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Editorial Results (free)

1. U of M Expands Toy Drive This Holiday Season -

The University of Memphis athletics department has announced that the annual Tiger Toy Drive will be expanded to include partnerships with the city of Memphis, CW30 and iHeart Radio.

The partnership with Mayor Jim Strickland and the city of Memphis has been a long-standing effort to provide toys for those in need in the Memphis area. However, this year, the Tigers welcome two community leaders to help in the drive: CW30 and iHeart Radio.

2. 50 Years Later -

Almost 50 years to the day after he died in a plane crash while on tour, the image and sound of soul singer Otis Redding remains vital and relevant – and heard.

3. Last Word: Bredesen Runs, Germantown Moratorium, Monsanto Fights Dicamba Ban -

The big reveal at the Greater Memphis Chamber’s annual luncheon Wednesday, at least for me – Dale Watson lives in Memphis now. The Americana musician, producer and author was among the performers at the Peabody and he had a bit of trouble getting the group of 700 business and political leaders to sing along with the refrain of one of his most popular tunes – “I Lie When I Drink and I Drink A Lot" -- with at least a dozen video cameras panning the room. But he continued on without audience participation. Other entertainment highlights featured Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland as the voice of Amazon’s Alexa.

4. U of M Expands Toy Drive This Holiday Season -

The University of Memphis athletics department has announced that the annual Tiger Toy Drive will be expanded to include partnerships with the city of Memphis, CW30 and iHeart Radio.

The partnership with Mayor Jim Strickland and the city of Memphis has been a long-standing effort to provide toys for those in need in the Memphis area. However, this year, the Tigers welcome two community leaders to help in the drive: CW30 and iHeart Radio.

5. Last Word: Norvell's New Contract, Grade-Changing Culture and Buying Gibson -

So the Grizz snap the losing streak Monday with a win over the Timberwolves. They try to start a winning streak Wednesday against the Knicks. Elsewhere, so much for a holiday lull. It was cold outside but many a keyboard around this place was warm enough Tuesday afternoon with both the anticipated and the unanticipated. And then there were those items that fall somewhere inbetween. Could happen but will it be today? In many of those cases, the answer was yes.

6. County Commission Renews Opioid Legal Skirmish with County Administration -

Shelby County Commissioners voted Monday, Dec. 4, to hire another attorney to represent it in an ongoing legal battle with county mayor Mark Luttrell over opioid litigation. And the commission approved a resolution declaring opioid abuse a “public nuisance” as an opening to legal depositions of opioid manufacturers and distributors.

7. Will Pre-K Put the City of Memphis Back in the Education Business? -

For the first time since the city of Memphis ceased funding schools after the historic merger of city and county districts, it’s looking to get back into education – by putting dollars into pre-K classrooms.

8. Last Word: Lake District Recycling, The New First and The AAC 'Glass Ceiling' -

The U.S. Senate vote on a tax reform plan is now set for 10 a.m. our time Friday morning following more debate in D.C. that began Thursday as the trigger provision to raise tax rates if economic growth from the proposed tax cuts doesn't materialize was ruled out of order by the Senate parliamentarian. This was the provision on which the support of U.S. Senator Bob Corker of Tennessee hinged. And Corker is leading a group of deficit hawks whose block of votes is considered crucial in what happens to a proposal that was being reshaped as midnight approached. Here's Politico with comments from Corker as of late Thursday

9. Jim Nabors, TV's Homespun Gomer Pyle and Singer, Dies at 87 -

HONOLULU (AP) – Jim Nabors, the Alabama-born comic actor who starred as TV's dim but good-hearted Southern rube Gomer Pyle and constantly surprised audiences with his twang-free operatic singing voice, died Thursday. He was 87.

10. Preparing For Park Without Brooks, MCA -

A new Memphis Brooks Museum of Art Downtown would open in 2022 at the earliest and cost $110 million along with an endowment.

“It’s going to be a little bit of a moving target. What we want to do is to build the endowment,” said Brooks director Emily Ballew Neff on the WKNO/Channel 10 program “Behind The Headlines.”

11. Collins Leaving as City's Chief Financial Officer -

City of Memphis chief financial officer Brian Collins is leaving the post he’s held for the last five years across two mayoral administrations to become executive director of the Illinois Municipal Retirement Fund, Collins announced Friday, Nov. 17. He is leaving City Hall in January and starts his new job Jan. 8.

12. Despite 6 Women's Statements, Bush Unlikely to Be Prosecuted -

HOUSTON (AP) – Allegations that former President George H.W. Bush inappropriately touched six women involve potential crimes punishable by fines or jail time, if they had been prosecuted.

13. Bus Planning Process Goes Deeper Into ‘Hard Choices’ -

On the road to recommending changes by May, a consultant is exploring options for a city bus system with a $45 million increase in funding. The options include “hard choices” that could either increase coverage and drop the frequency of bus trips, or increase the frequency of bus trips for quicker journeys but eliminate coverage in some sparsely populated areas of Memphis.

14. Upset at Missouri Vital to Bowl Hopes for Tennessee Vols -

Tennessee’s football program remains in limbo as the Vols pursue bowl eligibility under fifth-year coach Butch Jones.

Jones is hanging onto his job as the Vols (4-5, 0-5 SEC) play their final three games of the season, starting with Saturday night’s 7:30 ET game (SEC Network) against Missouri (4-5, 1-4 SEC) in Columbia.

15. County Legal Dispute Latest In A Series -

As attorneys for Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell’s administration and the county commission were in Chancery Court Tuesday, Nov. 7, the Memphis City Council’s attorney, Allan Wade, was being honored for 25 years of service to the city.

16. Making Best Better -

More than a decade ago, Carolyn Hardy was a vice president with the Coors Brewing Co. in Memphis when she attended the Leadership Development Intensive (LDI), a personal leadership training ground stretched across 3 1/2 days.

17. Josh Pastner Under NCAA Microscope -

Former University of Memphis basketball coach Josh Pastner has been accused of being complicit in extra benefits provided to at least two Georgia Tech players and to former Tiger player Markel Crawford.

18. Last Word: Changes Behind Highland Row, Lee Harris Opens and Ron Olson Moves -

Shelby County Commission chairwoman Heidi Shafer says the commission, through its attorneys, is in ‘the final stages of launching litigation” against big pharma over the opioid problem locally. And in a written statement Thursday she said she believes the litigation “will result in significant recovery for hundreds of millions of dollars that Shelby County has spent trying to heal, save, nurse and otherwise deal with the opioid crisis.” Shafer specifically announced the hiring on a contingency basis of a national law firm.

19. City Judges Timing and Steps in Fairgrounds Planning -

City of Memphis leaders likely will reveal a few new details when they present the draft plan for Mid-South Fairgrounds redevelopment at a Monday, Nov. 6, town hall meeting. But Mayor Jim Strickland’s administration took much of the suspense and speculation out of next week’s session Wednesday, Nov. 1, releasing details that show the administration’s general belief that a few steps still need to be taken before the city gets to a broad reconfiguration of the Fairgrounds.

20. City Fairgrounds Plan Keeps Coliseum on Hold -

When it unveils a general plan for Fairgrounds redevelopment Monday, Nov. 6, the administration of Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland will put the emphasis on setting the stage for a fuller redevelopment.

21. U of M Hooks Institute Given $10,000 Grant -

The Benjamin L. Hooks Institute at the University of Memphis has received a $10,000 grant from the Ingersoll Rand Foundation to support the Hooks African-American Male Initiative. The Hooks Institute launched HAAMI in 2015 to increase the retention and graduation rates of African-American male students at the U of M.

22. Memphis College of Art Closing Doors -

Memphis College of Art, the 81-year-old Overton Park institution, will close by May of 2020 after years of financial struggles.

The college’s board described the pending process as an “orderly dissolution of MCA’s real estate and other assets to fund the College’s debt obligations and other liabilities, including providing sufficient funding to serve existing students who remain at MCA.”

23. Memphis College of Art Closing Its Doors -

The Memphis College of Art will close by May of 2020 in what the board of the 81-year old Overton Park institution is describing as an "orderly dissolution of MCA’s real estate and other assets to fund the College’s debt obligations and other liabilities, including providing sufficient funding to serve existing students who remain at MCA."

24. Greenway’s Mud Island Segment Opens -

When Henry Turley was developing Harbor Town and building homes and apartments on Mud Island, he remembers marketing the view of the Wolf River.

25. Mud Island Segment of Greenway Opens -

With a ribbon of shoestrings, leaders of the Wolf River Conservancy formally opened Saturday, Oct. 21, the westernmost park of the Wolf River Greenway – a 115-acre site with a 1.2 mile long trail loop on the north end of Mud Island.

26. The Ties That Bind -

When Big River Crossing was about to open a year ago, Doug Carpenter was asked often where the Tennessee-Arkansas state line is over the Mississippi River.

His marketing firm DCA has overseen publicity for the crossing from concept through construction, so he has learned much about the history of the Harahan Bridge and the mighty river below it. But the stateline wasn't marked

27. How Should ‘Good People’ React to Racist Ideology? -

Southern nationalists planning to lead rallies in Murfreesboro and Shelbyville are banking on Republican ideas and protection to spread their views, a burr under the saddle for state lawmakers in the controlling party.

28. Fincher ‘Very Close’ to Entering Race for Corker’s Senate Seat -

Former Tennessee Congressman Stephen Fincher said Tuesday, Oct. 17, he is probably going to run for the U.S. Senate seat Bob Corker is giving up.

“We’re very close to getting in. We’re not 100 percent. But we’re very close,” Fincher said after the last stop of a week-long statewide listening tour in East Memphis.

29. Memphis Leaders Await Final Reports for Possible Coliseum Renovation -

As Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland’s administration considers final details for a Fairgrounds redevelopment plan, he and his staff are waiting on a complete analysis of the condition of the Mid-South Coliseum.

30. Fincher Says 'Very Close' To Senate Run -

Former Tennessee Congressman Stephen Fincher said Tuesday, Oct. 17, he is probably going to run for the U.S. Senate seat Bob Corker is giving up starting with the 2018 Republican primary.

“We’re very close to getting in. We’re not 100 percent. But we’re very close,” Fincher said after the last stop of a week-long statewide listening tour in East Memphis.

31. Corker’s Public Disagreement with Trump A Defining Moment in His Political Career -

Many politicians have touchstones outside the world of politics and holding office they will return to and use in their political life.

In the case of U.S. Sen. Bob Corker the tell or indication of that touchstone, he has said, is the sweat on his upper lip that has served as an indication a business deal was near but not yet done.

32. Trump Lashes Out at Corker; GOP Senator Hits Back -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A powerful Republican senator cast the president of his own party as a man-child who could set the U.S. "on the path to World War III" as the two engaged in an intense and vitriolic back-and-forth bashing, a remarkable airing of their party's profound rifts.

33. Last Word: The Corker Tweets, Market Stabilization and The Rise of the Landshark -

In the “That Didn’t Take Long” department, whatever diplomacy there was in the relationship between President Donald Trump and U.S. Senator Bob Corker of Tennessee vanished over the weekend – vanished in the course of several tweets starting with one from Trump claiming he refused an endorsement of Corker in a re-election bid next year and that resulted in Corker’s decision not to seek re-election. He claims Corker “begged” for his endorsement. “Said he could not win without my endorsement,” Trump added. “He also wanted to be Secretary of State, I said, ‘NO THANKS.’ He is also largely responsible for the horrendous Iran Deal.”

34. Brooks Museum Eyes Downtown Fire Station Site -

Brooks Museum officials are considering relocating to a Downtown site at Front Street and Union Avenue that is currently occupied by the Memphis Fire Department headquarters.

While officials with the city and the museum would not comment, the idea of putting a “cultural amenity” on the river side of Front Street between Union and Monroe avenues first surfaced about two months ago.

35. Brooks Museum Eyes Downtown Fire Station Site -

The city fire station at Union Avenue and Front Street and the adjacent parking garage appears to be under consideration as the new site for the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art, according to a source close to the situation who did not want to be identified by The Daily News.

36. Harris Talks ‘Radical’ Action on Confederate Monuments to Build Pressure -

City Council attorney Allan Wade says Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland’s administration and the council are not “in different places” when it comes to removing Confederate monuments from city parks.

37. Buffett Buys Big Into Haslam Family's Pilot Flying J -

OMAHA, Neb. (AP) – Warren Buffett's company is acquiring a major stake in Pilot Flying J truck stops and it will take over a majority stake within about five years from the family of Cleveland Browns owner Jimmy Haslam and Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam.

38. For Memphis Libraries, ‘Start Here’ Message is Reality -

At a time when it might seem that the usefulness of public libraries is waning, they are reemerging as 21st century community hubs — democratic spaces where people from every walk of life can encounter humanity, the elusive element technology cannot conquer.

39. Fairgrounds Plans Concern Liberty Bowl Tenants -

It wasn’t so much what Liberty Bowl Memorial Stadium’s football tenants saw in the most recent tentative ideas for the Fairgrounds redevelopment, it’s what they didn’t see – 3,000 parking spaces they estimated would be eliminated in the project.

40. Last Word: Corker's Decision, Buses & Bikes and Tenoke Comeback -

And with a brief, carefully-worded written statement Tuesday afternoon, U.S. Senator Bob Corker has blown up the forming-2018 race for the Senate seat he will give up at the end of 2018 and that probably applies to the 2018 race for Tennessee Governor. That’s even if Corker doesn’t follow Tuesday’s announcement by getting into the race for Governor at some point. Corker said nothing about what is next beyond his remaining time in office.

41. Boyd Drops Beale Contract, But Says It Wasn't A Conflict of Interest -

Memphis City Council chairman Berlin Boyd ended his company’s fundraising contract with the Beale Street Merchants Association Tuesday, Sept. 19. But he again insisted the contract was not a conflict of interest in his duties as a council member voting on items involving the entertainment district.

42. Beat LA? With 48 points, Memphis finds a way -

First, let’s make sure that history doesn’t get what happened Saturday at the Liberty Bowl twisted.

Yes, the University of Memphis Tigers’ 48-45 victory over No. 25 UCLA and quarterback Josh “Chosen” Rosen will be classified as an upset – at least a mild one, at least nationally.

43. Beat LA? With 48 points, Memphis finds a way -

First, let’s make sure that history doesn’t get what happened Saturday at the Liberty Bowl twisted.

Yes, the University of Memphis Tigers’ 48-45 victory over No. 25 UCLA and quarterback Josh “Chosen” Rosen will be classified as an upset – at least a mild one, at least nationally.

44. Last Word: The Monument Letter, Soulsville Gateway and Gas Tax Hike Regrets -

The Redbirds take Game 1 of the Pacific Coast League Championship series Wednesday evening with a 6-4 win over El Paso at AutoZone Park. Game 2 is noon Thursday at B.B. King and Union.

45. Power of Art -

From the nationwide study “Arts and Economic Prosperity V” came overwhelming evidence that the arts make a financial impact. But of all the data accumulated in a yearlong collection effort launched by Americans for the Arts, one number leaped out at Elizabeth Rouse, who is president and CEO of ArtsMemphis: in 2015 in Shelby County, the arts supported 6,138 jobs (full-time equivalent).

46. Judge Dismisses Lawsuit Over Treatment of Tennessee Disabled -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A judge on Friday dismissed a long-standing lawsuit over Tennessee's treatment of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities, ending federal oversight of state programs.

47. Editorial: Historical Commissions Must Be Run by Pros -

At some point, the question of what becomes of our city’s Confederate monuments will be resolved. Whenever that is, there are still some critical and arguably larger issues that should be addressed.

48. Right Response -

For many people in the Mid-South with barriers to getting to the appropriate health care professionals, sometimes a 911 call has seemed like their only option. That’s all changing now thanks to a new collaborative effort between the Memphis Fire Department’s Emergency Medical Services (EMS) and local health care organizations, area hospitals, nonprofits and philanthropists.

49. ‘Divisive Symbols’: Mississippi Case Offers Hope for Forrest Bust Removal -

State Sen. Lee Harris is encouraged by the U.S. Supreme Court’s request for the state of Mississippi to respond to a lawsuit seeking to remove the Confederate battle flag from its state flag.

50. New Class of Police Recruits Begin Training -

A new group of 76 Memphis Police recruits began training Monday, Aug. 28, at the police training academy, with a group of 24 more recruits, including police service technicians, joining the class in October.

51. Strickland Seeks $21.5M to Begin Work on Convention Center, Gateway -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland is seeking $21.5 million in immediate funding for pre-construction and early construction work on two projects on Downtown's north end: the long-awaited renovation of the Memphis Convention Center and to begin specific planning, land acquisition and construction for the Bicentennial Gateway project that includes the convention center and the Pinch District area north of it.

52. Grizzlies’ Grind City Media Expands Into Football Coverage -

Last September, the Memphis Grizzlies launched their new in-house digital news and information platform: Grind City Media.

Now, Grind City Media is trying to drive that initiative farther down the field, as it were, by adding college football coverage.

53. Experts Differ on Convention Center Hotel Financing -

At the end of the final hour-long panel discussion during the two-day Southern Lodging Summit Downtown, Chad Crandell, the managing director and CEO of CHM Warnick – one of the best-known hotel asset management firms and advisers to hotel owners – made his pitch.

54. Hotel Summit Panel Differs On Ways to Finance Convention Center Hotel -

At the end of an hour-long panel discussion at the very end of the two-day Southern Lodging Summit Downtown, Chad Crandell – the managing director and CEO of CHM Warnick, one of the best known hotel asset management firms and advisors to hotel owners in the business -- made his pitch.

55. Latino & Local -

Mauricio Calvo has heard the saying “all politics is local” in the course of making and maintaining connections through the Latino Memphis organization he leads. But prior to this year, political connections for the organization were more about getting needed services and building long-term relationships over time.

56. New MPD Recruit Class Begins Training -

A new group of 76 Memphis Police recruits began training Monday, Aug. 28, at the police training academy, with a group of 24 more recruits, including police service technicians, joining the class in October.

57. Tri-State Hosts Grand Opening of Banking HQ -

Tri-State Bank CEO Thomas Felder estimates that the more than 70-year-old institution – which has shifted its retail bank headquarters from Downtown to Whitehaven – will have a $2.5 million economic impact on the neighborhood surrounding it.

58. 9/01 in the 901 -

What started as an esoteric online conversation five years ago has grown into a massive citywide event to celebrate all the best parts of the Bluff City.

Though only in its second official year, attendance is expected to be high for Exposure at 901 Day, a free event that will be held at AutoZone Park from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. on, you guessed it – Sept. 1.

59. Officials Say Trump's Afghan Plan Involves 3,900 More Troops -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump's plan to end America's longest war and eliminate Afghanistan's rising extremist threat involves sending up to 3,900 additional U.S. troops, senior officials said Tuesday. The first deployments could take place within days.

60. University of Texas in Austin Removes Confederate Statues -

AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — The University of Texas quickly removed statues of Robert E. Lee and other prominent Confederate figures overnight from the main area of the Austin campus, a spokesman said Monday morning, just hours after the school's president ordered they be taken down.

61. Amid Retail and Industrial Successes, DeSoto Office Market Lags -

In the last few years, DeSoto County has become a magnet not only for retail development, but also for the industrial market.

Numerous new retail ventures have opened, and several other companies have opened industrial locations there, including FedEx Supply Services, XPO Logistics and Sephora.

62. Amid Retail and Industrial Growth, DeSoto County Office Market Lags -

In the last few years, DeSoto County has become a magnet not only for retail development, but also for the industrial market.

Numerous new retail ventures have opened, and several other companies have opened industrial locations there, including FedEx Supply Services, XPO Logistics and Sephora.

63. Last Word: Ouster History, Lake District in Foreclosure and Crosstown -

Five of the seven flags that fly on the southern tip of Mud Island River Park are folded and stored as of Thursday. The Riverfront Development Corporation took down the five flags that have flown over the turf we now call Memphis – before and since it became a city – including a version of the Confederate flag – leaving only the U.S. flag and the Tennessee flag. This was a reaction to the week-long and counting aftermath from the violence in Charlottesville.

64. Monument Effort Reflects Differing Strategies -

The call to remove Confederate monuments in Memphis city parks is increasingly meeting with local officials pointing toward Nashville and state officials. And local activists are pointing to a clock.

65. Mayor's Office Says Confederate Monument Protesters Asking City To Break Law -

Jefferson Davis was surrounded this week, first by a group of more than 100 citizens seeking to remove his statue from Memphis Park and then by police after the Tuesday, Aug. 15, protest.

The gathering, heavy with religious leaders, was coordinated by several groups that have been active about various community issues the past year and a half and pursuing the removal of Confederate monuments.

66. Charting a Course -

Daphne Large, founder, CEO and president of Data Facts Inc., didn’t have her company certified as a woman-owned business for 25 years. “I don’t want to be chosen because I’m a woman, but because I’m the best,” Large said, voicing a sentiment that many women business owners agree with.

67. Last Word: Charlottesville Reaction, Stax & Atlantic Together Again and MEMFix -

The violence in Charlottesville, Virginia over the weekend will be on a lot of minds in a lot of other places including Memphis as this week begins. And the discussion here in Memphis is already underway. The gathering point Saturday just hours after a suspected white supremacist drove his car into a group of counter protesters in Charlottesville really didn’t even need a lot of billing or explanation.

68. MIM Posts Surplus in ‘Electrifying’ 2017 Festival -

At the end of her year-long tenure as chairwoman of the board of the Memphis In May International Festival, Bobbi Gillis summed up the 2017 festival as “a fast moving roller coaster ride.” Rain wasn’t a problem for the month-long set of events. But lightning and straight-line winds were. MIM president and CEO Jim Holt could joke Thursday, Aug. 10, at the organization’s annual meeting that the festival was “electrifying.”

69. Memphis Police Department Adds 85 New Officers -

The Memphis Police Department has 85 new officers who were acknowledged at a graduation ceremony Thursday, Aug. 10, marking the first of two classes to go through the Memphis Police Academy this year.

70. Women-Owned Businesses Chart Progress of Diversity Contracting Efforts -

Daphne Large, founder, CEO and president of Data Facts Inc., didn’t get her company certified as a woman-owned business for 25 years.

71. The King's Castle: Graceland, Whitehaven open 40th anniversary Elvis Week -

It begins with a trivia contest and a sock hop. Those are the first two events Friday, Aug. 11, at the top of a crowded Elvis Week itinerary that marks 40 years since Elvis Presley died at Graceland.

72. Crosstown Concourse Reopening to Include Open Houses, Performances, More -

The formal dedication of the redeveloped Sears Crosstown building next week will include tours of the different uses of the 1.5-million-square-foot building and 20 musical acts as well as a banner drop.

73. Kelly Wins Praise Across The Aisle, But Bigger Task is Ahead -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Raised voices could be heard through the thick door to the Oval Office as John Kelly – then secretary of Homeland Security – offered some tough talk to President Donald Trump.

74. ‘Fed Up’ Campaign Warns Of Tougher Gun Penalties -

The Memphis Shelby Crime Commission and the city of Memphis have launched a marketing campaign to warn would-be offenders about tougher state penalties and possible federal prosecution for violent criminals in possession of a gun.

75. Trump Says Transgender People Should be Barred From Military -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Donald Trump said Wednesday he wants transgender people barred from serving in the U.S. military "in any capacity," citing "tremendous medical costs and disruption."

76. NCAA Rule Ending Two-a-Days Forcing Teams to Adjust -

The two-a-day football practices that coaches once used to toughen up their teams and cram for the start of the season are going the way of tear-away jerseys and the wishbone formation.

As part of its efforts to increase safety, the NCAA approved a plan this year that prevents teams from holding multiple practices with contact in a single day.

77. Bad Leadership or Politics? Motlow President’s Fall -

One day he was the golden boy, touting Motlow State’s success and posing with the governor for the signing of the Reconnect Act. The next, seemingly, he was gone with the wind.

At least publicly, everything was grand as Anthony “Tony” Kinkel helped Gov. Bill Haslam meet his Drive to 55 effort to put certificates or degrees in the hands of half of Tennessee adults by 2025. With limited space and resources, Kinkel pushed the Tennessee Promise scholarship at Motlow, the state’s fastest-growing community college, bolstering student retention, graduation and fundraising.

78. Resolution, Dollar-Figure Miscues Raise Sanitation Workers’ Grants by $20,000 -

After all of these years, maybe what happened Tuesday, July 25, to the city’s plan to pay the 14 surviving sanitation workers from 1968 a grant of $50,000 each was part of the larger narrative of the enduring turmoil of that historic time.

79. Juvenile Court Oversight Issue Spills Into Larger Criminal Justice Reform Debate -

Talking Monday, July 24, about criminal justice reform, Juvenile Court Judge Dan Michael mentioned the formal written request he, Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell and Sheriff Bill Oldham made to U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions in June to end Justice Department oversight of the court.

80. Juxtaposing Views Greet Voting Change -

Memphis City Council members Edmund Ford Jr. and Patrice Robinson have each been on the winning side of a council runoff election and share a district border along Elvis Presley Boulevard in Whitehaven.

81. ‘Fed Up’ Campaign Warns Of Tougher Gun Penalties -

The Memphis Shelby Crime Commission and the city of Memphis have launched a marketing campaign to warn would-be offenders about tougher state penalties and possible federal prosecution for violent criminals possessing a gun.

82. Riverfront Concept Plan Intersects With Many Others About Key City Asset -

The Memphis riverfront is hardly a blank canvas. But you would never know that from the number of plans there have been over several decades to make it more of a “front door” for the city – to borrow a phrase from more than a few of those reports.

83. Riverfront Concept Plan Emphasizes Connections, River Access -

A pedestrian bridge between the southern tip of Mud Island and Riverside Drive, more pedestrian use of Riverside Drive, a pavilion at Tom Lee Park and greater access to the edge of the Mississippi River are among the elements of a riverfront concept plan outlined Tuesday, July 18, by a Chicago architecture and urban design firm.

84. US to Create Independent Military Cyber Command -

WASHINGTON (AP) – After months of delay, the Trump administration is finalizing plans to revamp the nation's military command for defensive and offensive cyber operations in hopes of intensifying America's ability to wage cyberwar against the Islamic State group and other foes, according to U.S. officials.

85. Last Word: Rachel Heck, Beale Street's Cover and The Old Peabody -

The “fifth wave” of judicial appointments by President Donald Trump, as The White House termed them, are already causing some political ripples here primarily from state Senator Mark Norris’s appointment to the federal bench.

86. Summer in the City -

Saturday night on Beale Street is more than a catch phrase for businesses there.

It is chapters in old, out-of-print books like Lt. George W. Lee’s “Where The Blues Began” that you can only see in the Memphis-Shelby County Room of the Central Library. You can’t check the book out because of its rarity and age. But you can also find references to the lore of Saturday nights on Beale Street on plaques in the entertainment district that current patrons walk past without even noticing.

87. ‘Cheeseburger Buddies’ Make Nice for TV -

Tennessee coach Butch Jones passed his first test of the 2017 football season Monday. He made it through SEC Media Days.

There were no new catch phrases, although Jones did allude to the team’s “D.A.T.” (Details, Accountability, Toughness) motto. But nothing close to “champions of life” or “five-star hearts.”

88. Enough Expectations to Go Around as SEC Football Season Approaches -

HOOVER, Ala. – The countdown to the start of the next college football season is now measured in weeks, not months. But at an event such as SEC Media Days, the future is always framed by the past.

89. Last Word: Marathon County Budget Session, New Chandler Numbers and Confluence -

As we post this edition of Last Word, there is still some confusion about the KC-130 Marine cargo plane that crashed near the Leflore-Sunflower County line in Mississippi Monday evening.

All 16 people on board were killed in the crash.

90. Low-Key FBI Director Pick Would Lead Agency Through Tumult -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The attorney selected to replace James Comey as FBI director is described by those close to him as admirably low-key, yet he'd be taking over the law enforcement agency at a moment that's anything but tranquil.

91. Bridge Protest Anniversary Draws More Action, Reflection -

A year after the spontaneous protest march that ended with more than 1,000 people shutting down the Hernando DeSoto Bridge for several hours, the leader of that effort was again moving north along B.B. King Boulevard on Sunday, July 9.

92. Last Word: Rumors, The Return of Tyreke Evans and Broadband in Millington -

There is a popular saying attributed to Winston Churchill that goes like this: “A lie gets halfway around the world before the truth has a chance to get its pants on.” Even before social media, that was certainly the case in this part of the world called Memphis. The part of our history that doesn’t fit in books is littered with rumors that turned the city upside down in a much shorter period of time than it took to repair the damage done. That is what happened this weekend with Memphis Light Gas and Water.

93. Patterson Resignation Comes as Council Examines DMC’s Role -

Terence Patterson exited the Downtown Memphis Commission last week as the Memphis City Council is about to discuss replacing or restructuring not only the DMC, but the Riverfront Development Corp.

94. Last Word: Vince Carter Leaves, Fairgrounds and Pulling the Plug on Green Tech -

Vince Carter joins Zach Randolph with the Sacramento Kings next NBA season with an $8 million one-year pact for Carter. Still no word on Tony Allen’s free agency status as we put this up. The Grizz plan to retire Randolph’s jersey.

95. McCalla Keeps Police Surveillance Lawsuit -

A Memphis federal judge has dropped four citizens as plaintiffs in a lawsuit alleging the city violated a 1978 federal consent decree barring police from conducting surveillance of protesters, saying the citizens don’t have standing.

96. Fairgrounds Movement Triggers Liberty Bowl Questions -

For a prime piece of real estate that is supposed to be in a holding pattern, there is a lot of recent activity on and about the Mid-South Fairgrounds. And even when Liberty Bowl Memorial Stadium isn’t the immediate topic, it is an undeniable presence.

97. McCalla Keeps Police Surveillance Lawsuit, Drops Protester Plaintiffs -

A Memphis Federal Judge has dropped four citizens from a lawsuit alleging the city violated a 1978 federal consent decree barring police from conducting surveillance of protesters saying they don’t have standing.

98. Appling Road Greenline Access Awaits Funding -

There is a plan designed and ready for an Appling Road access point to the Shelby Farms Greenline and if the response to last week’s opening of the Perkins Road access point is any indication, it shouldn’t be too difficult.

99. Intel Report: Kremlin Sees US Urging Regime Change in Russia -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Kremlin leaders are convinced America is intent on regime change in Russia, a fear that is feeding rising tension and military competition between the former Cold War foes, the Pentagon's intelligence arm has assessed.

100. Tennessee Weighs Commission to Examine Jim Crow Brutality -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Charlie Morris vividly recalls his brother's murder.

Jesse Lee Bond was a sharecropper in Shelby County. Suspicious because his harvests never seemed to cover his debts, in the spring of 1939, Bond asked the local general store for a receipt of his seed purchases.