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Editorial Results (free)

1. Last Word: The Greensward Deal, Pulpit to Protest Call and Leader Federal's HQ -

There is nothing quite like a deadline to produce results.

I’m not talking about this job, although it is more than a coincidence that the closer a deadline gets the more you start to figure out how to write something.

2. Council Faces Residency, Overton Park Decisions -

Memphis City Council members take a final vote Tuesday, July 19, on putting a new residency requirement to city voters on the Nov. 8 ballot.

If approved, the referendum would be the fourth charter change involving where city employees live that Memphians have voted on in 12 years.

3. After The Bridge -

Four and a half hours after it began Sunday, July 10, the city's most significant and largest Black Lives Matter protest ended with police in riot gear slowly walking a group of around 100 protesters off the Hernando DeSoto Bridge and south on Front Street.

4. Frustrations Aired After Bridge Protest -

To get an idea of just how high emotions were running at the outset of the weekend’s Black Lives Matter rally Downtown that turned into a march, take many of the voices coming through a megaphone in the FedExForum plaza and put them in a church sanctuary with air conditioning and a better sound system.

5. Frustration Day After Black Lives Matter Protest -

To get an idea of just how high emotions were running at the outset of the weekend’s Black Lives Matter rally Downtown that turned into a march, take many of the voices coming through a megaphone in the FedExForum plaza and put them in a church sanctuary with air conditioning and a better sound system.

6. Protest at Memphis Bridge Ends Peacefully -

Four and a half hours after it began Sunday, July 10, the city’s most significant and largest Black Lives Matter protest ended with police in riot gear slowly walking a group of around 100 protesters off the Hernando DeSoto Bridge to Front Street.

7. Black Lives Matter Protest Draws Thousands In Memphis Protest Milestone -

Four and a half hours after it began Sunday, July 10, the city's most significant and largest Black Lives Matter protest ended with police in riot gear slowly walking a group of around 100 protesters off the Hernando DeSoto Bridge and south on Front Street.

8. Strickland and Rallings Urge Peace and Calm At End of Violent Week -

Memphis Police are “doubling up” on patrol for now, Memphis Police Director Michael Rallings said Friday, July 8, and are sending more officers to respond to calls in the wake of a sniper attack in Dallas Thursday evening that killed five police officers.

9. Greensward Partisans Turn Out Two Weeks Ahead of Council Votes on Settlement -

The Overton Park Greensward wasn’t on the Memphis City Council’s agenda Tuesday, July 5. But there were plenty of partisan from the controversy in council chambers in what was a rehearsal for a council vote in two weeks on a settlement of the park’s parking problem.

10. Last Word: Two Paths, Council Day, Conley Writes and WIGS Debut -

Two ways to look at the Fourth of July in Memphis. It was either soggy or the fireworks began early.

For probably less than a minute, the mother accused to killing four of her children last week in southeast Shelby County will make her first court appearance Tuesday morning either in person at 201 Poplar Ave. or by video link from Jail East.

11. The Week Ahead: July 4-10 -

Happy Fourth of July, Memphis! We hope you’re enjoying a long weekend – and if you do have to work today, we hope you’re able to sneak out early enough to watch some of the local fireworks displays tonight. Here are details on a few of them, plus other local happenings you need to know about this week…

12. Council to Debate Residency Limits, Again -

Memphis City Council members wade into the residency question Tuesday, July 5 – specifically a proposed referendum in November on a city charter amendment that would require “all persons employed solely by the city of Memphis to live and reside within the city of Memphis.”

13. Dean: Cities Need Transit Solutions for Growth -

During a busy day in Memphis last week, former Nashville Mayor Karl Dean stopped at City Hall to talk with Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland about a long-range city plan Strickland announced the following day.

14. Last Word: Pinch Plans, Beyond the Basics and the Golden Greek -

The future of the Pinch District looks to be Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland’s first venture beyond being “brilliant at the basics.”

15. Fairgrounds Revitalization Efforts Start Slow and Anew -

The Fairgrounds and the Mid-South Coliseum aren’t a priority of the new administration at City Hall.

And that’s fine with groups trying to chart a future for both.

“The building is in good shape. It’s not in a condition that can’t be mothballed for awhile,” said Chooch Pickard of the Coliseum Coalition. “We can take our time in planning for the Coliseum and the Fairgrounds and do it right. There’s no need to rush. We can take our time, find out what everyone really wants to do with it and raise the money.”

16. Last Word: ServiceMaster Details, Loflin Yard Changes and Bridge Lighting -

The ServiceMaster local incentives for the new Peabody Place headquarters have cleared the first hurdle.

That was the Center City Revenue Finance Corporation’s Tuesday meeting. It’s on to the Center City Development Corporation Wednesday and then EDGE.

17. American Studio Hit-Maker Moman Dies -

He found the old South Memphis movie theater that became Stax Records. He recorded more than 100 hit records for numerous record labels in a 10-year period in a nondescript building at Danny Thomas Boulevard and Chelsea Avenue.

18. Vendors Chosen for Makers Event at City Hall June 21 -

Event organizers have secured a line-up of vendors for the Maker Fair, to be held on June 21 in front of City Hall.

The local vendors include Aunt Key's Apothecary, Dr. Bean Coffee, Meekie's Munchies, Jeanine Hill Ceramics, Grace Given Gifts, Gifts from Nature, Question the Answer, Lindsey Glenn Designs, Michelle Duckworth, Ekata Designs, ARCHd LLC, Prim Society, Mary Claire White, Aperel Fashion, Phillip Ashley Chocolates and Double Barrel Lights.

19. Six Groups Inspect Mid-South Coliseum -

Six groups from Memphis and elsewhere inspected the Mid-South Coliseum this week, taking the city of Memphis up on an offer of four hours each to look over the mothballed 12,000-seat arena.

The city made the offer after it allowed a tour of the arena by the Coliseum Coalition and architects as the group pursues a plan to possibly restore or renovate the coliseum for future use.

20. June 10-16: This week in Memphis history -

2015: Andrea Miller is named the new president of LeMoyne-Owen College, making her the first woman to lead the city’s only historically black college. Miller is selected by the college’s board of trustees in a meeting on campus that lasts several hours as students, alumni and other supporters wait on the lawn outside Brownlee Hall for the announcement.

21. Vendors Chosen for Makers Event at City Hall June 21 -

Event organizers have secured a line-up of vendors for the Maker Fair, to be held on June 21 in front of City Hall.

The local vendors include Aunt Key’s Apothecary, Dr. Bean Coffee, Meekie’s Munchies, Jeanine Hill Ceramics, Grace Given Gifts, Gifts from Nature, Question the Answer, Lindsey Glenn Designs, Michelle Duckworth, Ekata Designs, ARCHd LLC, Prim Societ , Mary Claire White, Aperel Fashion, Phillip Ashley Chocolates and Double Barrel Lights.

22. Six Groups Inspect Mid-South Coliseum -

Six groups from Memphis and elsewhere inspected the Mid-South Coliseum this week, taking the city of Memphis up on an offer of four hours each to look over the mothballed 12,000-seat arena.

The city made the offer after it allowed a tour of the arena by the Coliseum Coalition and architects as the group pursues a plan to possibly restore or renovate the coliseum for future use.

23. Last Word: Verdell Smith and Lifeline, Strickland's First 5 Months and Tennessine -

Lots of blue lights in Cordova Thursday evening as the Memphis Police Department remembers Officer Verdell Smith, who died in Saturday’s Downtown rampage in the line of duty. His funeral is Friday.

24. Last Word: A Distinct Reaction, City Hall's Budget Season and BreakFest On Broad -

Funeral services for Memphis Police Officer Verdell Smith are set for Friday at Hope Presbyterian Church in Cordova.

The day before that Downtown leaders will gather in Handy Park on Beale Street to talk about new measures to make the district safer.

25. City Budgets, Stable Tax Rate Approved With Few Amendments -

Memphis City Council members approved a city operating budget of $666 million and a capital budget of $85 million along with a stable city property tax rate of $3.40 Tuesday, June 7, ending City Hall’s budget season.

26. Last Word: A Different Aftermath and Trolleys Aren't Just for Tourists -

A week that will likely end with the funeral of a Memphis Police officer began with a discussion about violent crime that is even at this early point proving to be different from the past discussions we’ve had at times like these.

27. City Council Could End Budget Season Tuesday -

The Memphis City Council should end its budget season Tuesday, June 3, with final votes on three resolutions and two ordinances that approve the city’s operating and capital budgets, and keep the city property tax rate at its current $3.40 – all for the fiscal year that begins July 1.

28. New Parks Director is Second Of Three Major Hires for Strickland Administration -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland has appointed a former director of cultural affairs for the city of Dallas and at Miami-Dade College in Florida to be the city’s new director of Parks and Neighborhoods.

29. June is Maker Month in Memphis -

This month in Memphis is all about the makers. From a gathering at the Broad Avenue retailer City & State to a “Makers Faire” in front of City Hall to a new privately funded effort to better understand the local maker economy, June will see a celebration and showcase of the city’s community of makers, artisans and the like.

30. Committee Recommends Pay Raises for City Employees -

The Memphis City Council’s budget committee completed its budget reviews Tuesday, May 31, recommending a 1.5 percent pay raise for city employees other than fire and police and $300,000 in grant funding to hire a full-time director for the Whitehaven Economic Development Council.

31. Council Committee Recommends Pay Raises Beyond Fire and Police -

It took six hours. But the Memphis City Council’s budget committee completed its budget reviews Tuesday, May 31, with a recommendation of a 1.5 percent pay raise for city employees other than fire and police and $300,000 in grant funding to hire a full-time director for the Whitehaven Economic Development Council.

32. Shelby County Schools Wraps Up a Calmer, But Still Eventful, Year -

Given the last six years of historic change in public education locally, you could be forgiven if you thought of Friday’s half day of classes for Shelby County Schools as the end of an idyllic school year.

33. City Opens Up Mid-South Coliseum to Reviews -

For a week in June, the city will allow citizen groups with qualified experts including architects and engineers to have access to the Mid-South Coliseum for four hours at a time twice a day.

The “Mid-South Coliseum Review Period” has a May 27 deadline for groups to request access under the city’s terms.

34. Memphis Police Partner With NextDoor Network -

Memphis Police and the city of Memphis are partnering with NextDoor, the social media network, to better communicate with residents.

Mayor Jim Strickland and interim Memphis Police Director Michael Rallings announced the partnership Thursday, May 19, at City Hall.

35. Memphis Police Partner With NextDoor Network -

Memphis Police and the city of Memphis are partnering with NextDoor, the social media network, to better communicate with residents.

Mayor Jim Strickland and interim Memphis Police Director Michael Rallings announced the partnership Thursday, May 19, at City Hall.

36. Overton Mediation Looks at Reality Of North Parkway On-Street Parking -

Where shuttle buses will drop off those bound for Overton Park and the Memphis Zoo in particular, as well as the public’s reaction to newly created on-street parking on North Parkway are issues being discussed in mediation to resolve the park’s Greensward controversy.

37. Council Sells Former Police HQ for $2 Million -

Memphis City Council members approved Tuesday, May 17, the sale of the old Central Police building at 128 Adams Ave. for $2 million to NCE Realty and Capital Group LLC for development as a boutique hotel.

38. Council Sells Former Police HQ for $2 Million -

Memphis City Council members approved Tuesday, May 17, the sale of the old Central Police building at 128 Adams Ave. for $2 million to NCE Realty and Capital Group LLC for development as a boutique hotel.

39. Council Auctions Old Police Building -

The city holds a rare auction at the Tuesday, May 17, session of the Memphis City Council, selling the old Central Police building at 128 Adams Ave. to the highest bidder.

40. Delay On Larger Pinch Plan Grows Uneasy -

When Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland met last week with representatives of Bass Pro Shops and city council member Berlin Boyd – the council member whose district includes the Pyramid, Mud Island, the Pinch District and St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital – there was a lot of turf to discuss.

41. Last Word: GMF Aftermath, Cop Counts and Budgets and Richardson Towers' Fall -

More on the move by Bank of New York to have a receiver appointed for the Warren and Tulane Apartments currently owned by Global Ministries Foundation.

GMF CEO Rev. Richard Hamlet responded Wednesday to the filing in Memphis federal court saying he agrees that a receiver for the property is a good idea. But he doesn’t agree – and in fact, strongly disagrees with the claims and reasoning behind the bank’s call for the receiver.

42. Haves, Have-Nots Get Varied Tax Relief -

Amid the rancor of bathroom and counseling bills, two major pieces of legislation slipped through the General Assembly this session with hardly a peep – elimination of the Hall tax and a partial revitalization of property tax relief for seniors and disabled veterans.

43. ‘Underground’ Stars Surface in Memphis -

The last time fans of the television show “Underground” saw actor Alano Miller, his character, Cato, was believed to be dead. The unexpected twist for a complex and central character in the WGN America drama based on the Underground Railroad in pre-Civil War America was still generating plenty of social media disbelief nearly a week later.

44. Rallings Fields Council Questions On Police Hiring, Director’s Job -

Interim Memphis Police Director Michael Rallings says he has plenty of time to apply for the job on a permanent basis.

For now, Rallings told Memphis City Council members he is focused on getting a $256.3 million budget approved as part of the overall $667 million city government operating budget, dropping crime numbers and raising the number of police on the force.

45. Nonprofit Operators Told That Failure Can Bring Long-Term Success -

“Innovation and the Courage to Fail.” That was the theme for the 11th annual conference for the nonprofit sector presented by the Alliance for Nonprofit Excellence and Nonprofit Quarterly.

46. Last Word: Humdingers, Gangster Disciples Paper Work and Underground Day -

Sometimes you think you know what is going on and then something happens like Chris Wallace, the general manager of the Memphis Grizzlies, grabbing a bite to eat Monday at Humdingers out east with former Grizz coach Lionel Hollins. Next thing you know there’s another possibility for the next Grizz coach – a return engagement that would be exceedingly rare.

47. 'Underground' Stars in Memphis Tuesday -

Three stars of the WGN America television series “Underground” are in Memphis Tuesday, May 10 – the day before the finale airs – for a sneak peek and panel discussion at the National Civil Rights Museum, 450 Mulberry St.

48. Mayor Opposes City Funds for Mud Island -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland says the city may be willing to help fund a $9 billion expansion of St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital that is mostly private capital.

49. The Week Ahead: May 9-15 -

Alright, Memphis, grab your calendars! Whether you want to book it over to the Ruby Bridges Reading Festival or just baste in the scent of barbecue, there’s plenty to do this week. Here’s our roundup...

50. Last Word: Mall Demo, Defining 'Fringe Element' and Herenton's New Path -

Once upon a time there were three “town centers” planned by the city of Memphis.

City facilities like libraries and police precincts would be the anchors and encourage private retail development in them.

51. French Fort Motel Compromise Hard-Fought -

The developer of the old Marine Hospital south of E.H. Crump Avenue at the Memphis-Arkansas Bridge across the Mississippi River and the leader of the French Fort neighborhood association never actually talked to each other Wednesday, May 4.

52. Geater Claims Dunavant Honor for Job Without a Description -

Lisa Geater likens the job of the Memphis City Council’s staff to being wallpaper. After 27 years working in the council office at City Hall, including 20 as the administrator running the office, Geater said her advice for new staff members was simple.

53. Last Word: Budget-Mania, TNReady's Backstory and Slow Down Millenial Investors -

The Overton Park Greensward controversy moves back to City Hall Tuesday as the council talks over an ordinance that sets further in stone the council’s decision in March to give the Memphis Zoo control of two-thirds of the greensward.

54. City Council Set for First Property Tax Rate Vote -

Memphis City Council members begin setting the stage for the approval of city operating and capital budgets when they meet Tuesday, May 3.

The council agenda includes first-reading votes on two ordinances that are placeholders for the basic passage of tax rates and the allocation of parts of the rate.

55. Last Word: BSMF Looks Up, Overton Park Respite and Slow Economic Growth -

The Beale Street Music Festival box office numbers won’t be in for a bit yet. But it looks like the three-day event that ended Sunday evening with Beck and Paul Simon weathered the weather very well, maybe better than usual.

56. New City Council Learns Ways of Budget Season Quickly -

There are 3,000 miles of street curbs in Memphis. Figures like this are the basic elements of budget season at City Hall.

They are how 13 Memphis City Council members – seven of them four months into their first four-year term of office – wrap their heads around an $85.3 million capital budget proposal and a $667 million operating budget proposal.

57. The Week Ahead: May 2-8 -

So, you think this is the “off-week” of the Memphis In May International Festival – the gap between the Beale Street Music Festival and the World Championship Barbecue Cooking Contest. But, while Tom Lee Park gets a breather, there are plenty of cultural experiences to soak up across Memphis. Here's our weekly roundup of local happenings you need to know about...

58. Overton Greensward Overcast Weekend Offers Temporary Interlude -

For a few hours Saturday morning, April 30, in Overton Park there was no one on the Greensward – no cars, no zoo crew, no protesters, no yoga class, no dogs or dog walkers. On an overcast day, there wasn't even a shadow to be cast.

59. Council Members Express Impatience with Minority Contracting Complexity -

Some Memphis City Council members want to challenge City Hall’s existing minority business system as its minority business effort is being streamlined.

The possible challenge includes questioning the idea of percentage goals in contracting based on a complex formula that includes multipliers.

60. Last Word: Prince, Violent Crime Numbers, and a Parkside Post Script -

Prince. It’s hard to think of a musician with a more complete knowledge of music as a social and cultural force and the ability to let that force inhabit his music and what he wanted to accomplish.
It is that knowledge and its use from obscurity to the pinnacle of fame and acclaim to his own journey for personal fulfillment that, to me, defines what has been lost.
Music mattered to Prince unlike it had ever mattered before. All of the influences analyzed and synthesized by someone born in rock and roll’s first wave pushed forward in a sound that combined rock and roll and rhythm and blues and funk with purpose and confidence.
It wasn’t a denial or downplaying of any of those music categories – all were present sonically and culturally. No juggling or quick changes.
That was his talent and it’s hard to think of anyone who has been as knowledgeable, intentional and successful -- commercially and artistically – in that combination.
Prince is remembered here for not only playing the city’s largest arenas but for his legendary after shows on Beale Street that brought an entertainment insider cachet the district has rarely seen since its early 1980s reopening.
His was an intensity and sense of purpose rarely seen and possessed in such a way in the 60 years since rock and roll started in this very city, kicked off by both Rocket 88 and That’s Alright Mama.
So why couldn’t the city’s rock radio stations do more than talk about Prince into commercial breaks after another Nickelback rock block and actually play some of his music to acknowledge such a huge genre crossing artist?
Not cool.

61. Strickland in New Seat for Budget Give-and-Take -

When Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland finished his budget address to the Memphis City Council Tuesday, April 19, council member Edmund Ford had a film clip he wanted Strickland and the rest of the council to watch.

62. Last Word: The Bible Veto Override Vote, Grizz Nostalgia and Kroger Goes Online -

The Tennessee Legislature hoped to end its 2016 session Wednesday at the end of an eventful day that included a failed attempt to override Gov. Bill Haslam’s veto of the bill that would have made the Bible the official state book.
But into Wednesday evening, the state House was still debating the Hall tax on dividends – specifically further roll backs of it. And the Senate had gone home for the night.
So Thursday looks like a good bet for the adjournment for the year and the formal start of the election season for incumbents.

63. Last Word: Budget Basics, A Peak At Greensward Mediation and Elvis & Nixon -

Spurs 94 – Grizzlies 68 in game 2 of the NBA playoffs. The TNT post-game show just showed the highlights of the game while Shaq and Charles Barkley talked about how big the women are in San Antonio. I’m not making this up. They didn’t even try to talk about the game. This is just grim.

64. Strickland’s First Budget Includes Police Raise -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland presents his first budget proposal Tuesday, April 19, to the Memphis City Council just four months after taking office as mayor.

65. The Week Ahead: April 18-24 -

Let’s get this week started, Memphis! Here’s our roundup of local happenings you need to know about, from the dreaded federal income tax filing day, to the scheduled end of the Tennessee Legislature for this session, to a couple of big round-ball games at FedExForum beginning Friday.

66. Legislators Playing Expensive Game With LGBT Issues -

The silly season is in full swing on Capitol Hill, but the “bathroom bill” and any jokes surrounding it are no laughing matter anymore. It’s getting downright expensive.

Tennessee Attorney General Herbert Slatery said this week the bill dealing with transgender student use of restrooms could cost the state more than $1.2 billion in federal funds for K-12 and higher education.

67. Last Word: Lipscomb's Successor, MATA School Buses and Roland's Big Breakfast -

Paul Young gets a lot more attention these days than he did when he was the first director of the city-county Office of Sustainability. The attention comes with being the city director of Housing and Community Development where virtually all of the funding comes from the federal government.
That federal funding has changed the face of public housing in the city in the last 25 years. There is only one large public housing project left in the city as a result of the federal funding and its use by Young’s predecessor, Robert Lipscomb.
And what Lipscomb did with the job combined with being the executive director of the Memphis Housing Authority is why a lot of people want to get to know Paul Young these days.
Our centerpiece story by Madeline Faber in Tuesday’s edition makes clear that Young has no desire to wield that kind of power. And it is unlikely anyone in the near future will have the kind of autonomy Lipscomb did.
But beyond that there is still the flow of a lot of federal dollars and Young has some ideas based on his experience in government and finance prior to coming to HCD – everything in government is initials.
It’s a much different experience than Lipscomb’s. Lipscomb coined the phrase “ending public housing as we know it” and at times that slogan wasn’t followed with a lot of detail about what came after public housing was demolished, especially with the first of the projects to fall.
The last public housing project, Foote Homes, will be demolished on Young’s watch which makes his tenure important if more limited than Lipscomb’s tenure.

68. Roland Starts 2018 Bid for County Mayor -

The 2018 Shelby County general elections are more than two years away. The 2016 county elections that decide races for General Sessions Court Clerk, five of the nine seats on the Shelby County Schools board and two judicial positions are still to come in August.

69. Last Word: Pastner's Georgia Tech Post-Season, Who Filed and Greensward Invitations -

Not so fast with the off-season. There is a Memphis post-season after all.

And the Grizz found it Thursday like a light at the end of a long-tunnel where a lot of people slipped and fell and can’t get up.
The light was Houston flaming out at home to Phoenix without the Grizzlies having to make a basket.
It’s all about the math. Stay in school, young people.

70. Last Word: Policing The Greensward, A Rural Oasis and Gene Chips -

The city of Memphis had 88 police staff and other city employees working an Overton Park detail Saturday and another 33 working Sunday on the same detail, according to the Strickland administration’s accounting on Monday.

71. Conrad Call for De-Annexation Talks Draws Favorable Reviews -

Memphis City Council Chairman Kemp Conrad wants to open talks with county commissioners on possible voluntary de-annexations.

And County Commission Chairman Terry Roland said he is open to the idea.

72. City Council Sets Stage for Budget Season -

Two weeks before Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland presents his first budget proposal to the Memphis City Council, the council and administration are setting the stage for the budget season to come.

73. Amended Senate De-annexation Bill Faces More Debate -

The de-annexation bill whose defeat became City Hall’s top priority in March is off the political frontburner.

But Memphis Democrats in the Tennessee Legislature who opposed the de-annexation by referendum measure expect that this isn’t the end of the concept or the move to make it law.

74. Memphis Presence Helps Turn Tide on Controversial Legislation -

The Tennessee Legislature’s de-annexation debate is over for now. But the bill’s effect on the Memphis-Capitol Hill relationship has left a larger political imprint than the proposal.

That’s saying a lot considering the proposal dealt with the possibility of territory and citizens rearranging the city’s boundaries to put them and the taxes they pay outside the city limits.

75. Memphis Leaders Pleased With 'Reprieve' on De-Annexation Bill -

The de-annexation by referendum legislation pending in the Tennessee Legislature was sent to a summer study committee Wednesday, March 30, in the state Senate, effectively killing the proposal for the legislative session.

76. Amendments Cloud Issue of De-Annexation -

Tennessee state senators go back to work Tuesday, March 29, in Nashville on a modified de-annexation bill.

The Senate State and Local Government Committee will be reviewing a set of amendments to their version of the bill, which changed substantially from the House version in a committee session last week.

77. Last Word: The De-Annexation Express, Return of The Curb Market and Different Fuel -

When time ran out Wednesday on the state Senate’s state and local government committee in Nashville, de-annexation legislation was still on the tracks as the Tennessee Legislature draws closer to adjournment for the year.

78. Memphis Fights Back: Senate Poised To Do Real Damage via De-Annexation -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland makes a persuasive argument against de-annexation legislation now being considered by the state Legislature, providing a long list of figures to show it would devastate the Bluff City.

79. Harris, Towns Hope to Delay Monday De-Annexation Vote -

Memphis Democrats in the Tennessee Legislature are hoping to delay a scheduled Monday, March 21, state Senate floor vote on a deannexation bill that cleared the state House a week ago.

“This train is moving very fast,” Democratic Sen. Lee Harris said Friday, March 18. “The city of Memphis has never made a significant presentation about the city of Memphis’ finances to the relevant committees or to the Senate members,” he added. “Minimally, we need to send this back to committee so that we can have some airing out of what the facts are and what the known consequences are. … Minimally, if you are going to devastate a city, you should know exactly what that means and what you are doing.”

80. County Commission Questions City Figures on Deannexation -

Some Shelby County Commissioners are skeptical about City Hall’s estimate of how much city government would lose in revenue if a deannexation bill in the Tennessee Legislature becomes law.

The commission’s discussion at Wednesday, March 16, committee sessions came as Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland was in Nashville to lobby against the bill in the state Senate.

81. Potential Revenue Loss Stirs Deannexation Options -

As a potentially damaging deannexation bill moves to the state Senate for a possible vote soon, city officials are considering options to combat the expected loss of revenue should the bill pass.

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland estimates the state deannexation law could cost City Hall $27.7 million on the low end but as much as $80 million if all Memphis annexations dating back to 1998 were negated by voters in those areas.

82. Council Tallies Damage in 'Day of Bad News' -

Memphis City Council member Berlin Boyd summed up City Hall’s attitude Tuesday, March 15, during the council’s executive session. “Today is the day of bad news,” he said after a briefing from Mayor Jim Strickland on the deannexation bill approved the night before by the Tennessee House.
That was followed by more details on the estimated $60 million it will cost to replace the entire radio system for local first responders from the radios to the towers used to transmit their signals.

83. RDC Hints at Beale Landing Expansion for River Cruises -

It takes $2.25 million a year to cover the bond payments on what it cost to build Beale Street Landing – $43 million.

And the overnight cruise boats that currently dock at the landing generate $4.7 million in local taxes each year.

84. Last Word: Deannexation, Pastner Past the Season and Chewing Gum and Walking -

The much-discussed deannexation bill in the Tennessee Legislature always had the votes Monday evening in the House with Memphis Democrats succeeding only in delaying the outcome in Nashville by about two hours.
The bill passed by a wide margin after a debate that was for the most part Memphis against the rest of the state starting just outside the city limits with Republicans in the Shelby County legislative delegation.
And there is some dispute between the bill’s sponsor from the Chattanooga area and Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland. Strickland puts the potential loss of tax revenue to the city at $80 million. Rep. Mike Carter says it is more like $27 million.

85. Finances Will Be in Focus at City Council -

The list of financial surprises that Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland presented to Memphis City Council members two weeks ago tops council discussions Tuesday, March 15.

86. Politics of Deannexation Proposal Grows More Complex -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland is heading to Nashville Wednesday, March 16, to talk with legislators about what he considers City Hall’s highest priority in the 2016 session of the Tennessee Legislature – defeating a deannexation proposal.

87. The Week Ahead: March 14-20, 2016 -

How was your weekend, Memphis? Here’s our weekly roundup of local happenings you need to know about, from the first look at the Greater Memphis Chamber’s proposed diversity program to a truly Irish celebration of St. Paddy’s Day.

88. Last Word: Mudslide, The Deannexation Storm and Kilzer at Calvary -

Lots of news on a very rainy day including the flooding from the constant rain that closed some schools and cancelled a lot of other events. And then there was a mudslide on Riverside Drive from the bluff overlooking Tom Lee Park and the Mississippi River. The rain has also pushed the Wolf River to the point that it is now over some parts of the greenway in Germantown.

89. Strickland Makes Defeating Deannexation Bill Top Priority -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland is downplaying but not ruling out a move toward local government consolidation as a response to a deannexation proposal in the Tennessee legislature.

90. Strickland Downplays Consolidation Response to Deannexation Bill -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland is downplaying a move toward local government consolidation as a response to a deannexation proposal pending in the Tennessee legislature.

91. Last Word: Cubits Anyone, The G-Word and The TV News Crime Block -

How long is a cubit? After a day in which many of you got about four to five inches of rain and more to come Thursday, it seems an appropriate and timely question.
And yes, there is a cubit conversion chart on line for converting that and other really old units of measurement no longer in use like the mina, drachma or the synodic month.
So the average cubit, which is supposed to be the length of a forearm, is 18 inches or a foot and a half. That’s 0.4572 of a meter, which might as well be an ancient unit of measurement.
Someone had to say it.
According to biblehub.com – I’m not making up websites – the book of Genesis sets God’s instructions to Noah as an arc with the dimensions of 300 cubits long, 50 cubits wide and 30 cubits tall. And it was to be made out of gopher wood and covered inside and out with pitch.
The New Living Translation and Holman Christian Standard Bibles convert that to an arc 450 feet long, 75 feet wide and 45 feet high.

92. Last Word: Redbirds Sold, Memphis Burning and When Old Dominick Was Young -

Grizzlies over the Cavaliers 106-103 Monday evening in Cleveland despite the pre-game injury story dominating up to tip-off.

93. Last Word: Trump, Clinton and Stanton, The Greensward Vote and Cover Letters -

This will be a relatively short edition of Last Word given the crush of an exceptional Tuesday in which a day at City Hall was more exciting than the state’s presidential primaries.

94. City Council to Discuss Greensward Controversy -

The next setting for the Overton Park Greensward controversy isn’t the park. It is City Hall.

Memphis City Council members have an executive session “discussion of Overton Park” on their committee list at 1:45 p.m. for Tuesday, March 1.

95. Overton Park Greensward Controversy Moves To City Hall Tuesday -

The next setting for the Overton Park greensward controversy isn’t the park. It is City Hall.

Memphis City Council members have an executive session “discussion of Overton Park” on their committee list for Tuesday, March 1.

96. Duke Takes Reins at Friends for Life -

Longtime nonprofit administrator Diane Duke recently took the helm of Friends for Life as its new executive director. In her new role, the Los Angeles native leads and oversees an organization that’s helping those affected by HIV/AIDS through the provision of education, housing, food, transportation and healthy life skills training.

97. Extra City Funding for MATA Faces Long Odds -

After a year and a half as leader of the Memphis Area Transit Authority, Ron Garrison has emerged with a start on the bus system he wants that won’t cost the city anything more.

98. Trailblazer -

Carolyn Chism Hardy is a trailblazer, a success story, an advocate for the poor and middle class, and now she’s one of the most influential people in the private sector.

99. I-Team Veteran Takes Reins Of Innovate Memphis -

Two years ago, when Justin Entzminger found a job that combined his background in entrepreneurship with his dedication to the public realm, he jumped at the chance to join the Mayor’s Innovation Delivery Team.

100. Last Word: Presidents Day In An Election Year, Minority Business and Spring Training -

Presidents Day in a presidential election year.
Consider the political kaleidoscope of a foggy office-bound or home-bound Monday in Memphis with former President George W. Bush on the tube in the late afternoon defending his brother’s presidential campaign without once uttering the word Trump.
No further word of a Trump appearance promised for Memphis and some of Donald Trump’s own statements Monday suggested that by the time Memphis is on his schedule, he might be running as an independent.
Then there is the obsession in one corner of social media with Supreme Court history in rich detail.
And heads were turned Monday evening by the excerpt on the Grammys from the Broadway musical about Alexander Hamilton – a founding father born in the West Indies who established the nation’s financial system and the Federalist party. He never became a president, in part, because the vice president killed him. Hamilton wasn’t the only one who had been talking bad about Aaron Burr. The top of the ticket, President Thomas Jefferson, had decided to dump Burr from the ticket in the next election and Burr was trying to transition to become governor of New York.