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Editorial Results (free)

1. Bonding Companies Banned by Criminal Court Judges -

Seven of the 10 Shelby County Criminal Court judges have banned two Memphis bonding companies from writing bonds in their courts.

The action by the judges follows the April 15 indictments of executives with Memphis Bonding Co. and 24 Hour Bonding Company on theft and sales tax fraud charges.

2. Judges Ban Two Bonding Companies -

Seven of the 10 Shelby County Criminal Court judges have banned two Memphis bonding companies from writing bonds in their courts.

The action by the judges follows the April 15 indictments of executives with Memphis Bonding Co. and 24 Hour Bonding Company on theft and sales tax fraud charges.

3. Kustoff Opens Congressional Bid With 15 Stops -

Former U.S. Attorney David Kustoff began his campaign for Congress Monday, April 11, with stops in Tipton County and Fayette County as well as East Memphis.

4. August Primaries Feature Intra-Party Challenges -

Two years after a disastrous slate of races for countywide offices, there is a move among younger Democratic partisans in Memphis to shake up the Democrats who represent the city in the Tennessee Legislature.

5. 8th Congressional District Primaries Draw 22 Contenders, 13 Republican -

The Republican primary race to fill the 8th District Congressional seat Republican incumbent Stephen Fincher is giving up drew a field of 13 contenders – seven from Shelby County and four from Jackson, Tennessee – at the Thursday, April 7, noon filing deadline for the Aug. 4 ballot.

6. Lawmakers Lure Us In With Momentary Sanity, And Then... -

Just when it appears the Tennessee Senate is made up of sensible people – as evidenced by the killing of de-annexation legislation – the body is changing course with a Bible-thumping measure.

7. Basar Out in 8th District Race, Luttrell Pulls Petition, Cohen Could Have Easy Ride -

Shelby County Commissioner Steve Basar has called off his plan to run in the crowded Republican primary for the 8th Congressional District, but Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell has pulled his petition to join the same crowded field.

8. Security Beefed Up Across World After Brussels Attacks -

MOSCOW (AP) – Authorities in Europe and across the world tightened security at airports, railway stations, government buildings and other key sites after deadly attacks Tuesday on the Brussels airport and its subway system.

9. Last Word: Putt and 1969, Fred Smith on Amazon and Ramsey's Departure -

George Howard Putt died in prison sometime last year state prison officials disclosed Wednesday -- far from the brief time he spent in Memphis but never far from the carnage he left behind in the Memphis of 1969.
The bodies of the first two of the five people killed by Putt between Aug. 14 and Sept. 11, 1969 were discovered just days after the murders of actress Sharon Tate and six others in Los Angeles by the Manson family dominated national news coverage. Less than a year earlier the Boston Strangler movie was in theaters, creating a sensation about the murders committed by serial killer Albert DeSalvo in Boston just a few years earlier.
Bernalyn and Roy Dumas were strangled by Putt in their home in Cooper-Young and Putt mutilated her body in a way that police homicide detectives still wouldn’t talk about decades later. The bodies were found in separate rooms.
Even with no details other than the names of the victims, the city was quickly spooked by the double murder. So when the body of Leila Jackson was found short of two weeks later, the city’s reaction was a palpable fear in which anyone unknown was to be avoided. Memphians didn’t tarry after work. They went home and bolted the doors.
It got worse as more victims turned up with little in common other than four of the five were women. They were of varying ages. Some were strangled and some were stabbed.
Just about any magazine rack of the day include true crime magazines that by the late 1960s were beginning to look very dated in their lurid noir-like covers teasing the most sensational crime narratives of the day.
They were an intentional contrast to the cover images of youth in bright colors in natural settings in other magazines heralding a new future and youth culture.
The murders in a Southern city, whose 1969 conservatism is hard to describe nearly 50 years later, quickly grabbed the covers of the true crime magazines. And the images they offered spoke to the scenic reality where Putt roamed even as the murders continued.
Apartment buildings and boarding houses were the settings for some of the murders but not all.
Glenda Sue Harden
was last seen walking to her car parked on the Cobblestones from the insurance office she worked at nearby. Her body was found in Martin Luther King/Riverside Park hidden under a piece of plywood.
At one of the murder scenes, police found an ice pick stuck in the side of the building with a stocking tied around it.
Putt’s last victim, in an apartment building on Bellevue, screamed as she was stabbed repeatedly and others in the building gave chase with police close behind, arresting Putt near the new and unopened section of the interstate that runs west of Bellevue.
Putt tried to force his way into another apartment nearby but the women inside kept him on the other side of the door.
The killer that panicked an entire city was a skinny utterly forgettable guy in his 20s with sideburns and glasses who appeared to have rarely roamed beyond a community of neighborhood bars, boarding houses and old apartment buildings in the Midtown and Medical Center areas.
It turns out he came to Memphis after walking away from a prison farm in Mississippi and into a Memphis that was slowly but surely changing. And the world that Putt encountered would soon vanish in large part.
Overton Square’s incarnation was about a year away. A new bridge was about to be built across the Mississippi River as part of Interstate 40 which was to go through Overton Park just south of the north-south leg of the interstate where Putt was captured.
Originally sentenced to death, Putt’s sentence was commuted when the U.S. Supreme Court banned the death penalty in the early 1970s.
He was serving a 497-year sentence when he died at the Turney Center Wednesday in Only, Tennessee.
Putt never sought parole and never gave any explanation for why he killed five people in less than a month and his apparently random selection of victims.

10. Luttrell Declares for Congressional Bid -

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell announced Monday, Feb. 29, that he will be a candidate in the August Republican primary for the 8th Congressional District.

11. Luttrell Could Impact 2 Races -

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell made a few stops between his first thought this month that he might want to run for Congress and going public with those thoughts Tuesday, Feb. 23.

12. Luttrell Weighing Congressional Bid -

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell is considering a run for Congress and he expects to make his decision in the next week.

13. The Week Ahead: Feb. 22, 2016 -

Good morning Memphis. The Monday holidays are gone for a while, we’re afraid, but you’ve got a whole week to finish that work instead of just four days. Here are a few items to look forward to this week, led by the annual announcement of performers who will descend on Memphis this May for the Beale Street Music Festival.

14. Last Word: Presidents Day In An Election Year, Minority Business and Spring Training -

Presidents Day in a presidential election year.
Consider the political kaleidoscope of a foggy office-bound or home-bound Monday in Memphis with former President George W. Bush on the tube in the late afternoon defending his brother’s presidential campaign without once uttering the word Trump.
No further word of a Trump appearance promised for Memphis and some of Donald Trump’s own statements Monday suggested that by the time Memphis is on his schedule, he might be running as an independent.
Then there is the obsession in one corner of social media with Supreme Court history in rich detail.
And heads were turned Monday evening by the excerpt on the Grammys from the Broadway musical about Alexander Hamilton – a founding father born in the West Indies who established the nation’s financial system and the Federalist party. He never became a president, in part, because the vice president killed him. Hamilton wasn’t the only one who had been talking bad about Aaron Burr. The top of the ticket, President Thomas Jefferson, had decided to dump Burr from the ticket in the next election and Burr was trying to transition to become governor of New York.

15. Roland Passes on 8th District Congressional Bid -

Shelby County Commission chairman Terry Roland will not be running in the Republican primary for the 8th Congressional District in August.

16. Cutting taxes, school choice, tort reform drive Sen. Kelsey -

State Sen. Brian Kelsey calls himself “a proud conservative who likes to get results.”

17. Butch Jones Builds for Championship Run With Staff Tweaks -

Tennessee football coach Butch Jones got serious about taking the next step with his football program not long after his team’s 45-6 victory over Northwestern in the Jan. 1 Outback Bowl.

Jones fired defensive coordinator John Jancek on Jan. 6, and three days later hired his top candidate for the opening, Bob Shoop of Penn State.

18. Citing Future, NexAir CEO Talks Merger And Acquisition -

When nexAir CEO Kevin McEniry says his company is always on the lookout for growth opportunities, it’s both an accurate reflection of its evolution over 75 years and also something of an understatement.

19. The Week Ahead: Dec. 14, 2015 -

How was your weekend, Memphis? Here’s our weekly rundown of local happenings you need to know about, from the annual AutoZone shareholder convergence Downtown to the new Star Wars movie...

20. Nashville Property Values Increasing at 'Historic' Clip -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — A Davidson County property assessor says he's expecting to see a "historic" rise in property values during Metro Nashville's next reappraisal.

According to The Tennessean, George Rooker Jr. told a newly created Metro Council Ad Hoc Affordable Housing Committee last week that he's estimating an average increase in residential property values of between 33 and 37 percent during the upcoming 2017 reappraisal.

21. Commission Cancels Veto Override Meeting -

Shelby County Commissioners were set to meet in special session Thursday, Nov. 12, before calling off those plans less than 24 hours later.

The session was to consider overriding Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell’s veto of their plan to hire their own attorney.

22. Success Looks Like Five-Game Win Streak For Vols -

Leaves are changing colors, a chill is in the fall air and Tennessee’s football schedule is getting softer.

Happens every year.

We’ve all heard by now how Tennessee is the best 3-4 team in college football. Now is the time to prove it.

23. Shelby County Commission Continues Quest for Legal Autonomy -

Shelby County commissioners have hired an attorney in their continued exploration of retaining their own permanent legal counsel independent of the county attorney’s office.

The body appointed former county commissioner Julian Bolton as special counsel in the matter Monday, Oct. 12. The commission has indicated Bolton is the attorney they’d like to hire on a permanent basis.

24. Is It Too Late? -

Carole King famously sang, “[I]t’s too late, baby now, it’s too late,/ Though we really did try to make it.” Something in this song created a gluey intangible not-yet-named noun that affixed itself to my soul. When I hear the words “Somethin’ inside has died, and I can’t hide/ And I just can’t fake it,” I feel a shudder throughout my being.

25. Treated Like 'The King' -

Dr. Mark Castellaw’s clinic in Germantown not only treats its patients’ medical needs – it’s also home to a memorabilia-packed shrine in honor of the King of Rock ‘n’ Roll.

26. Clinton to Propose Increasing Capital Gains Taxes -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Hillary Rodham Clinton plans later this week to propose raising capital gains taxes for some investors, part of a larger campaign effort to encourage greater focus on longer-term economic growth rather than more immediate gains for investors.

27. Historic Ashlar Hall in Limbo After ‘Renovation’ -

The owner of historic but troubled Ashlar Hall says he will move forward with plans to redevelop the property into a veterans center as questions continue to swirl around the state of the building, located at 1397 Central Ave.

28. Piano-Playing Senator's Latest Tune: New Education Policy -

WASHINGTON (AP) – How does a musician-senator fill the time during yet another partisan Senate stalemate?

In Sen. Lamar Alexander's case, he sits down at a borrowed piano in his Capitol Hill office and, with a grin, bangs out "The Memphis Blues."

29. Audio Overkill? Some Question Benefits of 'High-Res' Music -

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Its backers say it does for music lovers what ultra high-definition television has done for couch potatoes.

It's a digital format that packs nearly seven times the data found on CDs, touted as producing crystal-clear sounds with a sharpness that'll blow consumers away. Advocates like Neil Young and major record labels say the format that's the high end of what's known as "high-resolution" audio restores textures, nuances and tones that listeners sacrifice when opting for the convenience of music compressed into formats like MP3s or Apple's AAC.

30. County Commission Takes Long Way to Budget Approval -

In the space of five hours Monday, June 22, Shelby County Commissioners voted down an operating budget, a capital budget and an attempt at a continuation budget to keep spending at the same levels past July 1 and into the new fiscal year.

31. Your Fantasy Celebrity Board -

If you could have any five celebrities on your nonprofit board, who would you pick?

Visualize yourself as chair of the board of a nonprofit you believe in. Maybe it’s a university, an early childhood education center, a food bank, international research institute or performing arts company. You pick the nonprofit – and the board members!

32. Will Tennessee Republicans Ever Be Truly Happy? -

Why aren’t Tennessee Republicans happier?

With the GOP so dominate in the Tennessee General Assembly and losses so rare – on the Hill or in elections – the party’s lawmakers should be jubilant with this year’s session. But it’s never enough.

33. Rieger Begins Work at Memphis Chamber -

Tom Rieger recently joined the Greater Memphis Chamber as senior vice president of member development, a role in which he will oversee major fundraising activities, conduct membership drive campaigns and implement revenue enhancement opportunities.

34. Memphis Moves Closer to Downtown Building Purchase -

The state of Tennessee may have moved out, but the city of Memphis could be moving in.

The city has a tentative deal to buy the Donnelley J. Hill state office building near City Hall for $1.5 million.

35. End of Robust Hiring Streak Raises Doubts About Job Market -

WASHINGTON (AP) – For months, the U.S. economy's strength has been flagging.

Manufacturing slowed. Fewer homes were built. Cheaper gas failed to ignite consumer spending. Yet month after month, employers kept on hiring vigorously.

36. Sammons to Become Memphis CAO -

Incoming city chief administrative officer Jack Sammons should arrive at City Hall on May 8, just a few days after Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. presents his budget propsosal to the Memphis City Council.

37. Understanding Obamacare -

Talk to almost any business owner, whether theirs is a boutique retail operation or sprawling corporate office, and a two-pronged refrain quickly begins to repeat itself: Health care costs are one of the biggest, if not the biggest, slices of our budget.

38. Sammons Appointment Stalled, Wharton Makes Other Moves -

His plan to make Jack Sammons his new chief administrative officer is stalled – at best – but other parts of Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr.’s election-year overhaul of his administration are starting to move.

39. Wharton Still Mum on Extent of Shake-Up -

The move of Memphis-Shelby County Airport Authority Board chairman and former Memphis City Council member Jack Sammons back to City Hall is not a done deal just yet.

40. Mike Shildt: From College Walk-On To Memphis Redbirds Manager -

Any professional baseball player can tell you about the stigmas he has to fight. For one guy, it might be that he doesn’t hit with enough power. And for another it might be that he doesn’t make consistent enough contact.

41. Shildt to Manage Memphis Redbirds in 2015 -

The St. Louis Cardinals have selected Mike Shildt (pronounced like quilt) as the Memphis Redbirds’ new manager for the 2015 season.

The 46-year-old Shildt becomes the sixth manager in the Redbirds’ 18-year history and takes over for Ron “Pop” Warner, who was named a minor league roving infield coordinator with the Cardinals organization. Warner guided the Redbirds to the Pacific Coast League American South Division title in 2014 as the Triple-A club posted a 79-64 record. Warner managed the Redbirds from 2012-2014.

42. Spillyards Leads Community Advisors Launch -

Greg Spillyards has joined the brokerage team at Cushman & Wakefield/Commercial Advisors to launch the firm’s Community Advisors service line.

Community Advisors is focused on the Memphis city core, with a goal to provide real estate advisory services to assist in the revitalization of the city’s underserved areas with passion, creativity and entrepreneurship, and with service to those already living and leading in their neighborhoods.

43. After the Campaign -

The 2014 election year began in January with dissent from the floor.

At the end of the Shelby County Democratic Party’s annual Kennedy Day fundraiser in January, former Memphis City Council member and state Rep. Carol Chumney, who was not among the speakers, challenged the party establishment from her table to do more to support women running for office.

44. Voters Approve Wine, Amendments -

Shelby County citizens voted 2-to-1 Tuesday, Nov. 4, against a proposed amendment to the Tennessee Constitution that gives the Tennessee Legislature the power to regulate abortion, including in cases of rape or incest.

45. Voters Approve Wine, Constitutional Amendments -

Shelby County citizens voted 2-to-1 Tuesday, Nov. 4, against a proposed amendment to the Tennessee Constitution that gives the Tennessee Legislature the power to regulate abortion, including in cases of rape or incest.

46. Shelby Early Vote Shows "No" Carry On Abortion Amendment -

Shelby County’s early vote totals show a defeat for the amendment to the Tennessee Constitution involving abortion and passage of the other three amendments.

The vote count for Shelby County only during the early voting period in advance of the Tuesday, Nov. 4, election day show:

47. Skip Check-In; Latest Hotel Room Key is Your Phone -

NEW YORK (AP) – Hotels don't want guests to have to linger at the front desk – or even stop by at all.

New programs are helping speed up the check-in process for busy travelers, or in at least one case, letting them go straight to their rooms by using their smartphone to unlock doors.

48. Amendments, Wine Dominate Election Day -

The last of 2014’s three elections promises to be defined just as much by the questions on the ballot as it is by the choices among candidates.

Election Day is Tuesday, Nov. 4, across Tennessee, with polls open in Shelby County from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.

49. Why are Tennesseans So Afraid of an Income Tax? -

The odds of an income tax becoming a reality in Tennessee – one of the nation’s lowest-taxed states – are slim to none.

And, yet there is an amendment on the Nov. 4 ballot that would change Tennessee’s constitution by giving the Legislature authority to prohibit passage of an income tax or payroll tax in the state.

50. Early Vote Turnout Lags Behind 2010 -

Early voting turnout in advance of the Nov. 4 Election Day was running about 17,000 voters behind the early vote turnout four years ago for the same election cycle through the second and final weekend in the early voting period.

51. Schools, Development Dominate Germantown Races -

Germantown will have a new mayor once all of the votes are counted Nov. 4 in the city’s municipal elections on the ballot.

But the race between former Germantown Community Services director George Brogdon and alderman Mike Palazzolo likely won’t completely settle the community’s discussion and debate about development and the future of the Germantown Municipal Schools district.

52. McManus Joins Patrick Accounting -

Michelle McManus, a Memphis native and certified public accountant, has joined Patrick Accounting and Tax Services PLLC as manager. In her new role, McManus will supervise and review the monthly accounting process for a section of clients. She will also prepare and review tax returns and work closely with clients, assisting them with ongoing tax planning.

53. County Commission Starts School Bond Process -

Shelby County Commissioners vote Monday, Sept. 22, on a resolution that is the first step in issuing $120 million in general obligation bonds over the next two years to finance “public works projects, including schools,” according to the resolution.

54. Debt of Gratitude -

Robert Wright began working as a truck driver for Intermodal Cartage Co. in March 2006, making runs to cities across the Southeast.

55. South Carolina Back in SEC East Race -

The South Carolina defense still has improvement to make, but in beating Georgia 38-35 last Saturday the Gamecocks made a fourth-quarter goal-line stand and reasserted their presence in the SEC East Division.

56. IRS Says It Has Lost Emails From 5 More Employees -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Internal Revenue Service has lost emails from five more employees who are part of congressional probes into the treatment of conservative groups that applied for tax-exempt status, the tax service disclosed Friday.

57. McDonald Re-Elected at Filing Deadline -

Bartlett Mayor Keith McDonald was re-elected to another four-year term of office at the noon Thursday, Aug. 21, filing deadline for candidates in four sets of suburban municipal elections on the Nov. 4 ballot.

58. Bartlett Mayor McDonald Re-Elected at Filing Deadline -

Bartlett Mayor Keith McDonald was re-elected to another four-year term of office at the noon Thursday, Aug. 21, filing deadline for candidates in four sets of suburban municipal elections on the Nov. 4 ballot.

59. Wine Referendums Down to Final Day -

The deadline for signatures to be gathered on the still-forming proposed referendums to allow wine in grocery stores is Thursday, Aug. 21.

The deadline for candidates to file in the set of Bartlett, Germantown, Collierville and Millington municipal elections on the November ballot is at noon the same day.

60. Harvey Offers Advice to New County Commissioners -

Who swears in the judges who will be swearing in other county leaders later this month when they all begin their terms of office?

That was one of the questions new Shelby County Commissioners had for outgoing commission Chairman James Harvey the day after the election last week.

61. Cohen Prevails, Incumbents Dominate -

Democratic U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen held off Thursday, Aug. 7, the most serious electoral challenge he’s faced since winning the Congressional seat in 2006, in the form of attorney Ricky E. Wilkins.

62. Cohen, Luttrell, Weirich, Harris Take Early Vote -

Democratic U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen has taken the early vote over challenger Ricky Wilkins in the hard fought Democratic Congressional primary on Thursday’s Shelby County election ballot.

63. Commission to Have Different Look After Election -

The first post-election appointment for the winners of the 13 Shelby County Commission races on the Thursday, Aug. 7, election ballot is a Friday luncheon with commission Chairman James Harvey.

64. Republicans Rally In Bartlett -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam told a group of several hundred Republicans in Bartlett Monday, Aug. 4, that he would like to see a statewide turnout in the August Republican primaries of 750,000.

Haslam and U.S. Senator Lamar Alexander have been on a statewide bus tour since last week to pump up overall Republican turnout even as they face opposition in the GOP primaries for governor and the U.S. Senate. The goal is to also boost the turnout for Republican candidates in local general election races on the ballot.

65. Events -

Methodist Le Bonheur Germantown Hospital will hold a stroke survivor group meeting Tuesday, Aug. 5, at 4 p.m. in Medical Office Building A, 7655 Poplar Ave, suite 250. The group will discuss issues that can affect patients after a stroke. Email angela.mensi@mlh.org or call 516-6929.

66. New Nonprofit Charts Role in Blight Fight -

The bulldozer went straight for the leasing office of the former Spanish Oaks apartments on Cazassa Road near Memphis International Airport.

Meanwhile another bulldozer across the two-lane road was deep into demolishing a set of buildings in the old Winchester Park apartments.

67. Heart of Park Advances as Shelby Farms Parkway Stalls -

Within the space of a few days this month, the Shelby Farms Park Conservancy formally broke ground on the park’s $70 million Heart of the Park project and then its leaders watched as the Memphis City Council delayed the Shelby Farms Parkway project for a year.

68. Health Choice Selects Jones to Lead Provider Engagement -

LaTasha Jones has been named director of provider engagement at Health Choice LLC, where she will be responsible for directing and managing the implementation of a clinical integration database for Health Choice providers and practices.

69. More Departures From Haslam-Owned Truck-Stop Chain -

NASHVILLE (AP) – With a year-long federal fraud investigation looming over it, the huge truck-stop chain owned by the family of the Cleveland Browns owner and Tennessee's governor is doing some housecleaning at its highest levels.

70. Tracy Named IMC Chief Information Officer -

Joel Tracy has been named the first chief information officer at IMC Cos., a national logistics company focused on international shipments. In his new role, Tracy will be responsible for delivering a broad range of IT initiatives in support of IMC’s logistics business.

71. Malone to Challenge Luttrell In August Mayoral Showdown -

Former Shelby County Commissioner Deidre Malone will challenge incumbent Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell in the August county general election after winning the Tuesday, May 6, Democratic mayoral primary.

72. Malone Takes Early Vote In Mayoral Primary -

Former Shelby County Commissioner Deidre Malone took the early vote in the three-way Democratic primary for Shelby County Mayor.

The first results of the Tuesday, May 6, election night showed Malone leading rivals county commissioner Steve Mulroy and former Shelby County Schools board member Kenneth Whalum Jr.

73. Carnival Memphis Celebrates Trucking Industry -

Trucking industry representatives and employees packed the spacious Tennessee Ballroom at Hilton Memphis, the gleaming glass hotel in East Memphis, for Carnival Memphis’ salute to the trucking industry.

74. Haslam Unveils $1.5B Transportation Plan -

Gov. Bill Haslam and Transportation Commissioner John Schroer have released the state’s three-year, $1.5 billion transportation program.

The Haslam administration said the plan unveiled Thursday takes a conservative approach because of uncertainty over future federal transit funding. It contains no money to pay for early engineering work on new projects.

75. New Perspective -

When the U.S. Postal Service closed its branch office at 826 Mississippi Blvd. near E.H. Crump Boulevard in 2012, workers carted off an oil painting that hung there for several decades with little thought about the man portrayed in the painting.

76. Alexander has $3.1 Million for Senate Campaign -

Republican U.S. Sen. Lamar Alexander raised $614,000 in the first quarter, leaving him with $3.1 million on hand for his bid for a third term.

Alexander said he received formal notification on Thursday that he has qualified for the Aug. 7 primary. His eight opponents in the GOP nomination contest include state Rep. Joe Carr of Murfreesboro and former Shelby County Commissioner George Flinn.

77. Harris Files Ford Challenge at Deadline -

Memphis City Council member Lee Harris is challenging Democratic state Sen. Ophelia Ford in the August primary for District 29, the Senate seat held by a member of the Ford family since 1975.

78. Tigers Season Ends On Common Theme -

RALEIGH, N.C. – Senior guard Geron Johnson had guaranteed the Memphis Tigers would win two NCAA Tournament games. But in the wake of their 78-60 loss to top-seeded Virginia Sunday night in the round of 32, Johnson looked a reporter in the eye and offered a revised declaration.

79. Tigers Season Ends on Common Theme: ‘Underachieved’ -

RALEIGH, N.C. – Senior guard Geron Johnson had guaranteed the Memphis Tigers would win two NCAA Tournament games. But in the wake of their 78-60 loss to top-seeded Virginia Sunday night in the round of 32, Johnson looked a reporter in the eye and offered a revised declaration.

80. Tigers Hang to Beat GW in NCAAs -

RALEIGH, N.C. – Senior guard Michael Dixon Jr. once thought his college basketball career was done.

You know the story. From Big 12 Sixth Man of the Year at Missouri to being exiled after sexual assault allegations that never became more than that, never turned into actual charges.

81. University of Memphis Provost Kicks Off President Interviews -

David Rudd began with the obvious this week, as the four finalists to become the next president of the University of Memphis began individual sessions with faculty, students and staff at the city’s largest institution of higher education.

82. St. George’s Moves Toward Service Goal -

Past the halfway mark for the current school year, St. George’s Independent School students, their families and the school’s staff continue toward a goal of 1 million service minutes this school year.

83. IMC Cos. Expands Mid-Atlantic Footprint -

Memphis-based IMC Cos. has acquired the marine drayage division of Norfolk, Va.-based D.D. Jones Transfer and Warehouse Co.

84. IMC Cos. Expands Mid-Atlantic Footprint -

Memphis-based IMC Cos. has acquired the marine drayage division of Norfolk, Va.-based D.D. Jones Transfer and Warehouse Co.

85. Supreme Court Seems Divided in Climate Case -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Supreme Court appeared divided on Monday over the sole Obama administration program already in place to limit power plant and factory emissions of gases blamed for global warming.

86. St. George’s Moves Toward Service Goal -

Past the halfway mark for the current school year, St. George’s Independent School students, their families and the school’s staff continue toward a goal of 1 million service minutes this school year.

87. Roland ReElected At Filing Deadline, Two Countywide Races Set For August -

One of the six Shelby County Commission incumbents seeking re-election this year was effectively elected to a new four-year term in a new district with the noon Thursday, Feb. 20, filing deadline for candidates in the May county primaries.

88. Police, Fire Directors Discuss Budget With Council -

Memphis City Council members got deeper Tuesday, Feb. 4, into the specifics of Memphis Police and Fire Department budget decisions.

But they didn’t get a clearer picture of what the direction forward will be as they and Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. prepare to make some hard decisions about public safety in dealing with the city’s unfunded pension liability.

89. Council Hears More on Police and Fire Budget Decisions -

Memphis City Council member got deeper Tuesday, Feb. 4, into the specifics of Memphis Police and Fire Department budget decisions.

But they didn’t get a clearer picture of what the direction forward will be as they and Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. prepare to make some hard decisions about public safety in dealing with the city’s unfunded pension liability.

90. January 24-30: This week in Memphis history -

1985: Prince played two of three sold-out shows that winter at the Mid-South Coliseum on the Purple Rain tour. He returned in February for the third show.

1974: The real estate firm Poplar Pike Inc installed a Mark VI computer at its offices in the Eastwood Building at 6209 Poplar Ave., reported Joe Wade III, president of Poplar Pike Inc.

91. Damn This Traffic Jam! -

“Time for some traffic problems in Fort Lee.”

“Got it.”

So read an Aug. 13, 2013, email exchange between a couple of New Jersey pols. Why Fort Lee?

Earlier efforts to pluck Democratic endorsements in the Garden State for Gov. Chris Christie’s reelection campaign had failed as to Fort Lee’s mayor, Mark Sokolich. Moreover, the day before, the Democratic state senator who represents Fort Lee had effectively blocked Christie’s reappointment of a Republican state supreme court justice. On Aug. 12, Christie referred to Jersey’s Democratic state senators as “animals.”

92. Newest County Commissioner Takes Seat -

The newest Shelby County Commissioner is not a newcomer to politics.

But there will be something of a learning curve for former Germantown Alderman Mark Billingsley because of the uniqueness of each local legislative body from boards of aldermen to councils to school boards. The uniqueness isn’t in the structures of those bodies as much as it is in the personalities that come together on them.

93. Billingsley Is Newest County Commissioner As "Tax Dead" Program Advances -

Former Germantown alderman Mark Billingsley is the newest Shelby County Commissioner.

On the second ballot Monday, Jan. 13, commissioners appointed Billingsley to fill the vacancy created by the resignation this month of Wyatt Bunker, who became mayor of Lakeland last year.

94. Obama Picks Ex-Bank of Israel Head as No. 2 at Fed -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Barack Obama took a step Friday toward reshaping the Federal Reserve under incoming chairman Janet Yellen, choosing a leading expert on the global economy to be her vice chairman.

95. County Commission Expected to Fill Vacancy -

The Shelby County Commission starts with a dozen members at the first meeting of 2014. But it should be back up to the full 13 members by the end of the Monday, Jan. 13, session.

The commission meets at 1:30 p.m. at the Vasco Smith County Administration Building. Follow the meeting @tdnpols, www.twitter.com/tdnpols.

96. 15 Vie for County Commission Seat -

Shelby County Commissioners will interview a group of 15 citizens Wednesday, Jan. 8, who want to become the newest member of the elected body.

The committee session interviews come before the full commission is to vote Monday, Jan. 13, on a replacement for Commissioner Wyatt Bunker.

97. Lindow Rejoins The Centre Group -

Tracy Lindow has rejoined The Centre Group human resources firm as a senior consultant following several years in Germany. As a senior consultant, Lindow will help organizations improve their bottom line through human asset development by leveraging compensations strategies, executive search, employee attitude research and leadership skills development.

98. Meadows Appointed to State Dentistry Board -

Dr. Dan T. Meadows has been appointed to the Tennessee Board of Dentistry by Gov. Bill Haslam. Meadows, who has a private practice on Walnut Grove Road, will serve as the Rotating Dentist member through June 2016.

99. Fisher Joins Boy Scouts Chickasaw Council as CEO -

Richard L. Fisher has joined the Chickasaw Council of the Boy Scouts of America as chief executive officer. In his new role, Fisher will extend character development and leadership skills to youth who live in the Chickasaw Council territory, which includes the Mississippi Delta, Memphis, and Shelby and Crittenden counties.

100. Supreme Court Term Begins Amid Government Shutdown -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Supreme Court began its new term Monday by turning away hundreds of appeals, including Virginia's bid to revive its anti-sodomy law.

The justices took the bench just past 10 o'clock on the first Monday in October, even as much of the rest of the government was coping with a partial shutdown.