» Subscribe Today!
More of what you want to know.
The Daily News
X

Forgot your password?
Skip Navigation LinksHome > Name & Property Search
Search results for 'Jim Strickland' | Search again
DeSoto Public Records:9
Shelby Public Records:20
Editorial:100
West Tennessee:0
Middle Tennessee:33
East Tennessee:12
Other:0

You must be a subscriber to see the full results of your search.

Please log in or subscribe below if you are not already a subscriber.

The Daily News subscribers get full access to more than 13 million names and addresses along with powerful search and download features. Get the business leads you need with powerful searches of public records and notices. Download listings into your spreadsheet or database.

Learn more about our services | Search again


Editorial Results (free)

1. City Opens Up Mid-South Coliseum to Reviews -

For a week in June, the city will allow citizen groups with qualified experts including architects and engineers to have access to the Mid-South Coliseum for four hours at a time twice a day.

The “Mid-South Coliseum Review Period” has a May 27 deadline for groups to request access under the city’s terms.

2. City Council to Wrap Up Budget Sessions -

The Memphis City Council’s budget committee meets Tuesday, May 24, for wrap-up sessions on the operating and capital budget proposals from Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland.

3. Pugh Takes Politically Volatile Shelter Position -

The new director of the Memphis Animal Shelter says a shelter that doesn’t euthanize animals because of time or space is a goal.

But Alexis Pugh, who starts the job next month, is quick to add that public safety is the immediate priority.

4. Global Ministries Continues to Take More Heat -

The receiver for the Warren and Tulane Apartments is in place with the notice filed in Memphis federal court last week that Foresite Realty Management LLC had accepted the job and that its bonding is in place.

5. Memphis Police Partner With NextDoor Network -

Memphis Police and the city of Memphis are partnering with NextDoor, the social media network, to better communicate with residents.

Mayor Jim Strickland and interim Memphis Police Director Michael Rallings announced the partnership Thursday, May 19, at City Hall.

6. Alexis Pugh to Lead Memphis Animal Shelter -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland has appointed Alexis Pugh, executive director of Mid-South Spay and Neuter Services, as the new director of Memphis Animal Services, effective in June.

7. Memphis Police Partner With NextDoor Network -

Memphis Police and the city of Memphis are partnering with NextDoor, the social media network, to better communicate with residents.

Mayor Jim Strickland and interim Memphis Police Director Michael Rallings announced the partnership Thursday, May 19, at City Hall.

8. Mud Island Search Becomes Dilemma -

The Riverfront Development Corp.’s time before the Memphis City Council’s budget committee this week was short.

9. Overton Mediation Looks at Reality Of North Parkway On-Street Parking -

Where shuttle buses will drop off those bound for Overton Park and the Memphis Zoo in particular, as well as the public’s reaction to newly created on-street parking on North Parkway are issues being discussed in mediation to resolve the park’s Greensward controversy.

10. Council Sells Former Police HQ for $2 Million -

Memphis City Council members approved Tuesday, May 17, the sale of the old Central Police building at 128 Adams Ave. for $2 million to NCE Realty and Capital Group LLC for development as a boutique hotel.

11. Council Sells Former Police HQ for $2 Million -

Memphis City Council members approved Tuesday, May 17, the sale of the old Central Police building at 128 Adams Ave. for $2 million to NCE Realty and Capital Group LLC for development as a boutique hotel.

12. Council Auctions Old Police Building -

The city holds a rare auction at the Tuesday, May 17, session of the Memphis City Council, selling the old Central Police building at 128 Adams Ave. to the highest bidder.

13. Delay On Larger Pinch Plan Grows Uneasy -

When Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland met last week with representatives of Bass Pro Shops and city council member Berlin Boyd – the council member whose district includes the Pyramid, Mud Island, the Pinch District and St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital – there was a lot of turf to discuss.

14. WIN Launches Data-Driven Initiative -

Workforce Investment Network has launched a new initiative that will use a data-driven approach to identifying a skilled workforce based on local industry needs.

The ACT Work Ready Communities initiative will use the college admissions ACT test to certify potential employees as “work ready,” according to a release from WIN.

15. Last Word: Mud Island Money, Elvis Mystery and Beyond Barbecue -

It looks like the dry rub will be in order for Memphis in May's barbecue weekend with a shower or two keeping the dust down in Tom Lee Park Wednesday.

If you can see it through the smoke, Mud Island might strike a first-tme observer as a marked contrast to all of the activity in Tom Lee Park that goes right up to the bluff's edge.

16. RVC Outdoors Seeks Strickland’s Commitment -

Andy Cates, CEO of Memphis-based RVC Outdoor Destinations, said his redevelopment plan for Mud Island won’t require significant public dollars, but he’s looking for a commitment from the city to move forward.

17. Wilson Urges Family Philanthropic Efforts at Dunavant Awards -

When most people think of the Kemmons Wilson family, there is an image that comes to mind. It’s a black and white photo from the 1950s of the five children – three boys and two girls – of the Holiday Inn founder cutting the ribbon on the very first Holiday Inn at 4925 Summer Ave.

18. Last Word: GMF Aftermath, Cop Counts and Budgets and Richardson Towers' Fall -

More on the move by Bank of New York to have a receiver appointed for the Warren and Tulane Apartments currently owned by Global Ministries Foundation.

GMF CEO Rev. Richard Hamlet responded Wednesday to the filing in Memphis federal court saying he agrees that a receiver for the property is a good idea. But he doesn’t agree – and in fact, strongly disagrees with the claims and reasoning behind the bank’s call for the receiver.

19. Haves, Have-Nots Get Varied Tax Relief -

Amid the rancor of bathroom and counseling bills, two major pieces of legislation slipped through the General Assembly this session with hardly a peep – elimination of the Hall tax and a partial revitalization of property tax relief for seniors and disabled veterans.

20. ‘Underground’ Stars Surface in Memphis -

The last time fans of the television show “Underground” saw actor Alano Miller, his character, Cato, was believed to be dead. The unexpected twist for a complex and central character in the WGN America drama based on the Underground Railroad in pre-Civil War America was still generating plenty of social media disbelief nearly a week later.

21. Wilson Urges Family Philanthropy at Dunavant Awards -

Families can have an impact on public service, the chairman of Kemmons Wilson Inc. said Wednesday, May 11, at the 13th annual Bobby Dunavant Public Servant Awards.

22. Rallings Fields Council Questions On Police Hiring, Director’s Job -

Interim Memphis Police Director Michael Rallings says he has plenty of time to apply for the job on a permanent basis.

For now, Rallings told Memphis City Council members he is focused on getting a $256.3 million budget approved as part of the overall $667 million city government operating budget, dropping crime numbers and raising the number of police on the force.

23. Nonprofit Operators Told That Failure Can Bring Long-Term Success -

“Innovation and the Courage to Fail.” That was the theme for the 11th annual conference for the nonprofit sector presented by the Alliance for Nonprofit Excellence and Nonprofit Quarterly.

24. Last Word: Humdingers, Gangster Disciples Paper Work and Underground Day -

Sometimes you think you know what is going on and then something happens like Chris Wallace, the general manager of the Memphis Grizzlies, grabbing a bite to eat Monday at Humdingers out east with former Grizz coach Lionel Hollins. Next thing you know there’s another possibility for the next Grizz coach – a return engagement that would be exceedingly rare.

25. Rallings May Seek Permanent Director Post -

When law enforcement brass talk about putting “drugs and guns on the table” – it’s a literal expression of a police department touting its ability.

Interim Memphis Police Director Michael Rallings did just that last week with the results of a 2 1/2 month operation by the police Organized Crime Unit that began Feb. 1, his first day on the job as police director.

26. Last Word: The Airport and Hotels, Loans and Musicians and Underground in Town -

That didn’t take long. Fired one day, hired the next for Dave Joerger now formerly of the Grizz.

27. 'Underground' Stars in Memphis Tuesday -

Three stars of the WGN America television series “Underground” are in Memphis Tuesday, May 10 – the day before the finale airs – for a sneak peek and panel discussion at the National Civil Rights Museum, 450 Mulberry St.

28. WIN Launches Data-Driven Initiative -

Workforce Investment Network has launched a new initiative that will use a data-driven approach to identifying a skilled workforce based on local industry needs.

The ACT Work Ready Communities initiative will use the college admissions ACT test to certify potential employees as “work ready,” according to a release from WIN.

29. Mayor Opposes City Funds for Mud Island -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland says the city may be willing to help fund a $9 billion expansion of St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital that is mostly private capital.

30. Last Word: Behind Grit N Grind, Brooks at 100 and Massacre -

This is a 12-month-a-year basketball town. There’s the season, possibly a post season, which by NBA standards is a second season. (Yep, they are still playing.) And then there is the rest of the year when whatever has been about to boil over behind the façade of sports clichés finally begins to spill out into the open.

31. Raleigh Mall Demolition Signals Change After Delays -

The crowd of several hundred people on the south end of the Raleigh Springs Mall Saturday, May 7, was larger than the crowd inside the mall to shop.

They came to watch the beginning of the end.

32. Demolition Begins On Raleigh Springs Mall Property -

With the business end of a Volvo crawler excavator, Memphis City Council member Bill Morrison kicked off the start of demolition Saturday, May 7, at the Raleigh Springs Mall.

33. Trustee’s Conference Meets in Memphis -

County trustees from across Tennessee will meet in Memphis for their annual conference on Tuesday through Thursday, May 10-12, at the Sheraton Memphis Downtown.

The trustees meet to exchanges ideas and practices, talk with state leaders, and take continuing education courses.

34. The Week Ahead: May 9-15 -

Alright, Memphis, grab your calendars! Whether you want to book it over to the Ruby Bridges Reading Festival or just baste in the scent of barbecue, there’s plenty to do this week. Here’s our roundup...

35. Massacre: 1866 and the Battles Over How Memphis History is Told -

At the end of March with much secrecy, Rev. Keith Norman took delivery and responsibility for a large, heavy crate that stayed in his office for the next month.

“Don’t tell anybody, don’t let anybody get it, if they come in and say they work for the park commission or anybody, tell them to show identification,” were the instructions said Norman, who is president of the Memphis Branch NAACP.

36. Last Word: Mall Demo, Defining 'Fringe Element' and Herenton's New Path -

Once upon a time there were three “town centers” planned by the city of Memphis.

City facilities like libraries and police precincts would be the anchors and encourage private retail development in them.

37. French Fort Motel Compromise Hard-Fought -

The developer of the old Marine Hospital south of E.H. Crump Avenue at the Memphis-Arkansas Bridge across the Mississippi River and the leader of the French Fort neighborhood association never actually talked to each other Wednesday, May 4.

38. Geater Claims Dunavant Honor for Job Without a Description -

Lisa Geater likens the job of the Memphis City Council’s staff to being wallpaper. After 27 years working in the council office at City Hall, including 20 as the administrator running the office, Geater said her advice for new staff members was simple.

39. Overton Traffic Plans On Display Saturday -

All roads in Overton Park except the one in front of the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art will be one-way streets Saturday, May 7, as the Overton Park Conservancy tries out some traffic and parking remedies on a busy day in the park.

40. Last Word: Council Return on Overton, No Frayser Truck Stop and Historian-apolooza -

June 30 is fast approaching. It’s coming up so fast that the City Council is moving to seal in any agreement that might come from the Overton Park Greensward mediation process before the ink dries.

41. Council Approves Overton Boundary Ordinance on First Reading -

Memphis City Council members approved an ordinance Tuesday, May 3, on the first of three readings to set boundaries in Overton Park including the use of the park Greensward.

But some council members who supported a March 1 resolution that gave the Memphis Zoo control of the greensward were much more hesitant about the ordinance two months later.

42. Norris Recounts Path to Majority Status, Dunavant Award -

Good government isn’t a bowl of cherries. There will be controversy even with the best of intentions and with everything done by the numbers. And that applies to those who win awards like state Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris of Collierville.

43. Last Word: Budget-Mania, TNReady's Backstory and Slow Down Millenial Investors -

The Overton Park Greensward controversy moves back to City Hall Tuesday as the council talks over an ordinance that sets further in stone the council’s decision in March to give the Memphis Zoo control of two-thirds of the greensward.

44. City Council Set for First Property Tax Rate Vote -

Memphis City Council members begin setting the stage for the approval of city operating and capital budgets when they meet Tuesday, May 3.

The council agenda includes first-reading votes on two ordinances that are placeholders for the basic passage of tax rates and the allocation of parts of the rate.

45. Greensward Mediation Deadline Looms -

Memphis City Council members begin to lock in specific boundaries for the use of the Overton Park Greensward on Tuesday, May 3.

But the proposed ordinance achieving that end is expected to change by the time its third and final reading is scheduled sometime in June.

46. Last Word: BSMF Looks Up, Overton Park Respite and Slow Economic Growth -

The Beale Street Music Festival box office numbers won’t be in for a bit yet. But it looks like the three-day event that ended Sunday evening with Beck and Paul Simon weathered the weather very well, maybe better than usual.

47. Norris, Geater Named Dunavant Award Recipients -

Tennessee State Senate Republican Leader Mark Norris of Collierville and Lisa Geater, chief of staff to Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland, are the recipients of the annual Bobby Dunavant Public Servant Awards to be presented in May by the Rotary Club of Memphis East.

48. New City Council Learns Ways of Budget Season Quickly -

There are 3,000 miles of street curbs in Memphis. Figures like this are the basic elements of budget season at City Hall.

They are how 13 Memphis City Council members – seven of them four months into their first four-year term of office – wrap their heads around an $85.3 million capital budget proposal and a $667 million operating budget proposal.

49. The Week Ahead: May 2-8 -

So, you think this is the “off-week” of the Memphis In May International Festival – the gap between the Beale Street Music Festival and the World Championship Barbecue Cooking Contest. But, while Tom Lee Park gets a breather, there are plenty of cultural experiences to soak up across Memphis. Here's our weekly roundup of local happenings you need to know about...

50. Last Word: The Draft, The Greensward-Council Footnote and The Zoo Beatles -

I’ve never watched an NFL draft before Thursday evening’s in which Paxton Lynch, quarterback for the University of Memphis, was drafted by the Super Bowl champion Denver Broncos as the 26th pick of the first round.

51. Overton Greensward Overcast Weekend Offers Temporary Interlude -

For a few hours Saturday morning, April 30, in Overton Park there was no one on the Greensward – no cars, no zoo crew, no protesters, no yoga class, no dogs or dog walkers. On an overcast day, there wasn't even a shadow to be cast.

52. Reaction to the Death of Civil Rights Leader Rev. Samuel Billy Kyles -

Rev. Samuel Billy Kyles died Tuesday in Memphis after a long illness. Here's a roundup of reaction from local leaders, Kyles' associates and the National Civil Rights Museum...

53. Commission Debates Full Bill for Police Body Cameras -

Most Shelby County commissioners expressing an opinion say they favor body cameras for Memphis Police.

But the opinions begin to differ significantly when comes to who pays for the back-office system to handle the recordings and how much the whole bill will be.

54. CBHS Gets $1 Million Gift, Names Business Program -

Christian Brothers High School has announced its business program will be called the Bill and Carol Marr Department of Business and Economics. The program is named in honor of the $1 million gift from alumnus Bill Marr, CBHS Class of 1964.

55. Council Members Express Impatience with Minority Contracting Complexity -

Some Memphis City Council members want to challenge City Hall’s existing minority business system as its minority business effort is being streamlined.

The possible challenge includes questioning the idea of percentage goals in contracting based on a complex formula that includes multipliers.

56. Last Word: Prince, Violent Crime Numbers, and a Parkside Post Script -

Prince. It’s hard to think of a musician with a more complete knowledge of music as a social and cultural force and the ability to let that force inhabit his music and what he wanted to accomplish.
It is that knowledge and its use from obscurity to the pinnacle of fame and acclaim to his own journey for personal fulfillment that, to me, defines what has been lost.
Music mattered to Prince unlike it had ever mattered before. All of the influences analyzed and synthesized by someone born in rock and roll’s first wave pushed forward in a sound that combined rock and roll and rhythm and blues and funk with purpose and confidence.
It wasn’t a denial or downplaying of any of those music categories – all were present sonically and culturally. No juggling or quick changes.
That was his talent and it’s hard to think of anyone who has been as knowledgeable, intentional and successful -- commercially and artistically – in that combination.
Prince is remembered here for not only playing the city’s largest arenas but for his legendary after shows on Beale Street that brought an entertainment insider cachet the district has rarely seen since its early 1980s reopening.
His was an intensity and sense of purpose rarely seen and possessed in such a way in the 60 years since rock and roll started in this very city, kicked off by both Rocket 88 and That’s Alright Mama.
So why couldn’t the city’s rock radio stations do more than talk about Prince into commercial breaks after another Nickelback rock block and actually play some of his music to acknowledge such a huge genre crossing artist?
Not cool.

57. Bridging a Divide -

The Mid-South is united by more than the Mississippi River, but that’s what it took to get the region’s mayors in the same room.

In the aftermath of the 2011 Mississippi River flood, damage stretched from Millington’s naval base to Memphis’ Beale Street. Leaders of the affected municipalities had to come together to apply for FEMA grants and plot their way out of devastation.

58. CBHS Receives $1 Million Gift, Names New Business Program -

Christian Brothers High School has announced its business program will be called the Bill and Carol Marr Department of Business and Economics. The program is named in honor of the $1 million gift from alumnus Bill Marr, CBHS Class of 1964.

59. Memphis’ Shrinking Population Cause for Concern -

Even as Memphis has grown larger through annexing surrounding communities, its population has steadily dwindled due to outmigration to the surrounding suburbs. Inner-city struggles will become more pronounced if this region’s wealthiest tax base continues that outward pattern, national experts say.

60. Strickland in New Seat for Budget Give-and-Take -

When Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland finished his budget address to the Memphis City Council Tuesday, April 19, council member Edmund Ford had a film clip he wanted Strickland and the rest of the council to watch.

61. City Budget Season Begins With the Basics -

The Memphis City Council Budget Committee begins its work next week with afternoon sessions that lead to a goal of a June 7 council vote on Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland’s first budget proposal.

62. Last Word: Budget Basics, A Peak At Greensward Mediation and Elvis & Nixon -

Spurs 94 – Grizzlies 68 in game 2 of the NBA playoffs. The TNT post-game show just showed the highlights of the game while Shaq and Charles Barkley talked about how big the women are in San Antonio. I’m not making this up. They didn’t even try to talk about the game. This is just grim.

63. Strickland Defines 'Brilliant at the Basics' $667M Budget Plan -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland took a $667 million operating budget proposal to Memphis City Council members Tuesday, April 19, that keeps the property rate stable at $3.40.

64. Last Word: When To Heal, Budget Day at City Hall and Cheese Steak Pondering -

After Sunday’s thrashing of the Grizzlies by the Spurs in their 2016 NBA playoff debut, there is a school of thought among Grizz watchers that the sooner this is over the better.
But there are others who would have a more content off season if the Grizz could win just one game in the series as they go down and then proceed back to the cave for some summer healing.
Either way, Game 2 is Tuesday in San Antonio and then FedExForum Friday for Game 3.

65. Strickland’s First Budget Includes Police Raise -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland presents his first budget proposal Tuesday, April 19, to the Memphis City Council just four months after taking office as mayor.

66. The Week Ahead: April 18-24 -

Let’s get this week started, Memphis! Here’s our roundup of local happenings you need to know about, from the dreaded federal income tax filing day, to the scheduled end of the Tennessee Legislature for this session, to a couple of big round-ball games at FedExForum beginning Friday.

67. Tubby Smith's Hire Comes With 'Highest Expectations' -

Wearing a University of Memphis lapel pin on his suit jacket, Tubby Smith was introduced on the floor of FedExForum Thursday, April 14, as the 18th head coach in Tigers history.

University president M. David Rudd called it a “historic hire” for the school and said Smith arrived as the “most accomplished coach” to lead the program (take that, John Calipari).

68. Last Word: Tubby Time, Haslam's Veto and Africa in April's 30th Year -

It was just four weeks ago that all of this talk about change at the top of the Tiger basketball chart was put to rest. Coach Josh Pastner’s performance was reviewed by the University of Memphis administration and he was staying at least for another season. Four weeks to the day of that announcement, Pastner is the new coach at Georgia Tech and we are in the first day of the Tubby Smith era at the U of M.

69. Lot Availability, Prices Putting Home Construction Behind Demand -

The recent uptick in the residential real estate market is devouring what’s left of lot development that lagged during the recession, and tight supply is raising home prices in the Memphis area.

70. This Week in Memphis History: April 15-21 -

2014: Memphis Police Director Toney Armstrong announces he will retire in 2017 and has enrolled in the city’s deferred retirement option plan. The retirement date depends on Memphis Mayor A C Wharton winning re-election in 2015 or Wharton’s successor keeping Armstrong on until retirement.
Wharton loses his re-election bid, and in November 2015, new mayor Jim Strickland names Armstrong interim police director while searching for a replacement. Armstrong left in February to become director of security for St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital.

71. Parkinson: OK to ‘Go A Little Bit Extreme’ to Get Job Done -

With U.S. Marine Corps training, Rep. Antonio Parkinson knows how to grab people’s attention.

He did that earlier this year when he sponsored legislation to kill the Achievement School District, Tennessee’s solution for turning around struggling schools.

72. Last Word: Tubby Fever, School Closings and March Real Estate Numbers -

The Tigers basketball grapevine is nothing but Tubby Smith as of Wednesday when the speculation was joined by torrent of rumors about contact between the Texas Tech coach and the University of Memphis.
Smith has now acknowledged he’s talking with the U of M.
More background on Smith from The Sporting News and Mike DeCourcy, a former sports reporter at The Commercial Appeal, that came out before everything went Tubby here.

73. Legislators Playing Expensive Game With LGBT Issues -

The silly season is in full swing on Capitol Hill, but the “bathroom bill” and any jokes surrounding it are no laughing matter anymore. It’s getting downright expensive.

Tennessee Attorney General Herbert Slatery said this week the bill dealing with transgender student use of restrooms could cost the state more than $1.2 billion in federal funds for K-12 and higher education.

74. Last Word: Lipscomb's Successor, MATA School Buses and Roland's Big Breakfast -

Paul Young gets a lot more attention these days than he did when he was the first director of the city-county Office of Sustainability. The attention comes with being the city director of Housing and Community Development where virtually all of the funding comes from the federal government.
That federal funding has changed the face of public housing in the city in the last 25 years. There is only one large public housing project left in the city as a result of the federal funding and its use by Young’s predecessor, Robert Lipscomb.
And what Lipscomb did with the job combined with being the executive director of the Memphis Housing Authority is why a lot of people want to get to know Paul Young these days.
Our centerpiece story by Madeline Faber in Tuesday’s edition makes clear that Young has no desire to wield that kind of power. And it is unlikely anyone in the near future will have the kind of autonomy Lipscomb did.
But beyond that there is still the flow of a lot of federal dollars and Young has some ideas based on his experience in government and finance prior to coming to HCD – everything in government is initials.
It’s a much different experience than Lipscomb’s. Lipscomb coined the phrase “ending public housing as we know it” and at times that slogan wasn’t followed with a lot of detail about what came after public housing was demolished, especially with the first of the projects to fall.
The last public housing project, Foote Homes, will be demolished on Young’s watch which makes his tenure important if more limited than Lipscomb’s tenure.

75. Roland Starts 2018 Bid for County Mayor -

The 2018 Shelby County general elections are more than two years away. The 2016 county elections that decide races for General Sessions Court Clerk, five of the nine seats on the Shelby County Schools board and two judicial positions are still to come in August.

76. State Halts City Board From Issuing Bonds -

The city of Memphis entity that sold $12 million in municipal bonds on behalf of Global Ministries Foundation has been told it can no longer conduct such business.

The Tennessee Housing Development Agency has temporarily de-authorized the Health, Educational & Housing Facility Board of the city of Memphis to sell bonds. The decision is related to the withdrawal of federal subsidies going to Global Ministries Foundation’s portfolio and a subsequent downgrading of those bonds as well as leadership changes at the Health & Ed Board.

77. Zoo Offers Parking Plan, Devotes Parking Fees to Long-Range Parking Solution -

The Memphis Zoo is suggesting the city general services maintenance yard on the east side of the park be used as a parking area and a second greensward with “eco-friendly options” that “are not disruptive to the park” to get zoo patrons from there to the zoo.

78. State Halts Memphis Health & Ed Board From Doing Business -

The city of Memphis entity that sold $12 million in municipal bonds on behalf of Global Ministries Foundation has been told it can no longer conduct such business.

The Tennessee Housing and Development Agency has temporarily de-authorized the Health, Educational and Housing Facility Board of the city of Memphis to sell bonds. The decision is related to the withdrawal of federal subsidies going to Global Ministries Foundation’s portfolio and a subsequent downgrading of those bonds as well as leadership changes at the Health & Ed Board.

79. Wastewater Leak Stopped, McKellar Cleanup Continues -

The boat ramp on McKellar Lake at theA bypass around a raw sewage leak into Cypress Creek and McKellar Lake was up and running Thursday, April 7, according to the city of Memphis.

The bypass ends a leak in the main wastewater line to the T.E. Maxson Wastewater Treatment Plant that was discovered March 31 and triggered a large fish kill of more than 10,000 in McKellar Lake.

80. Last Word: Pastner's Georgia Tech Post-Season, Who Filed and Greensward Invitations -

Not so fast with the off-season. There is a Memphis post-season after all.

And the Grizz found it Thursday like a light at the end of a long-tunnel where a lot of people slipped and fell and can’t get up.
The light was Houston flaming out at home to Phoenix without the Grizzlies having to make a basket.
It’s all about the math. Stay in school, young people.

81. Cypress-McKellar Wastewater Leak Stopped, Cleanup Continues -

A bypass around a raw sewage leak into Nonconnah Creek and McKellar Lake was up and running Thursday, April 7, according to the city of Memphis.

The bypass ends a leak in the main wastewater line to the T.E. Maxson Wastewater Treatment Plant that was discovered March 31 and triggered a large fish kill of more than 10,000 in McKellar Lake, which Nonconnah Creek runs into.

82. City Council Debates Idea of De-Annexation Compromises -

A proposal to form a joint city-county group to explore voluntary de-annexation and the city’s footprint goes to the Memphis City Council for a vote in two weeks.

But there is vocal sentiment on the council against the city giving up any of its turf, including the most recently annexed areas of south Cordova and Southwind-Windyke.

83. Lawsuit Seeks to Void City Decision on Greensward -

A lawsuit filed in Shelby County Chancery Court Tuesday, April 5, seeks to void the March 1 Memphis City Council vote that gave the Memphis Zoo undisputed control of most of the Overton Park Greensward.

84. Lawsuit Seeks to Void City Decision on Greensward -

A lawsuit filed in Shelby County Chancery Court Tuesday, April 5, seeks to void the March 1 Memphis City Council vote that gave the Memphis Zoo undisputed control of most of the Overton Park Greensward.

85. Last Word: Policing The Greensward, A Rural Oasis and Gene Chips -

The city of Memphis had 88 police staff and other city employees working an Overton Park detail Saturday and another 33 working Sunday on the same detail, according to the Strickland administration’s accounting on Monday.

86. Conrad Call for De-Annexation Talks Draws Favorable Reviews -

Memphis City Council Chairman Kemp Conrad wants to open talks with county commissioners on possible voluntary de-annexations.

And County Commission Chairman Terry Roland said he is open to the idea.

87. City Council Sets Stage for Budget Season -

Two weeks before Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland presents his first budget proposal to the Memphis City Council, the council and administration are setting the stage for the budget season to come.

88. MPD Officer Schilling Gets Disability Retirement -

The city of Memphis pension board granted a line-of-duty disability retirement Thursday, March 31, to Memphis police officer Connor Schilling.

Schilling is the officer who shot and fatally wounded Darrius Stewart in July during a traffic stop in Hickory Hill.

89. Amended Senate De-annexation Bill Faces More Debate -

The de-annexation bill whose defeat became City Hall’s top priority in March is off the political frontburner.

But Memphis Democrats in the Tennessee Legislature who opposed the de-annexation by referendum measure expect that this isn’t the end of the concept or the move to make it law.

90. Memphis Presence Helps Turn Tide on Controversial Legislation -

The Tennessee Legislature’s de-annexation debate is over for now. But the bill’s effect on the Memphis-Capitol Hill relationship has left a larger political imprint than the proposal.

That’s saying a lot considering the proposal dealt with the possibility of territory and citizens rearranging the city’s boundaries to put them and the taxes they pay outside the city limits.

91. Officer Involved in Darrius Stewart Shooting is Retiring -

The city of Memphis pension board granted a line-of-duty disability retirement Thursday, March 31, to Memphis police officer Connor Schilling.

Schilling is the officer who shot and fatally wounded Darrius Stewart in July during a traffic stop in Hickory Hill.

92. Memphis Leaders Pleased With 'Reprieve' on De-Annexation Bill -

The de-annexation by referendum legislation pending in the Tennessee Legislature was sent to a summer study committee Wednesday, March 30, in the state Senate, effectively killing the proposal for the legislative session.

93. MATA Board Approves Significant Route Changes -

Sixteen bus route changes will take effect in May at the Memphis Area Transit Authority.

The changes, which were approved at the March 29 meeting of the MATA board of commissioners, mark the first significant batch of route changes since MATA CEO Ron Garrison took the position in 2014.

94. Mud Island Proposals Advance to More Scrutiny -

The two finalists working with a Riverfront Development Corp. committee to redevelop Mud Island River Park will have their plans further reviewed by the administration of Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland.

95. RDC Doubles Down With Two Mud Island Finalists -

A working group of the Riverfront Development Corporation is recommending that the city and a new subcommittee of the RDC work with both of the finalists it has selected to run Mud Island River Park.

96. Amendments Cloud Issue of De-Annexation -

Tennessee state senators go back to work Tuesday, March 29, in Nashville on a modified de-annexation bill.

The Senate State and Local Government Committee will be reviewing a set of amendments to their version of the bill, which changed substantially from the House version in a committee session last week.

97. Greensward Crowd Limits Zoo Overflow Parking -

The first Saturday of the spring in Overton Park drew a crowd on the park Greensward that outnumbered the cars parked on the Greensward.

And the group of several hundred park-goers blocked the overflow zoo parking on the Greensward briefly Saturday, March 26.

98. Cleaning House -

Every neighborhood in Memphis and Shelby County has the right to be free from the negative effects of vacant, abandoned and blighted properties. That’s the battle cry of the Memphis Blight Elimination Charter, a 23-page pledge that will steer policy and programs dedicated to blight eradication.

99. De-Annexation Bill Still Alive, Now In Two Versions -

At week’s end in Nashville, a bill to allow de-annexation by referendum was still on the tracks to passage. But there were significant differences in the Senate and House versions as the Tennessee Legislature heads for adjournment for the year in early April.

100. Last Word: The De-Annexation Express, Return of The Curb Market and Different Fuel -

When time ran out Wednesday on the state Senate’s state and local government committee in Nashville, de-annexation legislation was still on the tracks as the Tennessee Legislature draws closer to adjournment for the year.