County Budget Delay Centers on $3.5 Million for Schools -

Most of the declarations Monday, June 20, before the Shelby County Commission delayed final votes on local schools funding to next week came from the audience.

“For too long we’ve bled, died, cried and pled for education,” former Memphis City Council and Memphis City Schools board member TaJuan Stout-Mitchell told the commission.

22. Local, State Leaders to Make Lamar Avenue Announcement Tuesday -

The Lamar Avenue road project waiting for years to get started could be about to emerge from the planning stage to construction with a federal grant.

State and local leaders will gather in the heart of the busy freight corridor Tuesday, June 21, for a “major announcement.”

23. County Commission Delays Budget Votes, Germantown School Talks Surface -

Shelby County Commissioners delayed final votes on all of the budget matters before them Monday, June 20, until a special meeting next week.

And a proposed sale of two Germantown schools surfaced in the middle of another marathon budget session for commissioners.

24. Schools Funding Again Center Stage For County Commission -

Shelby County commissioners could wrap up most of the formalities Monday of their budget season.

But it will probably take a while.

The biggest issue of the season – school funding – appeared to be resolved with a compromise last week in committee sessions.

25. County Schools Funding Compromise to Be Tested -

Fragile is probably the best way to describe the compromise that emerged this week from county commissioners to fully fund the Shelby County Schools budget for the fiscal year that begins July 1.

The plan that closes a $27.4 million gap between what the school system wants and what Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell proposed in April had eight votes on the 13-member commission in Wednesday, June 15, committee sessions.

26. Commission Puts Together Schools Funding Compromise -

Shelby County Commissioners cobbled together a fragile plan Wednesday, June 15, to fully fund the Shelby County Schools system’s budget request, closing a $27.4 million budget gap with county government funding.

27. Local LGBT Community Stands in Solidarity After Orlando Massacre -

Flags across the state of Tennessee were at half staff Sunday, June 12, following the Sunday morning mass shooting at the Pulse nightclub in Orlando, Florida.

And a vigil for the victims of the Orlando shooting was scheduled Sunday at 8:30 p.m. at the Memphis Gay & Lesbian Community Center in Cooper-Young.

28. Bankers Association Hosting Free Political Forum June 14 -

The Mortgage Bankers Association of Memphis will host a free political forum on June 14 at the Agricenter International Amphitheater.

The purpose of the event is to introduce the public to candidates running for office in the 8th Congressional District so individuals can learn more about each candidate’s position on various issues.

29. Bankers Association Hosting Free Political Forum June 14 -

The Mortgage Bankers Association of Memphis will host a free political forum on June 14 at the Agricenter International Amphitheater.

The purpose of the event is to introduce the public to candidates running for office in the 8th Congressional District so individuals can learn more about each candidate’s position on various issues.

30. Corrections Officers Want Commission to Increase Pay -

Shelby County Commissioners approved a stable county property tax rate of $4.37 Monday, June 6, on the first of three readings and set the stage for final budget deliberations in committee sessions next week.

31. Commission Adds To Budget Decisions, Backs Herenton Juvenile Offender Schools -

Shelby County Commissioners approved a stable county property tax rate of $4.37 Monday, June 6, on the first of three readings and set the stage for final budget deliberations in committee sessions next week.

32. Commission Adds To Budget Decisions, Backs Herenton Juvenile Offender Schools -

Shelby County Commissioners approved a stable county property tax rate of $4.37 Monday, June 6, on the first of three readings and set the stage for final budget deliberations in committee sessions next week.

33. County Commission Explores Wheel Tax Shift -

Shelby County Commissioners set the stage in Wednesday, June 1, committee sessions to take the first of three votes Monday on a stable $4.37 county property tax rate.

But the commission will put off a vote on the county operating budget to further discuss a shift of revenue from the county wheel tax.

34. Last Word: South Main and Main, More Wheel Tax Mileage and City Hall Shark Tank -

When we talk about South Main these days and all that is happening in that area, we aren’t talking about Main Street Memphis further south of that, even though it’s the same road.

35. County Commission Explores Wheel Tax Shift for Schools -

Shelby County Commissioners set the stage in Wednesday, June 1, committee sessions to take the first of three votes Monday on a stable $4.37 county property tax rate.

But the commission will put off a vote on the county operating budget to further discuss a shift of revenue from the county wheel tax.

36. County Commission Explores Wheel Tax Shift For SCS -

Shelby County Commissioners set the stage in Wednesday, June 1, committee sessions to take the first of three votes Monday on a stable $4.37 county property tax rate.

But the commission will put off a vote on the county operating budget to further discuss a shift of revenue from the county wheel tax.

37. Last Word: As The Wheel Tax Turns, New Zoo Poll and Once Every Dozen Years -

When the school year ends, that’s not necessarily when leaders of school systems can take it easy.

That’s because the business of school systems is about looking months if not years ahead on your mental calendar.

38. SCS Budget Quest About More Than Dollar Figures -

When the Shelby County Commission meets next week to look over the budget proposal approved Monday, May 16, by the Shelby County Schools board, there will be a debate that goes beyond the bottom line dollar figures and line items.

39. WIN Launches Data-Driven Initiative -

Workforce Investment Network has launched a new initiative that will use a data-driven approach to identifying a skilled workforce based on local industry needs.

The ACT Work Ready Communities initiative will use the college admissions ACT test to certify potential employees as “work ready,” according to a release from WIN.

40. SCS Budget Plan Goes To School Board For Vote Monday -

Shelby County Schools board members meet Monday, May 16, to vote on a budget proposal that goes to the Shelby County Commission for funding.

The budget proposal up for a vote Monday has $27 million in red ink – the gap between revenues and expenses.

41. Last Word: Mud Island Money, Elvis Mystery and Beyond Barbecue -

It looks like the dry rub will be in order for Memphis in May's barbecue weekend with a shower or two keeping the dust down in Tom Lee Park Wednesday.

If you can see it through the smoke, Mud Island might strike a first-tme observer as a marked contrast to all of the activity in Tom Lee Park that goes right up to the bluff's edge.

42. Shelby County Schools Board Eyes Wheel Tax to Bridge Budget Gap -

Shelby County Schools board members are looking at the county wheel tax to bridge some, but not all of the $27 million gap in their still tentative budget for the new fiscal year.

The specific solution they are looking at is the half of the $32 million in annual revenue from the wheel tax that Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell has proposed go instead to capital projects across all seven public school systems in Shelby County. The new fiscal year begins July 1.

43. Weirich Gets Body-Cam Help Until July -

Shelby County Commissioners approved Monday, May 9, three temporary positions for the Shelby County District Attorney General’s Office toward the rollout of Memphis Police Department body cameras.

44. County Commission Debates Body Cam Compromise, Minority Business Contracts -

Shelby County Commissioners approved Monday, May 9, three temporary positions for the Shelby County District Attorney General’s office toward the roll out of Memphis Police Department body cameras.

45. County Commission Debates Body Cam Compromise, Minority Business Contracts -

Shelby County Commissioners approved Monday, May 9, three temporary positions for the Shelby County District Attorney General’s office toward the roll out of Memphis Police Department body cameras.

46. WIN Launches Data-Driven Initiative -

Workforce Investment Network has launched a new initiative that will use a data-driven approach to identifying a skilled workforce based on local industry needs.

The ACT Work Ready Communities initiative will use the college admissions ACT test to certify potential employees as “work ready,” according to a release from WIN.

47. Trustee’s Conference Meets in Memphis -

County trustees from across Tennessee will meet in Memphis for their annual conference on Tuesday through Thursday, May 10-12, at the Sheraton Memphis Downtown.

48. Last Word: Mall Demo, Defining 'Fringe Element' and Herenton's New Path -

Once upon a time there were three “town centers” planned by the city of Memphis.

City facilities like libraries and police precincts would be the anchors and encourage private retail development in them.

49. Herenton Pitches Two New Schools For Juvenile Offenders -

Former Memphis Mayor Willie Herenton began Wednesday, May 4, with an appeal that got the attention of Shelby County Commissioners. “We don’t want your money,” he told 11 of the 13 commissioners in committee sessions as he pitched two new residential campuses for children in juvenile detention.

50. Last Word: Budget-Mania, TNReady's Backstory and Slow Down Millenial Investors -

The Overton Park Greensward controversy moves back to City Hall Tuesday as the council talks over an ordinance that sets further in stone the council’s decision in March to give the Memphis Zoo control of two-thirds of the greensward.

51. Luttrell’s Budget Includes More Schools Funds -

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell takes a $1.16 billion county government budget proposal with no property tax hike and a possible $8.7 million in new funding for schools to Shelby County commissioners Wednesday, May 4.

52. The Week Ahead: May 2-8 -

So, you think this is the “off-week” of the Memphis In May International Festival – the gap between the Beale Street Music Festival and the World Championship Barbecue Cooking Contest. But, while Tom Lee Park gets a breather, there are plenty of cultural experiences to soak up across Memphis. Here's our weekly roundup of local happenings you need to know about...

53. Health Alliance Prepares for Annual Meeting May 12 -

The Common Table Health Alliance’s annual meeting will take place on Thursday, May 12, honoring three health impact leaders from the community and addressing the topic “Childhood Obesity: Have We Finally Turned the Corner?”

54. Commission Approves Houston High Project -

Shelby County Commissioners approved Monday, April 25, the Germantown Municipal School Dis-trict’s use of $196,521 for a repaving project at Houston High School. The county capital funding is left from HVAC renovations at Dogwood Elementary School.

55. Reaction to the Death of Civil Rights Leader Rev. Samuel Billy Kyles -

Rev. Samuel Billy Kyles died Tuesday in Memphis after a long illness. Here's a roundup of reaction from local leaders, Kyles' associates and the National Civil Rights Museum...

56. Common Table Health Alliance Prepping for Annual Meeting -

The Common Table Health Alliance’s annual meeting will take place on Thursday, May 12, honoring three health impact leaders from the community and addressing the topic “Childhood Obesity: Have We Finally Turned the Corner?”

57. Commission Approves Houston High Project -

Shelby County Commissioners approved Monday, April 25, the Germantown Municipal School District’s use of $196,521 for a repaving project at Houston High School. The county capital funding is left from HVAC renovations at Dogwood Elementary School.

58. Regionalism Enhances Recruiting For Cities in Metros -

When Memphis hits a dirty dozen list – whether it’s for crime, or education attainment, or poverty – those ratings are based on Memphis Metropolitan Statistical Area data.

And while Memphis, as the largest city in the MSA, has the lion’s share of economic disparity, those problems don’t just effect the city’s 600,000 citizens.

59. The Week Ahead -

It’s a new week that ends with Music Fest, Memphis! Here’s a roundup of other local happenings you need to know about, from some important government meetings, to corporate earnings reports and a new exhibit set to open at the Memphis Zoo.

60. Judicial Commissioners Grow in Number, Job Description -

Seventeen years ago, there were three newly minted judicial commissioners working at the Criminal Justice Center.

In makeshift quarters at first, they primarily worked night-time hours after the criminal courts, General Sessions and Shelby County Criminal, had closed for the day.

61. Bridging a Divide -

The Mid-South is united by more than the Mississippi River, but that’s what it took to get the region’s mayors in the same room.

In the aftermath of the 2011 Mississippi River flood, damage stretched from Millington’s naval base to Memphis’ Beale Street. Leaders of the affected municipalities had to come together to apply for FEMA grants and plot their way out of devastation.

62. Mid-South Mayors Don’t See Barriers In Regionalism -

It took the Mississippi River’s devastating flood in 2011 for Mid-South leaders to consider greater collaboration among the area’s 10 counties and three states.

Mid-South mayors came together to plot their way out of disaster, and that convening set the stage for a formal alliance, the Mid-South Mayors’ Council.

63. Last Word: Tubby Time, Haslam's Veto and Africa in April's 30th Year -

It was just four weeks ago that all of this talk about change at the top of the Tiger basketball chart was put to rest. Coach Josh Pastner’s performance was reviewed by the University of Memphis administration and he was staying at least for another season. Four weeks to the day of that announcement, Pastner is the new coach at Georgia Tech and we are in the first day of the Tubby Smith era at the U of M.

64. Lot Availability, Prices Putting Home Construction Behind Demand -

The recent uptick in the residential real estate market is devouring what’s left of lot development that lagged during the recession, and tight supply is raising home prices in the Memphis area.

65. Last Word: Tubby Fever, School Closings and March Real Estate Numbers -

The Tigers basketball grapevine is nothing but Tubby Smith as of Wednesday when the speculation was joined by torrent of rumors about contact between the Texas Tech coach and the University of Memphis.
Smith has now acknowledged he’s talking with the U of M.
More background on Smith from The Sporting News and Mike DeCourcy, a former sports reporter at The Commercial Appeal, that came out before everything went Tubby here.

66. Luttrell Wants to Bridge Urban-Rural Divide -

U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen knows the signs of someone making the transition to running for Congress.

So when he and Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell spoke at the March 31 opening of Moore Tech’s new welding school, Cohen watched closely as Luttrell began talking about the lack of workforce training and questioned the old Shelby County Schools slogan of “every child college bound.”

67. Kustoff Opens Congressional Bid With 15 Stops -

Former U.S. Attorney David Kustoff began his campaign for Congress Monday, April 11, with stops in Tipton County and Fayette County as well as East Memphis.

68. August Primaries Feature Intra-Party Challenges -

Two years after a disastrous slate of races for countywide offices, there is a move among younger Democratic partisans in Memphis to shake up the Democrats who represent the city in the Tennessee Legislature.

69. 8th Congressional District Primaries Draw 22 Contenders, 13 Republican -

The Republican primary race to fill the 8th District Congressional seat Republican incumbent Stephen Fincher is giving up drew a field of 13 contenders – seven from Shelby County and four from Jackson, Tennessee – at the Thursday, April 7, noon filing deadline for the Aug. 4 ballot.

70. Amended Senate De-annexation Bill Faces More Debate -

The de-annexation bill whose defeat became City Hall’s top priority in March is off the political frontburner.

But Memphis Democrats in the Tennessee Legislature who opposed the de-annexation by referendum measure expect that this isn’t the end of the concept or the move to make it law.

71. Last Word: The Curtain Falls in Nashville, Political Cuneiform and Ramsey Talks -

And in less than a half hour Wednesday, the de-annexation drama that should qualify as the political equivalent of a Netflix binge-watchable television series made just for Memphis was done.

72. Basar Out in 8th District Race, Luttrell Pulls Petition, Cohen Could Have Easy Ride -

Shelby County Commissioner Steve Basar has called off his plan to run in the crowded Republican primary for the 8th Congressional District, but Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell has pulled his petition to join the same crowded field.

73. Amendments Cloud Issue of De-Annexation -

Tennessee state senators go back to work Tuesday, March 29, in Nashville on a modified de-annexation bill.

The Senate State and Local Government Committee will be reviewing a set of amendments to their version of the bill, which changed substantially from the House version in a committee session last week.

74. Cleaning House -

Every neighborhood in Memphis and Shelby County has the right to be free from the negative effects of vacant, abandoned and blighted properties. That’s the battle cry of the Memphis Blight Elimination Charter, a 23-page pledge that will steer policy and programs dedicated to blight eradication.

75. Memphis Fights Back: Senate Poised To Do Real Damage via De-Annexation -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland makes a persuasive argument against de-annexation legislation now being considered by the state Legislature, providing a long list of figures to show it would devastate the Bluff City.

76. Roadmap to Attacking Blight Awaits City and County Approval -

Blighted properties, overgrown lots and abandoned buildings are not unique to Memphis. But Memphis is the only city with a blight elimination charter that affirms cross-sector commitment to uproot the causes of blight and prevent further decline.

77. Last Word: Monday Vote, Beale's Search and Longview Heights -

Look for the state Senate to vote on the deannexation bill Monday in Nashville. At least that’s the date on the Senate calendar.

That could change as a member of the Shelby County legislative delegation has at last asked the Tennessee Attorney General for a legal opinion on the proposal. But it’s not a straight-up question about whether the proposal is constitutional. It’s a question about the specific characterization of past Memphis annexations as “egregious” – what has come to be the key legal term in this considerable political controversy.

78. County Commission Questions City Figures on Deannexation -

Some Shelby County Commissioners are skeptical about City Hall’s estimate of how much city government would lose in revenue if a deannexation bill in the Tennessee Legislature becomes law.

The commission’s discussion at Wednesday, March 16, committee sessions came as Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland was in Nashville to lobby against the bill in the state Senate.

79. Porter-Leath's Early Childhood Academy Highlights Collaboration -

The past six years have brought so many changes in kindergarten through 12th-grade education locally and statewide that it is easy to lose track of how different early childhood instruction is in its preparation of children for the next step in their journey.

80. Last Word: Putt and 1969, Fred Smith on Amazon and Ramsey's Departure -

George Howard Putt died in prison sometime last year state prison officials disclosed Wednesday -- far from the brief time he spent in Memphis but never far from the carnage he left behind in the Memphis of 1969.
The bodies of the first two of the five people killed by Putt between Aug. 14 and Sept. 11, 1969 were discovered just days after the murders of actress Sharon Tate and six others in Los Angeles by the Manson family dominated national news coverage. Less than a year earlier the Boston Strangler movie was in theaters, creating a sensation about the murders committed by serial killer Albert DeSalvo in Boston just a few years earlier.
Bernalyn and Roy Dumas were strangled by Putt in their home in Cooper-Young and Putt mutilated her body in a way that police homicide detectives still wouldn’t talk about decades later. The bodies were found in separate rooms.
Even with no details other than the names of the victims, the city was quickly spooked by the double murder. So when the body of Leila Jackson was found short of two weeks later, the city’s reaction was a palpable fear in which anyone unknown was to be avoided. Memphians didn’t tarry after work. They went home and bolted the doors.
It got worse as more victims turned up with little in common other than four of the five were women. They were of varying ages. Some were strangled and some were stabbed.
Just about any magazine rack of the day include true crime magazines that by the late 1960s were beginning to look very dated in their lurid noir-like covers teasing the most sensational crime narratives of the day.
They were an intentional contrast to the cover images of youth in bright colors in natural settings in other magazines heralding a new future and youth culture.
The murders in a Southern city, whose 1969 conservatism is hard to describe nearly 50 years later, quickly grabbed the covers of the true crime magazines. And the images they offered spoke to the scenic reality where Putt roamed even as the murders continued.
Apartment buildings and boarding houses were the settings for some of the murders but not all.
Glenda Sue Harden
was last seen walking to her car parked on the Cobblestones from the insurance office she worked at nearby. Her body was found in Martin Luther King/Riverside Park hidden under a piece of plywood.
At one of the murder scenes, police found an ice pick stuck in the side of the building with a stocking tied around it.
Putt’s last victim, in an apartment building on Bellevue, screamed as she was stabbed repeatedly and others in the building gave chase with police close behind, arresting Putt near the new and unopened section of the interstate that runs west of Bellevue.
Putt tried to force his way into another apartment nearby but the women inside kept him on the other side of the door.
The killer that panicked an entire city was a skinny utterly forgettable guy in his 20s with sideburns and glasses who appeared to have rarely roamed beyond a community of neighborhood bars, boarding houses and old apartment buildings in the Midtown and Medical Center areas.
It turns out he came to Memphis after walking away from a prison farm in Mississippi and into a Memphis that was slowly but surely changing. And the world that Putt encountered would soon vanish in large part.
Overton Square’s incarnation was about a year away. A new bridge was about to be built across the Mississippi River as part of Interstate 40 which was to go through Overton Park just south of the north-south leg of the interstate where Putt was captured.
Originally sentenced to death, Putt’s sentence was commuted when the U.S. Supreme Court banned the death penalty in the early 1970s.
He was serving a 497-year sentence when he died at the Turney Center Wednesday in Only, Tennessee.
Putt never sought parole and never gave any explanation for why he killed five people in less than a month and his apparently random selection of victims.

81. Last Word: Cubits Anyone, The G-Word and The TV News Crime Block -

How long is a cubit? After a day in which many of you got about four to five inches of rain and more to come Thursday, it seems an appropriate and timely question.
And yes, there is a cubit conversion chart on line for converting that and other really old units of measurement no longer in use like the mina, drachma or the synodic month.
So the average cubit, which is supposed to be the length of a forearm, is 18 inches or a foot and a half. That’s 0.4572 of a meter, which might as well be an ancient unit of measurement.
Someone had to say it.
According to biblehub.com – I’m not making up websites – the book of Genesis sets God’s instructions to Noah as an arc with the dimensions of 300 cubits long, 50 cubits wide and 30 cubits tall. And it was to be made out of gopher wood and covered inside and out with pitch.
The New Living Translation and Holman Christian Standard Bibles convert that to an arc 450 feet long, 75 feet wide and 45 feet high.

82. Luttrell Exit for Congress Likely Would Not Lead to County Special Election -

There probably won’t be a special election for Shelby County mayor if current mayor Mark Luttrell gets elected to Congress later this year.

83. Last Word: Redbirds Sold, Memphis Burning and When Old Dominick Was Young -

Grizzlies over the Cavaliers 106-103 Monday evening in Cleveland despite the pre-game injury story dominating up to tip-off.

84. Commission Votes Down Term Limits Referendum On First Reading -

Shelby County Commissioners voted down a referendum ordinance Monday, March 7, to eliminate term limits in county government.

But the ordinance moves on to second and third readings despite the vote on first reading under the commission’s rules of procedure.

85. Last Word: Election Day, Luttrell Makes It Six, And About "Executive Sessions" -

Can You Feel It? Tuesday is election day in Memphis and across the state in this presidential election year. And all indications are the turnout locally should be above the 24 percent mark we’ve been at in the last two presidential election years.

86. Luttrell Declares for Congressional Bid -

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell announced Monday, Feb. 29, that he will be a candidate in the August Republican primary for the 8th Congressional District.

87. Hopson: Help ASD Improve, At Least for Now -

The state-run Achievement School District has a problem in how it engages with the public, especially in areas where it is about to take over a school.

But Shelby County Schools superintendent Dorsey Hopson isn’t ready to say it is time for the state to pick a winner and a loser and fund either the ASD or Innovation Zone schools run by SCS.

88. Last Word: Timing and Numbers, Old Dominick Takes Shape and Zip Lines To Spring -

Political opportunity is defined by timing.
Witness a look at the early voting turnout numbers in advance of Tuesday’s election day.

More than half of the more than 43,000 Shelby County voters who cast early ballots voted Monday and Tuesday – the last two days of an early voting period that began Feb. 10 – way back there when Martin O’Malley was the third Democratic presidential contender and Jeb Bush was considered a force to be reckoned with in the Republican primaries.

89. Luttrell Could Impact 2 Races -

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell made a few stops between his first thought this month that he might want to run for Congress and going public with those thoughts Tuesday, Feb. 23.

90. Last Word: Presidential Distractions, Dude Perfect and The Kirby Farm House -

When it comes to political surprises, the presidential contenders may be the next group on the ballot locally. But they need to up their game if they are going to hold the attention of Memphis voters.
With three of the Republican contenders on their way to Shelby County this weekend and probably more making plans, the attention Tuesday shifted dramatically to the open 8th District Congressional seat that isn’t on the ballot until the August primaries.

91. Luttrell Weighing Congressional Bid -

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell is considering a run for Congress and he expects to make his decision in the next week.

92. Roland Passes on 8th District Congressional Bid -

Shelby County Commission chairman Terry Roland will not be running in the Republican primary for the 8th Congressional District in August.

93. Roland Passes on 8th Congressional District Run, Sticks With Mayor in 2018 -

Shelby County Commission chairman Terry Roland will not be running in the Republican primary for the 8th Congressional District in August.

94. Trust Fund Mentioned as Possible $1.1B Solution on School Benefits Liability -

A trust fund is one possibility that has surfaced early in the formal discussions of the Shelby County School system’s $1.1 billion benefits liability.

The first meeting of the ad hoc committee on the matter last week drew nine of the 13 Shelby County Commissioners, the administration of Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell and two of nine Shelby County Schools board members.

95. Mid-South Mayors to Host RegionSmart Summit -

More than 200 local leaders from the government, economic development, planning, architecture and engineering sectors will come together this April to collaborate on the challenges and opportunities confronting the Mid-South right now.

96. Mid-South Mayors to Host RegionSmart Summit -

More than 200 local leaders from the government, economic development, planning, architecture and engineering sectors will come together this April to collaborate on the challenges and opportunities confronting the Mid-South right now.

97. County Commission Forms OPEB Committee -

Shelby County Commissioners have created an ad hoc committee to talk over the health insurance benefits liability of the former Memphis City Schools system and who is responsible for it.

Commission chairman Terry Roland announced Monday, Jan. 25, he had formed the committee, which includes leaders of the Shelby County Schools system and Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell’s administration.

98. HUD Funds Mid-South Greenprint With $60 Million Grant -

One of the largest federal grants ever awarded to Shelby County government will fund efforts to avoid some of the flooding the Memphis area saw in 2011.

The federal department of Housing and Urban Development and U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen of Memphis announced Thursday, Jan. 21, the $60 million grant to fund the Mid-South Regional Greenprint and Sustainability Plan.

99. Luttrell, Strickland Attend Obama’s State of the Union -

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell and Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland both attended the Tuesday, Jan. 12, State of the Union address, the final State of the Union address by President Barack Obama

100. Reaves: Memphis Should Pay Share of Schools Liability -

The Shelby County commissioner who sought a legal opinion over who pays $1.1 billion of Shelby County Schools’ benefits liability says he has more questions.

Commissioner David Reaves requested the opinion from Tennessee Attorney General Herbert Slatery in December through state Sen. Brian Kelsey.