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Editorial Results (free)

1. 20 Key Numbers Heading Into Titans Camp -

Only months removed from their first playoff victory since 2003, the Tennessee Titans returned to training camp this week seeking to build on last year’s momentum.

There are plenty of storylines this season, – a new head coach, a quarterback looking to rebound and, as always, important new rookies and free-agent signings.

2. 5 Questions to Ponder Before Titans’ Camp -

In a little more than a month, the Titans will take the field for their first training camp under head coach Mike Vrabel.

There’s an air of anticipation surrounding the team as it comes off back-to-back winning records for the first time since 2007-08.

3. A Look Back At UT’s History In NCAA Tourney -

Basketball coach Rick Barnes was fired by Texas in late March of 2015 when he refused to fire members of his coaching staff.

4. Heir on the Side of Caution -

The closest and best parcel of land for a second convention center hotel in Downtown Memphis is the Mud Island parking garage. It’s a block away from the Memphis Cook Convention Center and is the first site that came up when a Denver developer approached the city last year about possibly building such a hotel.

5. Taking Stock: Titans’ Top Needs for 2018 -

With the Super Bowl in the books and another NFL season come and gone, it will soon be time to prepare for the 2018 season.

For the Tennessee Titans, that means trying to fill in the remaining pieces of the puzzle to take another step toward reaching the big game.

6. ‘Ugly’ Titans Offense Can No Longer Be Ignored -

It had been festering for weeks, but the Tennessee Titans seemed to push the matter aside as they were squeezing out close wins against the NFL’s third-easiest schedule.

“Winning ugly” is how it was seen through rose-colored glasses, with an 8-4 record as exhibit 1.

7. Titans Willing to Let Davis Learn on the Job -

One of the most anticipated aspects of this Tennessee Titans season was how much of an impact rookie wide receiver Corey Davis could have.

8. Byard Adding ‘Smart’ to Instinctual Game -

With five interceptions in two games, it’s tough not to notice what a second-year safety is doing for the Tennessee Titans.

But as flashy as the results have been for Kevin Byard, perhaps the reason why the former Middle Tennessee star is finding success can be found in another play – one in which the Titans defense was in total disarray.

9. Folk’s Folly’s Kauker Named Tenn. Restaurant Manager of Year -

Folk’s Folly Prime Steak House general manager Diane Kauker has won the Tennessee Hospitality & Tourism Association’s 2017 Restaurant Manager of the Year Award, which honors a manager who has demonstrated exceptional leadership, service, and community and civic involvement. The judges noted Kauker’s outstanding performance beyond her normal job duties, including providing excellent service to Folk’s Folly guests and the greater community.

10. The Good (Youth), Bad (Injuries) & Ugly (12-9 Win at Cleveland) -

As the Tennessee Titans head into their bye week, they use this time to self-evaluate the first seven games of the season.

So, we are here to help them delve into what went right, what went wrong and what was just plain awful through the first seven games of the 2017 season.

11. Titans Begin Season With Questions At Wide Receiver -

For most of their two decades in Tennessee, the wide receiver position has been a glaring hole for the Titans.

Other than the years when Derrick Mason and Drew Bennett were among Steve McNair’s primary targets, and an occasional quality free agent signing like Nate Washington, there have been many swings and misses when it comes to the Titans and the wide receiver position.

12. Vols, Jackets Each Eager to Make Statement -

Enough of the talk. Enough of the speculation. Let’s play some football.

Tennessee starts its fifth season of the Butch Jones coaching era on Monday night against Georgia Tech at the new Mercedes-Benz Stadium in Atlanta. Kickoff is 8 p.m. (TV: ESPN).

13. Wolf, Offense Look To Prove Predictions Wrong -

It’s championship or bust for Tennessee senior tight end Ethan Wolf.

Bowl victories are nice. So are nine-win seasons. But Wolf wants a lot more in his final season with the Vols.

“Our goal here at Tennessee every single year is to win a championship, and that’s going to remain the goal,” Wolf says. “Yeah, there may have been a little bit of excitement the first year, maybe the second year winning the bowl game. It’s always exciting, but that’s the bare minimum right now.”

14. Military Plane Crash Kills at Least 16 in Mississippi -

ITTA BENA, Miss. (AP) – A U.S. military plane crashed into a field in rural Mississippi on Monday, killing at least 16 people aboard and spreading debris for miles, officials said.

Leflore County Emergency Management Agency Director Frank Randle told reporters at a late briefing that 16 bodies had been recovered after the KC-130 spiraled into the ground about 85 miles (135 kilometers) north of Jackson in the Mississippi Delta.

15. Titans Will Have Best Roster in More Than a Decade -

The folks at Pro Football Focus recently ranked the Tennessee Titans’ roster No. 3. Not third in the AFC South. Third in the entire NFL. This means one of two things: Either Pro Football Focus has gotten hold of some bad videotape or the Titans finally have some really good players.

16. Titans Poised to Break Free of Weak AFC South -

When Marcus Mariota participated on the first day of the Titans’ recent organized team activities – OTAs for you hardcore NFL fans – it sent two messages to the rest of the AFC South:

17. Spring Lessons: Here’s Who Vols Will Start -

Tennessee football coach Butch Jones isn’t big on naming starters and divulging depth charts. Not until he has to. So it comes as no surprise the Vols enter summer workouts and fall camp with junior Quinten Dormady and redshirt freshman Jarrett Guarantano still competing for the starting quarterback’s job.

18. The Week Ahead: March 20-26 -

Happy Monday, Memphis! It’s the first day of spring, and a bounty of social gatherings, government meetings and business events are in bloom. Check out our top picks in The Week Ahead…

19. Next Season’s Memphis Tigers Defense Begins Building Up Now -

If spring football practice is about looking ahead – and it is – then the off-season that precedes it is about looking back. University of Memphis defensive coordinator Chris Ball watched every defensive snap from the 2016 season – 1,025 plays from an 8-5 season.

20. Looks Like 10-2, SEC Title Game, Orange Bowl for UT -

Editor’s note: Nashville sports correspondent Dave Link has been accurate in predicting season outcomes for the Tennessee Vols in recent years. His 2016 season predictions, released just before press time, culminates with an SEC Championship appearance. Here’s his take on the season…

21. Mularkey Might Find Elusive Success in Third Shot -

Is the third time the charm for Mike Mularkey? The Tennessee Titans certainly hope so.

Mularkey’s first two NFL head coaching gigs – Buffalo 2004-05, Jacksonville 2012 – resulted in a combined 16-32 record. Add his 2-7 run as interim head coach for the Titans last season and that makes him 18-39.

22. Northwestern Defense Tough, But Give Edge to UT -

There’s nothing like spending the Christmas holidays in Florida, and Tennessee’s football team will savor every minute of it for the second consecutive year.

The Vols (8-4) board a flight Saturday morning to Tampa, Fla., where they will spend almost a week before the Jan. 1 Outback Bowl against Northwestern (10-2).

23. Here’s How Vols Grade Going Into Second Half -

Order has been restored in Vol Nation, at least for now.

Tennessee’s football team restored it with a 38-31 victory over then-No. 19 Georgia last Saturday at Neyland Stadium.

UT’s rally from a 24-3 deficit has much of the fan base back on board with Vols coach Butch Jones and his staff after a precarious week leading up to the game.

24. Rocky Top In Nashville: Good For City, Bad For Vols -

I can’t help but get fired up for a college football game between Tennessee and Virginia Tech in front of 150,000 people at Bristol Motor Speedway.

25. College Football Notebook: No More Dress Rehearsals for Memphis Tigers -

Last week, the University of Memphis football team finished training camp with simulated end-of-week preparation, culminating with a video test Friday night and a mock game Saturday, Aug. 29, at Liberty Bowl Memorial Stadium.

26. Vols Nearly Set on Offense as Season Approaches -

With Tennessee’s football team three weeks into fall camp, the offensive depth charts are set at some positions, while others remain open.

UT coach Butch Jones enters the 2015 season with no questions at quarterback or running back. His has plenty of receivers and all should get their share of playing time.

27. Memphis Sole -

The football field measurements are perhaps inevitable in describing just how big Nike’s Northridge distribution center in Frayser is after its $301 million expansion.

The 2.8 million-square-foot facility – the equivalent of 49 football fields – is Nike Inc.’s largest distribution center in the world.

28. Awards Spotlight Knoxville's Top Achievers -

The depth and strength of the Knoxville area business community was highlighted recently with the Knoxville Chamber’s 11th annual Pinnacle Business Awards presentation.

A dry cleaner, government contractor, clothing designer, technology innovator and media executive were among the Knoxville area companies and business leaders recognized for their achievements.

29. Bonnaroo, CMA Fest Overlap Presents Problems -

With CMA Music Fest and Bonnaroo on the same four-day weekend, it will be tough for a fan to catch Rubblebucket down in the field in Manchester and, say, Florida Georgia Line at LP Field.

Well, that might be a reach, but there are likely fans that would want both Billy Joel and Alan Jackson, for instance.

30. Vols’ Dobbs Embraces the Role of ‘CEO Quarterback’ -

Joshua Dobbs enters his junior season as Tennessee’s undisputed No. 1 quarterback and team leader, the player most responsible for the Vols’ relevance again in SEC football.

31. Vols Take Plenty of Momentum Into Offseason -

KNOXVILLE – There’s nothing like going into the offseason on a high note. The Vols will be riding the momentum from the resounding 45-28 victory against Iowa in the Jan. 2 TaxSlayer Bowl through the end of recruiting season, winter workouts, spring practices and into the summer months.

32. Dobbs Makes Strong Case for Vols Starting QB Job -

KNOXVILLE – University of Tennessee football coach Butch Jones faces a big question this week about his starting quarterback for Saturday night’s game at South Carolina.

Will it be sophomore Josh Dobbs, whose impressive debut off the bench in last Saturday’s 34-20 loss to No. 4-ranked Alabama gave UT a dual-threat QB?

33. UT Who? Vols-Ole Miss Game a Mirror Image of ’69 -

KNOXVILLE – Bud Ford usually had no problem wearing the orange blazer in his early days as assistant sports information director at the University of Tennessee.

Not on this day, though. It was Nov. 15, 1969.

34. After Florida, How Do Vols Get Excited About UTC? -

Look around the University of Tennessee’s Neyland Stadium about mid-afternoon Saturday.

No more human orange-and-white checkerboard in the stands. Some empty seats, for sure. The most diehard of UT football fans will turn out to cheer for their beloved Vols against Tennessee-Chattanooga.

35. Vols Among NCAA’s Youngest Headed Into Sunday Opener -

KNOXVILLE – For better or worse, University of Tennessee football coach Butch Jones won’t need to wait long to see the talent level of his highly touted freshman class.

Jones will find out Sunday night at 7 when the Vols play host to Utah State at Neyland Stadium. The Aggies will be an underdog – probably by a touchdown or so – and a trendy pick for some as an upset special.

36. Events -

Mud Island will host a Fourth of July celebration and fireworks display Friday, July 4, at the park, 125 N. Front St. The park will be open at 10 a.m., and fireworks begin at nightfall. Visit mudisland.com.

37. Midtown Medical Office Building Sells for $2.6 Million -

A partnership of two Utah-based companies has acquired a medical office building on Union Avenue near Overton Square.

Trivalis LLC and Novalis LLC, both based in Utah, acquired the medical office building built in 1967 at 2076 Union Ave., next door to the IHOP restaurant, for $2.6 million. The property, at the corner of Union Avenue and Florence Street, was appraised at $1.3 million in 2013, according to the Shelby County Assessor of Property’s office. The sellers, Missouri-based Roundabout Real Estate LLC and Visual Projects LLC, acquired the property in 2008 for $2 million.

38. Time for Tigers to Back Up Words -

Looking back at a few quotes from the once 11th-ranked Tigers at their preseason media day, in light of the embarrassment that was their recent 101-80 loss to No. 7 Oklahoma State:

Senior guard Geron Johnson: “One (free-throw) attempt a game last year, I mean that’s terrible if I’m supposed to be some tough guy.” He shot one free throw – and missed it – in 24 minutes in Stillwater.

39. Appeals Court Upholds Dismissal of 'Soul Man' Suit -

Sam Moore may be "The Legendary Soul Man," but a federal appeals court says he doesn't have sole use of the title.

40. Appeals Court Upholds Dismissal of 'Soul Man' Suit -

Sam Moore may be "The Legendary Soul Man," but a federal appeals court says he doesn't have sole use of the title.

41. Meeting Set in Mill Blast Suit -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) – A settlement conference is scheduled Thursday in a federal lawsuit brought by a man who was injured in an explosion at an International Paper Co. mill in Mississippi in 2008.

42. Hot-Shooting Memphis Beats Central Florida 84-55 -

MEMPHIS (AP) – The Memphis Tigers wanted to make sure Central Florida did not have a chance to beat them on a last-second play this time.

Will Barton had 18 points and 11 rebounds, Memphis shot better than 60 percent most of the second half and the Tigers won their third straight with a 84-55 victory over the Knights on Tuesday night.

43. Clanton Lifts Central Florida Over Memphis 68-67 -

ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) – Keith Clanton's three-point play with 4 seconds to go lifted Central Florida over Memphis 68-67 Wednesday night and gave the Knights their first victory over the Tigers in 11 meetings.

44. Rules for Federal Drug Case Still Being Formed -

The words “inordinate” and “extraordinary” keep coming up in the court documents for the largest drug case ever brought in Memphis federal court, even though the case is now down to two defendants who are scheduled to go to trial next month.

45. Marcus and Davy -

Kings of this wild frontier. Marcus Winchester was the son of one of our founders, and he was our city’s first mayor, first postmaster and the proprietor of our very first store. He was also the agent for something called the Rice Tract, two adjoining 5,000-acre parcels on the Fourth Chickasaw Bluff acquired by Andy Jackson, John Overton and the Winchester family. That land would become Memphis, a city laid out by Jackson, Overton and General James Winchester in 1819 as a business venture.

46. Nevels Takes Reins of BMHC Foundation -

Jenny Nevels has been promoted to executive director of the Baptist Memorial Health Care Foundation.

47. Rhodes Examines Katrina’s Impact On Fifth Anniversary -

Photographer Aric Mayer spends a lot of his time thinking about the ways in which the larger events of nature overlap with those of civilization.

And still, Mayer, the lead photographer who covered Hurricane Katrina for The Wall Street Journal, said he has difficulty fully communicating what he experienced when he arrived in New Orleans a week after the storm devastated the city.

48. Springdale Fights Back -

In the mile of Springdale Street between Chelsea and Jackson avenues there are five churches. That’s not counting the churches on side streets.

On Eldridge Avenue, one of those side streets, between two tiny churches is a pair of identical small houses – both boarded up.

The one closest to the corner has faded blue spray paint stenciled across the plywood.

In inner-city Memphis, the stenciling is as familiar as gang graffiti. It’s the mark of the Memphis Police Department’s Blue CRUSH campaign.

Five years into the crackdown guided by a devotion to crime statistics, crime is down in Memphis.

But the statistical drop in crime has come with lingering questions and concerns in Springdale and other neighborhoods with Blue CRUSH houses.

“Once we board them up, we really have to depend on the community to let us know if drug dealers have broken back into them,” Shelby County District Attorney General Bill Gibbons said. “If we don’t know about it, sometimes drug dealers can get right back in there.”

In the neighborhoods, homeowners lament that street level dealers are easily replaced and soon released from jail to resume their place in the neighborhoods – now with a criminal record that makes a move away from drug dealing even more unlikely.

Last year, a team from Memphis that included a police officer, a state prosecutor, a federal prosecutor, a University of Memphis researcher, the head of the Memphis Leadership Foundation and the pastor of one of those five churches along Springdale went to several cities to get training in a new anti-drug strategy.

“We were really interested in changing people’s lives, not locking them up,” Springdale Baptist Pastor Derrick Hughes told The Memphis News. Hughes wasn’t sure at first if he would be part of the Drug Market Intervention (DMI) program.

“It sounded as if possibly it was just another program that was going to possibly just put criminals in jail without rehabilitation,” he said. “And I wanted to make sure that if we were going to be a part of something that it was going to look at rehabilitating the person, changing lives, changing them from a holistic point of view as well as a spiritual point of view.”

Gibbons said some of his prosecutors and some police brass also had their doubts as they looked for an area to test out DMI Memphis style.

“It was based primarily on looking at crime patterns and in particular drug activity in that area,” he told The Memphis News. There was plenty of open drug dealing in the Springdale area.

Drug Market Intervention is picking several street level drug dealers in a community, confronting them with the evidence against them and telling them they have one more chance to get out of the business. The police are involved in making a decision not to prosecute a few as they target dozens of others in an area.

Others on the team are community leaders from the neighborhood. And some are with proven programs to provide job training and other help in getting a legitimate job.

High Point, N.C., was the first stop for the Memphis group because it is the birthplace of DMI. It seems an unlikely example for Memphis with a population of fewer than 100,000. But in 2003, High Point had several open air drug markets. The city’s new police chief, James Fealy, attacked them using what became the DMI strategy.

David Kennedy, director of the Center for Crime Control and Prevention at John Jay College of Criminal Justice, replicated DMI in other cities with money from the federal Bureau of Justice Assistance. The BJA funded the training of the Memphis team and came here.

Kennedy’s philosophy is specific to open air drug markets. It doesn’t pretend to eliminate all drug dealing.

“Open air drug markets are found primarily in our cities and in African-American neighborhoods,” Kennedy wrote in a 2008 article for the National Institute of Justice (NIJ) Journal. “Although we are loathe to admit it, this issue is soaked in race.”

Kennedy said police complained to him that the families of the drug dealers and others in the surrounding communities knew they were selling drugs, did nothing to stop it and profited from it.

But Kennedy said those living in the communities countered that police were only interested in locking up as many people as they could as part of a conspiracy to destroy the community.

Kennedy said each side had a point and each side was wrong.

“The crime is real and overwhelmingly the arrests are legitimate. But we are destroying the village in order to save it,” he wrote. “And none of this gets rid of the crime. The drug markets and violence continue to exist.”

Kennedy didn’t try to tackle the long-standing racial issues and their lengthy back story. The conversations that formed the basis for the DMI strategy were about drug markets.

It was hard for some on the Memphis team to believe that hardened drug dealers would respond when the threat of arrest, prison time, drive-by shootings and gang turf tripwires hadn’t discouraged them from the life.

Nevertheless, when they returned to Memphis, the planning began for several months of undercover drug buys in the Springdale area by the police Organized Crime Unit. For months, the officers bought repeatedly from dozens of street dealers in a two-mile radius of Springdale. And they recorded the drug buys on video – not just one buy but multiple buys.

Prosecutors reviewed the cases against more than 60 men and women and prosecuted 51 of them. Five were indicted on federal drug charges. Six others – five men and a woman – were the first candidates for the Memphis DMI program.

“It was taking a look at individuals who obviously were involved in drug trafficking, but a little more on the periphery – not an extensive drug record,” Gibbons said.

A few days after New Year’s Day, police descended on the Springdale area serving the arrest warrants and putting up a fresh crop of plywood with blue stenciling on the drug houses in the area. The neighborhood grapevine buzzed anew about the heavy police presence.

It was still buzzing when on the coldest day of the year – Jan. 8 – the Memphis group knocked on six doors in the Springdale area. The temperature never got near freezing and was in single digits part of the day.

No one inside the six houses knew they were coming. No one approaching the doorsteps knew what the reaction inside would be.

It was the first indication the six people involved and inside those homes had that they had sold drugs to undercover Memphis police officers and had been recorded on video making multiple drug sales to the officers.

The father of one of the six was among those who had been arrested.

When the DMI team knocked on his door, his grandmother answered.

“He did not want his grandmother to know why we were standing at the door,” Peggie Russell, the DMI coordinator and a University of Memphis researcher and community resource specialist, said. “He said, ‘It’s OK grandmother.’”

Howard Eddings, president of the Memphis Leadership Foundation, said the young man didn’t deny he was a drug dealer.

“He wanted to basically shut the door,” Eddings told The Memphis News. “She might not have known exactly what he was doing. She was an older lady. He didn’t like the fact that we were knocking on her door.”

He and the other five got a letter asking them to come to Springdale Baptist Church a few days later. If they came, the letter from Police Director Larry Godwin said they would not be prosecuted this time.

For Hughes the pledge was crucial. He wanted to be able to say, “I give you my word, you will not be arrested,” with certainty and conviction.

Five of the six showed up at Hughes’ church where the congregation and other community leaders were waiting in the sanctuary. On the walls were posters of the 51 defendants who weren’t getting the chance they were about to get. The posters included the possible prison sentences those defendants faced.

The five “guests” sat in a reserved front row with a friend or family member.

Their faces blurred in a video of the event, they listened as Assistant District Attorney Amy Weirich told them, “We’ve had it,” and called their names individually. “The Memphis Police Department is tired of picking up dead bodies in the street.”

Russell remembers some denying they had done anything wrong. Then police showed the video.

They watched video of themselves selling drugs numerous times to undercover police officers.

The woman’s denials stopped.

“She got caught during the first time. I don’t necessarily know that we believed it was the first time,” Eddings remembered. “But she was so embarrassed as a mom who had small kids who was put in the spotlight. … All of her junk is coming to the forefront.”

Russell said some of the others were telling those who came with them that they had no idea why they were summoned to the church.

“You’re sitting there and you’re telling your family member, ‘No, I didn’t do it,’” Russell said. “Then the tape started rolling … and you see yourself. It’s reality. You can’t hide it. I think that was a turning point for most of them.”

Hughes told the group of five that the church cared about them and was willing to help.

Some of his congregants spoke up too.

“Our congregants said, ‘Listen, we’re tired of watching you sell drugs. We’re tired of being afraid of coming in and out of our communities. We want our community back,’” Hughes recalled. “During the call in, some of our residents had an opportunity to look in their faces and say, ‘We are tired of the way you’ve been running down our communities. This used to be a wonderful community where people had pride, where people had hope. … Now a lot of us are afraid.’”

After the tough talk and the confrontation came a commitment to work with the five DMI candidates. Eddings emphasized there are no guarantees.

“We were careful not to promise them that we were going to get them jobs or that even if we could get them a job that it was going to pay them something comparable to what they were making on the street,” he said. ”We said the opposite. We can’t do that at all. But one thing we do know for sure. If you stop doing what you’re doing, you don’t go to jail.”

Russell, who gets much of the credit for pushing to give DMI a try and has become the program’s de facto coordinator, described the response as “something totally new.”

“It’s not about those five,” she said. “They are supposed to stay out of trouble for two years to make the necessary transition in their lives. But it’s really about the Hollywood Springdale community, changing the response of the community to open air drug sales.”

Eddings was surprised by the response.

“Most of these guys’ mamas know what they’re doing. But to know now that other mamas and other grandparents and other church leaders and the community have their eye on you, it has a different motivation,” he said. “Some of these guys are hardened. They’ve been doing it for a while and they’ve been out there on the streets. So, not much embarrasses them. But I could tell by looking at them and even some of the denials.”

The Memphis Leadership Foundation already works with convicted felons trying to make the difficult transition after prison. There are even fewer guarantees for those with a substantial prison record.

Marcus, who didn’t want his last name used, vented about how hard it’s been to find a legitimate job since he did prison time in 2006 for felony drug dealing.

“It’s not like people want to sell drugs,” he began. “On a lot of applications they are saying they don’t discriminate. They’re lying. … They’re ready to end the session right then. They might tear up the application in your face.”

If drug dealers like him bring blight to areas like Springdale and violence and a hard life for law-abiding citizens, Marcus said society has responded with its own brand of hardness.

“They ain’t reaching out anymore,” he said. “They expect for the world to be better because we’re building more jails. We’re putting more cops out. If somebody killed me today – the person who killed me, they want to put him in jail. But why put him in jail when y’all treating this man he killed like he’s a nobody anyway.”

Eddings said with criminal records or without, street level drug dealers have problems as they get older because they have no legitimate work history. He started to say there aren’t transferable skills before thinking about it.

“Actually, some of the skills do transfer. They’ve just got to get access,” he said. “It’s really a reshaping, a little bit more recognition that they need to deal with in terms of how they see themselves and how they can use those skills that they utilize on the streets to do something positive and pursue a legitimate way of life.”

The young man Eddings is working with seems not to have hit the wall that Marcus is at yet.

“He is simply trying to figure out how to put one foot in front of the other. They go from having some source of income to having no source of income,” Eddings told The Memphis News. “We’re convincing him now that getting his GED ought to be a decision that he ought to make. He’s been a little slow in that.”

Hughes said he would get the occasional dope boy showing up at his church before DMI.

“Very rarely. I did hear one or two stragglers you come across who say, ‘Yes, I do want to change.’ Often times, it’s usually because of a pending trial or they are in trouble,” he said. “Since that time, we’ve had a lot of people coming, wanting to change their lives.”

Gibbons is reviewing some neighborhoods where DMI might go next but he’s not saying where because of the undercover police work involved. He wants to see it replicated based on lessons learned in Memphis and he hopes to get a federal grant to hire a full-time coordinator.

The sixth man given a chance in the DMI program didn’t come to the church and was prosecuted. He pleaded guilty to five counts of selling drugs and was sentenced to four years in prison and fined $10,000. But the sentence was suspended and he was put on a diversion program.

Weirich recalled Criminal Court Judge John Fowlkes asking the man why he didn’t respond. He told Fowlkes, “It sounded too good to be true.”

...

49. Out of Bounds -

The August report from the NCAA calls him “student-athlete 1.” Everyone but the NCAA and the University of Memphis calls him Derrick Rose.

50. Settlement Proposals Due in IP Mill Explosion Suit -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) - Memphis-based International Paper Co. and two brothers who were severely burned when a boiler exploded at a Mississippi plant have until Friday to submit proposals to settle a federal lawsuit.

51. Feibelman Honored by American College of Trial Lawyers -

Jef Feibelman has become a Fellow of the American College of Trial Lawyers. Feibelman is an attorney with Burch, Porter & Johnson PLLC. He received his undergraduate and law degrees from Yale University.

52. BRIDGES: One Big Facet of Uptown's Resurgence -

Marcus Jackson, a 20-year-old business major at the University of Memphis, is still amazed at his personal transformation over the last few years.

He went from being a typical, introverted high school student to winning a string of accolades. He was chosen captain of his school's track team, senior class secretary and homecoming king. Jackson's peers at Kirby High School voted him "Mr. Senior."

53. Archived Article: Calvary P.2 - Calvary continues Lenten series on WednesdayCalvary Episcopal Church will begin its annual Lenten Noonday Preaching Series on Calvary Lenten series continues Calvary Episcopal Church continues its annual Lenten Noonday Preaching Series on Monday, wi...

54. Archived Article: Calvary P.2 - Calvary continues Lenten series on WednesdayCalvary Episcopal Church will begin its annual Lenten Noonday Preaching Series on Lenten series continues today at Calvary Calvary Episcopal Church continues its annual Lenten Noonday Preaching Series on W...

55. Archived Article: Back-lent - Former Memphis pastor Former Memphis pastor to speak at Calvary Calvary Episcopal Church will continue its annual Lenten Noonday Preaching Series this week with the Rev. Dr. Alvin O. Jackson and the Rev. Dr. Daniel P. Matthews. The series offers fre...

56. Archived Article: Back - Calvary to begin Lenten Calvary to begin Lenten series on Wednesday Calvary Episcopal Church will begin its annual Lenten Noonday Preaching Series on Wednesday with the Rev. Dr. Herbert ODriscoll speaking. Free noon services will feature speakers fr...

57. Archived Article: Memos - Promus Names New Development Ronald C. Muzii Jr. has been named vice president of development for Promus Vacation Resorts. Muzii was formerly president of Innovative Hospitality Group Inc. in Miami. He is a graduate of Cornell University. B. Ted Ham...

58. Archived Article: Law Briefs - The Memphis/Mid-South chapter of the Federal Bar Association and the U The Memphis/Mid-South chapter of the Federal Bar Association and the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Tennessee will co-sponsor a continuing legal education semina...

59. Archived Article: Tech Briefs - SCB Computer Technology Inc SCB Computer Technology Inc. has been awarded a $5.4 million contract by the Mississippi Department of Human Services for its Year 2000 conversion and consulting work. The 14-month contract begins Oct. 1. Ben C. Bryant Jr...

60. Archived Article: Welcome Wagon Jts - 7/29 jts welcome wagon! State, city set to inaugurate Welcome Center By JAMES SNYDER The Daily News The new Tennessee Welcome Center at the base of the Hernando-DeSoto bridge will get its grand opening Thursday with a host of local and state officia...