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Editorial Results (free)

1. Harris' White House Trip Rejected by State GOP Officials -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Over the last two years, Tennessee state senators have been reimbursed for out-of-state travel for meetings from Florida to Alaska, and on topics ranging from school vouchers to the dangers of radical Islam.

2. Outsourcing Savings Estimates Strain ‘Credulity’ -

Terry Cowles flashes a photo of ceiling lamp fixtures on the screen and tells state legislators a vendor’s state Capitol team used its electrical training to remove, repair and reinstall fixtures, saving taxpayers $15,500.

3. Legislature Votes to Strip Funding From UT Diversity Office -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — State lawmakers voted to send a message that they don't agree with the sexually open and progressive views of the Office for Diversity and Inclusion on the University of Tennessee campus. So the Legislature on Thursday passed a bill stripping it of state funds — a total of nearly $337,000. The money will be used to fund minority scholarships instead.

4. The Opportunity of a Learning Lifetime -

The opportunity of a tuition-free community college education for every Tennessee high school graduate who wants it is one of our state’s boldest initiatives. That’s what the Tennessee Promise program represents.

5. Last Word: Pastner's Georgia Tech Post-Season, Who Filed and Greensward Invitations -

Not so fast with the off-season. There is a Memphis post-season after all.

And the Grizz found it Thursday like a light at the end of a long-tunnel where a lot of people slipped and fell and can’t get up.
The light was Houston flaming out at home to Phoenix without the Grizzlies having to make a basket.
It’s all about the math. Stay in school, young people.

6. Conrad Call for De-Annexation Talks Draws Favorable Reviews -

Memphis City Council Chairman Kemp Conrad wants to open talks with county commissioners on possible voluntary de-annexations.

And County Commission Chairman Terry Roland said he is open to the idea.

7. Amended Senate De-annexation Bill Faces More Debate -

The de-annexation bill whose defeat became City Hall’s top priority in March is off the political frontburner.

But Memphis Democrats in the Tennessee Legislature who opposed the de-annexation by referendum measure expect that this isn’t the end of the concept or the move to make it law.

8. Memphis Leaders Pleased With 'Reprieve' on De-Annexation Bill -

The de-annexation by referendum legislation pending in the Tennessee Legislature was sent to a summer study committee Wednesday, March 30, in the state Senate, effectively killing the proposal for the legislative session.

9. Last Word: Back to Nashville, Dentistry & Genomes and Living The Fable -

The Memphis traffic is again heavy on the Interstate to Nashville as the Senate state and local government committee meets Tuesday to pick up where it left off with the still-forming version the upper chamber is crafting of the de-annexation bill.

10. Amendments Cloud Issue of De-Annexation -

Tennessee state senators go back to work Tuesday, March 29, in Nashville on a modified de-annexation bill.

The Senate State and Local Government Committee will be reviewing a set of amendments to their version of the bill, which changed substantially from the House version in a committee session last week.

11. Opposers Fight De-Annexation Another Day -

When the state Senate’s State and Local Government Committee convenes at noon Wednesday, March 21, in Nashville, Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland and his administration will have been working Capital Hill for about a day and a half.

12. Harris, Towns Hope to Delay Monday De-Annexation Vote -

Memphis Democrats in the Tennessee Legislature are hoping to delay a scheduled Monday, March 21, state Senate floor vote on a deannexation bill that cleared the state House a week ago.

“This train is moving very fast,” Democratic Sen. Lee Harris said Friday, March 18. “The city of Memphis has never made a significant presentation about the city of Memphis’ finances to the relevant committees or to the Senate members,” he added. “Minimally, we need to send this back to committee so that we can have some airing out of what the facts are and what the known consequences are. … Minimally, if you are going to devastate a city, you should know exactly what that means and what you are doing.”

13. Harris Seeks Legal Opinion on Deannexation Bill, Senate Vote Set For Monday -

State Sen. Lee Harris of Memphis has requested a legal opinion from the Tennessee Attorney General’s office on the deannexation bill the Senate could vote on Monday, March 21.

14. Bipartisan Skeptics Doubt Haslam’s Outsourcing Plan -

Poor timing and questionable numbers: That’s how legislators are viewing a business justification plan for outsourcing facilities management across Tennessee.

The Office of Customer Focused Government tells state senators, if all departments opt in, the state could save $35.8 million by the second year of a contract under study for building operations and services – without laying off state workers or cutting pay and benefits.

15. Cordova Apartments Sell for $31.1 Million -

555 Wood Arbor Parkway
Memphis, TN 38018
Sale Amount: $31.1 million

Sale Date: March 2, 2016
Buyer: CEAI Grove LLC
Seller: Trinity 464 LLC
Loan Amount: $4.2 million
Borrower: CEAI Grove LLC
Lender: CBRE Multifamily Capital Inc.
Details: The Grove at Trinity Point apartments have sold for $31.1 million.

16. Cordova Apartments Sell for $31.1 Million -

The Grove at Trinity Point apartments have sold for for $31.1 million.

In a March 2 warranty deed, Trinity 464 LLC sold the Cordova property to CEAI Grove LLC. In conjunction with the sale, CEIA Grove signed a certificate of joint venture with Fundrise Real Estate Investment Trust.

17. Rare Wins for Democrats on Guns, Outsourcing -

Legislative Democrats got a chance to beat their chests a little bit after a proposal to allow guns in the state Capitol and Legislative Plaza failed, and they hope to do the same with outsourcing.

18. AP Sources: Clippers Trade Stephenson to Memphis for Green -

The Memphis Grizzlies traded forward Jeff Green to the Los Angeles Clippers on Thursday in exchange for guard Lance Stephenson and a future protected first-round draft pick.

The deal confirmed by the Clippers hours after the NBA trade deadline passed reunites Green with Doc Rivers, who coached him in Boston from 2011-13.

19. AP Source: Grizzlies Sending Lee to Charlotte in 3-Team Deal -

The Charlotte Hornets have acquired veteran swingman Courtney Lee from the Memphis Grizzlies in a three-team trade that will help bolster the team's perimeter shooting and defense after losing Michael Kidd-Gilchrist to a shoulder injury.

20. Teachers Wary of Haslam’s Push For Increased Pay -

Pushing a budget with more than $100 million for K-12 teacher pay raises, Gov. Bill Haslam says Tennessee is taking education to new levels by raising standards, linking teacher evaluations to student performance and expanding education options.

21. Last Word: History As Geology, Beyond the Greensward and City Hall's HR Director -

History can be like geology once you get it in something that isn’t in the form of a book.
There are layers on top of layers that you may not ever see or miss until a site is wiped clean for the next present that used to be the future and will eventually become the past.
That’s the case with the city’s historic Medical Center where much has come and gone several times over as our city’s considerable investment in medicine and health approaches the end of its second century.
Health Sciences Park used to be the site of a hospital. You would think something as massive as the tower of Baptist Memorial Hospital’s central campus on Union Avenue would be missed. Yet even those of us who grew up with its presence drive past it every day without a thought of what was once there.
The same with the site of Russwood Park on the north side of Madison Avenue and the old bus barns where Beale used to run further east than it does now.
In recent years, new facilities have arisen as the medical center makes itself over in a kind of economic regeneration without a comprehensive plan.
There is now an effort to come up with a comprehensive plan for the area that is more than different ventures buying or leasing land and making plans for their needs.
Eight of the institutions in the area have hired a consulting firm to develop a master plan that includes not just facilities but residential and retail areas.
It’s a significant step for an area that remains intriguing for those of us trying to remember what was where and how long some of the survivors have been holding out in much different streetscapes than were there when they arrived.
The Masonic lodge at the dead end of Dunlap into Union Avenue is a survivor. It’s where the funerals were held for some of those killed in the 1925 river disaster in which Tom Lee rescued so many others.
The lodge at one time had an earth-shaking pipe organ that I had the rare privilege of hearing at a concert following its restoration in the 1980s – the ancient 1980s.
And I still wonder about the tiny medical textbook storefront and how it endures at a time when students rent books and others use digital versions.
There are still remnants of the porous border between the medical center and the Union Avenue auto row that used to exist and arose around the old Ford plant.

22. Minority Leader Harris Confident Even on Wrong Side of Supermajority -

Lee Harris says he ran for state Senate because he felt Memphis could do better on Capitol Hill, defeating Ophelia Ford in 2014.

23. Last Word: New Minority Business Numbers, The House Affair and The Heights -

The recently revived discussion on minority business in Memphis is about to go back on the front burner again. Fueling the intensity are new U.S. Census numbers. They show the percentage of business receipts in Memphis produced by black-owned businesses has dropped since the 2007 census numbers showed a 1.08 percent share of those receipts by black-owned businesses. That in a city whose population is 63 percent African-American.
The drop to below one percent is even though the overall receipts in 2012 were higher than they were in 2007.
Madeline Faber is the first to report the new numbers as part of a cover story in our weekly, The Memphis News, that will be on the streets and in the racks Saturday, on-line Friday afternoon.
The numbers are such a telling story and such an important indicator that we broke it out as its own story in advance of the cover story.

24. Harris Passes On Challenging Cohen For House Seat -

A surprise January dalliance by Tennessee Sen. Lee Harris of Memphis with a challenge of U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen in the August primaries didn’t make it quite to the end of the month.

25. Last Word: Kroger Disses Clarence Saunders, Mud Island Plans and The Australians -

What is old has become new again. And judging by your reaction to Andy Meek’s story on the Kroger plans for online ordering of groceries, what is old has gone viral as well.
Here are the basics:
You order from a list of items and Kroger fills the order and has it waiting for you to pick up.
When you think about the idea of supermarkets, which originated here in Memphis with Piggly Wiggly, it’s enough to make the Piggly Wiggly founder himself, Clarence Saunders, spin in his grave.
Before he came up with the idea of taking store shelves from behind the counter and putting them out there for you to get your own stuff from them, you would tell your grocer what you wanted and he would write it down on a paper bag and get it for you, wrap it up and present it to you.
Saunders changed all of that as you know if you’ve seen the Pink Palace’s child-sized replica of a Piggly Wiggly store from the start of the 20th century.
A century later, no paper bags and you can still walk among the shelves if you wish.
Perhaps this isn’t that extreme. Maybe this is simply a swing of the pendulum, back toward the middle ground.
Saunders tried to push it even further with his Keedoozle stores that followed Piggly Wiggly. In those stores, the items were lined up in what amounted to vending machines with shoppers releasing an item from the vertical row with a key.
Here Saunders went too far. He mashed the bread.

26. Impatient Clemmons Anxious for Minority Voice to Be Heard -

Democratic state Rep. John Ray Clemmons is only halfway through his first two-year term representing District 55 in Nashville. But he’s not willing to wait years to speak out or push for change.

27. Cohen, Ford Pull Petitions For August Primaries -

U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen has pulled a qualifying petition to run for another term in Congress starting with the Aug. 4 Democratic primary.

28. Tennessee Legislature Opens 2016 Session on Capitol Hill -

The Tennessee General Assembly's 2016 session will be a short one, likely done by early April. The gavels fall in the House and Senate chambers in Nashville at noon Tuesday, Jan. 12, opening the election year session.

29. Candidates Already Gearing Up For August Elections -

The ballot for the March 1 Tennessee presidential primaries and county primaries for General Sessions Court Clerk was set while many voters were focused on the holidays and preparations for the new city leaders taking office in January.

30. After First Meeting, Personality of New Council Emerges -

The judgments began early for the new Memphis City Council, which met for the first time Tuesday, Jan. 5, at City Hall.

State Sen. Lee Harris, on hand to be honored as a former city council member, called the group the “Kumbaya Council,” as it approved 13 appointees by Mayor Jim Strickland, 11 of them with unanimous votes.

31. Last Word: The River, The New Mayor and Explaining Boll Weevils -

Hello, 2016. What’s your hurry?

First things first – the Mississippi River at our doorstep is above flood stage. But the crest is now predicted to come Friday and will be just over 40 feet – lower than predicted last week.
We will be posting web stories on the forecasts and other announcement from the county’s Office of Preparedness each evening to work with their schedule for summarizing where we are.
Floods are a slower moving cause for concern because we know what is happening upriver from us where the river is narrower. But this is also the Mississippi River, which is the definition of unpredictable.

32. Harris Weighs Cohen Challenge -

Tennessee state Senate Democratic leader Lee Harris is considering a challenge of U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen in the August Democratic Congressional primary.

33. Refugees, Regents, Privatization On Tap for New Session -

State Sen. Ken Yager isn’t quite ready for the state of Tennessee to reclaim the Refugee Resettlement Program from Catholic Charities.

34. After a Year of Triumphs and Defeats, Haslam Looks Ahead -

Eight days into 2015, Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam formally set a special session of the Tennessee legislature for February on his Insure Tennessee plan, a Medicaid expansion Haslam negotiated with the Obama administration.

35. Last Word: Recovery in North Mississippi, Opera in 2016 and Uptown North of Chelsea -

It’s been a holiday season of challenged hopes and muted emotions in our corner of the world.
The beginning of the series of storms and tornadoes they spawned killed eight people in North Mississippi where recovery is still a fact of life in this last week of 2015.
This will be a week of funerals and damage assessments for federal disaster aid throughout our region.
And you will hear more stories of escapes and new beginnings after losing everything of any material value.
But even in our spared city, our thoughts will return instinctively to the young lives taken so suddenly and so close to the family gatherings in which our youngest give so much more in the way of hope than they will realize at this tender age.

36. Last Word: More Medical Expansions, Norris & Harris and Christmas In Hell's Kitchen -

Last Word is a new daily online column that offers an overview of what’s happened at the end of shift, so to speak. Picture a dimly lit newsroom in the Downtown night and the last person in the place leaving a memo for the morning shift and you have a pretty good idea of what we are aiming for.

37. Norris: Gas Tax Proposal Not Happening in 2016 -

Don’t look for a gas tax hike in the 2016 session of the Tennessee legislature, says the state Senate majority leader.

“We’re not going to do a gas tax in 2016,” Rep. Mark Norris of Collierville said on the WKNO-TV program “Behind The Headlines.” “We are going to have to address it soon enough and these conversations are very important.”

38. Council's New Crop -

They ran in the considerable shadow of the most competitive Memphis mayoral race in a generation. The new Memphis City Council that takes office with Mayor-elect Jim Strickland in January isn’t necessarily a generational shift. It doesn’t signify a wholesale ousting by the electorate, either.

39. Voters Fill in City Hall Blanks In Last Election of Busy 2015 -

The 2015 election season was put to rest last week: A low-turnout set of five Memphis City Council runoff elections filled in the blanks of what will be a different City Hall starting in 2016.

With a 4.8 percent turnout across the turf of five single-member City Council districts, voters in the Thursday, Nov. 19, non-partisan council runoff races defined the new council that takes office in January. The 13-member body will include six new faces.

40. Dangerous Time to Play Emotionally Charged Missouri -

Tennessee’s football team may be headed into a perfect storm Saturday night at Missouri.

It’s been an emotional whirlwind the last two weeks for the Tigers (5-5, 1-5 SEC), and they will have plenty of motivation against the Vols (6-4, 3-3).

41. Events -

Mid-South Ice House will be open for its Holiday Season from Friday, Nov. 27, through Jan. 5 at 10705 Ridgeway Industrial Drive in Olive Branch. Special events include a “Frozen” Friday Skate, a Star Wars Skate, a Grinchmas Skate and more. Visit midsouthicehouse.com for a schedule.

42. Council Runoff Elections: Morgan Tops Springer, Boyd Over Anderson -

With a scant 4.8 percent turnout, Memphis voters filled in the blanks at City Hall Thursday, Nov. 19, by electing four new members to the Memphis City Council and returning an appointed incumbent.

Thursday’s winners join new council members Martavius Jones and Philip Spinosa in taking office January 1, making six new faces on the 13-member council.

43. Last Election of 2015 Decides Five Council Races -

The last election of 2015 in Shelby County will fill in the blanks in a changing of the political guard at City Hall.

Six weeks after Memphis voters ousted incumbent Mayor A C Wharton and replaced him with Jim Strickland and elected two new members to the 13-member City Council – Martavius Jones and Philip Spinosa – voters will decide who gets five more council seats.

44. Bipartisan Brakes for Governor Haslam’s Privatization Push -

Plans to put Tennessee’s real estate and government operations in the hands of private business are much further along than Gov. Bill Haslam would like people to think.

A master of downplaying big issues, Haslam says he’s simply looking for ways to make government run more efficiently and save money.

45. Attorney Rob Ratton Joins Fisher & Phillips -

Robert W. Ratton has joined Fisher & Phillips LLP’s Memphis office as of counsel, a role in which he represents employers in a wide range of employment law matters and supports clients with internal investigations and compliance issues. Ratton most recently served as a staff attorney at TruGreen LP.

46. Five City Council Races Destined for Runoffs -

The identity of the Memphis City Council that will take office in January with six new members was still in flux at the end of a very long and frustrating Oct. 8 election night.

The races for four of those six open seats and the seat now held by an appointee to the council are going to a Nov. 19 runoff election – one week before Thanksgiving.

47. Tennessee Dems Introduce Bill to Allow Gun Ban at Sports, Music Venues -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Two Democrats are introducing legislation to allow all firearms to be banned at major sports and music venues.

Senate Minority Leader Lee Harris of Memphis and state Rep. John Ray Clemmons of Nashville say their bill would create an exemption to the new state law that bans local governments from prohibiting people with handgun carry permits to be armed in parks.

48. Democrats Criticize Haslam for Exploring More Outsourcing -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Democrats claimed on Tuesday that Republican Gov. Bill Haslam is displaying hostility toward state workers by looking to outsource the management of more government functions to the private sector, but Haslam dismissed the allegation as politics.

49. Lucas Named CIO at Regional One -

Jackie Lucas has joined Regional One Health as senior vice president and chief information officer. In her new role, Lucas is responsible for information technology and telecommunications for the organization.

50. Scott Sharpe Named CAO Of District Attorney General’s Office -

Scott Sharpe recently was named chief administrative officer of the Shelby County District Attorney General’s office following the departure of longtime CAO Priscilla Campbell.

51. Attorney General: Private Groups Can't Ban Guns in Parks -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — An attorney general's opinion says private organizations can't prevent licensed handgun permit holders from taking weapons into events the groups operate at public parks.

52. Memphis Mayoral Field Set at 10 -

Shelby County Election Commissioners have certified the Memphis election ballot for Oct. 8.

These are the names to appear on that ballot for the 15 elected offices.

The commission met hours after the noon Thursday, July 23, deadline for candidates to withdraw from the ballot if they wished.

53. Southern Heritage Defined Differently Across Tennessee -

Tennessee’s loyalty was divided in the Civil War, and 150 years later, little is changed as the debate over Confederate symbols arises in the wake of the racist-fueled South Carolina church massacre.

54. React: Supreme Court’s Gay Marriage Ruling -

A divided U.S. Supreme Court voted 5-4 that same-sex couples have a right to marry anywhere in the United States. Here is a roundup of local reaction to the landmark ruling.

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam:

55. Harris Pushes For Insure Tennessee Comeback -

State Senate Democratic leader Lee Harris of Memphis will be on the campaign trail this summer.

Harris and other Democratic leaders in the majority Republican Tennessee legislature will campaign across the state this summer for the comeback of the Insure Tennessee proposal in the 2016 legislative session.

56. Time to Produce -

MEMPHIS: THE SEQUEL. “People who make movies – people like Francis Ford Coppola and Milos Forman and Sydney Pollack, and our own Craig Brewer and Willy Bearden – and people like me who write and produce TV spots and videos all have something in common. We know just how damn good Memphis looks through a lens, we know how deep the local talent pool is for actors and crew, we know how wide the choice is for great locations.

57. Council Vacancy Draws Eight Applicants -

Eight citizens have applied for a vacancy on the Memphis City Council, some with no intention of serving beyond the end of 2015 and others with plans to seek a full, four-year term in the October elections.

58. Council Begins Hearings on Operating Budget -

The Memphis City Council is down a member as its budget committee begins hearings Tuesday, May 5, on the $656.5 million operating budget proposal of Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr.

Council member Shea Flinn resigned Thursday effective immediately to take a position as vice president at the Greater Memphis Chamber in charge of the Chairman’s Circle.

59. Lee Harris, Brian Kelsey Spend Lunch Hour in Twitter Debate -

State Senators Brian Kelsey and Lee Harris spent their lunch hour Friday, March 27, debating Insure Tennessee, school vouchers and gun rights in a Twitter debate between the two Shelby County legislators – Kelsey a Republican and Harris a Democrat.

60. Planning Meeting for MEMfix Pinch Scheduled for Friday -

A planning meeting for the MEMfix event focusing on the Pinch District will be held Friday, March 27.

The one-hour event will begin at 3:30 p.m. in the Memphis Room at the Crowne Plaza Hotel Downtown. Livable Memphis and the Downtown Neighborhood Association are hosting the planning session, which will feature State Sen. Lee Harris as a special guest.

61. Cool Catt -

The Honorable George Rose Smith is depicted in a John Deering wall-mounted bronze relief at the Central Arkansas Library System’s main branch. He’s in his robe, seated in front of a giant crossword grid. The inscription reads: “Wordsmith Extraordinaire – New York Times Crossword Puzzle Author – Arkansas Supreme Court Justice 1949-1987.”

62. Bill Would Allow Guns in Off-Campus Areas -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A proposal that would allow guns in off-campus areas used by schools has passed the Senate.

The measure sponsored by Republican Sen. Mark Green of Clarksville was approved 26-5 on Monday.

63. Flinn Signals Exit From City Council -

In the political mathematics of an election year, another seat on the Memphis City Council just opened up – sort of.

Council member Shea Flinn went a bit further Wednesday, March 18, than his “no comment” the week before to persistent rumors he might resign from the council and take a job with the Greater Memphis Chamber.

64. Harris’ Bill Faces Opposition From Memphis City Council Members -

Legislation by Sen. Lee Harris requiring local governments to hold a referendum before they take on “extraordinary” debt could run into opposition from his own City Council and municipal leaders across Tennessee.

65. Local Elections Ramp Up With Gumbo Fest -

There were so many contenders for the District 5 seat on the Memphis City Council at the Sunday, Feb. 8, Tennessee Equality Project Gumbo Contest that they occasionally went for the same voter’s hand in the crowd of several hundred.

66. Smith Enters Race for Council District 7 -

Thurston Smith, a manager at the Memphis Veterans Affairs Center, announced Thursday, Feb. 5, that he will be running for the District 7 Memphis City Council seat in the October city elections.

Smith told supporters at a gathering on Mud Island after setting the stage for the bid over several months with an exploratory campaign.

67. Traffic Camera Revenue Could Fund Scholarships -

Democratic state Sen. Lee Harris of Memphis has filed legislation that would use revenue from municipal red light cameras to send students to college.

68. Bill Would Use Traffic Camera Revenue to Fund Scholarships -

Democratic state Sen. Lee Harris of Memphis has filed legislation that would use revenue from municipal red light cameras to send students to college.

69. 100 North Main Seeks Historic Designation -

An effort to redevelop a Downtown skyscraper may have received a boost this week. A state board is recommending that the tower at 100 N. Main St. be listed on the National Register of Historic Places, a move that could allow the owner to seek tax credits and grants to redevelop the building.

70. 100 N. Main Recommended for Historic Register, Pinch Decision Delayed -

A state board is recommending that the skyscraper at 100 N. Main St. Downtown be listed on the National Register of Historic Places, a move that could allow the owner to seek tax credits and grants to redevelop the building.

71. Haslam on Statewide Tour to Tout Insure Tennessee -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam says he isn’t counting votes in the Tennessee legislature just yet for his Insure Tennessee Medicaid expansion proposal.

At least he’s not counting hard votes for the upcoming Feb. 2 special legislative session as he holds a series of nine public forums across the state.

72. Boyd Gets Encore as City Council Member -

After serving less than a year on the Memphis City Council in 2011, Berlin Boyd is back on the council and working toward a longer stay.

Boyd was the pick of the other 12 council members Tuesday, Jan. 20, to fill the District 7 vacancy created when Lee Harris resigned to take his seat in the state Senate.

73. Council Approves Schools Deal, Appoints Boyd -

Two weeks after they ignored a proposed $43.1 million settlement of the six-year old schools funding legal standoff, Memphis City Council members Tuesday, Jan. 20, approved a $41.8 million settlement with Shelby County Schools.

74. Council Takes Up Beale’s Next Act -

Memphis City Council members are likely to have some questions Tuesday, Jan. 20, about the still tentative settlement of the last part of the court fight for control of Beale Street.

The tentative terms of the settlement between the city of Memphis and the Beale Street Development Corp. leaked last week and include a share of revenues from the operation of the entertainment district for the BSDC that would otherwise go to the city, which owns the property between Second and Fourth streets.

75. City Council Field at Six for Vacancy -

With a new deadline for prospective City Council members to apply for the open District 7 seat, a total of six citizens had applied by the noon Thursday, Jan. 15, deadline for consideration by the Memphis City Council.

76. City Council Gets Ahead of Self With Vacancy Deadline -

The deadline for submitting an application to fill a vacant seat on the Memphis City Council wasn’t necessarily last week, according to a legal opinion from the council’s attorney.

Allan Wade issued the opinion Monday, Jan. 12, after only two of the seven citizens who applied for the District 7 vacancy by the noon Wednesday, Jan. 7, deadline had 25 signatures of voters in the district on the petition the council requires in its rules of procedure for filling such a vacancy.

77. Seven Apply to Fill City Council Vacancy -

Seven citizens, including two former Memphis City Council members, applied to fill the open District 7 council seat by a noon Wednesday, Jan. 7, deadline set by the body.

Council members plan to fill the seat, which was vacated by Lee Harris after he was elected to the state Senate, at their Jan. 20 meeting.

78. Harris Goes to Nashville -

At his last Memphis City Council session, Lee Harris reflected this week on his three years on the council and the group of politicians he joined.

79. City Council Vacancy Draws Seven Applicants -

Seven citizens, including two former Memphis City Council members, applied to fill the open District 7 council seat by a noon Wednesday, Jan. 7, deadline set by the body.

Council members plan to fill the seat, which was vacated by Lee Harris after he was elected to the state Senate, at their Jan. 20 meeting.

80. Council Signals Return to Schools Funding Mediation -

It’s back to mediation Thursday, Jan. 8, in the six-year long schools funding deadlock between the city of Memphis and Shelby County Schools.

That was the next step several Memphis City Council members pointed to after more than an hour behind closed doors at City Hall Tuesday with their attorney as well as city Chief Administrative Officer George Little.

81. Election Year Marks Passing of Generations -

There were more than a few indications of the passing of political generations in Memphis this past year.

Political leaders left the scene to return to life out of office, got elected to other offices and, in some cases, passed away.

82. Council Approves More Rape Kit Testing Funds -

Memphis City Council members approved Tuesday, Dec. 16, $1.5 million more in city funding for rape kit testing. The money comes from higher-than-anticipated revenue collections on the city’s tax on mixed drinks.

83. Council Approves More Rape Kit Testing Funds -

Memphis City Council members approved on Tuesday, Dec. 16, $1.25 million more in city funding for rape kit testing. The money comes from higher-than-anticipated revenue collections on the city’s tax on mixed drinks.

84. City Council Approves Pension Changes -

Memphis City Council members put to rest Tuesday, Dec. 16, at least the City Hall portion of the debate about city employee benefits and the liability of those benefits by approving changes to the city’s pension plan.

85. Collins, Harris Discuss Tax Incentive Concerns -

Memphis City Council members Harold Collins and Lee Harris agree for the most part on the value of the Graceland expansion plan the council approved two weeks ago.

86. Pickard Joins Explorations on Tentative 2015 Ballot -

The contingency plans and other political maneuvering for the city of Memphis elections are well underway.

And a key part of the calculation is making plans for a change in plans.

Architect and planner Charles “Chooch” Pickard is one of several citizens running “exploratory” campaigns at this point.

87. Graceland Plan Highlights Blurred Lines in Financing -

There are private funds and public funds. And when a private project has the potential to up the tax revenue taken in by local and state governments, that money enters a middle ground between the two.

88. Harris Chosen to Lead Tennessee Senate Democrats -

Newly elected state Sen. Lee Harris of Memphis is the new leader of Tennessee Senate Democrats.

Harris was chosen Tuesday, Nov. 25, by the group of five Democratic senators. Three of the five Democrats in the 33-member state Senate are from Memphis: Harris and Sens. Sara Kyle and Reginald Tate.

89. Incumbent Council Members Weighing Choices -

The only open seat on the Memphis City Council in the 2011 city elections is once again an open seat going into the 2015 city elections.

Current council member Lee Harris was elected to the state Senate in the August elections and will resign effective Jan. 12. That means the remaining 12 council members will appoint someone to fill the year remaining in Harris’s four-year council term of office.

90. After the Campaign -

The 2014 election year began in January with dissent from the floor.

At the end of the Shelby County Democratic Party’s annual Kennedy Day fundraiser in January, former Memphis City Council member and state Rep. Carol Chumney, who was not among the speakers, challenged the party establishment from her table to do more to support women running for office.

91. Lowery Named 2015 City Council Chairman -

The longest-serving member of the Memphis City Council will be the 2015 chairman of the 13-member body.

Myron Lowery was elected by the council unanimously and without opposition Tuesday, Nov. 18. He succeeds Jim Strickland in the chairman’s position.

92. Wharton’s Hybrid Pension Falls in Council -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr.’s hybrid pension proposal, the second of two parts of his overhaul of city employee benefits, was voted down Tuesday, Nov. 18, by the Memphis City Council in a bid by some on the council to end “uncertainty” among city employees.

93. New Lawmakers Trace Likely Abortion Legislation -

The two newest state legislators from Shelby County say they hope to find ways to work across party lines and even with the Shelby County Commission and the Memphis City Council.

“We may not be in the majority, but there is a lot we can do,” said incoming state Sen. Sara Kyle, who will be one of five Democrats in the 33-member Senate when next year’s legislative session in Nashville begins.

94. Voters Approve Wine, Amendments -

Shelby County citizens voted 2-to-1 Tuesday, Nov. 4, against a proposed amendment to the Tennessee Constitution that gives the Tennessee Legislature the power to regulate abortion, including in cases of rape or incest.

95. Council Pans City Garbage Proposal -

The administration of Mayor A C Wharton Jr. calls it SMART – Save Money And Reduce Trash. It’s a rebranding of the slow move to a pay-as-you-throw concept for city garbage and trash pickup.

96. Voters Approve Wine, Constitutional Amendments -

Shelby County citizens voted 2-to-1 Tuesday, Nov. 4, against a proposed amendment to the Tennessee Constitution that gives the Tennessee Legislature the power to regulate abortion, including in cases of rape or incest.

97. Shelby Early Vote Shows "No" Carry On Abortion Amendment -

Shelby County’s early vote totals show a defeat for the amendment to the Tennessee Constitution involving abortion and passage of the other three amendments.

The vote count for Shelby County only during the early voting period in advance of the Tuesday, Nov. 4, election day show:

98. Haslam Reaches End of Campaign Trail in Memphis -

On his last campaign event on the last full day of the 2014 campaign season, Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam was surrounded by whimsy and cookies in a decidedly pink East Memphis shop.

Haslam supporters packed the Whimsy Cookie Company, a boutique cookie bakery on Poplar Avenue Monday, Nov. 3, just before the afternoon rush hour.

99. Amendments, Wine Dominate Election Day -

The last of 2014’s three elections promises to be defined just as much by the questions on the ballot as it is by the choices among candidates.

Election Day is Tuesday, Nov. 4, across Tennessee, with polls open in Shelby County from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.

100. Early Vote Turnout Lags Behind 2010 -

Early voting turnout in advance of the Nov. 4 Election Day was running about 17,000 voters behind the early vote turnout four years ago for the same election cycle through the second and final weekend in the early voting period.