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Editorial Results (free)

1. View From the Hill: Tearful End for Non-Citizen Tuition Relief Bill -

State Rep. Raumesh Akbari grew so emotional she couldn’t speak. On the verge of tears, the Memphis Democrat started to talk about a high school from her Shelby County district with a large number of undocumented immigrant students.

2. Coalition Urges City Funding For Memphis Schools -

A group of 13 organization and 17 citizens including Shelby County Schools board chairman Chris Caldwell and state Representatives Raumesh Akbari and G.A. Hardaway are calling on Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland to include at least $10 million in funding for schools in the budget he takes to the Memphis City Council next week.

3. Memphis’ Political History Reflects Changes With New Entries -

There was a moment during the March unveiling of former Mayor A C Wharton Jr.’s portrait in the Hall of Mayors when the task of framing history gave way to the present.

It came when attorney Ricky E. Wilkins talked about the importance of Wharton and his predecessor, Willie Herenton – the only two black mayors in Memphis history – to the city’s political present. Wharton attended the event; Herenton was noticeably absent.

4. Last Word: Spring Votes, Those Tax Bills and Tim McCarver on Baseball Changes -

Look for more details on the specifics of the “Gateway” project to start to emerge now that a crucial if overlooked piece of the geographic puzzle in the north Downtown area has come into public view. The city’s largest hotel, also the city’s original convention center hotel, is about to change hands and go back to flying the Marriott flag.

5. Police Arrest 7 in Wake of St. Petersburg Subway Bombing -

ST. PETERSBURG, Russia (AP) — As part of a sweeping hunt for any accomplices of the St. Petersburg suicide bomber, investigators Wednesday rounded up seven suspected Islamic State recruiters from the Central Asia region of the former Soviet Union but found no immediate evidence of their involvement in the subway attack.

6. Political Past, Present Meet as Wharton’s Portrait Joins Hall of Mayors -

When A C Wharton Jr. was Memphis mayor, his relationship with the Memphis City Council wasn’t always good. And it would usually get worse whenever he’d call a press conference in the Hall of Mayors on a Tuesday the council was meeting. Some council members thought it was to draw attention from them.

7. Last Word: Milhaus Sells, Voucher Debate Gets Heated and Boyd's Fly Around -

Highland Row isn’t fully open yet and it is already up for sale as part of a real estate portfolio. The owner, Milhaus, based in Indianapolis, is a development, construction and property management company that works in mixed use development. And the portfolio being on the market could turn into a recapitalization.

8. Tennessee Fusion Center Monitored July Protests In Memphis, Emails Reveal -

A state “fusion center” that coordinates information among local law enforcement has been keeping a detailed list of legal protests in Memphis and other Tennessee cities, according to emails from last July requested by a student researching “predictive policing” efforts in Memphis.

9. Kelsey’s School Voucher Bill Faces Legislative Showdown -

NASHVILLE – A showdown is looming over a pilot voucher program targeting Shelby County Schools after the legislation moved out of Senate and House panels this week with unanimous votes.

10. Clayborn Temple Restoration Approaches One-Year Mark -

Box lunches and stained glass were the order of the day as developers of Clayborn Temple hosted the Rotary Club last month at the landmark Downtown church.

It was one in a series of events Frank Smith and Rob Thompson have hosted at the AME Church since they reopened its doors last October to explore uses for it and start a fuller renovation in time for the 50th anniversary of the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in the spring of 2018.

11. The Week Ahead: February 28-March 6 -

It's Monday, Memphis – time to peek at this week's (very busy) dance card, from the opening of Graceland's $45 million entertainment complex to a showcase of the latest high-tech ag innovations to a celebration of some local "hidden figures." Check out what else you need to know about in The Week Ahead...  

12. Escort List Lawsuit Revives Old Court Order -

Nearly 40 years after U.S. District Judge Robert McRae signed a federal consent decree barring the Memphis Police Department from ever gathering and keeping information from “political intelligence” surveillance of Memphis citizens, the court order has come back to life.

13. City Hall List Controversy Deepens With Questions About Police Surveillance -

The controversy deepened Monday, Feb. 20, over a list of 81 people – many who participated in protests in the last year – who require a police escort while anywhere in City Hall.

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland took questions Monday from reporters for the first time since the list was made public Friday and followed up Saturday by announcing he had asked Memphis Police Director Michael Rallings to review names on the list.

14. City Hall List Controversy Deepens With Questions About Police Surveillance -

The controversy deepened Monday, Feb. 20, over a list of 81 people – many who have participated in recent protests for different causes in the last year – who require a police escort while anywhere in City Hall.

15. Strickland Calls For Review of City Hall Escort List -

Memphis Police Director Michael Rallings is reviewing a list of 81 citizens who cannot come to City Hall without a police escort to wherever they are going in the building after Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland requested the review Saturday, Feb. 18.

16. Strickland Calls For Review of City Hall Escort List -

Memphis Police Director Michael Rallings is reviewing a list of 81 citizens who cannot come to City Hall without a police escort to wherever they are going in the building after Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland requested the review Saturday, Feb. 18.

17. Strickland Calls For Review of City Hall Escort List -

Memphis Police Director Michael Rallings is reviewing a list of 81 citizens who cannot come to City Hall without a police escort to wherever they are going in the building after Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland requested the review Saturday, Feb. 18.

18. The Week Ahead: February 20-26 -

Enjoying that spring-like weather, Memphis? It’s another week of politics and music in the Bluff City, highlighted by the anticipated announcement Wednesday of acts that will be playing the Beale Street Music Festival in May. Here are some other highlights:

19. The Week Ahead: February 13-19 -

Music is a common theme this week, which is nice to know, isn’t it, Memphis? And the sounds of other balls – not the dribbling kind – will take the stage again as the Memphis Open gets into swing and the University of Memphis throws its first real pitch of the 2017 season. Check out this week's list of need-to-know happenings...

20. Midtown Market Developers Scale Back Plans -

The proposed Midtown Market mixed-use development at Union Avenue and McLean Boulevard has changed as its developers continue to seek financing and adjust more than a year after they unveiled the ambitious but tentative plan.

21. New Book Spurs Call for Fresh Probe of Emmett Till Lynching -

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (AP) – The horrific 1955 Mississippi slaying of Emmett Till, which helped trigger the modern civil rights movement, should be re-investigated now that a key witness is quoted as saying she lied about what the black teen said and did before he was lynched, Till's relatives say.

22. Body Count -

A day at a time, Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland has been writing the names of those who have been murdered in a notebook he keeps with him since he became mayor in January 2016.

When five people, two of them 15 years old, died violently the weekend that much of the world’s attention was on protest marches and the new administration in Washington, Strickland was getting updates on the latest surge in violence.

23. Strickland Proposes 7 Areas for Possible De-Annexation -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland wants to at least discuss de-annexing seven parts of the city and reducing the city’s square mileage by 8 percent and thus increasing the city’s population density.

24. Strickland Proposes 7 Areas For Possible Deannexation -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland wants to at least discuss de-annexing seven parts of the city and reducing the city’s square mileage by 8 percent and thus increasing the city’s population density.

25. What are the Odds? Blackburn is Still the Favorite -

Tennessee has its search firm and its search committee is in place to find the replacement for Dave Hart as the university’s athletic director.

Hart announced last August he would retire June 30, and with Tennessee undergoing a transition in its chancellor’s position, the search for Hart’s replacement was put on the back burner.

26. Last Word: The Grizz Farm Club Moves, Changing the NAACP and $15 An Hour -

How many of you knew the Iowa Energy was what amounts to a minor league team connected to the Grizz? How many of you knew that before Wade Baldwin and Troy Williams got sent there last month?

27. College Football Bowl Scene Changes, But AutoZone Liberty Bowl Endures -

Step inside the East Memphis offices of the AutoZone Liberty Bowl and the 58-year history of the game is captured in long, mirrored display cases featuring the helmets of every team to play in the game – from the simple crimson-and-white helmet of Alabama to the golden dome of Notre Dame.

28. Crime Issue Shows Complexity After Record Homicide Tally -

When the subject is crime in Memphis, it never stays in one place for very long. Former Memphis Mayor Willie Herenton’s conclusion that the city’s problem with violent crime is a black problem drew criticism Tuesday, Jan. 3, from Memphis City Council member Janis Fullilove.

29. Huston to Lead Downtown Marketing Initiatives -

Penelope Huston has joined the Downtown Memphis Commission as vice president of marketing, communications and events. Huston has more than 20 years’ experience in advertising, marketing, public relations, and relationship management, most recently serving as director of marketing for Memphis in May.
In her new role, she will be responsible for developing the DMC’s marketing strategy; driving activities to enhance the image of Downtown and public awareness of its growth and value to the region; and lead initiatives to position Downtown as a center for culture, tourism, business and entertainment. 

30. Herenton's First New Year's Remarks In A Decade Stir Pot -

It’s been 10 years since Willie Herenton delivered his last New Year’s Prayer Breakfast message – a political homily Herenton made an institution while serving as mayor of Memphis.

31. Strickland, Herenton Seek Larger, More Focused Volunteerism Efforts -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland and former Memphis Mayor Willie Herenton pointed to a better coordinated form of volunteerism in 2017 at Strickland’s first annual New Year’s Prayer Breakfast.

32. Final Goodbye: Roll Call of Some of Those Who Died in 2016 -

Death claimed transcendent political figures in 2016, including Cuba's revolutionary leader and Thailand's longtime king, but also took away royals of a different sort: kings of pop music, from Prince and David Bowie to George Michael.

33. Memphis Bridge Protest Underscores 2016 National Narrative on Race, Police -

It was a year to the month since Memphis Police officer Connor Schilling shot and fatally wounded Darrius Stewart during a traffic stop in Hickory Hill. Stewart’s death in July 2015 and a subsequent decision by a Shelby County grand jury that Schilling would face no state criminal charges was still an issue in Memphis. This past July, it became the local face of a resumed national narrative.

34. Justice Department Begins Yearlong Investigation of MPD -

In some ways, a year and a half of local protests, turbulence and questions about police conduct came full circle Wednesday, Nov. 30, in Hickory Hill.

A U.S. Justice Department panel investigating the Memphis Police Department heard from more than two dozen people among a room of 50 at Hickory Hill Community Center.

35. Florida Didn’t Kill UT’s Season; Vanderbilt Could -

Tennessee’s primary goal for the 2016 football season was to win the SEC East Division, and the Vols failed.

Does that mean the season was a failure?

Not yet.

Not until the No. 24-ranked Vols play Vanderbilt on Saturday night (7:30, SEC Network) in Nashville and find out their bowl destination.

36. Federal Review of MPD to Take Two Years -

The U.S. Justice Department agency reviewing the Memphis Police Department will start meeting the public after Thanksgiving in the first two town hall meetings to hear from citizens.

The Nov. 29 and 30 sessions at Mississippi Boulevard Christian Church and Hickory Hill Community Center, respectively, are part of a two-year process.

37. Cleveland Indians, ‘Major League’ Come to World Series -

The Chicago Cubs have the charm and the brand. Lovable losers. The Friendly Confines of Wrigley Field.

And they are fighting 108 years of history. The Goat Curse. The Gatorade on Leon Durham’s glove. Steve Bartman.

38. Last Word: In Defense of The Cossitt, Joe Royer and 3 Months Since The Bridge -

Citizens of Memphis, I rise in defense of the city’s first public library. Not in its original much-loved state but in defense of its much-ridiculed modernization.

No, I will not follow that with a defense of John Calipari or the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame’s location in Cleveland instead of Memphis or the late Mo’ Money Taxes and the company’s commercials. But I reserve the right to, at some future date, defend the big silver sculpture thing on the northeast corner of Front and Poplar at the Cannon Center.

39. Town Hall Meetings Reflect Shift in Protest Discussions -

Almost three months after Black Lives Matter movement protestors shut down the Hernando DeSoto Bridge and as a result, opened talks with the administration of Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland, some of the civic discussion has moved to economic issues.

40. Mayor Starts Post-Protest Community Meetings -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland will kick off a series of community meetings Oct. 25 in the wake of the Black Lives Matter protests in July and August.

41. Mayor Starts Post-Protest Community Meetings -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland will kick off a series of community meetings Oct. 25 in the wake of the Black Lives Matter protests in July and August.

42. Last Word: The Grizz Are Back, Bass Pro Shops Buys Cabela's and Stein at Amurica -

Some of you will remember the late George Lapides, whom I worked with for a time at WREC, had a policy about pre-season baseball games or what he called the “Grapefruit League.” It was that they didn’t exist. He wouldn’t acknowledge the games much less the scores.

43. Strickland Has 4 Plans to Spike Minority Business -

Black-owned businesses take in less than 1 percent of all revenue flowing through Memphis, which is unacceptable, according to Mayor Jim Strickland. On Sept. 28, Strickland introduced four new programs that will boost the wealth of minority and women-owned businesses.

44. Council Sets Stage for Final Pot Ordinance Vote -

With no debate, Memphis City Council members approved Tuesday, Sept. 20, the second of three readings of an ordinance that would allow police officers to write a ticket with a $50 fine for possession of less than a half ounce of marijuana.

45. With Some Gas Stations Dry, Pipeline Works to Send More Fuel -

ATLANTA (AP) – Gas prices spiked and drivers found "out of service" bags covering pumps as the gas shortage in the South rolled into the work week, raising fears that the disruptions could become more widespread.

46. A Tasteful List 2016 -

MEMPHIS BY THE BITE. Presenting the sixth serving of the Tasteful List, updated for 2016 – alphabetical local favorites in one decidedly local man’s opinion – the only things easy to swallow in an election year.

47. Photographer Steber Captures Fading Legends on Blues Highway -

Bill Steber stood at the crossroads in the Mississippi Delta and made a deal with the devil that would allow him to not only master his photographic skills but become one of the most respected documentarians of Mississippi Delta blues. And kind of make a living (or at least fashion his life) while he’s at it.

48. The Fading Accuracy of Political Polling -

Joe Carr says he couldn’t believe the deficit when U.S. Rep. Diane Black trounced him in the August election to recapture Tennessee’s 6th Congressional District seat.

49. 2 More Universities Furl Confederate-Themed Mississippi Flag -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) – Two more Mississippi universities have stopped flying the state's flag, which prominently features the Confederate battle emblem.

Mississippi State University and the Mississippi University for Women confirmed Tuesday that they had taken down the state's flag from outdoor flagpoles over the summer. The universities' actions came after state lawmakers failed to act on changing the flag this year.

50. Study Leads to Broader Call for Business Ties -

Rodney Strong, CEO of the Atlanta law and public policy firm Griffin and Strong that authored city government’s latest disparity study on minority contracting, didn’t come to talk about the study last week when he spoke to a room of 40 African-American civic and business leaders.

51. Last Word: $60 Million, Frozen Graceland and Wreck It Ralph's Return -

The federal government’s problem with a law the Tennessee Legislature passed earlier this year is serious -- $60-million serious.

And Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam, in Hickory Hill Thursday, said he’s working on a compromise that would have the Legislature undo what it did this year when the new legislative session begins in January.

52. Police Separate Elvis Fans From Protesters -

The latest Black Lives Matter movement protest included a show of force by Memphis Police that included plenty of questions about how police functioned as gatekeepers for Graceland’s annual candlelight vigil.

53. Last Word: Candlelight Protest, International Paper Rumors and Ruby Wilson -

Graceland and Black Lives Matter meet again Monday evening, according to the announcement as the weekend began of the Coalition of Concerned Citizens.

The coalition, which includes leaders of the July 10 bridge protest as well as the July 12 protest that briefly blocked traffic on Elvis Presley Boulevard outside Graceland, isn’t too happy with how its meeting with Mayor Jim Strickland went last Thursday.

54. Coalition Calls For Graceland Protest -

The Coalition of Concerned Citizens is calling for a “massive, nonviolent peaceful protest of direct action” Monday, Aug. 15, at Graceland in advance of the annual candlelight vigil marking the anniversary of Elvis Presley’s death.

55. Strickland Meets With Protesters In Advance of Graceland Protest Call -

The Coalition of Concerned Citizens is calling for a “massive, nonviolent peaceful protest of direct action” Monday, Aug. 15, at Graceland in advance of the annual candlelight vigil marking the anniversary of Elvis Presley’s death.

56. Last Word: The Elvis Bubble, Global Entry At MEM and ARC at the Rec Room -

Elvis Week is with us. If you are on Elvis Presley Boulevard every day you know that the Elvis Week landscape is very different this year with the Guest House at Graceland hotel going up and well underway at this point – 90 percent complete toward a late October opening we were told during a media tour on Wednesday.

57. Last Word: SEC and GMF, Wiseacre's Growth and Apartment Action -

The Securities and Exchange Commission has been investigating Global Ministries Foundation since mid-July. The revelation turned up Wednesday in a Memphis Federal Court filing by the receiver appointed to oversee and sell the Tulane and Warren apartments.

58. Rallings Vows to Reform Memphis Police Dept. -

Memphis Police Director Michael Rallings will get a pay boost from $150,000 to $219,000 a year as he becomes the permanent head of the Memphis Police Department.

The appointment of Rallings by Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland goes to the Memphis City Council for approval Tuesday, Aug. 9, for what is expected to be a unanimous vote.

59. Last Word: School Is In, It's Rallings and Looking At Our Reflection -

The school year begins Monday across Shelby County – for students.

Teachers have been back for the last two weeks in one way or another preparing for the year. School administrators longer than that including some new principals at several schools.

60. Rallings: 'The World Is In Turmoil' -

Memphis Police Director Michael Rallings will get a pay boost from $150,000 to $219,000 a year as he becomes the permanent head of the Memphis Police Department.

The appointment of Rallings by Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland goes to the Memphis City Council for approval Tuesday, Aug. 9, for what is expected to be a unanimous vote.

61. Kustoff Victory Caps TV, Outsider Heavy Congressional Campaign -

Former U.S. Attorney David Kustoff claimed the Republican nomination for Tennessee’s 8th Congressional district Thursday, Aug. 4, in a 15-county contest in which the eastern parts of Shelby County played a decisive role.

62. Kustoff Claims 8th GOP Primary, Todd Upset by Lovell, Jenkins Over Newsom -

Former U.S. Attorney David Kustoff claimed the Republican nomination for Tennessee’s 8th Congressional district Thursday, Aug. 4, in a 15-county contest in which the eastern parts of Shelby County played a decisive role.

63. Events -

Metal Museum will host its Pokemon Go-themed Whet Thursday on Aug. 4 from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. at 374 Metal Museum Drive. Attendees can enjoy free museum admission, food, live music and a hands-on activity while catching all the Pokemon they can find. Cost is free. Visit metalmuseum.org.

64. Outnumbered Democrats Hope To Ride Anti-Trumpmentum -

State Rep. Raumesh Akbari identified herself with the “Fighting 26,” also known as the Tennessee House Democratic Caucus, when she took the podium to support Hillary Clinton at Philadelphia’s Democratic National Convention.

65. The Week Ahead: July 25-31 -

Happy Monday, Memphis! We’re wrapping up July with an eclectic mix of local happenings, from political campaigning to a celebration of all things Harry Potter. Plus, what you need to know about Tennessee sales tax holiday and much more…

66. Last Word: The Greensward Deal, Pulpit to Protest Call and Leader Federal's HQ -

There is nothing quite like a deadline to produce results.

I’m not talking about this job, although it is more than a coincidence that the closer a deadline gets the more you start to figure out how to write something.

67. Last Word: Baton Rouge Again, Identifying The Memphis Movement & Early Voting -

It is becoming more and more difficult to keep the danger to police officers from extremists and the danger of police training and policies that are used to justify questionable police shootings in the same frame.

68. The Week Ahead: July 18-24 -

It’s supposed to get hotter in Memphis this week, which is pretty normal for mid-July, and the coming week brings what could be a hot debate at the Memphis City Council meeting Tuesday on a plan to solve parking on the Overton Park Greensward. That and some other events planned this week include...

69. Black Lives Matter Movement Defines Itself Beyond Single Leader -

The city’s Black Lives Matter movement doesn’t have a single leader or “figurehead” and shouldn’t be oversimplified, said a coalition of several groups involved in the protests.

70. Last Word: Conley Makes It Official, No "Figure Heads" and Early Voting Opens -

Mike Conley signed on the dotted line about an hour before the press conference confirming that he and the Grizz front office have closed on the deal that makes him the highest paid player in NBA history… for now.

71. BLM Movement Leaders Add to Demands, Conley Says 'Time To Speak Up' -

The city’s Black Lives Matter movement doesn’t have a single leader or “figure head” and shouldn’t be oversimplified, said a coalition of several groups involved in the protests.

72. After The Bridge -

Four and a half hours after it began Sunday, July 10, the city's most significant and largest Black Lives Matter protest ended with police in riot gear slowly walking a group of around 100 protesters off the Hernando DeSoto Bridge and south on Front Street.

73. Tenn. Police Look to Keep Peace at Black Lives Matter Protests -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Police in several major Tennessee cities have indicated they made a concerted effort to avoid arrests and maintain peace during recent Black Lives Matter protests.

74. Black Lives Matter Protesters Arrested Outside Graceland -

Six Black Lives Matter protesters were arrested Tuesday, July 12, as they blocked Elvis Presley Boulevard at the gates of Graceland.

The arrests were out of a group of 100 protesters led by Frank Gotti, who was among the organizers of the Sunday rally turned march to the Hernando DeSoto Bridge.

75. Frustrations Aired After Bridge Protest -

To get an idea of just how high emotions were running at the outset of the weekend’s Black Lives Matter rally Downtown that turned into a march, take many of the voices coming through a megaphone in the FedExForum plaza and put them in a church sanctuary with air conditioning and a better sound system.

76. Last Word: The Day After The Bridge, Big River Plans and the U of M Train Tracks -

The lure of the bridge was tempting some of the organizers of Sunday’s Black Lives Matter protest that shut down the Hernando DeSoto Bridge on the day after the protest that drew thousands.

77. Frustration Day After Black Lives Matter Protest -

To get an idea of just how high emotions were running at the outset of the weekend’s Black Lives Matter rally Downtown that turned into a march, take many of the voices coming through a megaphone in the FedExForum plaza and put them in a church sanctuary with air conditioning and a better sound system.

78. Protest at Memphis Bridge Ends Peacefully -

Four and a half hours after it began Sunday, July 10, the city’s most significant and largest Black Lives Matter protest ended with police in riot gear slowly walking a group of around 100 protesters off the Hernando DeSoto Bridge to Front Street.

79. Black Lives Matter Protest Draws Thousands In Memphis Protest Milestone -

Four and a half hours after it began Sunday, July 10, the city's most significant and largest Black Lives Matter protest ended with police in riot gear slowly walking a group of around 100 protesters off the Hernando DeSoto Bridge and south on Front Street.

80. The Rest of the August Ballot -

If all goes according to plan on the Aug. 4 election day, Linda Phillips hopes the result is that you don’t see her in any of the reporting on election night.

81. The Week Ahead: June 27-July 3 -

It's been a long time coming, but Friday is the kickoff for wine sales in grocery stores. While you're getting your corkscrews ready, check out what else is going on this week – from a deadline in the greensward mediation process to a special superhero stop at St. Jude...

82. June 10-16: This week in Memphis history -

2015: Andrea Miller is named the new president of LeMoyne-Owen College, making her the first woman to lead the city’s only historically black college. Miller is selected by the college’s board of trustees in a meeting on campus that lasts several hours as students, alumni and other supporters wait on the lawn outside Brownlee Hall for the announcement.

83. Committee Recommends Pay Raises for City Employees -

The Memphis City Council’s budget committee completed its budget reviews Tuesday, May 31, recommending a 1.5 percent pay raise for city employees other than fire and police and $300,000 in grant funding to hire a full-time director for the Whitehaven Economic Development Council.

84. Council Committee Recommends Pay Raises Beyond Fire and Police -

It took six hours. But the Memphis City Council’s budget committee completed its budget reviews Tuesday, May 31, with a recommendation of a 1.5 percent pay raise for city employees other than fire and police and $300,000 in grant funding to hire a full-time director for the Whitehaven Economic Development Council.

85. Council Committee Probes Grant Requests -

Memphis City Council Budget Committee Chairman Edmund Ford Jr. likens it to the television show “Shark Tank.”

Instead of entrepreneurs, leaders of nonprofits made their pitches to the budget committee Tuesday, May 24, for grants from the council as part of the budget process.

86. Wilson Urges Family Philanthropic Efforts at Dunavant Awards -

When most people think of the Kemmons Wilson family, there is an image that comes to mind. It’s a black and white photo from the 1950s of the five children – three boys and two girls – of the Holiday Inn founder cutting the ribbon on the very first Holiday Inn at 4925 Summer Ave.

87. 'Underground' Stars in Memphis Tuesday -

Three stars of the WGN America television series “Underground” are in Memphis Tuesday, May 10 – the day before the finale airs – for a sneak peek and panel discussion at the National Civil Rights Museum, 450 Mulberry St.

88. Last Word: Behind Grit N Grind, Brooks at 100 and Massacre -

This is a 12-month-a-year basketball town. There’s the season, possibly a post season, which by NBA standards is a second season. (Yep, they are still playing.) And then there is the rest of the year when whatever has been about to boil over behind the façade of sports clichés finally begins to spill out into the open.

89. Massacre: 1866 and the Battles Over How Memphis History is Told -

At the end of March with much secrecy, Rev. Keith Norman took delivery and responsibility for a large, heavy crate that stayed in his office for the next month.

“Don’t tell anybody, don’t let anybody get it, if they come in and say they work for the park commission or anybody, tell them to show identification,” were the instructions said Norman, who is president of the Memphis Branch NAACP.

90. Last Word: BSMF Looks Up, Overton Park Respite and Slow Economic Growth -

The Beale Street Music Festival box office numbers won’t be in for a bit yet. But it looks like the three-day event that ended Sunday evening with Beck and Paul Simon weathered the weather very well, maybe better than usual.

91. The Week Ahead: May 2-8 -

So, you think this is the “off-week” of the Memphis In May International Festival – the gap between the Beale Street Music Festival and the World Championship Barbecue Cooking Contest. But, while Tom Lee Park gets a breather, there are plenty of cultural experiences to soak up across Memphis. Here's our weekly roundup of local happenings you need to know about...

92. The Week Ahead: April 18-24 -

Let’s get this week started, Memphis! Here’s our roundup of local happenings you need to know about, from the dreaded federal income tax filing day, to the scheduled end of the Tennessee Legislature for this session, to a couple of big round-ball games at FedExForum beginning Friday.

93. Last Word: Tubby Time, Haslam's Veto and Africa in April's 30th Year -

It was just four weeks ago that all of this talk about change at the top of the Tiger basketball chart was put to rest. Coach Josh Pastner’s performance was reviewed by the University of Memphis administration and he was staying at least for another season. Four weeks to the day of that announcement, Pastner is the new coach at Georgia Tech and we are in the first day of the Tubby Smith era at the U of M.

94. Parkinson: OK to ‘Go A Little Bit Extreme’ to Get Job Done -

With U.S. Marine Corps training, Rep. Antonio Parkinson knows how to grab people’s attention.

He did that earlier this year when he sponsored legislation to kill the Achievement School District, Tennessee’s solution for turning around struggling schools.

95. Legislators Playing Expensive Game With LGBT Issues -

The silly season is in full swing on Capitol Hill, but the “bathroom bill” and any jokes surrounding it are no laughing matter anymore. It’s getting downright expensive.

Tennessee Attorney General Herbert Slatery said this week the bill dealing with transgender student use of restrooms could cost the state more than $1.2 billion in federal funds for K-12 and higher education.

96. August Primaries Feature Intra-Party Challenges -

Two years after a disastrous slate of races for countywide offices, there is a move among younger Democratic partisans in Memphis to shake up the Democrats who represent the city in the Tennessee Legislature.

97. 8th Congressional District Primaries Draw 22 Contenders, 13 Republican -

The Republican primary race to fill the 8th District Congressional seat Republican incumbent Stephen Fincher is giving up drew a field of 13 contenders – seven from Shelby County and four from Jackson, Tennessee – at the Thursday, April 7, noon filing deadline for the Aug. 4 ballot.

98. Can GOP Keep Grasp On Success Ramsey Built? -

As much as Tennessee Republicans want to put a happy face on the departure of Senate Speaker and Lt. Gov. Ron Ramsey, holding it together in the wake of his departure will be an awesome task.

99. 1866 Massacre Author Says Riot Has Important Lessons -

When historian Stephen V. Ash went looking for source material on that most difficult of events to piece back together – three days of mob violence in a 19th century Southern city – he expected a challenge.

100. Last Word: Deannexation, Pastner Past the Season and Chewing Gum and Walking -

The much-discussed deannexation bill in the Tennessee Legislature always had the votes Monday evening in the House with Memphis Democrats succeeding only in delaying the outcome in Nashville by about two hours.
The bill passed by a wide margin after a debate that was for the most part Memphis against the rest of the state starting just outside the city limits with Republicans in the Shelby County legislative delegation.
And there is some dispute between the bill’s sponsor from the Chattanooga area and Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland. Strickland puts the potential loss of tax revenue to the city at $80 million. Rep. Mike Carter says it is more like $27 million.