» Subscribe Today!
More of what you want to know.
The Daily News
X

Forgot your password?
Skip Navigation LinksHome > Name & Property Search
Search results for 'Jim Boyd' | Search again
DeSoto Public Records:1
Shelby Public Records:160
Editorial:100
West Tennessee:7
Middle Tennessee:33
East Tennessee:41
Other:1

You must be a subscriber to see the full results of your search.

Please log in or subscribe below if you are not already a subscriber.

The Daily News subscribers get full access to more than 13 million names and addresses along with powerful search and download features. Get the business leads you need with powerful searches of public records and notices. Download listings into your spreadsheet or database.

Learn more about our services | Search again


Editorial Results (free)

1. Last Word: Changes Behind Highland Row, Lee Harris Opens and Ron Olson Moves -

Shelby County Commission chairwoman Heidi Shafer says the commission, through its attorneys, is in ‘the final stages of launching litigation” against big pharma over the opioid problem locally. And in a written statement Thursday she said she believes the litigation “will result in significant recovery for hundreds of millions of dollars that Shelby County has spent trying to heal, save, nurse and otherwise deal with the opioid crisis.” Shafer specifically announced the hiring on a contingency basis of a national law firm.

2. Brooks Museum Eyes Downtown Fire Station Site -

Brooks Museum officials are considering relocating to a Downtown site at Front Street and Union Avenue that is currently occupied by the Memphis Fire Department headquarters.

While officials with the city and the museum would not comment, the idea of putting a “cultural amenity” on the river side of Front Street between Union and Monroe avenues first surfaced about two months ago.

3. Brooks Museum Eyes Downtown Fire Station Site -

The city fire station at Union Avenue and Front Street and the adjacent parking garage appears to be under consideration as the new site for the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art, according to a source close to the situation who did not want to be identified by The Daily News.

4. Last Word: Las Vegas React, Moral Monday, Who Pays For Beale Security? -

We open with reaction Monday to the mass shooting in Las Vegas:

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland:

5. Paying Beale Street Security Costs Raises Lease Questions -

Memphis City Council members vote Tuesday, Oct. 2, on whether the city should start using some of the $378,000 in Beale Street cover charge funds the Downtown Memphis Commission has been holding in two bank accounts since June.

6. Raised From the Dead -

GHOST AND SPIRIT. I walked through the town at mid-morning. Like any town you spend a lifetime in, you know people.

I spoke to the guy that owns the coffee shop, Jimmy Lewis, as he walked between customers over cups and conversation. He and I went to the same high school, and I see they’re building a new high school right here in town – going to be trying all kinds of new ideas in there, a public/private, secondary/higher education partnership model for the country I’m told.

7. Last Word: The No Compete, Liberty Bowl Blues and Assessing the ASD -

The calendar says fall but the weather says summer and in Arlington the flags and notices say election day. The polls at the two polling places in Arlington open from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Thursday in municipal elections – the only regularly scheduled election of 2017 in Shelby County, which in our politics is frequently regarded as an invitation for departures and vacancies in other office that cause the scheduling of special elections. We’ve already had those earlier this year for a spot on the Lakeland commission and a state House seat.

8. Boyd Drops Beale Contract, But Says It Wasn’t Conflict of Interest -

Memphis City Council chairman Berlin Boyd ended his company’s fundraising contract with the Beale Street Merchants Association Tuesday, Sept. 19. But he again insisted the contract was not a conflict of interest in his duties as a council member voting on items involving the entertainment district.

9. Boyd Drops Beale Contract, But Says It Wasn't A Conflict of Interest -

Memphis City Council chairman Berlin Boyd ended his company’s fundraising contract with the Beale Street Merchants Association Tuesday, Sept. 19. But he again insisted the contract was not a conflict of interest in his duties as a council member voting on items involving the entertainment district.

10. Last Word: The Monument Letter, Soulsville Gateway and Gas Tax Hike Regrets -

The Redbirds take Game 1 of the Pacific Coast League Championship series Wednesday evening with a 6-4 win over El Paso at AutoZone Park. Game 2 is noon Thursday at B.B. King and Union.

11. Council Mulls Legal Options To Move Park Monuments -

Memphis City Council members are exploring new options for the Confederate monuments in city parks that include boarding up statues of Nathan Bedford Forrest and Jefferson Davis as nuisances, to prevent them from being vandalized and maintain public order, or by citing a provision of the state’s Civil Rights Act.

12. Council Considers Other Legal Options on Confederate Monuments -

Memphis City Council members are exploring new options for the Confederate monuments in city parks that include boarding up statues of Nathan Bedford Forrest and Jefferson Davis as nuisances, to prevent them from being vandalized to maintain public order, or by citing a provision of the state’s Civil Rights Act.

13. Council Considers Other Legal Options on Confederate Monuments. -

Memphis City Council members are exploring new options for the Confederate monuments in city parks that include boarding up statues of Nathan Bedford Forrest and Jefferson Davis as nuisances, to prevent them from being vandalized, to maintain public order or by citing a provision of the state’s Civil Rights Act.

14. Ken Hause Cooks Up Strategy To Enhance L’Ecole Culinaire -

L'Ecole Culinaire-Memphis has added Ken Hause its campus director. In his new role, Hause is responsible for overseeing operations of the Memphis campus, including ensuring a rich student experience that leads to employment in the culinary field, while enhancing the school’s reputation for educational excellence, compliance and operational performance.

15. Binghampton, Uptown Redevelopment Efforts Move Forward While Waiting for the CRA -

If Binghampton can get a proposal for tax increment financing (TIF) approved by the end of the year, it would mean an immediate $332,000 in capital and an estimated $26 million over the 30-year life of the TIF zone to sustain and further grow commercial and residential development in the area.

16. Resolution, Dollar-Figure Miscues Raise Sanitation Workers’ Grants by $20,000 -

After all of these years, maybe what happened Tuesday, July 25, to the city’s plan to pay the 14 surviving sanitation workers from 1968 a grant of $50,000 each was part of the larger narrative of the enduring turmoil of that historic time.

17. Overton Gateway Compromise Approved By Council -

Memphis City Council members approved the Overton Gateway mixed residential development Tuesday, July 25 in a pair of unanimous votes – one for the plans on the north side of Sam Cooper Boulevard at East Parkway and the other for the plans on the south side of Sam Cooper at East Parkway.

18. Overton Gateway Compromise Approved By Council -

Memphis City Council members approved the Overton Gateway mixed residential development Tuesday, July 25 in a pair of unanimous votes – one for the plans on the north side of Sam Cooper Boulevard at East Parkway and the other for the plans on the south side of Sam Cooper at East Parkway.

19. Summer in the City -

Saturday night on Beale Street is more than a catch phrase for businesses there.

It is chapters in old, out-of-print books like Lt. George W. Lee’s “Where The Blues Began” that you can only see in the Memphis-Shelby County Room of the Central Library. You can’t check the book out because of its rarity and age. But you can also find references to the lore of Saturday nights on Beale Street on plaques in the entertainment district that current patrons walk past without even noticing.

20. Additional Sanitation Workers May Get Benefits -

The city of Memphis had 1,100 sanitation workers when the historic strike began in February 1968, with close to 1,000 of them walking off the job following the grisly deaths of two of their own trapped in the grinder of a garbage truck in East Memphis.

21. Council Approves Sanitation Workers Benefits -

There may be more than 14 city sanitation workers from 1968 who are still alive. And the city is double-checking its list as the Memphis City Council approved Tuesday, July 11, the payment of $50,000 grants to 14 of the workers it has already identified including four still working for the city.

22. Council Takes Up Sanitation Worker Benefits -

Memphis City Council members vote Tuesday, July 11, on grants of $50,000 each for the 14 surviving city sanitation workers from the 1968 strike along with a supplemental retirement plan for sanitation workers hired after the strike.

23. Patterson Resignation Comes as Council Examines DMC’s Role -

Terence Patterson exited the Downtown Memphis Commission last week as the Memphis City Council is about to discuss replacing or restructuring not only the DMC, but the Riverfront Development Corp.

24. Tennessee, Left Coast a World Apart on Immigration -

San Francisco resident Terry Karlsson relishes her hometown’s reputation for embracing “multi-cultural diversity.”

The wife of a Swedish immigrant, Karlsson says she believes San Francisco’s status as a sanctuary city, one in which it refuses to participate in the enforcement of federal immigration law, reflects a nation born of people who moved here, a land of immigrants from many countries.

25. City Council Pushes Back at Administration -

Sometimes there are seven votes. Other times there aren’t. But Memphis City Council debates increasingly point to different thoughts about the city’s course as outlined by the administration of Mayor Jim Strickland.

26. City Council Approves DROP Freeze, Delays Stormwater and Sewer Fee Votes -

The city has its third voluntary freeze on retirements in two years with a Tuesday, June 20, vote by the Memphis City Council. But it came after lots of council debate about whether the freeze might have the opposite overall effect of stabilizing the Memphis Police force at the top for future growth in the ranks below or whether it will prompt the middle ranks to exit quicker if they can’t rise in the ranks.

27. Council to Shore Up Budget Loose Ends, Talk Beale Street, DROP and UrbanArt -

Memphis City Council members have done most of the heavy lifting and taken votes on the major items that end the budget season at City Hall.

But they still have a few loose ends to wrap at their Tuesday, June 20, session.

28. Events -

Memphis Botanic Garden will host the Food Truck Garden Party: Beach Party on Wednesday, June 14, from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. at MBG, 750 Cherry Road. Enjoy live music, cash bar, fun in the Play Zone and food trucks. Adult admission is $5 for members and $10 for nonmembers (includes one drink); children’s admission is free for members and $5 for nonmembers. Buy tickets at memphisbotanicgarden.com/foodtruck or at the gate.

29. Events -

The Memphis Juneteenth Jobs & Career Fair will be held Tuesday, June 13, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at St. Andrew AME Church, 867 South Parkway E. Human resources directors and executives from more than 25 Memphis and Mid-South companies will be on hand to discuss opportunities; attendees are encouraged to bring resumes. For more information, contact Telisa Franklin at memphisjuneteenth@gmail.com or 901-281-6337.

30. Railgarten Could Be Back At Memphis City Council -

The Memphis City Council may have more questions about the Railgarten bar/restaurant in Midtown.

The council questioned the development’s addition of intermodal containers and an outside area after the council approved a special use permit earlier this year.

31. Railgarten Could Be Back At Memphis City Council -

The Memphis City Council may have more questions about the Railgarten bar/restaurant in Midtown.

The council questioned the development’s addition of intermodal containers and an outside area after the council approved a special use permit earlier this year.

32. City Council Settles Budget, But Other Issues Remain -

The budget season at City Hall is over with the Tuesday, June 6, Memphis City Council vote approving a $680 million city operating budget, an $81.3 million capital budget and a $3.27 city property tax rate.

33. City Council Completes Budget Season, Says Larger Issues of Priorities Remain -

Memphis City Council members approved Tuesday, June 6, a $680 million city operating budget for the fiscal year that starts July 1, an $81.3 million capital budget and a $3.27 city property tax rate.

34. City Council Weighs $7.3M Cut in Police Budget -

Memphis City Council members will likely be discussing possible amendments to the city budget right up to the final June 6 votes on the budget and tax rate resolutions and ordinances.

In a council budget committee wrap-up session Tuesday, May 30, that drew nine of the 13 council members, the group considered but took no action on a proposal by council member Martavius Jones to cut $7.3 million in funding for the Memphis Police Department.

35. City Council Discusses $7.3 Million Cut in Police Budget -

Memphis City Council members will likely be discussing possible amendments to the city budget right up to the final June 6 votes on the budget and tax rate resolutions and ordinances.

In a council budget committee wrap-up session Tuesday, May 30, that drew 9 of the 13 council members, the group considered but took no action on a proposal by council member Martavius Jones to cut $7.3 million in funding for the Memphis Police Department.

36. City Council Members: Beale Bucks Evolving -

Beale Street’s new $5 weekend night cover charge still has a few details to work out, says Memphis City Council chairman Berlin Boyd.

“We’re not putting a period there, we’re putting a comma because we are taking a pause,” Boyd said on the WKNO/Channel 10 program “Behind The Headlines.”

37. Last Word: Sessions Notes, Lakeland Elects and Golf Classic Turns 60 -

U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions doesn’t stick with the script he has when he makes a speech, like the one he gave Thursday at the federal building to a room full of federal prosecutors and local and state law enforcement. Some of that comes from his background as a former U.S. Attorney and Alabama’s Attorney General, not to mention his tenure as a U.S. senator.

38. Beale Street Cover Charge Cut, Larger Debate Remains -

The Saturday night summer cover charge on Beale Street is going from $10 to $5 next month. But the discussion about the Beale Street Bucks program is hardly over. And the crowd control measure is certain to raise longer-term questions about who controls the city-owned district.

39. Council Sets Stage for City Employee Pay Raises -

Memphis City Council members approved Tuesday, May 23, a 1 percent across-the-board pay raise for all city employees setting the stage for a final vote on budget matters at the June 6 council session.

40. Council Sets Stage for Raise, Keeps Railgarten and Cuts Beale Cover -

Memphis City Council members approved Tuesday, May 23, a 1 percent across the board pay raise for all city employees setting the stage for a final vote on budget matters at the June 6 council session.

41. Last Word: Issues or Elections, City Impasse Decisions and Memphis Sk8s -

Those active in the Republican and Democratic parties at the local, state or national level will tell you their job is to elect candidates of their party to office at all levels of government. It's even in writing in just about any party's mission statement. And the inability of the local Democratic party to do that in countywide partisan elections is one of several factors that led to the state party disbanding the local party last year.

42. Beale Street Issues Deepen and Grow -

The issue of who controls what in the Beale Street entertainment district has come to the forefront after the abolition of the Beale Street Tourism Development Authority.

The Memphis City Council abolished the authority in April and has now moved into a deepening debate about the Beale Street Bucks program used by merchants and the street’s interim manager, the Downtown Memphis Commission, as a crowd control measure.

43. Boyd’s Move for Police Overtime Cut Has Deeper Roots -

Of 10 Memphis City Council members present Thursday, May 4, for the ongoing review of the city budget proposal, half favored a move to cut police overtime and half did not.

Two efforts by council chairman Berlin Boyd to cut the $22.4 million line item – first by $5 million and then by $2.7 million – failed on tie votes both times, with some council members switching sides from one vote to the next.

44. Boyd Police Overtime Cut Approved -

Of 10 Memphis City Council members present Thursday, May 4, for the ongoing review of the city budget proposal, half favored a move to cut police overtime and half did not.

The two efforts by council chairman Berlin Boyd to cut the $22.4 million line item – first by $5 million and then by $2.7 million – failed on tie votes both times with some council members switching sides from one vote to the next.

45. Boyd: Memphis Public Safety Spending Out of Balance -

Memphis City Council chairman Berlin Boyd says the city budget is lopsided when it comes to its priorities.

And Boyd called Wednesday, May 3, for a shift away from public safety spending – specifically city spending on police – the largest single part of the operating and capital budgets as well as the largest division in city government.

46. Council Moves to Operating Budget Examination -

Memphis City Council members open budget hearings Thursday, May 5, on Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland’s $680 million operating budget proposal for the fiscal year that begins July 1.

47. View From the Hill: IMPROVE Act an Insight Into Testy Election Ahead -

In case anyone’s keeping stats, Senate leadership soundly defeated House leadership this session in the gas tax/tax cut battle.

Whether this is a forerunner to a Republican gubernatorial primary remains to be seen as Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris and House Speaker Beth Harwell weigh decisions. It’s not as if they’d be facing off against each other, though, since businessman Bill Lee and former Economic and Community Development Commissioner Randy Boyd are definitely in the race and not hurting for money.

48. City of Memphis Budget Could Face Bumpy Road -

Memphis City Council budget hearings begin Tuesday, May 2, at City Hall starting with Mayor Jim Strickland’s $77.8 million capital budget proposal for one-time spending on construction projects and similar expenses that are normally financed with bonds.

49. Strickland Delivers $680 Million Operating Budget to Council -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland delivered a $680 million city government operating budget proposal to the Memphis City Council Tuesday, April 25, with no property tax increase and no use of city reserves to balance it.

50. Council Brokers New Zoo Parking Compromise, Abolishes Beale Authority -

The Memphis City Council went back into the terms for an expanded Memphis Zoo parking lot Tuesday, April 11, just nine months after brokering and approving a compromise on the project between the zoo and the Overton Park Conservancy.

51. Last Word: Spring Votes, Those Tax Bills and Tim McCarver on Baseball Changes -

Look for more details on the specifics of the “Gateway” project to start to emerge now that a crucial if overlooked piece of the geographic puzzle in the north Downtown area has come into public view. The city’s largest hotel, also the city’s original convention center hotel, is about to change hands and go back to flying the Marriott flag.

52. Early Voting in District 95 Primaries Begins Friday -

Early voting opens Friday, April 7, in the special primary elections for state House District 95 as other elections – including some 2018 races – already show plenty of signs of political life.

53. Political Past, Present Meet as Wharton’s Portrait Joins Hall of Mayors -

When A C Wharton Jr. was Memphis mayor, his relationship with the Memphis City Council wasn’t always good. And it would usually get worse whenever he’d call a press conference in the Hall of Mayors on a Tuesday the council was meeting. Some council members thought it was to draw attention from them.

54. Last Word: No More Lottery Balls, The Voucher Bill Advances and UCLA -

Spring is in the air, which can only mean one thing – the Overton Park Greensward controversy is back on. Just this past weekend, I was in the park noting the metal barrier that separates Greensward pedestrians from Zoo parkers and that the barrier was not “decorated” with save the greensward paraphernalia as much as it has been the previous three springs.

55. Impasse Compromise Wins Council Approval, Union Acceptance -

No more lottery balls for the Memphis City Council in the spring. The council approved Tuesday, March 21, an overhaul of the city’s impasse procedures – the rules for the council settling stalled contract talks between the city’s municipal unions and the city administration.

56. Beale Street Authority’s Days May Be Numbered -

The Beale Street Tourism Development Authority would be out of business by May 21 and the city would be charged with hiring a day-to-day manager for the Beale Street entertainment district under a proposal by council member Martavius Jones.

57. Council Receptive To Restoring City Control of Beale -

The Beale Street Tourism Development Authority would be out of business by May 21 and the city administration would be charged with hiring a day to day manager for the Beale Street entertainment district under a proposal by council member Martavius Jones.

58. Last Word: Lakeland Date Set, Silos in South Main and Trespassing in Apartments -

Here comes the Governor’s race with Randy Boyd doing the honors here in Memphis Wednesday at the top of the second day of his fly-around. Boyd’s opening sounds very much like he is running as the heir apparent to Gov. Bill Haslam – although there are no heirs in politics, at least not without an election. He talked a lot about hitting workforce development and job goals of the Haslam administration if he is elected Governor in 2018.

59. Last Word: Milhaus Sells, Voucher Debate Gets Heated and Boyd's Fly Around -

Highland Row isn’t fully open yet and it is already up for sale as part of a real estate portfolio. The owner, Milhaus, based in Indianapolis, is a development, construction and property management company that works in mixed use development. And the portfolio being on the market could turn into a recapitalization.

60. Memphis in May Delegation Returns From Colombia -

A delegation of 48 Memphians representing the Memphis In May International Festival returned to the city from Colombia Tuesday, March 7.

Colombia is the honored country for this year’s Memphis in May series of events.

61. Memphis in May Delegation Returns From Colombia -

Some members of a delegation of 48 Memphians representing the Memphis In May International Festival returned to the city from Colombia Tuesday, March 7. And others remained in Cartagena through week's end.

62. Councilmen Draw Lines On Safety, Deannexation -

Attorneys for the city of Memphis have filed a motion to combine two federal court lawsuits over a City Hall surveillance list and have them brought before the same federal judge.

And U.S. District Judge Jon P. McCalla has granted the motion of the American Civil Liberties Union of Tennessee to intervene in the lawsuit on the plaintiff’s side.

63. Rallings: Escort List Has Mistakes But Name Selection Isn’t Political -

Mistakes were made in putting together the list of 81 citizens who require a police escort at City Hall, Memphis Police Director Michael Rallings said this week.

“We’ll continue to review the list. It’s a work in progress,” Rallings said after a committee session with Memphis City Council members Tuesday, Feb. 21. “We admit there are some errors on the list.”

64. Last Word: The List and Who Is On It, Lovell's Impact and Fountain Brook Recovers -

A list of 81 people who can’t come to City Hall without a police escort includes a lot of names from the last year of protests and marches in the city. And as the week begins, the list is under review by Memphis Police Director Michael Rallings at the request of Mayor Jim Strickland.

65. Grant Begins New North Memphis Rebuilding Effort -

North Memphis was once a place where heavy manufacturing was across the street from residential development and mom-and-pop retail was just down the street.

It was a thriving, blue-collar area of Memphis with block clubs, union halls, grassroots politics, lumber yards and nightclubs.

66. Memphis Mayor Creates Riverfront Task Force to Build Cohesion -

The city’s latest push for riverfront development is putting an emphasis on linking up recent changes on the riverfront like Beale Street Landing to Downtown’s core and filling in gaps between those attractions.

67. Strickland To Announce Riverfront Task Force -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland will announce a mayoral task force Wednesday, Jan. 24, to “examine and develop a vision for the future of the Memphis riverfront,” according to Tuesday City Hall media advisory.

68. Awards Recognize Highest Ideals of Public Service -

Public service is a worthy legacy, and one that the Rotary Club of Memphis East wants to recognize and encourage in the next generation.

The annual Bobby Dunavant Public Servant Awards recognize one elected official and one non-elected public employee who have exemplified the virtues of former Probate Court Clerk Bobby Dunavant, for whom the award is named.

69. City Budget Season on the Way With Concerns -

One of the highlights of 2016 for the Memphis City Council that took office in January with six new members was a budget season in which there were no significant changes in the proposal by Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland, who also took office in January.

70. Nashville, Memphis Respond Differently to Pot Ordinance Opinion -

A legal opinion from the Tennessee attorney general requested by two Shelby County legislators has again put Nashville city leaders in the lead as municipal marijuana ordinances enacted there and in Memphis have taken a turn toward the courts.

71. Bridges Renames Center, Completes $20M Campaign -

Bridges celebrated the completion of a six-year, $20 million endowment campaign Tuesday, Nov. 15, that included the renaming of the nonprofit center as the Jim Boyd Bridges Center.

72. Bridges Renames Center, Completes $20M Campaign -

Bridges celebrated the completion of a six-year, $20 million endowment campaign Tuesday, Nov. 15, that included the renaming of the nonprofit center as the Jim Boyd Bridges Center.

73. City Hall City Leaders Prepare for Pre-Thanksgiving Town Hall on Pinch District Development -

A town hall meeting Nov. 22 on the city’s plan for redevelopment of the Pinch District Downtown should be the last session to gather public input, said the Memphis City Council member whose district includes the Pinch.

74. Town Hall Meetings Reflect Shift in Protest Discussions -

Almost three months after Black Lives Matter movement protestors shut down the Hernando DeSoto Bridge and as a result, opened talks with the administration of Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland, some of the civic discussion has moved to economic issues.

75. Council Passes Pot Ordinance 7-6 -

The Memphis City Council gave final approval Tuesday, Oct. 4, to an ordinance that gives Memphis Police the discretion to write a ticket with a $50 fine for possession of a half ounce or less of marijuana.

76. Last Word: The Grizz Are Back, Bass Pro Shops Buys Cabela's and Stein at Amurica -

Some of you will remember the late George Lapides, whom I worked with for a time at WREC, had a policy about pre-season baseball games or what he called the “Grapefruit League.” It was that they didn’t exist. He wouldn’t acknowledge the games much less the scores.

77. Council Sets Stage for Final Pot Ordinance Vote -

With no debate, Memphis City Council members approved Tuesday, Sept. 20, the second of three readings of an ordinance that would allow police officers to write a ticket with a $50 fine for possession of less than a half ounce of marijuana.

78. Study Leads to Broader Call for Business Ties -

Rodney Strong, CEO of the Atlanta law and public policy firm Griffin and Strong that authored city government’s latest disparity study on minority contracting, didn’t come to talk about the study last week when he spoke to a room of 40 African-American civic and business leaders.

79. Coliseum, Residency Rules Top City Council Day -

Memphis City Council members talk about possible lease terms for the Mid-South Coliseum Tuesday, Aug. 23, during their executive session.

The item – “discussion of Coliseum lease terms” – was added to the committee session agenda on Monday. It comes two weeks after the owners of Wiseacre Brewing Co. outlined to council members a general concept of moving the brewery into the Coliseum and greatly expanding their operations.

80. Police Separate Elvis Fans From Protesters -

The latest Black Lives Matter movement protest included a show of force by Memphis Police that included plenty of questions about how police functioned as gatekeepers for Graceland’s annual candlelight vigil.

81. Strickland Meets With Protesters In Advance of Graceland Protest Call -

The Coalition of Concerned Citizens is calling for a “massive, nonviolent peaceful protest of direct action” Monday, Aug. 15, at Graceland in advance of the annual candlelight vigil marking the anniversary of Elvis Presley’s death.

82. Council Likely to Vote On Pinch Plan in 90 Days -

A plan for the redevelopment of the Pinch area is essentially complete and Mayor Jim Strickland’s administration is rounding up grant funds and other financing for elements of the plan, according to Memphis City Council member Berlin Boyd.

83. Council Likely to Vote On Pinch Plan in 90 Days -

A plan for the redevelopment of the Pinch area is essentially complete and Mayor Jim Strickland’s administration is rounding up grant funds and other financing for elements of the plan, according to Memphis City Council member Berlin Boyd.

84. Greensward Partisans Turn Out Two Weeks Ahead of Council Votes on Settlement -

The Overton Park Greensward wasn’t on the Memphis City Council’s agenda Tuesday, July 5. But there were plenty of partisan from the controversy in council chambers in what was a rehearsal for a council vote in two weeks on a settlement of the park’s parking problem.

85. The Week Ahead: July 4-10 -

Happy Fourth of July, Memphis! We hope you’re enjoying a long weekend – and if you do have to work today, we hope you’re able to sneak out early enough to watch some of the local fireworks displays tonight. Here are details on a few of them, plus other local happenings you need to know about this week…

86. Council to Debate Residency Limits, Again -

Memphis City Council members wade into the residency question Tuesday, July 5 – specifically a proposed referendum in November on a city charter amendment that would require “all persons employed solely by the city of Memphis to live and reside within the city of Memphis.”

87. Pinch District to Move in a New Direction: Up -

The Pinch District is getting a sky-high development treatment. For decades, the north Downtown neighborhood has been known as a sea of parking lots punctuated by a handful of small businesses.

With St. Jude Children's Research Hospital announcing $1 billion in new construction, the Pinch's largest tenant is opening up its campus with new buildings, some as tall as 12 stories, in the greater Pinch neighborhood. A neighborhood-level presence is a sea change for the institution, which has grown to 2.5 million square feet behind a gated campus.

88. City Budgets, Stable Tax Rate Approved With Few Amendments -

Memphis City Council members approved a city operating budget of $666 million and a capital budget of $85 million along with a stable city property tax rate of $3.40 Tuesday, June 7, ending City Hall’s budget season.

89. Reaction Grows to Death of Memphis Police Officer In Downtown Crime Spree -

A violent half-hour rampage from one end of Downtown to the other ended Saturday evening with the death of a Memphis Police officer who was hit by the suspect’s car at B.B. King Boulevard and Beale Street. Three people were shot and wounded -- two critically -- at two locations on Downtown’s north end.

90. Committee Recommends Pay Raises for City Employees -

The Memphis City Council’s budget committee completed its budget reviews Tuesday, May 31, recommending a 1.5 percent pay raise for city employees other than fire and police and $300,000 in grant funding to hire a full-time director for the Whitehaven Economic Development Council.

91. Council Committee Recommends Pay Raises Beyond Fire and Police -

It took six hours. But the Memphis City Council’s budget committee completed its budget reviews Tuesday, May 31, with a recommendation of a 1.5 percent pay raise for city employees other than fire and police and $300,000 in grant funding to hire a full-time director for the Whitehaven Economic Development Council.

92. Delay On Larger Pinch Plan Grows Uneasy -

When Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland met last week with representatives of Bass Pro Shops and city council member Berlin Boyd – the council member whose district includes the Pyramid, Mud Island, the Pinch District and St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital – there was a lot of turf to discuss.

93. Last Word: Council Return on Overton, No Frayser Truck Stop and Historian-apolooza -

June 30 is fast approaching. It’s coming up so fast that the City Council is moving to seal in any agreement that might come from the Overton Park Greensward mediation process before the ink dries.

94. Council Approves Overton Boundary Ordinance on First Reading -

Memphis City Council members approved an ordinance Tuesday, May 3, on the first of three readings to set boundaries in Overton Park including the use of the park Greensward.

But some council members who supported a March 1 resolution that gave the Memphis Zoo control of the greensward were much more hesitant about the ordinance two months later.

95. New City Council Learns Ways of Budget Season Quickly -

There are 3,000 miles of street curbs in Memphis. Figures like this are the basic elements of budget season at City Hall.

They are how 13 Memphis City Council members – seven of them four months into their first four-year term of office – wrap their heads around an $85.3 million capital budget proposal and a $667 million operating budget proposal.

96. Council Members Express Impatience with Minority Contracting Complexity -

Some Memphis City Council members want to challenge City Hall’s existing minority business system as its minority business effort is being streamlined.

The possible challenge includes questioning the idea of percentage goals in contracting based on a complex formula that includes multipliers.

97. Potential Revenue Loss Stirs Deannexation Options -

As a potentially damaging deannexation bill moves to the state Senate for a possible vote soon, city officials are considering options to combat the expected loss of revenue should the bill pass.

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland estimates the state deannexation law could cost City Hall $27.7 million on the low end but as much as $80 million if all Memphis annexations dating back to 1998 were negated by voters in those areas.

98. Council Tallies Damage in 'Day of Bad News' -

Memphis City Council member Berlin Boyd summed up City Hall’s attitude Tuesday, March 15, during the council’s executive session. “Today is the day of bad news,” he said after a briefing from Mayor Jim Strickland on the deannexation bill approved the night before by the Tennessee House.
That was followed by more details on the estimated $60 million it will cost to replace the entire radio system for local first responders from the radios to the towers used to transmit their signals.

99. Green Sword -

First it was a rumor – there would be a move by the Memphis City Council aimed at putting a quick end to the long-simmering Overton Park Greensward controversy.

It would come quickly and just before the start of the third spring of protests against the Memphis Zoo's use of the northern part of the Greensward for overflow parking.

100. Duke Takes Reins at Friends for Life -

Longtime nonprofit administrator Diane Duke recently took the helm of Friends for Life as its new executive director. In her new role, the Los Angeles native leads and oversees an organization that’s helping those affected by HIV/AIDS through the provision of education, housing, food, transportation and healthy life skills training.