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Editorial Results (free)

1. Overton Greensward Overcast Weekend Offers Temporary Interlude -

For a few hours Saturday morning, April 30, in Overton Park there was no one on the Greensward – no cars, no zoo crew, no protesters, no yoga class, no dogs or dog walkers. On an overcast day, there wasn't even a shadow to be cast.

2. Reaction to the Death of Civil Rights Leader Rev. Samuel Billy Kyles -

Rev. Samuel Billy Kyles died Tuesday in Memphis after a long illness. Here's a roundup of reaction from local leaders, Kyles' associates and the National Civil Rights Museum...

3. The Week Ahead -

It’s a new week that ends with Music Fest, Memphis! Here’s a roundup of other local happenings you need to know about, from some important government meetings, to corporate earnings reports and a new exhibit set to open at the Memphis Zoo.

4. Bridging a Divide -

The Mid-South is united by more than the Mississippi River, but that’s what it took to get the region’s mayors in the same room.

In the aftermath of the 2011 Mississippi River flood, damage stretched from Millington’s naval base to Memphis’ Beale Street. Leaders of the affected municipalities had to come together to apply for FEMA grants and plot their way out of devastation.

5. Last Word: The Bible Veto Override Vote, Grizz Nostalgia and Kroger Goes Online -

The Tennessee Legislature hoped to end its 2016 session Wednesday at the end of an eventful day that included a failed attempt to override Gov. Bill Haslam’s veto of the bill that would have made the Bible the official state book.
But into Wednesday evening, the state House was still debating the Hall tax on dividends – specifically further roll backs of it. And the Senate had gone home for the night.
So Thursday looks like a good bet for the adjournment for the year and the formal start of the election season for incumbents.

6. Last Word: Budget Basics, A Peak At Greensward Mediation and Elvis & Nixon -

Spurs 94 – Grizzlies 68 in game 2 of the NBA playoffs. The TNT post-game show just showed the highlights of the game while Shaq and Charles Barkley talked about how big the women are in San Antonio. I’m not making this up. They didn’t even try to talk about the game. This is just grim.

7. Greensward Talks Getting Complex -

A week ago, the board of the Overton Park Conservancy had a visitor at its meeting – Richard Smith, the Memphis Zoo’s representative in the ongoing private mediation talks between the conservancy and the zoo.

8. Tubby Smith's Hire Comes With 'Highest Expectations' -

Wearing a University of Memphis lapel pin on his suit jacket, Tubby Smith was introduced on the floor of FedExForum Thursday, April 14, as the 18th head coach in Tigers history.

University president M. David Rudd called it a “historic hire” for the school and said Smith arrived as the “most accomplished coach” to lead the program (take that, John Calipari).

9. Lot Availability, Prices Putting Home Construction Behind Demand -

The recent uptick in the residential real estate market is devouring what’s left of lot development that lagged during the recession, and tight supply is raising home prices in the Memphis area.

10. This Week in Memphis History: April 15-21 -

2014: Memphis Police Director Toney Armstrong announces he will retire in 2017 and has enrolled in the city’s deferred retirement option plan. The retirement date depends on Memphis Mayor A C Wharton winning re-election in 2015 or Wharton’s successor keeping Armstrong on until retirement.
Wharton loses his re-election bid, and in November 2015, new mayor Jim Strickland names Armstrong interim police director while searching for a replacement. Armstrong left in February to become director of security for St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital.

11. Legislators Playing Expensive Game With LGBT Issues -

The silly season is in full swing on Capitol Hill, but the “bathroom bill” and any jokes surrounding it are no laughing matter anymore. It’s getting downright expensive.

Tennessee Attorney General Herbert Slatery said this week the bill dealing with transgender student use of restrooms could cost the state more than $1.2 billion in federal funds for K-12 and higher education.

12. Zoo Offers Parking Plan, Devotes Parking Fees to Long-Range Parking Solution -

The Memphis Zoo is suggesting the city general services maintenance yard on the east side of the park be used as a parking area and a second greensward with “eco-friendly options” that “are not disruptive to the park” to get zoo patrons from there to the zoo.

13. Wastewater Leak Stopped, McKellar Cleanup Continues -

The boat ramp on McKellar Lake at theA bypass around a raw sewage leak into Cypress Creek and McKellar Lake was up and running Thursday, April 7, according to the city of Memphis.

The bypass ends a leak in the main wastewater line to the T.E. Maxson Wastewater Treatment Plant that was discovered March 31 and triggered a large fish kill of more than 10,000 in McKellar Lake.

14. Last Word: Pastner's Georgia Tech Post-Season, Who Filed and Greensward Invitations -

Not so fast with the off-season. There is a Memphis post-season after all.

And the Grizz found it Thursday like a light at the end of a long-tunnel where a lot of people slipped and fell and can’t get up.
The light was Houston flaming out at home to Phoenix without the Grizzlies having to make a basket.
It’s all about the math. Stay in school, young people.

15. Cypress-McKellar Wastewater Leak Stopped, Cleanup Continues -

A bypass around a raw sewage leak into Nonconnah Creek and McKellar Lake was up and running Thursday, April 7, according to the city of Memphis.

The bypass ends a leak in the main wastewater line to the T.E. Maxson Wastewater Treatment Plant that was discovered March 31 and triggered a large fish kill of more than 10,000 in McKellar Lake, which Nonconnah Creek runs into.

16. Conrad Call for De-Annexation Talks Draws Favorable Reviews -

Memphis City Council Chairman Kemp Conrad wants to open talks with county commissioners on possible voluntary de-annexations.

And County Commission Chairman Terry Roland said he is open to the idea.

17. Memphis Presence Helps Turn Tide on Controversial Legislation -

The Tennessee Legislature’s de-annexation debate is over for now. But the bill’s effect on the Memphis-Capitol Hill relationship has left a larger political imprint than the proposal.

That’s saying a lot considering the proposal dealt with the possibility of territory and citizens rearranging the city’s boundaries to put them and the taxes they pay outside the city limits.

18. Memphis Leaders Pleased With 'Reprieve' on De-Annexation Bill -

The de-annexation by referendum legislation pending in the Tennessee Legislature was sent to a summer study committee Wednesday, March 30, in the state Senate, effectively killing the proposal for the legislative session.

19. Can GOP Keep Grasp On Success Ramsey Built? -

As much as Tennessee Republicans want to put a happy face on the departure of Senate Speaker and Lt. Gov. Ron Ramsey, holding it together in the wake of his departure will be an awesome task.

20. Greensward Crowd Limits Zoo Overflow Parking -

The first Saturday of the spring in Overton Park drew a crowd on the park Greensward that outnumbered the cars parked on the Greensward.

And the group of several hundred park-goers blocked the overflow zoo parking on the Greensward briefly Saturday, March 26.

21. Cleaning House -

Every neighborhood in Memphis and Shelby County has the right to be free from the negative effects of vacant, abandoned and blighted properties. That’s the battle cry of the Memphis Blight Elimination Charter, a 23-page pledge that will steer policy and programs dedicated to blight eradication.

22. De-Annexation Bill Still Alive, Now In Two Versions -

At week’s end in Nashville, a bill to allow de-annexation by referendum was still on the tracks to passage. But there were significant differences in the Senate and House versions as the Tennessee Legislature heads for adjournment for the year in early April.

23. Last Word: The De-Annexation Express, Return of The Curb Market and Different Fuel -

When time ran out Wednesday on the state Senate’s state and local government committee in Nashville, de-annexation legislation was still on the tracks as the Tennessee Legislature draws closer to adjournment for the year.

24. De-Annexation Bill Amended But Still on Path to Passage -

A state Senate committee considering amendments to the de-annexation bill pending in the Tennessee Legislature has amended it to allow for de-annexation by referendum anywhere in the state.

The committee got through two of 13 proposed amendments Wednesday, March 23, and will resume work on the amendments next week.

25. Memphis Fights Back: Senate Poised To Do Real Damage via De-Annexation -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland makes a persuasive argument against de-annexation legislation now being considered by the state Legislature, providing a long list of figures to show it would devastate the Bluff City.

26. Opposers Fight De-Annexation Another Day -

When the state Senate’s State and Local Government Committee convenes at noon Wednesday, March 21, in Nashville, Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland and his administration will have been working Capital Hill for about a day and a half.

27. De-Annexation Bill Sent Back to Legislative Committee -

The de-annexation bill pending in the Tennessee Legislature was sent back to a Senate committee in Nashville Monday, March 21, after those favoring the bill raised numerous questions about amendments to it.

28. 1866 Massacre Author Says Riot Has Important Lessons -

When historian Stephen V. Ash went looking for source material on that most difficult of events to piece back together – three days of mob violence in a 19th century Southern city – he expected a challenge.

29. Roadmap to Attacking Blight Awaits City and County Approval -

Blighted properties, overgrown lots and abandoned buildings are not unique to Memphis. But Memphis is the only city with a blight elimination charter that affirms cross-sector commitment to uproot the causes of blight and prevent further decline.

30. County Commission Questions City Figures on Deannexation -

Some Shelby County Commissioners are skeptical about City Hall’s estimate of how much city government would lose in revenue if a deannexation bill in the Tennessee Legislature becomes law.

The commission’s discussion at Wednesday, March 16, committee sessions came as Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland was in Nashville to lobby against the bill in the state Senate.

31. Grimes Joins Barge Waggoner As Transportation Project Manager -

Keafur Grimes has joined Barge, Waggoner, Sumner and Cannon Inc. as transportation project manager, bringing with him more than 35 years of experience. In his new role, Grimes manages transportation planning and construction projects to meet federal, state and local regulations; ensures that projects meet quality compliance and assurance standards as well as customer needs; and are delivered on time and within budget.

32. Last Word: Deannexation, Pastner Past the Season and Chewing Gum and Walking -

The much-discussed deannexation bill in the Tennessee Legislature always had the votes Monday evening in the House with Memphis Democrats succeeding only in delaying the outcome in Nashville by about two hours.
The bill passed by a wide margin after a debate that was for the most part Memphis against the rest of the state starting just outside the city limits with Republicans in the Shelby County legislative delegation.
And there is some dispute between the bill’s sponsor from the Chattanooga area and Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland. Strickland puts the potential loss of tax revenue to the city at $80 million. Rep. Mike Carter says it is more like $27 million.

33. Last Word: Tiger Drumbeat, Eye on Drones and Shelby County Biggest Home Sale -

Let the coaching drumbeat resume after the Tigers Sunday post-season collapse one game past Tulsa.
A confession here – I am so sports challenged that I thought UConn was a team from Alaska until I saw it spelled out.
In my defense, who associates Huskies with Connecticut?
My point is what happens next isn’t just about basketball. It’s about a change with a good track record of being emotional in the worst way.
It’s linked to how we want to be known for treating people and what they think of us as a result of that.
In those two areas, it’s never just business. It’s always personal.
Josh Pastner’s four predecessors were each very different case studies in this regard.
It could have been any stop in any city with a basketball court and a one-and-done star he could find and recruit to John Calipari. But he still had to hide under a blanket in the back seat of a car on the way to the airport and lie about it long after everyone knew.
Knew about the Kentucky job that is. The mess he left at the university would surface shortly thereafter.
Tic Price was two fast seasons and the proof that the Memphis job isn’t just about what happens on the court and the attendance at games.
Price was clearly excited about coming to Memphis. He clearly understood the importance and heritage of Tigers basketball and valued it. And he wasted no time at all getting lost in the Memphis that is not a part of that all encompassing world.
It was the only job Larry Finch wanted and ultimately the job he couldn’t continue to have. That after ignoring conventional wisdom as a player and coming from Melrose High to Memphis State, bringing a beloved team with him and then picking Memphis again in the ABA over the Lakers in the NBA.
None of that was considered in pushing him out the door and then naming a building after him.
Dana Kirk
wanted to be the hustler John Calipari was. He was certainly impersonal enough about it and he took the team to an era where a post-season NCAA bid was expected and is still expected to this day.
But his impersonality exacted a high cost and he paid most of that cost. Although you could argue the experience for his team that produced some legendary players also made some of them legendary casualties of his emotional distance. It didn’t allow him to go elsewhere because he never figured out that he was being underestimated just as much as the team whose needs he ignored was in the national view of college basketball.
While Calipari dodged big trouble twice, Kirk wasn’t even in Calipari’s league when it came to ducking and timing.
We are past our inferiority complex. That’s what the last NFL drive of the 1990s did for us.
But it’s not necessarily a bad thing that we see the people chosen to occupy these very public positions as a reflection to the world of who we are.

34. The Week Ahead: March 14-20, 2016 -

How was your weekend, Memphis? Here’s our weekly roundup of local happenings you need to know about, from the first look at the Greater Memphis Chamber’s proposed diversity program to a truly Irish celebration of St. Paddy’s Day.

35. Kilzer on a New Pulpit But Still Finding Sanctuary in Music -

“I died in Paris,” said John Kilzer, who spoke from the pulpit of Calvary Episcopal Church as part of the church’s annual Lenten Preaching Series.

The 50-something singer-songwriter and Methodist minister was telling the story of his spiritual death in November 1991 while on a European tour for Geffen Records and Peter Asher Management.

36. Last Word: Cubits Anyone, The G-Word and The TV News Crime Block -

How long is a cubit? After a day in which many of you got about four to five inches of rain and more to come Thursday, it seems an appropriate and timely question.
And yes, there is a cubit conversion chart on line for converting that and other really old units of measurement no longer in use like the mina, drachma or the synodic month.
So the average cubit, which is supposed to be the length of a forearm, is 18 inches or a foot and a half. That’s 0.4572 of a meter, which might as well be an ancient unit of measurement.
Someone had to say it.
According to biblehub.com – I’m not making up websites – the book of Genesis sets God’s instructions to Noah as an arc with the dimensions of 300 cubits long, 50 cubits wide and 30 cubits tall. And it was to be made out of gopher wood and covered inside and out with pitch.
The New Living Translation and Holman Christian Standard Bibles convert that to an arc 450 feet long, 75 feet wide and 45 feet high.

37. Strickland Backs No-Gang Zones in Legal Challenge -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland says court-ordered zones that forbid alleged gang members from gathering or associating in public within the zone are working as a crime-fighting tactic.

38. St. Louis Cardinals Sell Majority Stake in Memphis Redbirds -

Less than two years ago, the St. Louis Cardinals finalized their purchase of their Triple-A affiliate, the Memphis Redbirds. Now, the Cardinals, pending full approval from the Pacific Coast League, have announced on Monday, March 7, that they have reached an agreement to sell a majority interest in the Redbirds to Peter B. Freund, the Principal Owner of Trinity Baseball Holdings.

39. Greensward Dispute Mediation Begins -

The city-backed mediation effort between the Memphis Zoo and the Overton Park Conservancy begins Tuesday, March 8, following a busy weekend in Overton Park that brought out large crowds for the zoo as well as the park in general.

40. Strickland Outlines $136.1M In Capital Expense Surprises -

The city has to put up $30 million over five years to match a $30 million federal grant the city got in 2015 for the South City development, including demolition and redevelopment of the Foote Homes public housing development.

41. Green Sword -

First it was a rumor – there would be a move by the Memphis City Council aimed at putting a quick end to the long-simmering Overton Park Greensward controversy.

It would come quickly and just before the start of the third spring of protests against the Memphis Zoo's use of the northern part of the Greensward for overflow parking.

42. Strickland Backs MATA's Cost-Neutral Plan -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland is backing the plan by the Memphis Area Transit Authority to make some short-term adjustments to its route system later this year.

43. Strickland Outlines $136.1M in Capital Surprises -

The city has to put up $30 million over five years to match a $30 million federal grant the city got in 2015 for the South City development, including demolition and redevelopment of the Foote Homes public housing development.

44. Council Gives Zoo Authority Over Greensward Parking -

The next step in the Overton Park Greensward controversy is up to the Overton Park Conservancy now that the Memphis City Council has given the Memphis Zoo control of the northern part of the Greensward.

45. Strickland Says $136.1 Million In Capital Surprises 'Kick in the Shin' -

The city has to put up $30 million over five years to match a $30 million federal grant the city got in 2015 for the South City development, including demolition and redevelopment of the Foote Homes public housing development.

46. Council Approves Zoo Control of Overton Greensward Section -

Memphis City Council members voted 11-1 Tuesday, March 1, to grant the Memphis Zoo control of the northern part of the Overton Park Greensward.

The control comes in a resolution that surfaced earlier in the day Tuesday after a weekend of rumors about such a move by some on the council.

47. Mud Island Management Search Narrows to Two -

A committee reviewing proposals to manage the Mud Island River Park has narrowed the field of four contenders down to two.

The Riverfront Development Corp. working committee has narrowed the field to RVC Outdoor Destinations of Memphis and Mansion Entertainment and Media LLC.

48. Last Word: Presidential Distractions, Dude Perfect and The Kirby Farm House -

When it comes to political surprises, the presidential contenders may be the next group on the ballot locally. But they need to up their game if they are going to hold the attention of Memphis voters.
With three of the Republican contenders on their way to Shelby County this weekend and probably more making plans, the attention Tuesday shifted dramatically to the open 8th District Congressional seat that isn’t on the ballot until the August primaries.

49. MATA Chief: System ‘On Verge Of Collapse’ -

The president and CEO of the Memphis Area Transit Authority said Tuesday, Feb. 16, that the city’s bus system will “collapse” without additional operating funds and city capital funding to buy new buses.

50. More Police Body Camera Details, Still No Start Date -

The city plans to hire 10 part-time video analysts to start work on April 5 in the move to police body cameras as well as in-car cameras.

But there is still no roll-out date for the body cameras, Mayor Jim Strickland’s administration said Tuesday, Feb. 16, in a meeting with Memphis City Council members.

51. Last Word: Presidents Day In An Election Year, Minority Business and Spring Training -

Presidents Day in a presidential election year.
Consider the political kaleidoscope of a foggy office-bound or home-bound Monday in Memphis with former President George W. Bush on the tube in the late afternoon defending his brother’s presidential campaign without once uttering the word Trump.
No further word of a Trump appearance promised for Memphis and some of Donald Trump’s own statements Monday suggested that by the time Memphis is on his schedule, he might be running as an independent.
Then there is the obsession in one corner of social media with Supreme Court history in rich detail.
And heads were turned Monday evening by the excerpt on the Grammys from the Broadway musical about Alexander Hamilton – a founding father born in the West Indies who established the nation’s financial system and the Federalist party. He never became a president, in part, because the vice president killed him. Hamilton wasn’t the only one who had been talking bad about Aaron Burr. The top of the ticket, President Thomas Jefferson, had decided to dump Burr from the ticket in the next election and Burr was trying to transition to become governor of New York.

52. Memphis City Council to Get Police Body Camera Update -

Memphis City Council members are to get a timeline Tuesday, Feb. 16, on the roll out of police body cameras from Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland as well as some idea of the additional cost.

53. Last Word: Clinton in Whitehaven, Changes to Parkside and The Replacements Book -

The Presidential primary caravan has arrived.
Former President Bill Clinton was in Whitehaven Thursday evening to campaign for his wife, former Secretary of State and U.S. Senator Hillary Clinton.
And it was a reminder of his political potency as well as his popularity in a city that went for Barack Obama over his wife in the 2008 Tennessee Presidential primary but which was solidly behind him in both of his successful bids for the White House in the 1990s.
Clinton spoke in a packed Whitehaven High gymnasium to more than 700 people for almost an hour and then worked the crowd that gathered near the podium for another 25 minutes before sprinting out a door to a waiting car.
We’ll be busy this weekend with the opening of the local Bernie Sanders campaign headquarters and we’re still waiting on that promised Donald Trump Memphis appearance.
And we expect to encounter lots of Republican presidential partisans at the local GOP's annual Lincoln Day Gala on the 20th.

54. New Brass -

Just days before Toney Armstrong was off the city payroll, his successor as interim director of the Memphis Police Department, Michael Rallings, was getting used to the attention and ring kissing that comes with being the city’s top cop.

55. Cates Wants Detail on Downtown Agreements -

From Mud Island River Park across the Memphis harbor to The Pyramid and further east to St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital – there are a lot of connections as the areas head toward a new incarnation.

56. Last Word: History As Geology, Beyond the Greensward and City Hall's HR Director -

History can be like geology once you get it in something that isn’t in the form of a book.
There are layers on top of layers that you may not ever see or miss until a site is wiped clean for the next present that used to be the future and will eventually become the past.
That’s the case with the city’s historic Medical Center where much has come and gone several times over as our city’s considerable investment in medicine and health approaches the end of its second century.
Health Sciences Park used to be the site of a hospital. You would think something as massive as the tower of Baptist Memorial Hospital’s central campus on Union Avenue would be missed. Yet even those of us who grew up with its presence drive past it every day without a thought of what was once there.
The same with the site of Russwood Park on the north side of Madison Avenue and the old bus barns where Beale used to run further east than it does now.
In recent years, new facilities have arisen as the medical center makes itself over in a kind of economic regeneration without a comprehensive plan.
There is now an effort to come up with a comprehensive plan for the area that is more than different ventures buying or leasing land and making plans for their needs.
Eight of the institutions in the area have hired a consulting firm to develop a master plan that includes not just facilities but residential and retail areas.
It’s a significant step for an area that remains intriguing for those of us trying to remember what was where and how long some of the survivors have been holding out in much different streetscapes than were there when they arrived.
The Masonic lodge at the dead end of Dunlap into Union Avenue is a survivor. It’s where the funerals were held for some of those killed in the 1925 river disaster in which Tom Lee rescued so many others.
The lodge at one time had an earth-shaking pipe organ that I had the rare privilege of hearing at a concert following its restoration in the 1980s – the ancient 1980s.
And I still wonder about the tiny medical textbook storefront and how it endures at a time when students rent books and others use digital versions.
There are still remnants of the porous border between the medical center and the Union Avenue auto row that used to exist and arose around the old Ford plant.

57. Minority Leader Harris Confident Even on Wrong Side of Supermajority -

Lee Harris says he ran for state Senate because he felt Memphis could do better on Capitol Hill, defeating Ophelia Ford in 2014.

58. For the World's Most Scrutinized Body, Barbie Has a New Look -

NEW YORK (AP) — At 57, Barbie is getting a major makeover.

The iconic plastic doll, whose small waist and long legs have been criticized for creating unrealistic expectations for girls, will soon be sold with three new bodies — curvy, tall and petite. Barbie will also be more diverse, coming in seven skin tones, 22 eye colors and 24 hairstyles.

59. US Pending Home Sales Inch Up in December -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of people signing contracts to purchase homes managed to inch up last month, thanks to unseasonably warm weather in the Northeast.

The National Association of Realtors said Thursday that its seasonally adjusted pending home sales index crept up 0.1 percent to 106.8. Signed contracts jumped 6.1 percent in the Northeast, while they declined in the other three major U.S. regions.

60. Two Binghampton Gangs Targeted In Latest Zones -

Memphis’ latest no-gang zones take in a swath of real estate one may not normally associate with crime and violence: a country club, the Shelby Farms Greenline and an elementary school, to name a few.

61. Morgan: Permanent Overton Park Fix Will Take Time -

The Memphis City Council member whose district includes Overton Park says there is no immediate permanent fix for the greensward controversy beyond the zoo continuing to park cars there.

“Short term, there’s really nothing that can quickly move that number of cars,” council member Worth Morgan said on the WKNO-TV program “Behind the Headlines.”

62. Memphis Zoo CEO: Mediation, Court Action Can Coexist in Greensward Dispute -

The Memphis Zoo’s move to Chancery Court next week in the Overton Park greensward controversy does not damage the mediation process between the zoo and the Overton Park Conservancy.

That’s what zoo president and CEO Chuck Brady said as attorneys on both sides of the controversy prepare to make their cases in court.

63. Zoo Goes To Court Over Greensward -

The Memphis Zoo has gone to Chancery Court seeking undisputed legal control of the northern section of the Overton Park greensward.

Attorneys for the zoo filed the suit Thursday, Jan. 21, seeking a declaratory judgment in the dispute with the Overton Park Conservancy.

64. Some Funds Offer to Tame Market's Chaos, But at a Price -

NEW YORK (AP) — Freaked out by the stock market's big swings?

Then the investment industry has something it built just for you: funds that hope to offer a steadier ride. That sounds especially comforting after this year's jarring start for markets, in which drops of more than 1 percent have become typical. But be careful, the funds carry their own risks.

65. Last Word: The View Across The Harbor, Crosstown Undercurrents and Bonnaroo -

The fishing puns are overpowering as Bass Pro Shops expresses its interest in redeveloping Mud Island River Park, on the other side of the city harbor from the Pyramid Bass Pro Shops opened at just this past May.
Bass Pro Shops is one of five companies to express interest in Mud Island as part of the process by the Riverfront Development Corporation to go a different way with the park.
The RDC released the names of the companies Thursday.
Earlier this month, we outlined the RVC Outdoor Destinations proposal.
We don’t know nearly as much about what Bass Pro Shops has in mind or the other three firms.
All five now head for what amounts to a second round in which they submit specific plans to a search committee of the RDC including how they will pay for their plans.

66. Ursula Madden: From Broadcast News to Memphis Communications Chief -

She didn’t realize it at the time, but Ursula Madden was training for her career as a local television anchor.

This was when she was a girl, growing up in Portland, Oregon. Little Ursula might have been sent outdoors to play all the time, but her mother had other ideas.

67. Strickland Proposes Mediation in Greensward Controversy -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland is asking leaders of the Memphis Zoo and the Overton Park Conservancy to enter voluntary mediation over parking in the Overton Park Greensward.

68. Last Word: Tri-State's Deal With First Tennessee, Matt Barnes' Fine and The Grind -

It sounds strange to refer to this as a holiday weekend – the anniversary of the birth of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.
Holidays suggest something different than the rededication to purpose so many of us stress as our definition of this day honoring the memory of a leader whose life made it difficult to imagine what our society would be like without his presence.
That we feel compelled to express the meaning of the day through actions and a recommitment to principles buffeted by reality reflects a hope that we wish to retain as first-hand memories of King’s life fade and his legacy endures.

69. Last Word: Secrets In A Small Town, Bullard Bounce and Beale & Mud Island -

Munford! A winning Powerball ticket for the largest jackpot ever was sold in Munford and that warrants a rare exclamation mark.
Possibly two when you consider that small towns are supposed to be places where it is nearly impossible to keep a secret – at least from the other folks in the town.
The fact that it was sold at Naifeh’s, a long-standing Tipton County business institution adds to the story.
The person who bought the ticket in Munford holds one of three winning tickets which comes out to about $582 million for that ticket.
That is roughly the size of the city of Memphis operating budget.
There was a similar mystery underway Thursday in Dyersburg where someone bought a Powerball ticket worth a paltry $2 million. Probably worth an exclamation mark if I wasn’t over the limit and already feeling the unspoken disdain of my reporting brethren who are judging me harshly as you read this.

70. Last Word: Overton Park's Restless Winter, Across The Harahan and Higher Ed -

It may be chilly outside, but it might as well be July on the Overton Park greensward with all of the political heat that is building.
The thermometer spiked when more than two dozen trees donated to the Overton Park Conservancy in 2012 were removed this week by the Memphis Zoo which is preparing for large crowds in March.
That’s when its new Zambezi Hippo River Camp exhibit opens to much anticipation and much fanfare.
That and the New Year’s Eve legal opinion favoring the zoo’s position on its use of the greensward for overflow parking set the stage for a dispute the administration of Mayor Jim Strickland has had to mediate at less than two weeks in office.

71. Lakeland Commission to Vote On Term Extension Ordinance -

Lakeland commissioners take a final vote Thursday, Jan. 14, on an ordinance that would give them, Lakeland school board members and Lakeland mayor Wyatt Bunker an extra 14 months in office.

The ordinance, proposed by Bunker, would call off staggered city elections in September 2017 and September 2019. It would instead set those elections for November 2018 and November 2020.

72. New Memphis COO Doug McGowen Knows Importance of Carrying Out Orders -

From age 13 until he finished college, Doug McGowen was filling in his summers and college breaks with work. Real work. Sweat-on-the-brow work.

He grew up in Meadville, a small town in northwest Pennsylvania. And there he toiled for a small family-owned construction company, doing whatever was asked.

73. Last Word: Legislature's Return, Uber Pilot, Minivan Comeback and Bowie's Exit -

The gavel falls in Nashville.
The Tennessee legislature is back in session Tuesday. This is an election year session for the legislature. So it will be short – likely an early April adjournment. But that doesn’t mean the session is without expectations from outside Nashville.

74. Tennessee Legislature Opens 2016 Session on Capitol Hill -

The Tennessee General Assembly's 2016 session will be a short one, likely done by early April. The gavels fall in the House and Senate chambers in Nashville at noon Tuesday, Jan. 12, opening the election year session.

75. Last Word: El Chapo and Memphis, First Filers for August and Origins in Graffiti -

The Mississippi River at Memphis crested and then it rained.
The weekend rain added about two-tenths of an inch by Saturday to Friday’s crest.
But by Sunday, the river had dropped to 39.12 feet, which is still more than five feet above flood stage.

76. The Week Ahead: Jan. 11, 2016 -

How was your weekend, Memphis? Here’s our weekly rundown of local happenings you need to know about, from drones and robot research to the Grizzlies’ annual MLK symposium at the National Civil Rights Museum...

77. Last Word: The Crest, OPEB Fever, Armstrong Leaves and An Elvis Warning -

The crest is here and it is not quite 40 feet on the Mississippi River gauge. The projections Thursday evening going into Friday’s crest of the river at Memphis changed a bit from the 40.3 foot level. The crest is 39.8 feet.
No reports of major damage anywhere in Shelby County, according to the Shelby County Office of Prepardness.
But the river’s high water is still a sight to behold.

78. Council OKs Strickland's Directors, He Defends Pay Raises -

Memphis City Council members approved Mayor Jim Strickland’s slate of 12 division chiefs and directors Tuesday, Jan. 5, at the first council meeting of 2016. And Strickland defended the pay raises for some of those positions compared to the salaries those appointed positions paid in the Wharton administration.

79. Fed's Bullard to Address Economic Club of Memphis -

Only a few weeks after the Federal Reserve decided to raise interest rates after keeping them near zero for years, a key Fed official will be in Memphis later this month to talk about the economy and what lies ahead.

80. Last Word: Out With the Old, In With The River -

We end 2015 with an eye on the Mississippi River as the city marks the New Year with three major New Year’s Eve outdoor celebrations – one on Beale Street, another in the newly-awakened Overton Square and yet another in the Broad Avenue Arts District.
Two come with lots of memories of past New Year’s eves – with soon-to-be memories.
Overton Square’s comeback as a theater district has been a big story of the last two years.
But Beale Street at the end of 2015 is an institution that has also seen a lot of change in the last year with the move to a Beale Street Tourism Development Authority at year’s end.
Broad is a different story with a different context. The context is a diversified Memphis whose crowd is likely to be at least slightly more local than the mix in Overton Square and on Beale Street.
It's example could very well show us the path to a New Year's eve with public celebrations from Whitehaven to Frayser.

81. Strickland Takes Office Promising Change -

Things move quickly once it is decided the incumbent mayor will not be returning to City Hall.

The political spotlight shifts quickly to the new mayor who has about two months and two weeks to make some important decisions about his inner circle, set some priorities and figure out what needs to wait for more deliberation.

82. Memorable Events of 2015 will Spill Into 2016 -

When you really get down to it, history is a collection of moments, moments that, when they fall one after the other over the long arc of time, eventually form the tapestry representing who we are.

83. Deadly Shooting in Chattanooga Voted Top Story of 2015 -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – The fatal shooting of four Marines and a sailor in Chattanooga has been voted the top Tennessee news story of 2015.

Muhammad Abdulazeez, a 24-year-old naturalized U.S. citizen, opened fire on a recruiting center and a reserve facility on July 16. The FBI recently described the attack as an act "inspired and motivated by foreign terrorist propaganda."

84. City Leaders to Take Oath On New Year’s Day -

Memphis Mayor-elect Jim Strickland takes the oath of office Jan. 1.

Strickland will be joined in the oath by 13 Memphis City Council members and new City Court clerk Kay Robilio.

85. City Hall Shuffle Moves Into Christmas Eve With 8 Positions Cut -

Memphis-Mayor elect Jim Strickland announced on Christmas Eve that he will eliminate eight positions in the current administration, one of them vacant. And a ninth positon will become a part-time position. Strickland will also follow through on his long-held desire to end the city’s involvement in and funding of the Memphis-Shelby County Music Commission.

86. Last Word: 7 Dead in North Mississippi, City Hall Shuffle Continues, Another UCI Exit -

With first light Christmas Eve in North Mississippi the death toll from the Wednesday storm and tornadoes rose to seven with more than 40 injured, that according to Mississippi Gov. Phil Bryant who has declared a state of emergency.

87. The Week Ahead: Dec. 28, 2015 -

How was your (hopefully long) weekend, Memphis? This week, more than most, is a time of change – of renewal, of turning the page, starting over. And of course, a time to ask the annual question: What are we going to do on New Year’s Eve?

88. Young Named City HCD Director By Strickland -

Memphis Mayor-elect Jim Strickland has named Paul Young as the director of the city’s division of Housing and Community Development.

89. The Titans Will Be Sold. Soon. Here’s Why -

Anybody got a spare $2 billion lying around? If so, the Tennessee Titans could be yours. Despite statements to the contrary by Titans management, there is growing sentiment locally and around the NFL that the team soon will be available to the highest bidder.

90. Council's New Crop -

They ran in the considerable shadow of the most competitive Memphis mayoral race in a generation. The new Memphis City Council that takes office with Mayor-elect Jim Strickland in January isn’t necessarily a generational shift. It doesn’t signify a wholesale ousting by the electorate, either.

91. Last Word: The Force Reawakens, Methodist Expands and Setting Up 2016 -

Last Word is a new daily online column that offers an overview of what’s happened at the end of shift, so to speak. Picture a dimly lit newsroom in the Downtown night and the last person in the place leaving a memo for the morning shift and you have a pretty good idea of what we are aiming for.

92. Strickland Taps Memphis' First Female Fire Director -

Memphis Mayor-elect Jim Strickland made another significant staff announcement to start the week.

93. Wharton Touts Memphis’ Emergence in Exit Interview -

He didn’t win re-election, but A C Wharton says he did change the city’s politics in his six years as mayor.

“It would be the epitome of naivete to say that there are not some folks who still try to thrive politically on dividing us. I guess that will always be,” Mayor Wharton said in a Tuesday, Dec. 8, exit interview with The Daily News. “But by and large, I am convinced that most people are set on saying, ‘Let’s get along.’ It’s tough enough out there with us working together. Imagine what it will look like if we don’t. … I believe we are on our way.”

94. Jobs Report's Big Question Mark: Will Pay Growth Continue? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Is the U.S. job market finally healthy enough to lift Americans' long-stagnant pay?

Some tantalizing signs have suggested that wages are beginning to pick up after barely moving in the 6½ years since the Great Recession officially ended. On Friday, the government's jobs report for November should offer some clues about whether the modest pay gains will continue.

95. Council Approves Smart Meter Pact, Compromises on Water Rate Hike, Idlewild Gate -

Memphis City Council members approved Tuesday, Dec. 1, a $240-million five-year contract between Memphis Light Gas and Water Division and Elster Solutions LLC to outfit most of the city with Smart Meters.

96. College Football Notebook: Memphis Coaching Search a Waiting Game -

As this is being written, the University of Memphis coaching search is a game of wait and see. Athletic director Tom Bowen & Co. apparently remain fixed on Missouri defensive coordinator Barry Odom, who served in the same position for three seasons at Memphis before going to Missouri before the 2015 season.

97. Appeals Court Vacates Kyle Ruling on Bail Bond Rules -

Shelby County Chancery Court has no jurisdiction over the rules that Criminal Court judges make for bail bond companies.

That’s what the Tennessee Court of Appeals has ruled in a case that reversed a March decision by Chancellor Jim Kyle, which barred Criminal Court judges from enforcing a drug-testing requirement in its recently updated rules for bail bond companies.

98. Signs of Steady US Economy: Rising Pay and Solid Job Market -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Americans' pay is up, fewer people need unemployment aid, more are buying new homes and business spending is rebounding.

A flurry of data released Wednesday signaled that the fundamentals of the U.S. economy remain solid, if unspectacular, three weeks before the Federal Reserve will likely begin raising interest rates.

99. … and most memorable moments -

I was in a bar just outside Centennial Olympic Park in Atlanta when the bomb went off at the 1996 Summer Games.

I immediately jumped up, went out the door and into utter chaos, where I interviewed anybody who would stop to talk.

100. Toys Have Best Year in a Decade -

NEW YORK (AP) — Toys are staging a comeback.

The U.S. toy industry is expected to have its strongest year in at least a decade after several years of kids choosing videogames and mobile apps over Barbie and stuffed bears.