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Editorial Results (free)

1. September 16-22: This week in Memphis history -

1976: Solomon Alfred, described in The Daily News “Dining Out” column as a “restaurant, club and pinball emporium” has been open since May on the northeast corner of Madison and Cooper in Overton Square. It is owned by The Grove Inc., a Little Rock-based corporation.

2. All Monuments Are Grand in Arizona -

By rule it doesn’t rain in the desert. It can’t rain in the desert, right?

Wrong, and when it rains it pours, especially when driving through Arizona’s Painted Desert on our way to the South Rim of the Grand Canyon.

3. City's Fourth Bluff Project Gets $5 Million Grant -

A new national effort to counter the growing economic and social fragmentation in U.S. cities has awarded Memphis’ Fourth Bluff project a $5 million grant.

The effort, called Reimagining the Civic Commons, is a partnership of four national foundations that seeks to foster civic engagement, economic opportunity and environmental sustainability by revitalizing and connecting parks, libraries, community centers and other public spaces.

4. Memphis’ Fourth Bluff Project Gets $5 Million Grant -

A new national effort to counter the growing economic and social fragmentation in U.S. cities has awarded Memphis’ Fourth Bluff project a $5 million grant.

The effort, called Reimagining the Civic Commons, is a partnership of four national foundations that seeks to foster civic engagement, economic opportunity and environmental sustainability by revitalizing and connecting parks, libraries, community centers and other public spaces.

5. AZP Glory Days Only Rarely Revisited -

It began on April 1, 2000. The much-anticipated diamond gem Downtown was open for business.

The Memphis Redbirds beat the St. Louis Cardinals 10-6 in an exhibition game before 15,000 fans at AutoZone Park. Former University of Memphis outfielder Mark Little, leading off and playing center field for Memphis, got the Redbirds’ first hit in the new ballpark. Cardinals catcher Eli Marrero hit the first home run, a two-run blast onto the Bluff in left field.

6. The Week Ahead: August 29-September 4 -

Are you ready for some football, Memphis? The Tiger Blue faithful will welcome new coach Mike Norvell and new starting quarterback Riley Ferguson Saturday at the Liberty Bowl. Several other late-summer events precede the big gridiron season opener, including a concert fundraiser that starts Friday and a big 5K race on Labor Day. OK, that’s next Monday – so it’s a long week – better get those seersucker suits ready.      

7. MATA Route Proposals Straighter, Include Airport, Shelby Farms Shuttles -

A set of 49 proposed route and service changes to the city’s bus system are focused primarily on bus schedules in southwest Memphis and the Memphis International Airport area.

There are also eight new proposed routes and shuttle services.

8. Editorial: The Natives’ Guide To Memphis Tourism -

Mixing tourism with the everyday life of our city is always going to be a bit risky. And the mix is relatively new to a Memphis that has really only had a recognized tourism industry for about 35 years.

9. Thrill-Ride Accidents Spark New Demands for Regulation -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – In some parts of the U.S., the thrill rides that hurl kids upside down, whirl them around or send them shooting down slides are checked out by state inspectors before customers climb on. But in other places, they are not required to get the once-over.

10. Vols Offensive Line Rushing Into Much-Anticipated Season -

Jalen Hurd knows right where he stands among Tennessee’s running backs of the past and wants to be No. 1 in career rushing yards at the end of the 2016 season.

The junior from Hendersonville Beech High School needs 892 yards to surpass Travis Henry as UT’s career rushing leader.

11. Last Word: Graceland's Important Day, MAA's $4 Billion Buy and Hotel Napoleon -

Before the rain did its thing Monday night at Graceland, the latest Black Lives Matter movement protest was a fact at Graceland’s annual candlelight vigil.

Some tension and lots of noise on the line at Elvis Presley and Craft where police stopped those whom they identified as protesters. And more than a few allegations of racial profiling by police.

12. Dragon Fly Sprint Triathlon To be Held Aug. 27 -

The 27th annual Dragon Fly Sprint Triathlon, presented by P.R. Event Management LLC, is scheduled for Aug. 27 in Sardis, Miss. The event begins at 8 a.m. at Cypress Point on the Lower Lake at Sardis Reservoir with a half-mile swim, followed by an 18-mile bike course through the country and finishes with a 4-mile run along a woodland trail.

13. Rhodes Junior Builds High-Ranking iOS App -

Rhodes College junior Will Cobb, a computer science major, still can’t believe it.

He’s a budding app developer and the creator of Go Radar, an iOS-only smartphone app that’s a companion to the Pokemon Go augmented reality mobile game that’s become a smash around the world. Cobb’s app works in tandem with that game by helping players find Pokemon creatures – and as a measure of how popular the game itself is, the halo from it has sent Cobb’s app likewise shooting up the iOS top app rankings.

14. Wiseacre’s Coliseum Plan Fueled By Growth -

Council chairman Kemp Conrad noted the timing is “hot off Overton Park and the Greensward” – the protracted controversy the council was heavily involved in. “I do think it’s going to move fast one way or another,” Conrad said Tuesday, Aug. 9, of the concept of a new Wiseacre brewery in the Coliseum.

15. Last Word: The Evolution of Michael Rallings, Mediation Confidential and Council Day -

The appointment of Michael Rallings as the permanent Memphis Police Director goes to the Memphis City Council Tuesday for what is expected to be a unanimous vote.

Rallings and Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland talked about the appointment – the only major appointment in Strickland’s inner circle left seven months into his term as mayor – during a press conference Monday morning in the Hall of Mayors.

16. Last Word: Election Wrap Up, Crosstown's Momentum and GMF's Court Report -

For an election that only 14 percent of us turned out for, the Thursday elections in Shelby County delivered in terms of political drama.

David Kustoff, whose bid for Congress in the old 7th Congressional District 14 years ago ended in frustration amidst too many primary candidates from Shelby County, claimed the Republican primary in the 8th amidst an even larger field with even more Shelby County rivals.

17. Last Word: The One Before November, Defining The Outsider and Stock Exchange -

Election Day arrives in Shelby County.

And this election cycle, in the shadow of the November Presidential general election, has turned out to be pretty interesting.

18. Jernigan Raises Outlook for Earnings -

For Jernigan Capital, the newest Memphis-based public company that provides capital to self-storage entrepreneurs, the period between April and June saw the company achieve a handful of firsts.

Among the results for the second quarter, the company grew its net income to $5.4 million, up significantly from $1.1 million in the first quarter and reversing a Q2 2015 loss of $558,000. The second quarter was also the first time since the company’s April 2015 initial public offering that total income surpassed overhead costs.

19. With Redbirds Pitcher Reyes the Plan is Attack -

A few hours before St. Louis Cardinals prospect Alex Reyes took the mound at AutoZone Park, Memphis Redbirds manager Mike Shildt confided that it was a good time to “back him off” – or hold down his pitch count.

20. A Swing – and a Miss – is More Common in Baseball All the Time -

It’s obvious when there are a lot children at AutoZone Park. Even the most harmless infield popup prompts a collective shriek and the hope of a home run.

The long ball may not be what it was at the peak of baseball’s steroid era when Barry Bonds, Mark McGwire and Sammy Sosa were cartoon characters, but the game has not turned away from the notion of driving the ball.

21. Greenprint Summit Gauges Community Support -

It’s not easy being green. That is, until people begin to see projects like the Shelby Farms Greenline and Wolf River Greenway taking shape.

22. George Lapides: One of a Kind -

Almost every George Lapides story, at least for those of us working in Memphis sports media, begins with those first impressions after arriving in town.

His town.

Seeing George take over an interview or a press conference and putting on his own full-court press when the subject was trying to skate by with lame, say-nothing answers.

23. Parking Was Key in ServiceMaster Deal -

Parking concerns for ServiceMaster Global Holdings’ move to Downtown Memphis have been resolved.

On June 14, the Downtown Parking Authority granted ServiceMaster access to the parking garage at 250 Peabody Place.

24. Greenprint Summit To Be Held June 23 -

The Memphis-Shelby County Office of Sustainability will hold its second Greenprint Summit this month.

On June 23, regional speakers and local leaders will speak on their efforts in improving green infrastructure in the Mid-South.

25. Greenprint Summit To Be Held June 23 -

The Memphis-Shelby County Office of Sustainability will hold its second Greenprint Summit this month. On June 23, regional speakers and local leaders will speak on their efforts in improving green infrastructure in the Mid-South.

26. The Week Ahead: May 23-29 -

Alright, Memphis, it’s time to get this week started with our roundup of happenings you need to know about. 

The 2016 Memphis In May International Festival closes out Saturday with a pair of new additions to the monthlong lineup.
The Saturday by the river begins with the Great American River Run – a half-marathon and a 5K run with a riverside and Downtown route. There is, of course, a post-race party, which then segues into 901Fest – four stages in Tom Lee Park featuring local music and arts, from Al Kapone and Frayser Boy to the North Mississippi Allstars to Opera Memphis and the New Ballet Ensemble & School.
The idea here, and it may be an evolving concept, seems to be local and diverse and not as much of an emphasis on the stages and what happens there at the expense of those who stay after the run and those who come for the music and the arts.
To dot the I on that point, 901Fest also includes an air show.

27. Opera Memphis: If You Sing – Anywhere – They Will Listen -

For everything else opera might be, Ned Canty has made it his business to see opera as opportunity.

The general director for Opera Memphis, when Canty came to town five years ago the company was in decline.

28. Station to Station -

Even now, Explore Bike Share founder Doug Carpenter does not try to pretend that the initiative will cure all that ails Memphis. 

It won’t wipe out poverty. It can’t cure cancer. It won’t eliminate diabetes and obesity, solve all of the city’s transportation problems or totally bridge cultural and racial gaps that predate the bicycle’s invention.

29. Last Word: Mud Island Money, Elvis Mystery and Beyond Barbecue -

It looks like the dry rub will be in order for Memphis in May's barbecue weekend with a shower or two keeping the dust down in Tom Lee Park Wednesday.

If you can see it through the smoke, Mud Island might strike a first-tme observer as a marked contrast to all of the activity in Tom Lee Park that goes right up to the bluff's edge.

30. Massacre: 1866 and the Battles Over How Memphis History is Told -

At the end of March with much secrecy, Rev. Keith Norman took delivery and responsibility for a large, heavy crate that stayed in his office for the next month.

“Don’t tell anybody, don’t let anybody get it, if they come in and say they work for the park commission or anybody, tell them to show identification,” were the instructions said Norman, who is president of the Memphis Branch NAACP.

31. Memphis Attorney Speaks for Tunsil After Startling NFL Draft -

Although two quarterbacks – Jared Goff and Carson Wentz – were the first two players selected in last weeks’ NFL Draft, an Ole Miss offensive lineman and the 13th overall pick made most of the headlines.

32. This Week in Memphis History: April 29-May 5 -

2015: Formal opening of Bass Pro Shops at The Pyramid, an adaptation of a former 20,000-seat arena that took a decade to pull off. City leaders approached Bass Pro Shops about opening a store with other attractions in the arena after a look at other adaptive reuses of arenas across the country.

33. Last Word: The Draft, The Greensward-Council Footnote and The Zoo Beatles -

I’ve never watched an NFL draft before Thursday evening’s in which Paxton Lynch, quarterback for the University of Memphis, was drafted by the Super Bowl champion Denver Broncos as the 26th pick of the first round.

34. Last Word: Prince, Violent Crime Numbers, and a Parkside Post Script -

Prince. It’s hard to think of a musician with a more complete knowledge of music as a social and cultural force and the ability to let that force inhabit his music and what he wanted to accomplish.
It is that knowledge and its use from obscurity to the pinnacle of fame and acclaim to his own journey for personal fulfillment that, to me, defines what has been lost.
Music mattered to Prince unlike it had ever mattered before. All of the influences analyzed and synthesized by someone born in rock and roll’s first wave pushed forward in a sound that combined rock and roll and rhythm and blues and funk with purpose and confidence.
It wasn’t a denial or downplaying of any of those music categories – all were present sonically and culturally. No juggling or quick changes.
That was his talent and it’s hard to think of anyone who has been as knowledgeable, intentional and successful -- commercially and artistically – in that combination.
Prince is remembered here for not only playing the city’s largest arenas but for his legendary after shows on Beale Street that brought an entertainment insider cachet the district has rarely seen since its early 1980s reopening.
His was an intensity and sense of purpose rarely seen and possessed in such a way in the 60 years since rock and roll started in this very city, kicked off by both Rocket 88 and That’s Alright Mama.
So why couldn’t the city’s rock radio stations do more than talk about Prince into commercial breaks after another Nickelback rock block and actually play some of his music to acknowledge such a huge genre crossing artist?
Not cool.

35. Last Word: A Dog Named Elvis, Soulville's Change and Highlander Politics -

For those who stopped watching in the fourth quarter, The Grizzlies lost to the Spurs 106-74 in San Antonio Sunday to open the NBA's second season. If you put together the second and fourth quarters it would have been close. But oh the first and third quarters.

36. Last Word: Tubby Time, Haslam's Veto and Africa in April's 30th Year -

It was just four weeks ago that all of this talk about change at the top of the Tiger basketball chart was put to rest. Coach Josh Pastner’s performance was reviewed by the University of Memphis administration and he was staying at least for another season. Four weeks to the day of that announcement, Pastner is the new coach at Georgia Tech and we are in the first day of the Tubby Smith era at the U of M.

37. Southern Yankee -

To best understand another man’s baseball passion, you must first understand his baseball pain. So if you hope to truly understand Peter B. Freund, new majority owner of the Memphis Redbirds, you must travel back to his youth.

38. Memphis College of Art Making Moves to Consolidate Campuses -

Memphis College of Art has confirmed the consolidation of its Downtown campus with its Overton Park campus and will begin relevant construction over the summer.

That construction includes converting five MCA-owned apartment buildings around the Overton Park campus into studios for use in the graduate program.

39. Last Word: Pastner's Georgia Tech Post-Season, Who Filed and Greensward Invitations -

Not so fast with the off-season. There is a Memphis post-season after all.

And the Grizz found it Thursday like a light at the end of a long-tunnel where a lot of people slipped and fell and can’t get up.
The light was Houston flaming out at home to Phoenix without the Grizzlies having to make a basket.
It’s all about the math. Stay in school, young people.

40. This Week in Memphis History: April 1-7 -

2000: Opening day at AutoZone Park.

1964: Among the new privilege licenses listed in The Daily News: The Hippodrome Lounge at 498 Beale St., a reminder that while the current Beale Street Entertainment District stretches between Second and Fourth streets, over the decades it has taken in land east and west of those current boundaries.

41. Last Word: The Curtain Falls in Nashville, Political Cuneiform and Ramsey Talks -

And in less than a half hour Wednesday, the de-annexation drama that should qualify as the political equivalent of a Netflix binge-watchable television series made just for Memphis was done.

42. Last Word: Putt and 1969, Fred Smith on Amazon and Ramsey's Departure -

George Howard Putt died in prison sometime last year state prison officials disclosed Wednesday -- far from the brief time he spent in Memphis but never far from the carnage he left behind in the Memphis of 1969.
The bodies of the first two of the five people killed by Putt between Aug. 14 and Sept. 11, 1969 were discovered just days after the murders of actress Sharon Tate and six others in Los Angeles by the Manson family dominated national news coverage. Less than a year earlier the Boston Strangler movie was in theaters, creating a sensation about the murders committed by serial killer Albert DeSalvo in Boston just a few years earlier.
Bernalyn and Roy Dumas were strangled by Putt in their home in Cooper-Young and Putt mutilated her body in a way that police homicide detectives still wouldn’t talk about decades later. The bodies were found in separate rooms.
Even with no details other than the names of the victims, the city was quickly spooked by the double murder. So when the body of Leila Jackson was found short of two weeks later, the city’s reaction was a palpable fear in which anyone unknown was to be avoided. Memphians didn’t tarry after work. They went home and bolted the doors.
It got worse as more victims turned up with little in common other than four of the five were women. They were of varying ages. Some were strangled and some were stabbed.
Just about any magazine rack of the day include true crime magazines that by the late 1960s were beginning to look very dated in their lurid noir-like covers teasing the most sensational crime narratives of the day.
They were an intentional contrast to the cover images of youth in bright colors in natural settings in other magazines heralding a new future and youth culture.
The murders in a Southern city, whose 1969 conservatism is hard to describe nearly 50 years later, quickly grabbed the covers of the true crime magazines. And the images they offered spoke to the scenic reality where Putt roamed even as the murders continued.
Apartment buildings and boarding houses were the settings for some of the murders but not all.
Glenda Sue Harden
was last seen walking to her car parked on the Cobblestones from the insurance office she worked at nearby. Her body was found in Martin Luther King/Riverside Park hidden under a piece of plywood.
At one of the murder scenes, police found an ice pick stuck in the side of the building with a stocking tied around it.
Putt’s last victim, in an apartment building on Bellevue, screamed as she was stabbed repeatedly and others in the building gave chase with police close behind, arresting Putt near the new and unopened section of the interstate that runs west of Bellevue.
Putt tried to force his way into another apartment nearby but the women inside kept him on the other side of the door.
The killer that panicked an entire city was a skinny utterly forgettable guy in his 20s with sideburns and glasses who appeared to have rarely roamed beyond a community of neighborhood bars, boarding houses and old apartment buildings in the Midtown and Medical Center areas.
It turns out he came to Memphis after walking away from a prison farm in Mississippi and into a Memphis that was slowly but surely changing. And the world that Putt encountered would soon vanish in large part.
Overton Square’s incarnation was about a year away. A new bridge was about to be built across the Mississippi River as part of Interstate 40 which was to go through Overton Park just south of the north-south leg of the interstate where Putt was captured.
Originally sentenced to death, Putt’s sentence was commuted when the U.S. Supreme Court banned the death penalty in the early 1970s.
He was serving a 497-year sentence when he died at the Turney Center Wednesday in Only, Tennessee.
Putt never sought parole and never gave any explanation for why he killed five people in less than a month and his apparently random selection of victims.

43. Last Word: Tiger Drumbeat, Eye on Drones and Shelby County Biggest Home Sale -

Let the coaching drumbeat resume after the Tigers Sunday post-season collapse one game past Tulsa.
A confession here – I am so sports challenged that I thought UConn was a team from Alaska until I saw it spelled out.
In my defense, who associates Huskies with Connecticut?
My point is what happens next isn’t just about basketball. It’s about a change with a good track record of being emotional in the worst way.
It’s linked to how we want to be known for treating people and what they think of us as a result of that.
In those two areas, it’s never just business. It’s always personal.
Josh Pastner’s four predecessors were each very different case studies in this regard.
It could have been any stop in any city with a basketball court and a one-and-done star he could find and recruit to John Calipari. But he still had to hide under a blanket in the back seat of a car on the way to the airport and lie about it long after everyone knew.
Knew about the Kentucky job that is. The mess he left at the university would surface shortly thereafter.
Tic Price was two fast seasons and the proof that the Memphis job isn’t just about what happens on the court and the attendance at games.
Price was clearly excited about coming to Memphis. He clearly understood the importance and heritage of Tigers basketball and valued it. And he wasted no time at all getting lost in the Memphis that is not a part of that all encompassing world.
It was the only job Larry Finch wanted and ultimately the job he couldn’t continue to have. That after ignoring conventional wisdom as a player and coming from Melrose High to Memphis State, bringing a beloved team with him and then picking Memphis again in the ABA over the Lakers in the NBA.
None of that was considered in pushing him out the door and then naming a building after him.
Dana Kirk
wanted to be the hustler John Calipari was. He was certainly impersonal enough about it and he took the team to an era where a post-season NCAA bid was expected and is still expected to this day.
But his impersonality exacted a high cost and he paid most of that cost. Although you could argue the experience for his team that produced some legendary players also made some of them legendary casualties of his emotional distance. It didn’t allow him to go elsewhere because he never figured out that he was being underestimated just as much as the team whose needs he ignored was in the national view of college basketball.
While Calipari dodged big trouble twice, Kirk wasn’t even in Calipari’s league when it came to ducking and timing.
We are past our inferiority complex. That’s what the last NFL drive of the 1990s did for us.
But it’s not necessarily a bad thing that we see the people chosen to occupy these very public positions as a reflection to the world of who we are.

44. ‘Fearless’ Stewart Embraces Battles With Supermajority -

Democratic state Rep. Mike Stewart lives on the front lines of the Tennessee General Assembly. As chairman of the House Democratic Caucus with 26 members, Stewart could employ a bunker mentality, but instead has chosen to take the fight to the other side of the aisle.

45. Last Word: Mudslide, The Deannexation Storm and Kilzer at Calvary -

Lots of news on a very rainy day including the flooding from the constant rain that closed some schools and cancelled a lot of other events. And then there was a mudslide on Riverside Drive from the bluff overlooking Tom Lee Park and the Mississippi River. The rain has also pushed the Wolf River to the point that it is now over some parts of the greenway in Germantown.

46. The Week Ahead: March 7-13 -

How was your weekend, Memphis? In a few short days it’ll be time to “spring forward” – but let’s not get ahead of ourselves. First, check out our weekly roundup of area happenings, from a discussion with local changemakers to the inaugural Memphis Black Restaurant Week…

47. Last Word: Hedgepeth Speaks, Josh Pastner's Future and Big Box Liquor -

Where else is there to begin but the Greensward controversy.
And we start with an email from Memphis City Council member Reid Hedgepeth in what is rapidly becoming a Last Word tradition and institution – the email in full.

48. Last Word: Election Day, Luttrell Makes It Six, And About "Executive Sessions" -

Can You Feel It? Tuesday is election day in Memphis and across the state in this presidential election year. And all indications are the turnout locally should be above the 24 percent mark we’ve been at in the last two presidential election years.

49. Last Word: The Moving Election Comes to Town and Missing Early Voters Are Found -

We probably haven’t had this much action with so many presidential candidates in the Memphis area since the 1984 Democratic presidential primary campaign.

Four of the contenders – three Republicans and one Democrat – in Memphis over the weekend looking for votes in advance of Tuesday’s Tennessee primary elections.

50. Events -

Hard Rock Cafe Memphis and On Location: Memphis will host an Oscar Night Watch Party on Sunday, Feb. 28, at 6 p.m. at Hard Rock, 126 Beale St. Activities and promotions are scheduled throughout the Academy Awards broadcast. Admission is free; suggested donation to Ronald McDonald House Charities of Memphis. Visit hardrock.com/memphis for details.

51. Retail Projects in Memphis Suburbs, Oxford Staple of Trezevant Realty Corp. -

Germantown-based Trezevant Realty Corp. has deep roots in the Mid-South commercial real estate market, and the uptick in the economy has more projects moving full-steam ahead.

52. The Moving Election -

The Trump balloons were a late arrival to the Shelby County Republican party’s annual Lincoln Day Gala, the local party’s largest annual fundraiser.

They were an unsubtle accent in a room of 500 people where unabashed hand-to-hand campaigning kept the buzz of conversation at a steady level for most of the evening.

53. Neil Young, Paul Simon, Modest Mouse Top Beale Street Music Fest Lineup -

Neil Young, Beck, Paul Simon, Train and Modest Mouse are among the headliners for the 2016 Beale Street Music Festival, April 29-May 1, in Tom Lee Park.

54. Last Word: The Road To Memphis, Medical District Plans and A Greensward Update -

The Republican presidential field is coming this way in the gap between early voting, which ends Tuesday evening, and the March 1 election day
Donald Trump, John Kasich and Ben Carson are booked for this coming weekend.

55. Claim Adds to Greensward Controversy -

Legal counter claims, parking study options and lots of old maps with even more long-filed plans have become the complex face of the Overton Park Greensward controversy.

As spring-like temperatures over the weekend mixed with cloudy skies, all fronts of the controversy were moving. The official arrival of spring to come in less than a month is the park’s busiest season.

56. After 40 Years of Pro Tennis, Will Memphis See Another? -

You can’t tell the players – or the owners – without a scorecard.

That’s the recent history of what is presently called the Memphis Open presented by ServiceMaster.

It is, specifically speaking, an ATP World Tour 250 event.

57. Mixed-Use Development at Shelby Farms Moves Forward -

The Land Use Control Board has approved initial outlines for a 57-acre planned development north of Shelby Farms Park.

58. MATA Changes Target Frayser and Southeast Memphis -

The public’s first chance to comment Tuesday, Feb. 9, on a set of 35 interim changes to Memphis’ bus schedule sounded like an auction.

There were questions that began with numbers – route numbers that would change directions and streets or the frequency of service. And there were a lot of numbers to consider.

59. Bertelkamp Made Right Call in Going with the Vols -

Bert Bertelkamp would be the first to tell you he’s pulling for Tennessee when calling basketball games as color commentator for the Vol Network.

And why wouldn’t he?

Bertelkamp is Big Orange to the bone. His father Hank played for the Vols (1951-53), was a team captain and remains a big supporter of UT.

60. Last Word: The Big Fizzle, John Jay Hooker's Exit And "A Great Sports Town" -

Everybody talks about the weather but nobody does anything about it – isn’t that how the saying goes?
In our case, it might be better to say everybody talks about the television weather coverage but nobody does anything about it.
As we all know now, Memphis dodged the “blizzard” warning artfully and passive-aggressively teased by several television stations who shall go un-named here because they know who they are and you do too.
That’s because they spent much of the day of "the blizzard that wasn’t" whining about the reaction from viewers who complained about the hype and then the promos the stations ran the day of the big fizzle.
We didn’t get much in the way of snow in Memphis, but we got a couple of feet of hype.

61. In the Game -

Way back in the 1990s, perhaps before the Grizzlies and FedExForum were even a twinkle in anyone’s eye, Chris Wallace came to Memphis and The Pyramid for a preseason NBA game featuring Michael Jordan and the Chicago Bulls.

62. Bass Pro Shops Eyes Mud Island -

Mud Island’s neighbor to the east is interested in redeveloping the river park.

Bass Pro Shops is among the five companies that have submitted proposals to the Riverfront Development Corp. to oversee Mud Island River Park. And all five have advanced to a second round of the process without the RDC releasing details of the material they submitted.

63. Fort Lauderdale for Beach, Adventure -

Fort Lauderdale screams “Hello Sunny,” but the tourism slogan isn’t necessary to get the point across for visitors once they arrive. It’s undeniable when stepping out from the airport to prepare for a few days in this South Florida hotspot.

64. Last Word: Secrets In A Small Town, Bullard Bounce and Beale & Mud Island -

Munford! A winning Powerball ticket for the largest jackpot ever was sold in Munford and that warrants a rare exclamation mark.
Possibly two when you consider that small towns are supposed to be places where it is nearly impossible to keep a secret – at least from the other folks in the town.
The fact that it was sold at Naifeh’s, a long-standing Tipton County business institution adds to the story.
The person who bought the ticket in Munford holds one of three winning tickets which comes out to about $582 million for that ticket.
That is roughly the size of the city of Memphis operating budget.
There was a similar mystery underway Thursday in Dyersburg where someone bought a Powerball ticket worth a paltry $2 million. Probably worth an exclamation mark if I wasn’t over the limit and already feeling the unspoken disdain of my reporting brethren who are judging me harshly as you read this.

65. Last Word: Overton Park's Restless Winter, Across The Harahan and Higher Ed -

It may be chilly outside, but it might as well be July on the Overton Park greensward with all of the political heat that is building.
The thermometer spiked when more than two dozen trees donated to the Overton Park Conservancy in 2012 were removed this week by the Memphis Zoo which is preparing for large crowds in March.
That’s when its new Zambezi Hippo River Camp exhibit opens to much anticipation and much fanfare.
That and the New Year’s Eve legal opinion favoring the zoo’s position on its use of the greensward for overflow parking set the stage for a dispute the administration of Mayor Jim Strickland has had to mediate at less than two weeks in office.

66. ‘Undefeated’ Courtney to Speak at Tigers Baseball Banquet -

The University of Memphis baseball program has never been shy about swinging for the fences when booking speakers for its annual Meet the Tigers Banquet. Past speakers include Hall-of-Famer George Brett, best-selling author John Grisham, and pitcher Jim Morris, who inspired the movie “The Rookie.”

67. Sports Execs Tackle Teams’ Economic Impact -

Football fans in Charlotte, N.C., have had a fun season watching the NFL’s Carolina Panthers reel in 15 wins, a near perfect season, and secure the top playoff seed in their conference.

And it could turn out to be quite the edge for the Panthers in their quest to reach the Super Bowl.

68. Refugees, Regents, Privatization On Tap for New Session -

State Sen. Ken Yager isn’t quite ready for the state of Tennessee to reclaim the Refugee Resettlement Program from Catholic Charities.

69. Cardinals Caravan Returns To Memphis Jan. 15 -

The annual St. Louis Cardinals Caravan will roll into Memphis and AutoZone Park on Friday, Jan. 15. The night’s activities are slated to begin at 6:30.

In the days ahead, the Cardinals and Memphis Redbirds will announce list of current and former Cardinals/Redbirds scheduled to attend.

70. Cardinals Caravan Returns To Memphis Jan. 15 -

The annual St. Louis Cardinals Caravan will roll into Memphis and AutoZone Park on Friday, Jan. 15. The night’s activities are slated to begin at 6:30.

In the days ahead, the Cardinals and Memphis Redbirds will announce list of current and former Cardinals/Redbirds scheduled to attend.

71. The Truth, Whole Truth, Nothing But the Truth -

THE INS AND UNS OF OUR TRUTH. Truth is the truth. It isn’t inconvenient, inconsistent or incomplete. It isn’t uncomfortable or unpleasant and certainly not untrue.

But what we’ve made of the truth is all of those things.

72. Grizzlies’ Footprint Growing Across Region; Redbirds, RiverKings Try to Hit Their Niches -

Decades ago, the St. Louis Cardinals used their vast radio network to extend their brand across the middle of America. Even today, they have more than 130 affiliated stations in eight states.

“The Cardinals did a great job through their radio outreach,” said John Pugliese, Memphis Grizzlies vice president of marketing, communications and broadcast.

73. Events -

Emmanuel United Methodist Church will host Breakfast with Santa on Saturday, Dec. 12, from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at 2404 Kirby Road. Enjoy a pancake bar, ornament station, photo booth and more. Cost is $5 per child/$10 family cap for activities; and $5 each for pancake and sausage bar. Visit eumckids.com.

74. The Week Ahead: Nov. 30, 2015 -

How was your weekend, Memphis? Here’s our weekly rundown of local happenings you need to know about, from snow and sledding at the Levitt Shell to orientation for members of the new Memphis City Council...

75. 22 Sports Blessings Worth Giving Thanks For -

Counting the blessings and giving sporting thanks for:

• John Calipari not hiring Keelon Lawson.

• Women who don’t like football but still let their men watch football on Thanksgiving. Y’all get it.

76. Greenprint Summit Shows Region’s Possibilities -

Trails and bike lanes aren’t the only path to regional success, but they’re playing a growing role in partnerships among communities that sometimes find themselves competing for jobs.

To date, 19 of those communities have adopted a 25-year, green-centric plan that was introduced earlier this year and has been endorsed by more than 50 organizations.

77. City Council Approves Hotel-Retail Development Near Shelby Show Place Arena -

Memphis City Council members approved Tuesday, Oct. 20, plans to develop one of the few open parcels of land along Germantown Parkway as either a hotel with retail or two retail strips.

The Germantown Market planned development by the Debra Loskovitz Spousal Trust is on the east side of Germantown Parkway, south of Timber Creek Drive next to the Shelby Show Place Arena.

78. Koonce Joins Sedgwick Client Services -

Sedgwick Claims Management Services Inc. has added K. Max Koonce II as senior vice president of client services for its casualty retail business unit. Koonce, an attorney by trade, comes to Sedgwick from Wal-Mart Stores Inc., where he was senior director of risk management. He simultaneously served as president of Claims Management Inc., Wal-Mart’s wholly owned third-party administrator.

79. Little Rock Officials Weigh Renaming Confederate Boulevard -

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — Though only a short stretch of Little Rock's Confederate Boulevard remains, to some it is a glaring reminder of the city's checkered racial past.

City officials are expected to consider a petition Thursday to rename the boulevard's last few blocks after one of the area's first black property owners. Coincidentally, the planning commission's vote comes 58 years to the day that 1,200 troops arrived to escort nine black students to their first day of class during the integration of Central High School.

80. Bona Fide -

When the Bona Fide Blues Festival takes a set of stages in Overton Square and the Cooper-Young neighborhood next month, it will mark a return that’s been a long time coming.

But it also will offer something new.

81. Is State’s Role to Provide a Service or Turn a Profit? -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam appears to be on the brink of privatizing state government. But he won’t be able to do it without a battle, especially from university unions and Democratic lawmakers.

82. Grizzlies Caravan Rolling Along, Hoping To Pick Up Fans Beyond Memphis -

Tony Allen will throw out the first pitch at AutoZone Park and mascot Grizz will toe the rubber before a Cardinals game at Busch Stadium in St. Louis.

83. Memphis Redbirds, Grizzlies Partner for ‘Grit & Grind Night’ -

The Memphis Redbirds and Memphis Grizzlies play in different sports and at different levels, but for years the people running the teams acted as though they were quasi-rivals.

Change has been in the works for a while – the annual Cardinals Caravan was at FedExForum this winter when AutoZone Park was getting a makeover – but now a growing partnership is in even greater evidence.

84. Events -

Playhouse on the Square will host the Great Wine Performances wine tasting Tuesday, Aug. 18, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Playhouse, 66 S. Cooper St. Characters in full costume will describe the wines. As guests sip, they can test their theatrical expertise for wonderful prizes. Tickets are $50 in advance or $65 at the door. Visit playhouseonthesquare.org.

85. Events -

Touchdown Club of Memphis will meet Monday, Aug. 17, from 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Chickasaw Country Club, 3395 Galloway Ave. Sportswriter and broadcaster Tony Barnhart, “Mr. College Football,” will speak. Cost is $60. Visit tdcmemphis.com.

86. Events -

Visible Music College will host the Memphis is Me mini music festival Thursday, Aug. 20, starting at 5 p.m. at Visible’s Memphis campus, 200 Madison Ave. The one-day festival will feature more than a dozen acts on three stages, all celebrating the best in Memphis music. Admission is free. Visit facebook.com/visiblemc for details.

87. Party in Style at Schermerhorn, Hall of Fame, Other Top Nashville Venues -

When showing off Nashville to business associates, family and friends, doing so at a swanky location with some Music City cache is sure to hammer home exactly why everyone wants to be here right now.

88. Party in Style at Schermerhorn, Hall of Fame, Other Top Nashville Venues -

When showing off Nashville to business associates, family and friends, doing so at a swanky location with some Music City cache is sure to hammer home exactly why everyone wants to be here right now.

89. Short History of the Nation's Most-Visited National Park -

In 1899, the Appalachian National Park Association began discussing the concept for a 12,000-square-mile park in parts of North and South Carolina, Georgia, Virginia and Tennessee.

During the next century, many individuals, organizations, politicians and nature advocates worked to establish what is now the country’s most visited national park – the Great Smoky Mountains.

90. Whalum Chooses Council Super District Race -

New Olivet Baptist Church pastor and former Shelby County Schools board member Kenneth Whalum Jr. will run for Memphis City Council in the October 8 city elections.

Standing with family, friends and supporters Tuesday, July 14, in Church Park, Whalum settled weeks of speculation by announcing he will run for council Super District 9 Position 2, formerly held by Shea Flinn.

91. Boner, Fate and the Summer of Shame -

Phil Bredesen knew what he was trying to do. He just didn’t know if he could accomplish it.

“I had this sense that Nashville was ready for change,” says the former Metro mayor and Tennessee governor, reflecting on his early motivation for taking on the system that had run Nashville for decades.

92. House Scraps Vote on Confederate Flag in Federal Cemeteries -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Republican-controlled House scrapped a vote on permitting the Confederate flag at Park Service-run cemeteries – including four in Tennessee – on Thursday, a retreat under fire that only escalated a ferocious attack by Democrats complaining the banner celebrates a murderous, racist past.

93. Memphis Redbirds' Winning Record Doesn't Extend to Attendance -

The Memphis Redbirds are running last in the 16-team Pacific Coast League’s attendance race; the St. Louis Cardinals own the best record in the 30-team on-field competition run by Major League Baseball.

94. Events -

Memphis Blues Society and Overton Square will host a Bluesday Tuesday concert featuring John Nemeth with guest Eric Hughes Tuesday, June 23, from 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. in the Tower Courtyard, 2101 Madison Ave. Cost is free. Visit overtonsquare.com.

95. Greening the Region -

A result of a $2.6 million grant from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development and two years of planning, the pre-implementation phase of the Mid-South Regional Greenprint and Sustainability Plan is gaining momentum.

96. Events -

Memphis Blues Society and Overton Square will host a Bluesday Tuesday concert featuring John Nemeth with guest Eric Hughes Tuesday, June 23, from 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. in the Tower Courtyard, 2101 Madison Ave. Cost is free. Visit overtonsquare.com.

97. Events -

The Metal Museum will exhibit “A Kind of Confession,” showcasing critical and contemporary metalwork from African-American artists, Saturday, June 20, through Sept. 11 at the museum, 374 Metal Museum Drive. Visit metalmuseum.org.

98. Taking Their Hacks? FBI Investigates Cardinals in Breach of Astros’ Database -

One funny man posted a picture of former St. Louis Cardinals pitcher Luther Hackman, deeming him a “person of interest.”

Just about everyone took a swing at the Cardinals’ tiresome Best Fans in Baseball moniker by pointing out that “you can’t spell BFIB without FBI.”

99. Senior Stature -

Sprawling across 37 acres of Collierville land, posh retirement community The Farms at Bailey Station will serve more than 500 senior residents when the final phase of construction is completed in 2016.

100. Stones Rock Music City -

Pleased to meet you, hope you guessed our name. Well, hell, Mick, if it’s puzzling you, it’s Nashville. Music City USA.

We’re the national media’s flavor of the day – the “It city,” which has gone from being a secondary concert market – remember The Beatles played Memphis, not Nashville – to one of the country’s prime touring destinations.