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Editorial Results (free)

1. White House: Budget Deficit to Rise to $600 Billion -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The White House on Friday predicted that the government's budget deficit for the soon-to-end fiscal year will hit $600 billion, an increase of $162 billion over last year's tally and a reversal of a steady trend of large but improving deficits on President Barack Obama's watch.

2. Secret Chapter of 9/11 Inquiry Released After 13-Year Wait -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Newly declassified pages from a congressional report into 9/11 released Friday have reignited speculation that some of the hijackers had links to Saudis, including government officials — allegations that were never substantiated by later U.S. investigations into the terrorist attacks.

3. How safe is our food? -

It’s not easy being a food inspector in Tennessee, dealing with an updated statewide food code to protect the public from foodborne illnesses and educating restaurateurs, many with their own ideas about their cuisine, on following the rules.

4. Attorney Schattgen Joins Bass, Berry & Sims -

Shine Chen Schattgen has joined the Memphis office of Bass, Berry & Sims LLP as an associate in the law firm’s health care group. Schattgen, who previously practiced in the Boston office of Ropes & Gray LLP, counsels health care clients on a range of operational, regulatory and transactional matters.

5. ‘Prevent’ Defenses: Freeze, Briles Look to Protect Themselves -

It’s safe to say in pretty much every college football program in America that players are made to pay some penalty for the basic infraction of being late to a practice or a team meeting.

Sometimes they are suspended for a quarter. Other times for a half or an entire game against some non-competitive directional school. Sometimes, the players even have a semi-legitimate excuse for being late.

6. June is Maker Month in Memphis -

This month in Memphis is all about the makers. From a gathering at the Broad Avenue retailer City & State to a “Makers Faire” in front of City Hall to a new privately funded effort to better understand the local maker economy, June will see a celebration and showcase of the city’s community of makers, artisans and the like.

7. The Week Ahead: May 30-June 5 -

It's time to get this week started, Memphis! Here’s our roundup of local happenings you need to know about, from a Funkadelic party at the New Daisy to a Day of Merrymaking on the Greensward... 

8. Rose Guiding Memphis Symphony to Firm Financial Footing -

What is classical music good for? How can it remain relevant in the 21st century? For most people, these are abstract questions – but for Gayle Rose, they couldn’t be more pressing.

9. Haves, Have-Nots Get Varied Tax Relief -

Amid the rancor of bathroom and counseling bills, two major pieces of legislation slipped through the General Assembly this session with hardly a peep – elimination of the Hall tax and a partial revitalization of property tax relief for seniors and disabled veterans.

10. ‘Underground’ Stars Surface in Memphis -

The last time fans of the television show “Underground” saw actor Alano Miller, his character, Cato, was believed to be dead. The unexpected twist for a complex and central character in the WGN America drama based on the Underground Railroad in pre-Civil War America was still generating plenty of social media disbelief nearly a week later.

11. Tennessee Leads the Nation in Bankruptcies -

Tennessee has a model program for financial literacy in its public schools. All high school students must pass a personal finance course to graduate, and even kindergartners are learning about money under a new initiative to extend the curriculum to primary school.

12. Akbari Proving to be Worthy Successor to Iconic DeBerry -

Those who wondered how Raumesh Akbari would do in following legendary Memphis legislator Lois DeBerry now have a much clearer picture.

13. Capitol Hill Buzz: House Republicans Solve Flag Fight With Coins -

WASHINGTON (AP) – House Republicans sidestepped the divisive fight over displays of the Confederate battle flag at the U.S. Capitol with plans to put up state coins instead.

Rep. Candice Miller, R-Mich., who heads the House Administration Committee, announced Thursday that reproductions of commemorative quarters depicting the 50 states, District of Columbia and the territories will line the wall between the Capitol and the Rayburn House Office Building.

14. Last Word: The Bible Veto Override Vote, Grizz Nostalgia and Kroger Goes Online -

The Tennessee Legislature hoped to end its 2016 session Wednesday at the end of an eventful day that included a failed attempt to override Gov. Bill Haslam’s veto of the bill that would have made the Bible the official state book.
But into Wednesday evening, the state House was still debating the Hall tax on dividends – specifically further roll backs of it. And the Senate had gone home for the night.
So Thursday looks like a good bet for the adjournment for the year and the formal start of the election season for incumbents.

15. Business Leaders Sign Letter Opposing Bathroom Law -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – The chief executives of Williams-Sonoma, Hilton Worldwide, T-Mobile and dozens of other major corporations have signed a letter asking Tennessee lawmakers to reject a transgender bathroom bill, saying it is discriminatory.

16. Legislators Playing Expensive Game With LGBT Issues -

The silly season is in full swing on Capitol Hill, but the “bathroom bill” and any jokes surrounding it are no laughing matter anymore. It’s getting downright expensive.

Tennessee Attorney General Herbert Slatery said this week the bill dealing with transgender student use of restrooms could cost the state more than $1.2 billion in federal funds for K-12 and higher education.

17. Last Word: The Zoo's Proposal, Health and Ed In Limbo and Annexation's Effect -

A busy weekend on several fronts not the least of which was Overton Park and the Greensward controversy.
The Greensward itself was pretty subdued on a chilly Saturday.
The action was to be found in an email the zoo sent out Saturday making some proposals and offering some thoughts on the traffic and parking study the Overton Park Conservancy released last week.
Here is our summary
of what the zoo is offering in what may be a new effort in the public discussion.
Of course, the private discussion which is the mediation effort continues. But it sounds like some of the mediation discussions may be finding their way into the public discussion.
The public discussion has been sporadically active but very muted so far. For instance there has been talk before of zoo parking on the eastern side of the park in what until recently was a city maintenance yard.
The proposal by the zoo was shot down pretty quickly because it included running a tram through the Old Forest.
But there are some scenarios that wouldn’t take such a tram through the Old Forest.
The zoo email from Saturday isn’t specific on how the folks who would park at the maintenance yard would get from there to the zoo.
Presumably that is grounds for some type of discussion.

18. Last Word: Pastner's Georgia Tech Post-Season, Who Filed and Greensward Invitations -

Not so fast with the off-season. There is a Memphis post-season after all.

And the Grizz found it Thursday like a light at the end of a long-tunnel where a lot of people slipped and fell and can’t get up.
The light was Houston flaming out at home to Phoenix without the Grizzlies having to make a basket.
It’s all about the math. Stay in school, young people.

19. Lake District Would Put Lakeland on the Map -

Before Lakeland became a city, it was the Lakeland Amusement Park. A California-based developer is bringing back that original flair with his proposal for The Lake District, a 165-acre mixed-use development.

20. Doctors Applaud End of Tennessee's Fetal Assault Law -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Brittany Hudson was pregnant, addicted to painkillers and afraid of a Tennessee law that calls for the arrest of mothers of drug-dependent babies. She eventually gave birth without medical help, on the side of a road in the foothills of the Great Smoky Mountains.

21. Last Word: D-Day, Opera Festival Returns and Buying GMF After the Bond Default -

This is what you might call D-Day in Nashville. The “D’ in this case stands for deannexation.
The bill to permit deannexation by referendum has in the course of two weeks become the city’s dominant political issue.

22. Council Tallies Damage in 'Day of Bad News' -

Memphis City Council member Berlin Boyd summed up City Hall’s attitude Tuesday, March 15, during the council’s executive session. “Today is the day of bad news,” he said after a briefing from Mayor Jim Strickland on the deannexation bill approved the night before by the Tennessee House.
That was followed by more details on the estimated $60 million it will cost to replace the entire radio system for local first responders from the radios to the towers used to transmit their signals.

23. Stop Trump Efforts Intensify As Election Day Arrives -

It’s hard to gauge how far it is going. But the “Stop Trump” effort among local and state Republicans includes trying to talk Democrats into crossing over and voting in Tuesday’s Tennessee Republican presidential primary.

24. Once the Paragon of the Sport, Lady Vols Seem to be Fading From the Spotlight -

As the 2015-16 regular season winds down, the Tennessee Lady Vols basketball team is navigating uncharted territory, and the winds aren’t favorable.

The Lady Vols began the season ranked No. 4 in the nation by the Associated Press and picked to finish second in the SEC by coaches and media. They had Final Four aspirations. Their roster was loaded.

25. The Moving Election -

The Trump balloons were a late arrival to the Shelby County Republican party’s annual Lincoln Day Gala, the local party’s largest annual fundraiser.

They were an unsubtle accent in a room of 500 people where unabashed hand-to-hand campaigning kept the buzz of conversation at a steady level for most of the evening.

26. Events -

The Downtown Memphis Commission will meet Friday, Feb. 26, at noon in the DMC conference room, 114 N. Main St. Visit downtownmemphiscommission.com.

University of Tennessee Health Science Center College of Health Professions will host an open house Friday, Feb. 26, from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. in the Student-Alumni Center’s O.D. Larry Dining Hall, 800 Madison Ave. Learn about careers in physician assistant studies, physical or occupational therapy, medical laboratory science and more. For details, email cohpcareers@uthsc.edu or call 901-448-2042.

27. Rare Wins for Democrats on Guns, Outsourcing -

Legislative Democrats got a chance to beat their chests a little bit after a proposal to allow guns in the state Capitol and Legislative Plaza failed, and they hope to do the same with outsourcing.

28. Tigers Can Still Draw Fans Needed For Payoff, NCAA Bid Less Likely -

The University of Memphis didn’t have much trouble with UCF, as evidenced by the 73-56 final score.

The paid attendance didn’t have much trouble with the actual attendance (scanned tickets), as evidenced by the 12,492 to 6,374 final score.

29. Tennessee to Release Statewide Animal Abuse Registry Jan. 1 -

GREENEVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Tennessee is set to become the first state to release a registry that will consist of the names of people convicted of having intentionally abused animals.

Beginning Jan. 1, anyone can access the online registry, see a picture of the offender, and learn the offender's age and where the offender lives, WBIR-TV reports (http://on.wbir.com/1ZAkHjQ).

30. After a Year of Triumphs and Defeats, Haslam Looks Ahead -

Eight days into 2015, Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam formally set a special session of the Tennessee legislature for February on his Insure Tennessee plan, a Medicaid expansion Haslam negotiated with the Obama administration.

31. Midway Point -

A quality, affordable neighborhood for low- to moderate-income Memphians. That’s developer Henry Turley’s ongoing vision for Uptown, a North Memphis neighborhood benefiting from $150 million in redevelopment efforts.

32. Delavega Joins Hooks Institute Leadership Team -

Dr. Elena Delavega, assistant professor in the University of Memphis’ Department of Social Work, has been named associate director of the Benjamin L. Hooks Institute for Social Change at the U of M. A former policy fellow at the institute, Delavega specializes in the study of poverty and economic development.

33. Corker Says Visa Waivers a Bigger Risk Than Refugees -

U.S. Sen. Bob Corker says he believes the nation needs to stop admitting Syrian refugees until security problems are solved, but the nation’s “bigger risk” in letting terrorists slip into the country lies with the nation’s Visa Waiver Program.

34. December Welcomes Batch of Memphis Holiday Markets -

By the time everyone has put up the tinsel, taken down the trees and is counting down the days until 2016 arrives, the month of December will have seen at least half a dozen holiday markets, stores and pop-up shops unfold around Memphis.

35. Eclectic Eye Collecting For Hope House -

Eclectic Eye is turning its sights toward helping Hope House this holiday season.

The optometry practice and eyewear boutique is collecting items from the Memphis-based nonprofit’s wish list throughout the month. In addition, for every item donated in December, Eclectic Eye will give $5, up to $500, to the organization.

36. Eclectic Eye Collecting For Hope House -

Eclectic Eye is turning its sights toward helping Hope House this holiday season.

The optometry practice and eyewear boutique is collecting items from the Memphis-based nonprofit’s wish list throughout the month. In addition, for every item donated in December, Eclectic Eye will give $5, up to $500, to the organization.

37. Business Leaders Forging New Identity for Summer Avenue -

Summer Avenue was home to the city’s first McDonald’s, the world’s first Holiday Inn and a small part of what was called the Broadway of America when the completion of U.S. 70 in 1927 took it across the U.S.

38. Competition for Jones Lang Lasalle in Tennessee -

Amid debate about privatization within state government, legislators are glad to see Tennessee seeking competition in its building leasing program.

“To me, when you’ve got competition, you’ve got people who may do something for next to nothing just to get their foot in the door,” says state Rep. Mike Sparks, who raised questions about the state’s leasing program and contract with Jones Lang Lasalle, which started charging commissions when it got involved in 2012.

39. Hard Work Leads to Success For Aunt Key’s Apothecary -

Carla Worth was a single mom of a 2-year-old, working two jobs and going to school.

Busy would be an understatement. But Worth also had a realization: Though she had several employment opportunities, she discovered she was pretty good at cleaning houses. And it worked well with her schedule.

40. Ginkgos And Thanks. And Thanks Again. -

LOOK FOR THE WONDER. REPEAT. I write about it every year. And it’s happened again.

Right outside my window is a ginkgo tree, and another on the other side of the house. Every fall they engage in an ancient mating dance, a spectacular competition for attention. So exhausting is the effort, it doesn’t last long. So intense is the result, it’s explosive. And then it’s gone.

41. Give Thanks at Work -

The holiday season is a fantastic time to reconnect with friends and loved ones. But, the importance of thanking those around you at work should not be overlooked at Thanksgiving or through the rest of the year.

42. The Sporting Life of David Climer -

I’m blaming Rudy Kalis. As the years passed in a long career as a sports writer, I always swore I’d never be the oldest guy at the press conference. As long as Rudy was in the house as sports anchor for WSMV-TV, I was safe. Then he got a morning gig at Channel 4.

43. THDA Makes $1 Million Habitat Challenge Grant -

The Tennessee Housing Development Agency will contribute $1 million in matching funds to Habitat for Humanity’s fundraising drive for the 2016 Jimmy & Rosalynn Carter Work Project in North Memphis.

44. THDA Makes $1 Million Habitat Challenge Grant -

The Tennessee Housing Development Agency will contribute $1 million in matching funds to Habitat for Humanity’s fundraising drive for the 2016 Jimmy & Rosalynn Carter Work Project in North Memphis.

45. Memphis Indie Holiday Market Returns December 12 -

Lauren Carlson, a Memphis artist with her own jewelry line called Question the Answer, is counting down the days to this year’s Memphis Indie Holiday Market.

46. Transplant Gives New Face, Scalp to Burned Senatobia Firefighter -

NEW YORK (AP) — A volunteer firefighter badly burned in a 2001 blaze has received the most extensive face transplant ever, covering his skull and much of his neck, a New York hospital announced Monday.

47. Time for Tuition Equality in Tennessee -

Tennessee has a unique opportunity to help the state economy and support education. Passage of the “Tuition Equality” bill in the upcoming state legislative session will provide a critical chance to educate thousands of Tennessee youth and narrow the skills gap that exists for Tennessee employers.

48. Business-Nonprofit Partnerships Crucial to Transforming Communities -

Whether in Memphis, Nashville or metro Denver, there are success stories. Businesses and nonprofits coming together not just to create jobs, but to forge life-changing opportunities that turn out to be positive for everyone involved.

49. I Choose Memphis: Amy Grow -

“I Choose Memphis” spotlights Memphians who are passionate about calling this community home. New Memphis Institute provides the profiles.

Name: Amy Grow

Job title and company: International Paper, Communications Department, Meetings & Events

50. Tennessee Aquarium to Build Freshwater Institute -

The Tennessee Aquarium has announced plans for a $4.5 million structure near the campus of Baylor School that will house the Tennessee Aquarium Freshwater Conservation Institute.

The aquarium announced Wednesday that the 14,000-square-foot riverfront facility will be a permanent base for conservation science. Officials say they hope it will vault their work to the national stage and reinforce their assertion that Chattanooga is the conservation capital of the South.

51. StyleBlueprint to Donate To Reader-Selected Charity -

Digital lifestyle publication StyleBlueprint Memphis is giving away $5,000 to a Memphis charity and is seeking local input on where the funds should be donated.

Now in its second week of voting, the contest has narrowed 36 possible recipients down to 12: The Cancer Card XChange, Citizens for Community Vehicles, The Exchange Club Family Center, The Forrest Spence Fund, Hope House, Humane Society of Memphis & Shelby County, Lite Memphis, Making Strides Memphis, Semmes-Murphy Foundation, A Step Ahead Foundation, St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital and Tails of Hope.

52. Grammy Museum to Celebrate Mississippi's Musical Talent -

GREENVILLE, Miss. (AP) — With a history of producing music legends such as Elvis Presley and B.B. King, it's no surprise that Mississippi is the home of the first Grammy museum outside of California.

53. Tennessee Aquarium to Build $4.5M Freshwater Institute -

CHATTANOOGA, Tenn. (AP) — The Tennessee Aquarium has announced plans for a $4.5 million structure near the campus of Baylor School that will house the Tennessee Aquarium Freshwater Conservation Institute.

54. StyleBlueprint to Donate To Reader-Selected Charity -

Digital lifestyle publication StyleBlueprint Memphis is giving away $5,000 to a Memphis charity and is seeking local input on where the funds should be donated.

Now in its second week of voting, the contest has narrowed 36 possible recipients down to 12: The Cancer Card XChange, Citizens for Community Vehicles, The Exchange Club Family Center, The Forrest Spence Fund, Hope House, Humane Society of Memphis & Shelby County, Lite Memphis, Making Strides Memphis, Semmes-Murphy Foundation, A Step Ahead Foundation, St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital and Tails of Hope.

55. JIFF Is Making a Difference in Memphis -

Pierre Teilhard de Chardin, French Jesuit and philosopher, said: “The future belongs to those who give the next generation reason to hope.” It is a brilliant way of capturing the solution, but how do you give hope to a generation of young people who seem mired in a downward spiral of multi-generational hopelessness? What do you hope for when your world is your ZIP code and your ZIP code is a world of violence, crime, hunger, homelessness, gangs, crack houses and unbridled anger? Who gives hope for the future when the present is so dire?

56. Treasury Warns Congress: Debt Limit Deadline Now Nov. 3 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Treasury Department on Thursday told Congress that it needs to act by Nov. 3 or the government will be dangerously close to being unable to pay all its bills.

That's a little sooner than Treasury Secretary Jacob Lew said two weeks ago when he set a Nov. 5 deadline. At the time, some GOP lawmakers felt Lew was trying to rush them into approving an increase in the government's $18.1 trillion borrowing limit.

57. Attorney Rob Ratton Joins Fisher & Phillips -

Robert W. Ratton has joined Fisher & Phillips LLP’s Memphis office as of counsel, a role in which he represents employers in a wide range of employment law matters and supports clients with internal investigations and compliance issues. Ratton most recently served as a staff attorney at TruGreen LP.

58. Metro Nashville’s Local-Hire Rule Gets Battered On Many Fronts -

The ink wasn’t dry on standards for Metro Nashville’s local-hire charter amendment when new Mayor Megan Barry put the measure on hold – despite sizable support in the August election.

59. Urban Barn Market Debuts October Event -

Debi Heying Vincent and Carrie Walters Floyd have traveled across the South, noticing the abundance of antique and vintage markets everywhere except Memphis.

60. Tennessee Housing Agency Adopts Green-Building Standards -

The Tennessee Housing Development Agency wants to build healthy communities from the ground up.

Under new guidelines to be incorporated later this year, affordable housing developers seeking Low-Income Housing Tax Credits will have to qualify for full certification from Enterprise Green Communities. The certification was first introduced nationally in 2004, and the THDA board recently approved incorporation of the revamped 2015 criteria.

61. Developers Threaten to Pull Out of Mall of Memphis Site -

Developers of the former Mall of Memphis site were again delayed as the board of the Economic Development Growth Engine tabled a vote on a payment-in-lieu-of-taxes benefit for the speculative industrial site.

62. Vanderbilt's Wireless ECG: Real Lifesaver for Heart Attack Victims -

Susan Eagle, M.D., didn’t necessarily see herself as an inventor, but she recognized a problem in her field and she just couldn’t live with it.

63. Buster’s Prepares to Open Major East Memphis Expansion -

Buster’s Liquors & Wines’ longtime East Memphis presence is about to get even bigger.

The third-generation family business, which began in 1954, has been in the University Center near the corner of Poplar Avenue and Highland Street since moving into its original 800-square-foot space in 1970.

64. Health Care Suffers As Rural Hospitals Continue Slow Fade -

Fayette County is the latest victim of hospital closings in Tennessee as many rural health care facilities continue to struggle financially.

Methodist Healthcare-Fayette Hospital closed in late March, bringing to four the number of shuttered hospitals in West Tennessee after Gibson General, Humboldt General and Haywood Park Community called it quits in 2014.

65. Comcast Teeing Up New Services Targeted at Millennials -

NEW YORK (AP) — Comcast, which became a TV powerhouse by signing up Generation Xers, baby boomers and their parents, now is fighting for millennial eyeballs.

The TV giant is investing in online media outlets like BuzzFeed and Vox that attract young viewers. It's setting up a streaming TV service for millennials who don't watch a boob tube. And it's developing a YouTube-like video app and website.

66. ‘Bigger Than Ballet’ -

As a child growing up in Frayser with an unstable home life, Briana Brown latched on to dance classes at the New Ballet Ensemble & School as a source of stability.

Sitting at her University of Memphis dorm surrounded by psychology textbooks, she is ready to leap into the path built on 11 years of educational and professional development provided by her support system at New Ballet Ensemble.

67. First Tennessee Reopens Orange Mound Branch -

At the end of this week, First Tennessee Bank is hosting a grand reopening of its updated Orange Mound branch, at 2284 Lamar Ave.

68. First Tennessee Reopens Orange Mound Branch -

At the end of this week, First Tennessee Bank is hosting a grand reopening of its updated Orange Mound branch, at 2284 Lamar Ave.

69. Real Deal -

They were tossing around numbers, trying to guess the win total for the 2015 University of Memphis football season.

In the not-too-distant past, the two Highland Hundred members and longtime season-ticket holders might have been able to add their guesses together and still come up short of the six victories needed for their favorite team to be bowl-eligible.

70. Handful Of Music Festivals Set For August -

In March, one of James Sposto’s friends posted to his Facebook page a thought about being a musician in Memphis.

Daniel McKee, a bassist who’s done turns in a few different bands, lamented that he’s never had a chance to play at the Levitt Shell. Sposto, a digital media entrepreneur in Memphis, used that as a catalyst to start preparing for something he’d already had been thinking about making happen – putting on a show that celebrates and supports the local Memphis music he’s a fan of.

71. Baby Budget -

About $245,000. That’s the estimated cost for raising one child from birth through age 18.

And that figure surprised young women who attended a recent workshop funded by a grant from GiVE 365, the Community Foundation of Greater Memphis’ dollar-a-day philanthropy program.

72. Congress Passes 3-Month Highway, Transit Aid Patch -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Congress sent President Barack Obama a three-month bill to keep highway and transit money flowing to states on Thursday, one day before the deadline for a cutoff of funds.

73. Family Room -

Family homelessness may be an extraordinarily difficult problem to solve, but in Sister Maureen Griner’s experience many homeless families are just regular folks.

“Ordinary families with ordinary problems,” she said.

74. Make a Mess -

If you eat a plate of ribs at Charlie Vergos’ Rendezvous, you’re likely to walk away with messy fingers. You’re also likely to get messy at a new business in Overton Square, where sisters Anna Vergos Blair and Katherine Vergos Riederer have opened their kid-friendly creativity zone The Art Project.

75. Ikea Seeks $16 Million Permit For First Memphis Store -

Future Ikea Store
On 42 Acres In Cordova
Permit Cost: $16 million

Application Date: July 2015
Owner/Tenant: Ikea
Details: Ikea is moving forward with its massive retail store in Cordova.

76. All-Male Nanny Service Eyeing Middle Tennessee -

Mary Poppins he’s not. No flying umbrellas, no Oscar-winning musical numbers.

But as a caregiver, Jon Ericksen would rank himself right up there with any nanny in the business.

“Two nieces grew up in the house with me, I have worked with kids a lot in all my jobs, so I knew this was something that I would be very interested in,” says Ericksen, one of the men working for MyManny, a Tennessee-based, all-male nanny agency.

77. Martin, Wilson Travel Parallel Paths to Success -

Pitmaster Pat Martin of Martin’s Bar-B-Que Joint and Chef Tandy Wilson of City House didn’t know one another in early 2007. Yet they’d soon have more than a few things in common.

78. Seeds of Nutrition in South Memphis -

Second in a series of profiles on the Community Foundation of Greater Memphis’ GiVE 365 grantees.

The community garden/urban farming concept literally took root years ago. Knowledge Quest founder and director Marlon Foster remembers well the 25-by-25-foot plot at the Fowler Homes housing project back in 1999. It was a humble beginning planted with a few seeds and a lot of faith and hope.

79. Keeping the Beat -

Jody Stephens may best be known as a rock 'n' roll timekeeper, the guy whose drum kit kept the beat and provided the rhythmic foundation for the pioneering power pop group Big Star.

80. Different Strokes -

Five years ago, Jim Napolitano left Hillwood Country Club in Nashville to become general manager at Chickasaw Country Club. The economy was still wheezing and Chickasaw, which received its charter in 1922 – or two years after the 19th Amendment gave women the right to vote – was trapped in a time warp.

81. Overbey Has No Regrets for Sponsoring Insure Tennessee -

Republican Sen. Doug Overbey took the road less traveled this year when he sponsored Insure Tennessee at the request of Gov. Bill Haslam.

Despite the legislation’s failure in special and regular sessions, he has no regrets and looks forward to continuing the fight in 2016 for a market-based plan to obtain roughly $1 billion annually through the Affordable Care Act to provide coverage to some 280,000 Tennesseans who are caught in a gap between TennCare and the federal plan.

82. A Door of Their Own -

Maybe during the four-plus years that Jackie Hinton was living on the streets of Memphis, you drove past her as she was walking to a shelter for a meal or a bed and a shower.

83. The Soul of Memphis -

What if there was one place that could give a meaningful identity to a new generation of Memphians, preserve the sacred story of Memphis’ social and musical history and communicate the city’s soul to the rest of the world?

84. Opry Has Become Big Part of CMA Fest -

The relationship between the Grand Ole Opry – the 90-year-old radio program and down home variety show – and CMA Music Fest is a pretty simple formula.

“A win for CMA Music Fest is a win for the Opry,” says Pete Fisher, vice president and general manager of the nation’s longest continuously running radio program.

85. Making the Connection -

Archie Willis III had just earned his master’s degree in business at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill when he returned to Memphis in 1981 to help his father, A.W. Willis Jr., redevelop the Adler Hotel Annex.

86. State Employment Policies Not Great for Recruiting -

If job security is your goal, working for the state might not be such a good idea.

Gov. Bill Haslam’s administration offered a voluntary buyout recently to more than 2,000 state employees, a proposal workers had known about since February.

87. Ramsey: No Medicaid Expansion Until 2017 -

The Tennessee legislative session ended in late April, giving itself a little more than two and a-half months to handle the state’s business. That’s plenty of time, according to Lt. Gov. Ron Ramsey.

88. Harold Ford Sr. Returns to Memphis Funeral Business With New Concept -

In his years as a political force in Memphis, Harold Ford Sr. was known for his attention to detail.

The former Congressman would brush past campaign workers and climb a ladder to level a campaign banner or change the layout of “the Ford ballot,” sought by everyone from presidential candidates to court clerks.

89. Study Finds 3-1 Shortfall of Women in STEM Careers -

Women in the United States have made great strides in education and entry in the workplace over the past 50 years, yet they continue to be underrepresented in science, technology, engineering and math, referred to collectively as STEM disciplines.

90. Convincing Girls, Women to Pursue Science and Math Careers -

Claudia Rawn is used to talking about science, so when asked to speak about women in the STEM disciplines, she was a bit out of her comfort zone.

The speaking invitation came from organizers with the University of Tennessee’s inaugural Women in STEM Research Symposium, held in April.

91. Cannabis Oil Bill Could Lead to More ‘Evil Weed’ Wins -

Logan and Stacie Mathes were on "pins and needles" as they waited for Gov. Bill Haslam to sign legislation into law allowing cannabis oil to be used to treat seizures and similar medical problems in Tennessee.

92. 1 in 4 US Renters Must Use Half Their Pay for Housing Costs -

WASHINGTON (AP) – More than one in four U.S. renters have to use at least half their family income to pay for housing and utilities.

That's the finding of an analysis of Census data by Enterprise Community Partners, a nonprofit that helps finance affordable housing. The number of such households has jumped 26 percent to 11.25 million since 2007.

93. Will Tennessee Republicans Ever Be Truly Happy? -

Why aren’t Tennessee Republicans happier?

With the GOP so dominate in the Tennessee General Assembly and losses so rare – on the Hill or in elections – the party’s lawmakers should be jubilant with this year’s session. But it’s never enough.

94. New State Chair Wants All-GOP Legislature -

With more than six years of experience in the House of Representatives, Knoxville Republican Ryan Haynes is leaving the post to take on a new job: Tennessee Republican Party chairman.

95. Nashville Sounds Owner, Players Marvel at New Park -

Ten days before the Nashville Sounds’ scheduled home opener at their palatial new digs, First Tennessee Park in Germantown was still very much a work in progress.

Frank Ward, owner of the Class AAA Pacific League team, was strutting around like a proud father, all but ready to pass out cigars to an expectant media as workmen painted, pounded and pushed to make everything ready in preparation for opening of the 10,000-seat facility.

96. Sounds Like a Hit for Neighbors -

For months, sounds of construction surrounded the Nashville Sounds’ sparkling new First Tennessee Park in Germantown.

The constant thump-thump-thump of pounding jackhammers competed with the irritating, high-pitched beeps of vehicles backing up. Ka-ching! Cranes lifted steel beams into place, keeping time with a syncopated thrumming of never-ending drilling. Ka-ching!

97. Tennessee School Voucher Bill Approaching Key Committee -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A state school voucher proposal that failed in the last two Tennessee General Assembly sessions is gaining support as it approaches a key committee in the final days of this year's legislative session.

98. Major Changes -

Aside from Christmas bells for its annual red kettle campaign, The Salvation Army historically has had a “quiet presence” in Memphis, according to Ellen Westbook, director of community relations and development.

99. Dogwoods & Elvis -

Dogwood Arts Festival President Janet Testerman’s family lore with Knoxville’s spring celebration goes back to the days of Elvis when he was a showstopper at the event. Her mother, also named Janet, had the once-in-a-lifetime chance to meet the King.

100. Tennessee House Bogs Down Over Making Bible Official Book -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A small-town Republican's proposal to make the Bible the official book of Tennessee ran into opposition from top members of his own party as the House delayed a scheduled vote on the measure Tuesday.