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Editorial Results (free)

1. Editorial | Help Wanted: Top Cop With View Beyond the Ranks -

Finding the city’s next top cop is the most important police director selection in a generation.

And we believe the next Memphis Police Department director must be more than a leader of the ranks.

2. Last Word: Rallings Meets the Council, Million Dollar Auditions & A Pinch Plan Emerges -

His second day on the job, the new Memphis Police Director, Michael Rallings, met the Memphis City Council and discovered just what a huge issue police body cameras are – if he didn’t know that already.
His answers to some pointed questions about when police can turn off those cameras and why made this an uneven first encounter.
Council members told him they got an earful from constituents over the weekend in the wake of the fatal police shooting of Johnathan Bratcher in South Memphis. And some of the reaction they got was to reports that a police dispatcher ordered police trying out the body cameras to turn them off as they arrived at the scene of the shooting.
There are three cameras being tested. And one of the officers with them showed up after the shooting, according to police.
Meanwhile, Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland still didn’t have a timetable for the roll-out of the cameras but did offer some specifics including hiring by the MPD of 10 new personnel to deal with the handling of what the camera records.
And Strickland’s intention is to pay for it out of the existing MPD budget.

3. Strickland: Police Body Camera Rollout Requires More Personnel -

The rollout of police body cameras will mean hiring more people at the Memphis Police Department and the Shelby County District Attorney General’s office, according to Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland.

4. Council Probes Police Body Camera Delay -

Memphis City Council members talk Tuesday, Feb. 2, about when police body cameras might be ready for action.

And there will probably be questions at the 11 a.m. executive session about whether a limited test use of the cameras recorded any of last week’s fatal police shooting of Johnathan Bratcher in South Memphis.

5. Last Word: Groundhog Day's Long Shadow, Minority Percentage & The Value of Sports -

After the January into February weekend we had with its outbreak of spring fever, you might wonder if groundhogs are allowed to change their minds or if shadows that are the result of television lights count as a prediction on the winter’s length.
Or maybe it would be appropriate to have a weather map that includes the Groundhog Day immunity zones – areas where the long shadow of the groundhog does not venture.
Note to television meteorologists: This would in no way interfere with your right to declare large parts of your viewing areas as places of "potentially severe weather" far into the future. But you will need a different color for the Groundhog Immunity Zones.

6. Bratcher Shooting First Test of Local Pact With TBI -

The first fatal police shooting since local law enforcement and prosecutors adopted a policy of sending such cases to the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation is being watched closely.

And a quick initial account by the TBI is a change from the agency’s normal posture of not making any comments and abiding strictly by a state law that seals all of its records from the public unless by court order or subpoena.