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Editorial Results (free)

1. Last Word: Easy Fishing on Big River, Competing City Priorities and Durham's Fine -

The Arkansas side of the Big River Crossing opened Wednesday for the first time since May 2 when a rising Mississippi River prompted its closing while the crossing proper on the north side of the Harahan Bridge remained open. There is still some of the muddy river left on the Arkansas flood plain and several dozen cranes stopping in Wednesday afternoon for some easy fishing in the shallow waters.

2. Last Word: Your Neighbor Has Power, City Budget Wrap Take One and BBQ -

We are at the point in our storm recovery where the novelty and sense of adventure have reached the end of their very short lives in areas where the power is still out. And the restoration of that service is at a point where you now have people on one side of a street with power and those on the other side may still be in the dark and the heat.

3. Council Faces Railgarten, Beale Bucks, Police Overtime -

Memphis City Council members have a rare evidentiary hearing Tuesday, May 23, at the top of their agenda on an unusual development case the council approved several months ago.

The council holds an evidentiary hearing on the Railgarten bar and restaurant on Central Avenue east of Cooper Street that the council granted a special use permit for. The council moved to possibly revoke that permit after Railgarten added some intermodal containers and an outside area to the development.

4. The Week Ahead: May 22-28 -

Happy Monday, Memphis! School is almost over for the year, and you have plenty of chances to get outside in the coming days for the unofficial start of summer – from 901Fest at Tom Lee Park to the opening of the Splash Park at the Children’s Museum. Check out details on those and more events you need to know about in The Week Ahead…

5. Council Hears Railgarten Dispute in 2 Weeks, Appoints Impasse Panels -

Memphis City Council members will hold an evidentiary hearing in two weeks to sort out a Midtown restaurant-bar that ran afoul of the approvals needed to open with annexes including intermodal containers and an outdoor area.

6. Memphis City Council Could Act to Revoke Railgarten's Permit -

Memphis City Council members are considering a hearing that could lead to revoking the special-use permit that allowed the Midtown restaurant/bar Railgarten to open just last month.

The council approved a special-use permit for Railgarten on Central Avenue east of Cooper Street, but code enforcement officers closed down two annexes to the business using intermodal containers shortly after it opened in April to large crowds.

7. The Week Ahead: May 1-7 -

Happy Monday, Memphis! May has arrived, which means it’s time to kick off the Memphis in May International Festival with the always-popular Beale Street Music Festival – and that’s just one of the events music lovers will enjoy this week. Plus, check out where to celebrate Star Wars fans’ favorite holiday and other happenings you need to know about in The Week Ahead... 

8. Events -

The second series of Memphis 3.0 public meetings continues this week at these locations: 
• Tuesday, March 28, 5:30 p.m.: Hollywood Community Center, 1560 N. Hollywood St.
• Thursday, March 30, 5:30 p.m.: Glenview Community Center, 1141 S. Barksdale St.
The comprehensive planning team will share research that has been conducted since the first set of rallies, which generated more than 10,000 comments, and seek input on specific topics to help shape priorities and goals. Visit memphis3point0.com for a schedule of upcoming meetings.

9. Last Word: No More Lottery Balls, The Voucher Bill Advances and UCLA -

Spring is in the air, which can only mean one thing – the Overton Park Greensward controversy is back on. Just this past weekend, I was in the park noting the metal barrier that separates Greensward pedestrians from Zoo parkers and that the barrier was not “decorated” with save the greensward paraphernalia as much as it has been the previous three springs.

10. Last Word: Lakeland Date Set, Silos in South Main and Trespassing in Apartments -

Here comes the Governor’s race with Randy Boyd doing the honors here in Memphis Wednesday at the top of the second day of his fly-around. Boyd’s opening sounds very much like he is running as the heir apparent to Gov. Bill Haslam – although there are no heirs in politics, at least not without an election. He talked a lot about hitting workforce development and job goals of the Haslam administration if he is elected Governor in 2018.

11. Events -

NAWBO Memphis will hold a reception honoring Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland on Thursday, March 16, from 4:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. at Memphis Bioworks, 20 Dudley St., suite 200. The reception celebrates Strickland and the city’s Office of Diversity for moving the needle to ease access for women- and minority-owned enterprises to do business with the city. Cost is free with a suggested donation of $15. Visit nawbomemphis.org.

12. Events -

NAWBO Memphis will hold a reception honoring Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland on Thursday, March 16, from 4:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. at Memphis Bioworks, 20 Dudley St., suite 200. The reception celebrates Strickland and the city’s Office of Diversity for moving the needle to ease access for women- and minority-owned enterprises to do business with the city. Cost is free with a suggested donation of $15. Visit nawbomemphis.org.

13. Events -

An Islamic art presentation and exhibit on the topic “What Is ‘Islamic Art’?” will be held Wednesday, March 15, at 5 p.m. at the Germantown Library, 1925 Exeter Road. The Muslims in Memphis month event will also feature hands-on activities. Cost is free. Visit muslimsinmemphis.org for a full schedule of events.

14. Events -

The fourth annual Memphis Multicultural Career Expo will be held Monday, March 13, from 2 p.m. to 7 p.m. at the Memphis Hilton, 939 Ridge Lake Blvd. The event brings together job seekers from different backgrounds and communities with hiring managers from more than 30 Memphis companies. Attendees are strongly recommended to wear professional attire and bring business cards and copies of their resume. Cost is free; visit careerexpomemphis.com for advance registration and a list of participating employers. 

15. House Committee Delays Haslam's Transportation Bill -

NASHVILLE – A split House Transportation Committee slammed the brakes Tuesday on Gov. Bill Haslam’s IMPROVE Act, even though it contains a measure to use the sales tax for transportation funding instead of raising fuel taxes.

16. City Hall List Leads to Court Fight Over Police Surveillance -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland’s administration may have put to rest the basic matter of the City Hall escort list and who is on it.

17. Protesters Pared from City Hall List as Second Lawsuit Filed -

Protesters on the City Hall escort list are off the list, Memphis Police Director Michael Rallings said Wednesday, March 1. But their names will remain on a no trespassing notice for Mayor Jim Strickland’s home.

18. The Week Ahead: February 28-March 6 -

It's Monday, Memphis – time to peek at this week's (very busy) dance card, from the opening of Graceland's $45 million entertainment complex to a showcase of the latest high-tech ag innovations to a celebration of some local "hidden figures." Check out what else you need to know about in The Week Ahead...  

19. Binghampton Gateway Comes to Food Desert -

The groundbreaking of a shopping center doesn’t always attract a large crowd of city officials and TV cameras, but then again not every shopping center is an oasis in the middle of a food desert.

20. Binghampton Gateway Center Spells End for Inner City Food Desert -

The groundbreaking of a shopping center doesn’t always attract a large crowd of city officials and TV cameras, but then again not every shopping center is an oasis in the middle of a food desert.

21. The Week Ahead: February 20-26 -

Enjoying that spring-like weather, Memphis? It’s another week of politics and music in the Bluff City, highlighted by the anticipated announcement Wednesday of acts that will be playing the Beale Street Music Festival in May. Here are some other highlights:

22. Last Word: Connecting Downtown, Tranquil Treasure and Gas Tax Complexities -

Temple over the Tigers Wednesday in Philadelphia 77-66. East Carolina at the Forum is coming up Saturday. Grizz and Raptors at the Forum Wednesday evening and the Grizz win 101 – 99. The Grizz are on the road starting Friday against the Trail Blazers.

23. Last Word: The TVA Well Controversy, Fred Smith Redux and Norris On The Gas Tax -

The new Trader Joe’s in Germantown won’t be alone by the plans the supermarket chain got approved Tuesday night by the Germantown Design Review Commission. The conversion of the old Kroger store on Exeter includes seven other bays as Trader Joe’s goes for a smaller footprint than the size of the original building.

24. Events -

Playhouse on the Square will present the regional premiere of “Rock of Ages” Friday, Jan. 20, through Feb. 12 at 66 S. Cooper St. Visit playhouseonthesquare.org.

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland and the Memphis Office of Youth Services will hold the first event in the “Hear Me Out” Youth Forum Series Saturday, Jan. 21, from 10 a.m. to noon at Greater New Liberty Missionary Baptist Church, 250 E. Raines Road. The series allows youths ages 14-21 the opportunity to share concerns and offer solutions to issues they’ve faced or observed to a panel of city leaders. Others forums will be held Jan. 28, Feb. 4 and Feb. 11 at different locations. Registration required; visit cityofmemphisyouth.org.

25. Events -

The 58th annual AutoZone Liberty Bowl, featuring Georgia vs. TCU, will be held Friday, Dec. 30, at 11 a.m. at Liberty Bowl Memorial Stadium, 335 S. Hollywood St. Halftime entertainment includes Motown legends The Commodores, high school marching bands, dancers and homecoming queens from across the country. A pregame buffet ($40) starts at 8 a.m. in the Pipkin & Creative Arts Building at the Mid-South Fairgrounds. Visit libertybowl.org or call 901-795-7700 for tickets.

26. Events -

The 58th annual AutoZone Liberty Bowl, featuring Georgia vs. TCU, will be held Friday, Dec. 30, at 11 a.m. at Liberty Bowl Memorial Stadium, 335 S. Hollywood St. Halftime entertainment includes Motown legends The Commodores, high school marching bands, dancers and homecoming queens from across the country. A pregame buffet ($40) starts at 8 a.m. in the Pipkin & Creative Arts Building at the Mid-South Fairgrounds. For ticket information, visit libertybowl.org or call 901-795-7700.

27. Nashville, Memphis Respond Differently to Pot Ordinance Opinion -

A legal opinion from the Tennessee attorney general requested by two Shelby County legislators has again put Nashville city leaders in the lead as municipal marijuana ordinances enacted there and in Memphis have taken a turn toward the courts.

28. Broke and Broken: Democrats Lose More Ground in State Legislature -

Tennessee House Democrats will have to start calling themselves the “Fighting 25,” down from the “Fighting 26,” after dropping a district in the battle to regain relevance statewide.

29. Election Fallout: What a Trump Or Clinton Presidency Means for State -

Donald Trump is going to win easily in Tennessee.

Everyone, most of all the campaigns for both Trump and Hillary Clinton, accept this fact, as evidenced by the lack of campaign time spent in the state – and most of the South, for that matter – during this contentious campaign cycle.

30. Last Word: An Early Voting Challenge, Raleigh Settlement and Rocky Top Tumult -

Early voting in Shelby County ended with some lines Thursday at several of the 21 sites. We should have the final turnout numbers Friday morning and you can get the totals first @tdnpols, www.twitter.com/tdnpols.

31. Last Word: After The Fire, Hard Changes at Fred's and Durham Doesn't Go Quietly -

The immediate questions have simple answers. It was a short in an air conditioner cord that caused the fire that killed 9 people – three adults and six children – before dawn Monday morning in South Memphis.

32. As Long as You’re Here, Kick Durham Out -

State lawmakers hit the snooze button in July when prospects were high for a special session to oust Rep. Jeremy Durham over a career of carousing.

33. Looks Like 10-2, SEC Title Game, Orange Bowl for UT -

Editor’s note: Nashville sports correspondent Dave Link has been accurate in predicting season outcomes for the Tennessee Vols in recent years. His 2016 season predictions, released just before press time, culminates with an SEC Championship appearance. Here’s his take on the season…

34. Celtic Crossing Making Changes, But Retaining Irish Pub Identity -

Celtic Crossing owner DJ Naylor was in his native Ireland this summer and, naturally, in a pub. He was offered a craft beer and told he would like it. He did.

As Naylor remembers that moment: “It’s good; now just get me a pint of Guinness.”

35. Events -

Another Broken Egg will celebrate its new location at 65 S. Highland St. with pre-opening charity events Friday, Aug. 5, and Saturday, Aug. 6, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. All proceeds from Friday’s event will go to Ronald McDonald House Charities-Memphis, and Saturday’s proceeds will go to St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. Reservations are required and can be made for up to four guests at newatabe.com.

36. Events -

Metal Museum will host its Pokemon Go-themed Whet Thursday on Aug. 4 from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. at 374 Metal Museum Drive. Attendees can enjoy free museum admission, food, live music and a hands-on activity while catching all the Pokemon they can find. Cost is free. Visit metalmuseum.org.

37. Outnumbered Democrats Hope To Ride Anti-Trumpmentum -

State Rep. Raumesh Akbari identified herself with the “Fighting 26,” also known as the Tennessee House Democratic Caucus, when she took the podium to support Hillary Clinton at Philadelphia’s Democratic National Convention.

38. Events -

Tennessee Department of Labor & Workforce Development’s mobile Career Coach will be at the Millington Public Library on Wednesday, Aug. 3, from 10:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. at 4858 Navy Road. Career Coach staff will help people create resumes and register with jobs4tn.gov, where more than 200,000 jobs are available.

39. Last Word: Orlando, Rain Delay At Southwind and Church Health Center's Move -

Many of us were watching the streets of our own city closely this weekend – the places where people gather for good times when the weather is warm and the sky is clear. Lately some of those places have been the settings for vivid and sudden reminders that all is not well in our city.

40. Local LGBT Community Stands in Solidarity After Orlando Massacre -

Flags across the state of Tennessee were at half staff Sunday, June 12, following the Sunday morning mass shooting at the Pulse nightclub in Orlando, Florida.

And a vigil for the victims of the Orlando shooting was scheduled Sunday at 8:30 p.m. at the Memphis Gay & Lesbian Community Center in Cooper-Young.

41. June 10-16: This week in Memphis history -

2015: Andrea Miller is named the new president of LeMoyne-Owen College, making her the first woman to lead the city’s only historically black college. Miller is selected by the college’s board of trustees in a meeting on campus that lasts several hours as students, alumni and other supporters wait on the lawn outside Brownlee Hall for the announcement.

42. The Week Ahead: May 9-15 -

Alright, Memphis, grab your calendars! Whether you want to book it over to the Ruby Bridges Reading Festival or just baste in the scent of barbecue, there’s plenty to do this week. Here’s our roundup...

43. Events -

Center for Southern Folklore will host Bill Donoghue for a seminar and Q&A titled “Sonny Boy Williamson II: Rock’s Missing Blues Link” on Wednesday, May 4, at 3 p.m. at 119 S. Main St. Following the seminar, co-researcher Jim Basnight will perform Delta-style selections on his 12-string guitar. Cost is free. For reserved seating, email jlpeiser@gmail.com or call 901-525-3655.

44. Last Word: BSMF Looks Up, Overton Park Respite and Slow Economic Growth -

The Beale Street Music Festival box office numbers won’t be in for a bit yet. But it looks like the three-day event that ended Sunday evening with Beck and Paul Simon weathered the weather very well, maybe better than usual.

45. Last Word: The Bible Veto Override Vote, Grizz Nostalgia and Kroger Goes Online -

The Tennessee Legislature hoped to end its 2016 session Wednesday at the end of an eventful day that included a failed attempt to override Gov. Bill Haslam’s veto of the bill that would have made the Bible the official state book.
But into Wednesday evening, the state House was still debating the Hall tax on dividends – specifically further roll backs of it. And the Senate had gone home for the night.
So Thursday looks like a good bet for the adjournment for the year and the formal start of the election season for incumbents.

46. Most Political Hopefuls Follow Through in August Elections -

Shelby County election commissioners meet Tuesday, April 19, to set the ballot for the Aug. 4 state and federal primaries and county general elections.

Of 99 qualifying petitions for the ballot pulled in Shelby County, some by the same citizen pondering multiple races, 65 were filed by the April 7 qualifying deadline and four of those 65 petitions had been withdrawn by the April 14 withdrawal deadline.

47. Three Withdraw From August Ballot At Thursday Deadline -

Three contenders in the Aug. 4 state legislative primaries in Shelby County withdrew from the races by the Thursday, April 14, withdrawal deadline including two would-be challengers of veteran Democratic state House members from Memphis.

48. Last Word: Lipscomb's Successor, MATA School Buses and Roland's Big Breakfast -

Paul Young gets a lot more attention these days than he did when he was the first director of the city-county Office of Sustainability. The attention comes with being the city director of Housing and Community Development where virtually all of the funding comes from the federal government.
That federal funding has changed the face of public housing in the city in the last 25 years. There is only one large public housing project left in the city as a result of the federal funding and its use by Young’s predecessor, Robert Lipscomb.
And what Lipscomb did with the job combined with being the executive director of the Memphis Housing Authority is why a lot of people want to get to know Paul Young these days.
Our centerpiece story by Madeline Faber in Tuesday’s edition makes clear that Young has no desire to wield that kind of power. And it is unlikely anyone in the near future will have the kind of autonomy Lipscomb did.
But beyond that there is still the flow of a lot of federal dollars and Young has some ideas based on his experience in government and finance prior to coming to HCD – everything in government is initials.
It’s a much different experience than Lipscomb’s. Lipscomb coined the phrase “ending public housing as we know it” and at times that slogan wasn’t followed with a lot of detail about what came after public housing was demolished, especially with the first of the projects to fall.
The last public housing project, Foote Homes, will be demolished on Young’s watch which makes his tenure important if more limited than Lipscomb’s tenure.

49. August Primaries Feature Intra-Party Challenges -

Two years after a disastrous slate of races for countywide offices, there is a move among younger Democratic partisans in Memphis to shake up the Democrats who represent the city in the Tennessee Legislature.

50. 8th Congressional District Primaries Draw 22 Contenders, 13 Republican -

The Republican primary race to fill the 8th District Congressional seat Republican incumbent Stephen Fincher is giving up drew a field of 13 contenders – seven from Shelby County and four from Jackson, Tennessee – at the Thursday, April 7, noon filing deadline for the Aug. 4 ballot.

51. Last Word: The De-Annexation Express, Return of The Curb Market and Different Fuel -

When time ran out Wednesday on the state Senate’s state and local government committee in Nashville, de-annexation legislation was still on the tracks as the Tennessee Legislature draws closer to adjournment for the year.

52. Last Word: Putt and 1969, Fred Smith on Amazon and Ramsey's Departure -

George Howard Putt died in prison sometime last year state prison officials disclosed Wednesday -- far from the brief time he spent in Memphis but never far from the carnage he left behind in the Memphis of 1969.
The bodies of the first two of the five people killed by Putt between Aug. 14 and Sept. 11, 1969 were discovered just days after the murders of actress Sharon Tate and six others in Los Angeles by the Manson family dominated national news coverage. Less than a year earlier the Boston Strangler movie was in theaters, creating a sensation about the murders committed by serial killer Albert DeSalvo in Boston just a few years earlier.
Bernalyn and Roy Dumas were strangled by Putt in their home in Cooper-Young and Putt mutilated her body in a way that police homicide detectives still wouldn’t talk about decades later. The bodies were found in separate rooms.
Even with no details other than the names of the victims, the city was quickly spooked by the double murder. So when the body of Leila Jackson was found short of two weeks later, the city’s reaction was a palpable fear in which anyone unknown was to be avoided. Memphians didn’t tarry after work. They went home and bolted the doors.
It got worse as more victims turned up with little in common other than four of the five were women. They were of varying ages. Some were strangled and some were stabbed.
Just about any magazine rack of the day include true crime magazines that by the late 1960s were beginning to look very dated in their lurid noir-like covers teasing the most sensational crime narratives of the day.
They were an intentional contrast to the cover images of youth in bright colors in natural settings in other magazines heralding a new future and youth culture.
The murders in a Southern city, whose 1969 conservatism is hard to describe nearly 50 years later, quickly grabbed the covers of the true crime magazines. And the images they offered spoke to the scenic reality where Putt roamed even as the murders continued.
Apartment buildings and boarding houses were the settings for some of the murders but not all.
Glenda Sue Harden
was last seen walking to her car parked on the Cobblestones from the insurance office she worked at nearby. Her body was found in Martin Luther King/Riverside Park hidden under a piece of plywood.
At one of the murder scenes, police found an ice pick stuck in the side of the building with a stocking tied around it.
Putt’s last victim, in an apartment building on Bellevue, screamed as she was stabbed repeatedly and others in the building gave chase with police close behind, arresting Putt near the new and unopened section of the interstate that runs west of Bellevue.
Putt tried to force his way into another apartment nearby but the women inside kept him on the other side of the door.
The killer that panicked an entire city was a skinny utterly forgettable guy in his 20s with sideburns and glasses who appeared to have rarely roamed beyond a community of neighborhood bars, boarding houses and old apartment buildings in the Midtown and Medical Center areas.
It turns out he came to Memphis after walking away from a prison farm in Mississippi and into a Memphis that was slowly but surely changing. And the world that Putt encountered would soon vanish in large part.
Overton Square’s incarnation was about a year away. A new bridge was about to be built across the Mississippi River as part of Interstate 40 which was to go through Overton Park just south of the north-south leg of the interstate where Putt was captured.
Originally sentenced to death, Putt’s sentence was commuted when the U.S. Supreme Court banned the death penalty in the early 1970s.
He was serving a 497-year sentence when he died at the Turney Center Wednesday in Only, Tennessee.
Putt never sought parole and never gave any explanation for why he killed five people in less than a month and his apparently random selection of victims.

53. The Week Ahead: March 14-20, 2016 -

How was your weekend, Memphis? Here’s our weekly roundup of local happenings you need to know about, from the first look at the Greater Memphis Chamber’s proposed diversity program to a truly Irish celebration of St. Paddy’s Day.

54. City Has Offer On Adams Police Station -

The realty group that proposed a short-lived Hotel Overton for Overton Square in 2015 has offered the city of Memphis $1.1 million for the old Central Police Station building at 128 Adams Ave.

55. Last Word: Mudslide, The Deannexation Storm and Kilzer at Calvary -

Lots of news on a very rainy day including the flooding from the constant rain that closed some schools and cancelled a lot of other events. And then there was a mudslide on Riverside Drive from the bluff overlooking Tom Lee Park and the Mississippi River. The rain has also pushed the Wolf River to the point that it is now over some parts of the greenway in Germantown.

56. City Has Offer On Adams Police Headquarters -

The realty group that proposed a short-lived Hotel Overton for Overton Square in 2015 has offered the city of Memphis $1.1 million for the old Central Police Station building at 128 Adams Avenue.

57. Last Word: Leaving Warren and Tulane, New Police Brass and Losing Housing -

Post Super Bowl edition of Last Word: Broncos 24 – Panthers 10 – Lady Gaga’s National Anthem kudos – Coldplay/Bruno Mars/Beyonce ambitious halftime extravaganza got lost in spots by bad sound.

58. Memorable Events of 2015 will Spill Into 2016 -

When you really get down to it, history is a collection of moments, moments that, when they fall one after the other over the long arc of time, eventually form the tapestry representing who we are.

59. The Week Ahead: Dec. 28, 2015 -

How was your (hopefully long) weekend, Memphis? This week, more than most, is a time of change – of renewal, of turning the page, starting over. And of course, a time to ask the annual question: What are we going to do on New Year’s Eve?

60. March 1 Presidential Primary Begins Complex Process -

Shelby County’s first election of 2016 seems like a simple affair. The Tennessee presidential primaries and countywide primaries for General Sessions Court Clerk are the only items on the ballot.

But the ballot approved last week by the Shelby County Election Commission includes 224 names. Only three of those names are the contenders in the two primaries for clerk. And another 17 are the presidential candidates.

61. Howard Stern Announces 5-Year Deal With Sirius XM -

NEW YORK (AP) — Much has changed for Howard Stern and SiriusXM since their first deal a decade ago — except for their desire to stay in business together.

The company announced Tuesday its third five-year deal to keep Stern's radio show at SiriusXM, together with a longer-term video arrangement that will allow fans to see as well as hear his program and have access to 30 years of career highlights.

62. The Week Ahead: Dec. 14, 2015 -

How was your weekend, Memphis? Here’s our weekly rundown of local happenings you need to know about, from the annual AutoZone shareholder convergence Downtown to the new Star Wars movie...

63. The Week Ahead: Dec. 7, 2015 -

How was your weekend, Memphis? Here’s our weekly rundown of local happenings you need to know about, from gift shopping at the Memphis Indie Holiday Market to the latest Beale Street developments ...

64. If Fear Is Goal, Terrorists Have Won in Tennessee -

The terrorists who struck Paris three weeks ago succeeded in more than killing and wounding hundreds of people. Their attack is pitting Americans against each other in how to respond, and Tennessee politicians are no exception.

65. I Choose Memphis: Amy Grow -

“I Choose Memphis” spotlights Memphians who are passionate about calling this community home. New Memphis Institute provides the profiles.

Name: Amy Grow

Job title and company: International Paper, Communications Department, Meetings & Events

66. The Week Ahead: Nov. 9, 2015 -

How was your weekend, Memphis? Here’s our weekly rundown of local happenings you need to know about, from revenge on the Warriors to crime reduction through urban planning…

It’s still election season in 70 percent of the city, which sounds like a weather forecast – part warning and part advisory.
But the seven-day outlook calls for an increased chance of political engagement this week. Early voting in the set of five Memphis City Council runoff races continues this week at eight satellite locations as well as the Downtown site, 157 Poplar Ave.
The runoff elections in council districts 2, 3, 4, 5 and 7 will determine the identity of a council that will have at least six, possibly seven new members. Super District council members Philip Spinosa and Martavius Jones, the two confirmed new faces on the council, were elected outright on Oct. 8.

67. ULI’s Final Fairgrounds Report Adds Parking Details -

The final report from an Urban Land Institute panel that visited the Mid-South Fairgrounds in June has more to say about parking challenges and scenarios.

The 38-page report released Tuesday, Nov. 3, affirms the group’s June call to add new facilities at the fairgrounds while keeping the Mid-South Coliseum, possibly in an altered form. And it includes more specific drawings and plans for parking that would be adaptable for other uses outside of the eight games a year that are played at Liberty Bowl Memorial Stadium.

68. Former Senator Fred Thompson Dies -

Former U.S. Sen. and one-time presidential contender Fred Thompson was in many ways a reluctant politician. But he was also a lobbyist with an envious arsenal of political skills honed both by his calling as an attorney and by his service as a lawyer during unprecedented political crises.

69. Five City Council Races Destined for Runoffs -

The identity of the Memphis City Council that will take office in January with six new members was still in flux at the end of a very long and frustrating Oct. 8 election night.

The races for four of those six open seats and the seat now held by an appointee to the council are going to a Nov. 19 runoff election – one week before Thanksgiving.

70. Candidates Play Out Early Voting-Election Day Gap -

The early vote is in but still to be counted. There is still some television time booked for last-minute appeals to election day voters.

The debates and questionnaires speak for themselves, and no longer have a place on schedules that in the run-up to Thursday’s Memphis election day have become about opportunities to meet and be seen by the most people possible.

71. Memphis Mayor's Race Poised For Close Finish -

A political summer dominated by the campaign for Memphis mayor begins turning toward fall Friday, Sept. 18, with the opening of the early voting period in advance of the Oct. 8 election day.

All 16 early voting sites are open weekdays from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. and Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. through Oct. 3.

72. Events -

New Ballet Ensemble & School will present “FreeFall” Friday and Saturday, Sept. 11-12, at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday, Sept. 13, at 2:30 p.m. at Hattiloo Theatre, 37 S. Cooper St. The performance showcases eclectic dance pieces, collaboratively performed by students and the ensemble. All performances are pay-what-you-can. Visit newballet.org for tickets.

73. Memphis Mayoral Debate Participants Announced -

The field is set for an upcoming televised Memphis mayoral debate scheduled for the eve of early voting.

The four mayoral contenders who will participate in the Sept. 17 debate, sponsored by The Daily News and Urban Land Institute Memphis, are incumbent Mayor A C Wharton, city council members Harold Collins and Jim Strickland and Memphis Police Association president Mike Williams.

74. Alabama Still Team to Beat, Tennessee On the Rise in 2015 Football Season -

Dak Prescott, the best returning quarterback in the Southeastern Conference, isn’t buying the national narrative that the league is “down” because the first College Football Playoff title game featured Ohio State beating Oregon.

75. First Mayoral TV Debate Features Aggressive Contenders -

The first televised debate of the 2015 race of Memphis Mayor Monday, Aug. 10, saw incumbent Mayor A C Wharton Jr. and city council member Jim Strickland clash repeatedly while fellow council member and mayoral challenger Harold Collins said Strickland and Wharton were “acting like Tom and Jerry.”

76. Joe Cooper Case Raises Questions About County Election Commission Discretion -

The definitive ballot for the Oct. 8 Memphis election was a bit late because of a challenge by city council contender Joe Cooper.

77. Preseason Analysis: Vols Will Defeat Oklahoma, Finish 8-4 -

Tennessee’s football team has something to prove as it concludes the first week of preseason practices and moves forward to the 2015 season.

The Vols must prove they belong in the national picture in Butch Jones’ third year as coach.

78. Bikesmith Ready to Roll Into First Brick-and-Mortar Store -

Memphis’ traveling bike repairman has finally found a home. A year and a half after enrolling in the Mayor’s Innovation Delivery Team initiative MEMMobile, Jim Steffen, known as The Bikesmith to cyclists needing an adjustment or a hail-Mary overhaul, has signed a lease on a brick-and-mortar extension of his mobile repair truck.

79. Joe Cooper Denied Spot on Memphis Election Ballot -

Memphis City Council contender Joe Cooper will not be on the October Memphis election ballot.

Shelby County Chancellor Jim Kyle ruled Thursday, Aug. 6, that Cooper’s request to be allowed on the ballot was not valid because Cooper didn’t gather the required 25 voter signatures by the July 16 deadline.

80. Joe Cooper Denied Spot On Memphis Election Ballot -

Memphis City Council contender Joe Cooper will not be on the October Memphis election ballot.

Shelby County Chancellor Jim Kyle ruled Thursday, Aug. 6, that Cooper’s request to be allowed on the ballot was not valid because Cooper didn’t gather the required 25 voter signatures by the July 16 deadline.

81. Strickland, Collins Clash on DROP Freeze -

Two political challengers to Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. clashed Tuesday, Aug. 4, over a plan by his administration to keep the city’s police ranks above the 2,000 mark.

City chief administrative officer Jack Sammons approached the council Tuesday in executive session about a plan to freeze the deferred retirement option plan (DROP) for city employees who have set their retirement date up to three years ahead of schedule.

82. Wharton Opens Whitehaven Headquarters as Collins Intensifies Challenge -

On the broiling parking lot of his Whitehaven campaign headquarters this weekend, Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. talked about “still water” after firing up a crowd of 150 supporters in a tent next to Elvis Presley Boulevard.

83. Kyle Puts Memphis Election Ballot On Hold -

The ballot for the Oct. 8 Memphis election is not final.

Shelby County Chancellor Jim Kyle issued a court order Thursday, July 30, holding up any printing of ballots or public notice of the election ballot pending an Aug. 6 hearing on a petition by city council candidate Joe Cooper.

84. Sparks Fly at Cooper-Young Mayoral Forum -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. was the target of two Memphis City Council members challenging him during most of a Cooper-Young political forum Tuesday, July 28.

It’s what Wharton predicted would happen once the campaign to the Oct. 8 ballot began to throw sparks.

85. Strickland's Memphis Mayoral Bid Heats Up -

Just hours after he dropped out of the race for Memphis Mayor, James Harvey endorsed mayoral contender Jim Strickland at the opening of Strickland’s Poplar Plaza campaign headquarters.

86. Memphis Mayoral Field Set at 10 -

Shelby County Election Commissioners have certified the Memphis election ballot for Oct. 8.

These are the names to appear on that ballot for the 15 elected offices.

The commission met hours after the noon Thursday, July 23, deadline for candidates to withdraw from the ballot if they wished.

87. Filing Deadline Shapes Field in Memphis Elections -

Now that they’ve made the filing deadline for the Oct. 8 Memphis elections, candidates have until Thursday, July 23, to withdraw if they wish before the ballot is set later that day in the 15 city races.

88. Ford Switches Races at Election Filing Deadline -

Darrell Wright cut it about as close as was possible at the noon Thursday, July 16, filing deadline for candidates in the Oct. 8 Memphis elections.

89. Memphis Filing Deadline Features Last-Minute Shifts, Intrigue -

The decision Tuesday, July 14, by a sixth Memphis City Council member to pass up a place on the Oct. 8 ballot has added some intrigue on the way to the noon Thursday, July 16, filing deadline for the Memphis elections.

90. Special Action on Same-Sex Nuptials a Waste of Time -

With Republican lawmakers scrambling for a response to the U.S. Supreme Court’s gay-marriage ruling, Tennesseans on both sides of the issue say they are seeking "equality."

Immediately after the court’s decision on Obergefell v. Hodges, Democratic U.S. Rep. Jim Cooper of Nashville said, "Love and equality won. I’m glad the Supreme Court ruled on the right side of history."

91. Supporters Seek to Revive Tennessee Medicaid Expansion Plan -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Supporters of a failed plan to expand Medicaid in Tennessee are renewing an effort to try to pass it after a recent ruling by the U.S. Supreme Court to uphold health insurance subsidies.

92. Chism Political Picnic Offers Pre-Campaign Snapshot -

Memphis mayoral contender Jim Strickland saw a face he didn’t recognize Saturday, June 13, in the southwest Memphis crowd at former County Commissioner Sidney Chism’s annual political picnic.

93. Ramsey: No Medicaid Expansion Until 2017 -

The Tennessee legislative session ended in late April, giving itself a little more than two and a-half months to handle the state’s business. That’s plenty of time, according to Lt. Gov. Ron Ramsey.

94. Two People Emerge For Airport Chairman Post -

A three-member committee of the Memphis-Shelby County Airport Authority is recommending two candidates to replace outgoing chairman Jack Sammons.

95. Two People Emerge for Airport Chairman Post -

A three-member committee of the Memphis-Shelby County Airport Authority is recommending two candidates to replace outgoing chairman Jack Sammons.

96. Indie Music Shops Prepare for Record Store Day -

Memphis’ stalwart independent record shops are preparing for their moment in the sun this weekend.

The one-day global Record Store Day event is Saturday, April 18. It’s held each year to celebrate and support independent shops.

97. City Requests Fairgrounds Review by ULI Experts -

The upcoming review of the Fairgrounds redevelopment concept by a group of Urban Land Institute experts will move quickly and could be a political wild card.

The city’s request last week for a review by Urban Land Institute’s Advisory Services goes to a part of the planning and land use nonprofit that has been specializing in such political hot potatoes since 1948.

98. New Federal Courthouse in Nashville Included in Obama Budget -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – President Barack Obama's budget proposal includes $181.5 million for a new federal courthouse in Nashville.

U.S. Rep. Jim Cooper, a Nashville Democrat who has long advocated for the new courthouse, lauded Monday's announcement a "critical next step" in getting the facility built.

99. Cohen Calls Tennessee Promise ‘A Fraud’ -

U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen of Memphis calls the Tennessee Promise last dollar scholarship program for community college and state technical centers “a fraud.”

100. Stars Flock to Music City’s Ernest Tubb Record Shop -

When Bob Dylan drops by, he generally goes right for “a handful” of Hank and Carter Family recordings, although on one Lower Broadway afternoon the old man from the North Country also is reported to have purchased a “Larry the Cable Guy” DVD.