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Editorial Results (free)

1. Fairgrounds Plan Will Consider Familiar Items -

The Fairgrounds redevelopment plan forming on a fast track will probably look familiar as far as the elements proposed for it.

“We are starting with the premise that we are using the previous planning efforts as insight for how we move forward,” Paul Young, city of Memphis Housing and Community Development director said on the WKNO/Channel 10 program “Behind The Headlines.”

2. Cohen Defines Gap Between Trump and Republicans -

There is a distinction to be made between the Republican majorities in the U.S. House and Senate and President Donald Trump, says U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen, one of Trump’s most vocal and virulent critics.

3. Tax Breaks Broaden For Residential, Retail Deals -

Some changes are coming in the rules surrounding incentives that the Economic Development Growth Engine for Memphis and Shelby County – or EDGE – can use for different kinds of development and for broader use of tax increment financing – or TIF – zones to sustain redevelopment.

4. Last Word: St. Jude School, More Gannett Moves and Maida Pearson Smith -

For most, the school year starts next week. But classes are already underway at St. Jude’s new Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, an idea 15 years in the making, according to the physician who had that idea. The school is a big step in higher education in Memphis and its road to research center status.

5. Barnes Tapped As New Tennessee Press Association President -

Eric Barnes, publisher and CEO of The Daily News Publishing Co. Inc., has become the next president of the Tennessee Press Association, the trade association for the state’s newspapers.

6. City Master Plan Development Aims To Reverse Random Development -

Not too far past a new generation of civic plans is the filter of reality – what is possible by a business bottom line.

At the outset of the still-forming Memphis 3.0 master development plan, the reality without a plan is striking.

7. Blight More Than Out-of-State LLCs -

The prominent role investors play in buying single-family homes in Memphis to rent them out is part of the city’s significant problem with blight.

But there are some property owners who live here who don’t even know that their loved one who died recently made them a property owner.

8. Foote Homes Last Vestige Of Public Housing -

As the last of the city’s large public housing developments is demolished, the oldest of the mixed-income communities that replaced them is about to turn 20.

College Park opened in 1998 on the site of what had been Lemoyne Gardens in the area of South Memphis now known as Soulsville.

9. Lawmakers: Talk, Action On Crime Don’t Match -

State Senate Minority Leader Lee Harris of Memphis says some of the rhetoric about criminal justice reform – not locking up as many nonviolent offenders for longer sentences – doesn’t match the push for legislation in Nashville.

10. Overton Park Conservancy Meets $1M Goal in Parking Compromise -

The Overton Park Conservancy raised $1 million by the June 11 deadline to move ahead with the Overton Park-Memphis Zoo parking compromise. The conservancy announced Sunday afternoon that it met the goal with hours to spare.

11. Luttrell, Commission Working Out Details of 3-Cent Property Tax Cut -

Shelby County Commissioners have talked for several years about cutting the county’s property tax rate. But it’s never been more than talk and never had close to the seven votes necessary to drop the tax rate.

12. City Council Members: Beale Bucks Evolving -

Beale Street’s new $5 weekend night cover charge still has a few details to work out, says Memphis City Council chairman Berlin Boyd.

“We’re not putting a period there, we’re putting a comma because we are taking a pause,” Boyd said on the WKNO/Channel 10 program “Behind The Headlines.”

13. Hardy: EDGE’s MWBE Program Not Working -

The chairwoman of the Greater Memphis Chamber board said first indications are that minority business requirements in tax breaks awarded by the Economic Development Growth Engine – or EDGE – aren’t working.

14. Kustoff Talks Comey Missteps, Health Care -

The FBI investigation into possible Russian interference in the 2016 presidential campaign will continue without fired FBI director James Comey, says U.S. Rep. David Kustoff.

15. Economy In Flux -

With apologies to Dickens’ “A Tale of Two Cities,” for the professionals who follow economics for a living this is very much the best of times and the worst of times.

The moment is one of abundant optimism and rampant uncertainty. “Directionally,” they like to say, things look positive. And yet so much could still go very, very wrong.

16. Corker Sees Trump Foreign Policy Evolving, Not Moderating -

U.S. foreign policy should be to “keep the volume up” on North Korea’s progress in developing a nuclear capability and intercontinental ballistic missiles, says U.S. Sen. Bob Corker, “with the acknowledgement that what you could bring in is Russia, China, South Korea and Japan into a conflict.”

17. Mayors Say Region Needs New Mindset, More Density -

When Hernando West first surfaced in 2007, it was going to be a different kind of development south of the state line. But the recession that followed put the plans for the city’s first mixed-use development on hold – until recently.

18. Money Behind New Zoo Parking Terms -

In the third attempt to bring an end to the Overton Park Greensward controversy last summer, Memphis City Council member Bill Morrison decided it was best not to try to reach agreement on all points, but on most points.

19. Council Brokers New Zoo Parking Compromise, Abolishes Beale Authority -

The Memphis City Council went back into the terms for an expanded Memphis Zoo parking lot Tuesday, April 11, just nine months after brokering and approving a compromise on the project between the zoo and the Overton Park Conservancy.

20. Lenoir Calls for Property Tax Cut Beyond New Certified Tax Rate From Reappraisal -

Shelby County Trustee David Lenoir says there should be a cut in the county property tax rate beyond the new certified property tax rate to be set as a result of the 2017 countywide property reappraisal.

21. Council Faces Beale Street, Parking Decisions -

Memphis City Council members have an agenda full of hot spots Tuesday, April 11. They vote on a move to abolish the Beale Street Tourism Development Authority, check to see if both sides paying for a Memphis Zoo parking solution in Overton Park are on the same page and take a final vote to change on-street parking around FedExForum and The Orpheum Theatre to a flat fee of $10 for “special events.”

22. Investor Dominance in Residential Real Estate Shows Signs of Change -

Investors buying single-family homes to rent them out or have a management firm rent them out may be giving way to banks more willing to make loans on lower-priced homes to owner-occupants.

“I would say the most interesting and big dynamic is folks who come in and buy a house for $20,000 these days, fix it up – sometimes well, sometimes poorly – sell it to a person in California for $64,000 – keep the rental management. And sometimes that helps a street and a neighborhood and sometimes it’s destructive,” said Steve Lockwood, executive director of the Frayser Community Development Corp. on the WKNO/Channel 10 program “Behind The Headlines.”

23. Rudd Says University Redirecting Neighborhood -

The railroad tracks between Highland Avenue and Zach Curlin Drive have been a fact of life and a border of sorts for as long as there has been a University of Memphis – even before it was called the University of Memphis.

24. Greensward Compromise Text, Discussion Differ on Cost Split -

At the end of a surprising day at City Hall, Memphis City Council member Worth Morgan was anticipating what might happen in the three weeks until the next council session to the compromise for zoo parking in Overton Park.

25. Greensward Compromise Unravels Over Who Pays What and When -

A Memphis Zoo parking plan appears to be in question after a Tuesday, March 21, city council committee session in which Memphis Zoo leaders said they will not put up half of the $500,000 to pay for planning and design work on the reconfigured and expanded zoo parking lot.

26. Zoo Parking Compromise In Doubt -

A Memphis Zoo parking plan appears to be off after a Tuesday city council committee session in which Memphis Zoo leaders said they will not put up half of the $500,000 to pay for planning and design work on the reconfigured and expanded zoo parking lot.

27. Hopson, Caldwell Plan for SCS Long-Term -

Five years into historic changes in public education locally, the rapid pace of change is starting to give way to longer-term views and plans.

“This has been the first year since the merger that we actually are in a position to do some strategic investments in our schools,” Shelby County Schools superintendent Dorsey Hopson said on the WKNO/Channel 10 program “Behind The Headlines.”

28. Conservancy Puts Up $250K For Zoo Parking Redesign -

The Overton Park Conservancy is turning over $250,000 to pay half of the cost for design and engineering work on the Memphis Zoo's reconfigured and expanded parking lot.

The conservancy board approved the release of the funding to the city this week and the funding goes to the Memphis City Council Tuesday, March 21, for approval.

29. Conservancy Puts Up Half of Money for Zoo Parking Redesign -

The Overton Park Conservancy is turning over $250,000 to pay half of the cost for design and engineering work on the Memphis Zoo's reconfigured and expanded parking lot.

The conservancy board approved the release of the funding to the city this week and the funding goes to the Memphis City Council Tuesday, March 21, for approval.

30. Councilmen Draw Lines On Safety, Deannexation -

Attorneys for the city of Memphis have filed a motion to combine two federal court lawsuits over a City Hall surveillance list and have them brought before the same federal judge.

And U.S. District Judge Jon P. McCalla has granted the motion of the American Civil Liberties Union of Tennessee to intervene in the lawsuit on the plaintiff’s side.

31. Real Estate Experts to Talk Market Trends, Projections -

With more than 30 years of expertise, second-generation homebuilder James Reid has seen a lot of ups and downs in West Tennessee’s real estate market.  

“While the market has obviously improved tremendously, last year in Shelby County we only pulled about 925 permits, which traditionally we’ve done in the neighborhood of 3,000 to 4,000,” Reid said. “So while we’ve recovered some, we’re still down from a typical year.”

32. Women Executives Share Business, Life Lessons -

Through several career stops, Susan Hunsberger learned that she didn’t like being a financial analyst, she did like engaging with people through recruiting and human resources, and that it was more than fine to let colleagues see that you don’t know it all.

33. TVA Drilling Controversy May Change Well Actions -

The controversy over Tennessee Valley Authority drilling water wells into the Memphis aquifer for the new TVA power plant in southwest Memphis is becoming a push for more public notice of such plans and better mapping of the water supply under the city.

34. Strickland Studies Options in Face of Immigration Travel Ban Order -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland has been getting a crash course in immigration policies – federal and local – in the last week.

35. Change Only Sure Thing In Sports, Panelists Say -

Almost five years ago, in his earliest days as athletics director at the University of Memphis, Tom Bowen had visions of a long and happy life in the Big East and as part of the BCS (Bowl Championship Series). But in short order, the league collapsed amid conference realignment and Bowen found himself guiding a university in a conference with no name.

36. State Leaders Invite Block Grant Funding -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam says a federal block grant to state government for health care under the right terms could allow the state to expand TennCare coverage.

“I think if they would give us that flexibility, we could take care of more people at lower cost. I just fervently believe that we could do that with the state,” Haslam said last week during a visit to Memphis. “But they have to give us the tools to do that with and give us the flexibility. Right now the federal government holds all the keys. … They don’t give us a lot of flexibility on how that works.”

37. Last Word: The Business of Local Sports, Garrison Leaves MATA and Broadband -

Marc Gasol makes the NBA’s Western Conference All Star team as a reserve, the first player in the history of the Grizz to make the All-Star Game three times.

Grizz business operations president Jason Wexler asked about Memphis hosting an NBA All-Star Game one of these days at The Daily News Sports Seminar Thursday at the Brooks. Wexler saying the city doesn’t have enough hotel rooms – the same barrier to drawing bigger conventions and meetings to the city.

38. Deannexation Group Gets Dollar Figures on Leaving Memphis -

If South Cordova, Windyke and Southwind leave Memphis, the city should get to keep sales tax and property tax revenue generated by commercial properties in those three recently annexed areas.

That, says Shelby County Commissioner Terry Roland, is the deal to be had in ongoing deannexation discussions.

39. Burgess Suggests Fewer Deputies In Courtroom -

Shelby County Commission chairman Melvin Burgess wants to see a broader use of Shelby County Sheriff’s deputies within the city working with Memphis Police.

40. Zoo Parking Space Dimensions Emerge as Issue in Greensward Compromise -

Some members of the city’s Overton Park Parking Committee want to talk about changing one of the key ground rules for reconfiguring and expanding the Memphis Zoo’s parking area.

And the zoo’s representative on the committee that met Thursday, Jan. 5, is adamant that the requirement for parking spaces to be 10 feet by 20 feet should remain as it is.

41. Zoo Parking Space Dimensions Emerge as Issue In Greensward Compromise -

Some members of the city’s Overton Park Parking Committee want to at least talk about changing one of the key ground rules for the rearrangement and expansion of the Memphis Zoo’s parking area.

And the zoo’s representative on the committee that met Thursday, Jan. 5, is just as adamant that the requirement for parking spaces to be 10 feet by 20 feet should remain as it is.

42. Lawmakers Address Prosecutors, ASD -

The majority and minority leaders of the Tennessee Senate say there is political pressure to break the link in funding for prosecutors and public defenders.

“I think it takes both efforts,” state Senate Republican Leader Mark Norris of Collierville said on ‘Behind The Headlines,’ the WKNO/Channel 10 program. “I think we need more prosecutors. I think we also need more public defenders.”

43. What Lies Ahead for UT Athletics in 2017 -

Hey Vols fans, Happy New Year. May your 2017 year in Tennessee sports be better than your 2016 year in Tennessee sports. Perhaps, a fresh start is what we all need. Let’s face it. The Music City Bowl wasn’t where Tennessee wanted the 2016 football season to end. The Vols were picked to win the SEC East Division in preseason and floundered to an 8-4 record in the regular season, 4-4 in the SEC. Their football season was about the norm for most UT sports in 2016: average. Here are some dates to mark in hope of better things ahead in 2017...

44. Arrests, Metal Barriers, Lawsuits All Played Role in Greensward Parking Compromise -

Spring at City Hall is budget season and it can be stormy for a new mayor, not to mention a city council with six new members. But that wasn’t the case in 2016.

The real spring political storm was the Overton Park Greensward – specifically overflow parking from the Memphis Zoo on the greenspace south of the zoo.

45. Memphis Adopts Version of Ceasefire -

A gun and gang violence program pioneered in Boston 20 years ago is coming to Memphis in the wake of a record year for homicides.

What is known nationally as Operation Ceasefire will be called the “Group Violence Initiative” in Memphis, said Memphis-Shelby Crime Commission president Bill Gibbons on the WKNO/Channel 10 program “Behind The Headlines.”

46. City Budget Season on the Way With Concerns -

One of the highlights of 2016 for the Memphis City Council that took office in January with six new members was a budget season in which there were no significant changes in the proposal by Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland, who also took office in January.

47. Palazzolo Says Germantown Maximizing Commercial Development Where it Can -

Just a few years ago, Germantown leaders were worried. Sales tax revenues were down in the recession and the city had annexed the last of its reserve area.

Looking back on it, Germantown Mayor Mike Palazzolo admits it was a challenge. The perspective has changed as the recession has lifted.

48. United Way, MIFA Leaders Work Toward Ending Poverty -

Nearly two years into his tenure as the president and CEO of United Way of the Mid-South, Dr. Kenneth Robinson says the funder of 79 nonprofit organizations in the region continues to work toward a new basic goal – ending poverty.

49. Memphis 3.0 Plan Weighs Scale Of Development -

Office towers close to smaller-scale retail or residential development is one of the themes in the still emerging plan for the expansion of St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital in the Pinch district.

50. Change Is Mantra At Brooks, Ballet Memphis -

The rotunda at the Brooks Museum of Art is in transition this week as the surreal figures of Yinka Shonibare’s “Rage of the Ballet Gods” give way to the burlap sculptures of Nnenna Okore that will be suspended from the rotunda dome for the next six months.

51. Increasing Firms Eligible for Contracts Could Propel More Minority Businesses -

City Hall’s effort to improve the level of business Memphis does with minority-owned firms has to meet up with the broader local effort to improve the growth of minority businesses in private, business-to-business contracts, says one of the leaders of the 2-year-old renewed push on both fronts.

52. Five-Year Crime Plan Avoids 'Stop & Frisk' Reference -

Memphis-Shelby Crime Commission president and CEO Bill Gibbons won’t even say “stop and frisk.”

53. Green Spaces Valuable Assets for Memphis, Citizens -

Shelby Farms Park’s biggest project – Heart of the Park – is open. The Wolf River Greenway is on track for completion no later than 2020. Overton Park has come through the greensward controversy and is moving ahead with park enhancements.

54. Last Word: In Defense of The Cossitt, Joe Royer and 3 Months Since The Bridge -

Citizens of Memphis, I rise in defense of the city’s first public library. Not in its original much-loved state but in defense of its much-ridiculed modernization.

No, I will not follow that with a defense of John Calipari or the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame’s location in Cleveland instead of Memphis or the late Mo’ Money Taxes and the company’s commercials. But I reserve the right to, at some future date, defend the big silver sculpture thing on the northeast corner of Front and Poplar at the Cannon Center.

55. Surface Parking Lots Inhibit Medical Center’s Growth -

Surface parking lots are a “default land banking” strategy, according to Tommy Pacello, president of the Memphis Medical District Collaborative. Often, developers will pave over land with the intention of building something at a later date.

56. Green Renaissance -

As director of Shelby Farms Park Conservancy, Jen Andrews has been on the front lines of what can fairly be called a green revival in Memphis. And she is amazed at how much change has occurred over the last decade, a rebirth that spans not just across the miles but now seems embedded in the city’s psyche.

57. A Greener Memphis Requires More Connectivity -

It sounds simple enough, the idea that, as Wolf River Conservancy executive director Keith Cole puts it, “One of the basic premises of connectivity is you never want to build a bridge to nowhere.”

58. Kane Discusses Bass Pro Changes, Mud Island, Convention Center -

Bass Pro Shops may be rethinking its mix of retail and attractions at the Pyramid, says the head of the Memphis Convention & Visitors Bureau.

In its first year of operation, Bass Pro Shops at the Pyramid drew 3 million visitors.

59. Legal Views Differ On Stewart Case Publicity -

When the Shelby County grand jury decided last November not to indict Memphis Police officer Connor Schilling in the fatal shooting of Darrius Stewart, it set in motion a set of decisions by authorities to talk publicly about the case.

60. Last Word: The Law & Darrius Stewart, MEMShop's Return and The Pot Debate -

The Memphis Bar Association’s Law School for Journalists is where reporters and attorneys and a few judges meet annually to talk over the issues they have with each other. And it is usually about a specific topic. This year that topic was the July 2015 police shooting of Darrius Stewart.

61. Memphis Bar’s Law School for Journalists Reviews Stewart Case -

The Memphis Bar Association’s Law School for Journalists is back Wednesday, Sept. 28, at the University of Memphis Cecil C. Humphreys School of Law with a focus this year on how the media covers police shootings.

62. Eclectic Eye Co-Founder: A Small Business Has to Start Somewhere -

Robbie Johnson Weinberg has a great appreciation for FedEx, AutoZone, International Paper and other large corporations based in Memphis. But when she’s traveling, the co-founder of Eclectic Eye always likes to check out the small businesses in other cities – everything from a neighborhood pub to the “funky comic book store.”

63. Rallings: Police Response to Protests Requires ‘Balance’ -

Memphis Police Director Michael Rallings says his department’s response to protests has to keep a national perspective on terrorism as well as the potential for violence.

“You may decide that you are going to protest not parking on the grass,” Rallings said during a Wednesday, Sept. 14, taping of the WKNO television program “Behind The Headlines.” “Someone else may come up and have a weapon and have a more nefarious plan that you’re not party to. When you get people gathered and there’s a threat, it’s our job to stand there and protect people – protect their right to protest, protest their right to assemble.”

64. New Voting Machines on Shelby County's Political Horizon -

The end is near for the touch-screen voting machines Shelby County voters have been using for 18 years.

This November could be the last presidential general election for the Diebold machines.

65. Animal Shelter Moves Toward Three-Year Action Plan -

The Memphis Animal Shelter should have a three-year action plan by the end of October to end the killing of pets at the shelter for time and space considerations.

“We’re a public safety agency so euthanizing animals that pose a danger to our community is something that is part of our core mission and humanely euthanizing animals that are sick, that are suffering,” said Alexis Pugh, director of Memphis Animal Services on the WKNO/Channel 10 program Behind The Headlines. “What we want to avoid is having to euthanize an animal that is adoptable, that is healthy, that is able to be placed, simply because we don’t have the space in our facility and this animal has been there too long.”

66. Barnes Re-Elected As Vice President of TPA -

Memphis Daily News publisher Eric Barnes is beginning his second term as vice president for daily newspapers for the Tennessee Press Association.

67. Daily News Acquires Chattanooga Newspaper -

The Daily News Publishing Co. announced it has acquired the Hamilton County Herald, a 100-year-old Chattanooga-based paper of record that adds another holding to the newspaper properties the Memphis-based company now owns across the largest markets in Tennessee.

68. Municipal Districts Tout ACT for Testing -

The superintendents of at least two of Shelby County’s suburban school systems say the state should use the ACT college entrance exam to gauge the achievement levels of high school students.

“We have universities who are giving full-ride scholarships based on their ACT scores,” said Germantown Municipal School District superintendent Jason Manuel on the WKNO/Channel 10 program Behind The Headlines. “Let’s use that test. It has a math component. It has a science, a reading and social studies component. Let’s use that as a measure.”

69. Barnes Re-Elected as TPA Vice President -

Memphis Daily News publisher Eric Barnes is beginning his second term as vice president for daily newspapers for the Tennessee Press Association.

70. The Daily News Publishing Co. Acquires Paper In Chattanooga -

The Daily News Publishing Co. announced it has acquired The Hamilton County Herald, a 100-year-old Chattanooga-based paper of record that adds another holding to the newspaper properties the Memphis-based company now owns across the largest markets in Tennessee.

71. County Leaders Face New Budget Anxiety -

Shelby County commissioners meet in special session Wednesday, July 23, to cross the last “t” of the spring budget season some 27 days after the start of the new fiscal year.

That’s “t” for taxes.

72. Editorial: Compromise, Potential And Parkland Changes -

Maybe a certain amount of distrust will always be present in the affairs of the park that stopped an interstate.

There certainly is a good amount of “trust but verify” sentiment now that the Memphis City Council has approved the Overton Park compromise that evaded one mediation deadline and stretched right up to a second deadline before its details were set in stone.

73. Zoo and OPC Reach Compromise in Greensward Controversy -

The Memphis Zoo and the Overton Park Conservancy reached agreement Monday, July 18, on a compromise to end the zoo’s overflow parking on the Greensward that fills in some of the blanks left in Mayor Jim Strickland’s proposal and changes some of the terms.

74. Overton Park Shuttle Terms Continue To Be Negotiated -

The mediation effort to resolve the Overton Park Greensward controversy is over.

But all of those involved are still talking privately.

Those talks are centered around a park plan proposed July 1 by Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland, who acted when the mediation failed to produce a comprehensive settlement by the end of June – Strickland’s deadline for mediation.

75. Greensward Plan Awaits Shuttle Details -

The Overton Park Greensward controversy is still moving although it is much closer to a resolution with last week’s proposal by Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland, said City Council chairman Kemp Conrad and councilman Worth Morgan, whose district includes the park.

76. Mayor, DA Discuss Approach To Curb Crime -

Much of the attention in local crime statistics this year goes to the jump in the city’s homicide rate.

But that rate pales in comparison to aggravated assaults.

From January through May, there were 492 aggravated assaults per 100,000 people in Memphis, according to statistics from the Memphis-Shelby County Crime Commission.

77. Dean: Cities Need Transit Solutions for Growth -

During a busy day in Memphis last week, former Nashville Mayor Karl Dean stopped at City Hall to talk with Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland about a long-range city plan Strickland announced the following day.

78. Greenprint ‘Movement’ Taking Hold Regionally -

It wasn’t that long ago that the land which is now Shelby Farms Park was up for grabs.

There was some sentiment to make it a park. There was probably more sentiment to develop it as residential, office or retail space, or all three.

79. Last Word: Farewell Northside, Roland's Stand and Wayne Jackson -

Northside High School is no more. The Klondike-Smoky City institution graduated its last class last month.

The Shelby County Schools board had voted that same month to give the high school one more school year.

80. Greenprint Summit Gauges Community Support -

It’s not easy being green. That is, until people begin to see projects like the Shelby Farms Greenline and Wolf River Greenway taking shape.

81. Fairgrounds Revitalization Efforts Start Slow and Anew -

The Fairgrounds and the Mid-South Coliseum aren’t a priority of the new administration at City Hall.

And that’s fine with groups trying to chart a future for both.

“The building is in good shape. It’s not in a condition that can’t be mothballed for awhile,” said Chooch Pickard of the Coliseum Coalition. “We can take our time in planning for the Coliseum and the Fairgrounds and do it right. There’s no need to rush. We can take our time, find out what everyone really wants to do with it and raise the money.”

82. DMC Wants to Connect Successful South End to South City -

For the past 15 years, the Downtown Memphis Commission has concentrated its development efforts in the South Main area. The fruits of that labor, which turned an abandoned stretch of Main Street into a blossoming haven for retail and restaurants, is spilling over onto South Front Street.

83. Council Auctions Old Police Building -

The city holds a rare auction at the Tuesday, May 17, session of the Memphis City Council, selling the old Central Police building at 128 Adams Ave. to the highest bidder.

84. Shelby County Schools Board Eyes Wheel Tax to Bridge Budget Gap -

Shelby County Schools board members are looking at the county wheel tax to bridge some, but not all of the $27 million gap in their still tentative budget for the new fiscal year.

The specific solution they are looking at is the half of the $32 million in annual revenue from the wheel tax that Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell has proposed go instead to capital projects across all seven public school systems in Shelby County. The new fiscal year begins July 1.

85. Mayor Opposes City Funds for Mud Island -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland says the city may be willing to help fund a $9 billion expansion of St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital that is mostly private capital.

86. Overton Traffic Plans On Display Saturday -

All roads in Overton Park except the one in front of the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art will be one-way streets Saturday, May 7, as the Overton Park Conservancy tries out some traffic and parking remedies on a busy day in the park.

87. Council Members Express Doubts About Solidifying Overton Park Boundaries -

Two months after the Memphis City Council approved a resolution giving the Memphis Zoo control of two-thirds of the Overton Park Greensward, the votes are still there to set park boundaries in stone.

88. Shelby Farms Park Transformation Started With Plan -

Two years ago this summer, the Shelby Farms Park Conservancy had raised $52 million to start its “Heart of the Park” work that is scheduled to open in the late summer and early fall.

89. Greensward Talks Getting Complex -

A week ago, the board of the Overton Park Conservancy had a visitor at its meeting – Richard Smith, the Memphis Zoo’s representative in the ongoing private mediation talks between the conservancy and the zoo.

90. Rapid Transit Option, Route Changes Designed To Make MATA More Relevant -

Budget season is looming, and the Memphis Area Transit Authority is angling for an additional $8 million in operating funds and $5 million in capital improvement dollars to prevent significant cuts to service.

91. Greensward Controversy Shows Complex Mix of Groups -

No one from the Memphis Zoo or City Hall showed up for the Greensward box luncheon Saturday, April 9, despite the invitations sent out by Citizens to Preserve Overton Park.

CPOP leaders nevertheless gathered on the other side of the metal parking barrier in place on the Greensward for the second weekend. They dutifully stacked the box lunches and set a vase of flowers on another table near plastic cups and a glass pitcher of water.

92. Zoo Offers Parking Plan, Devotes Parking Fees to Long-Range Parking Solution -

The Memphis Zoo is suggesting the city general services maintenance yard on the east side of the park be used as a parking area and a second greensward with “eco-friendly options” that “are not disruptive to the park” to get zoo patrons from there to the zoo.

93. Last Word: A Day In The Park, Fashion Week and the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame -

The skid is over. The Grizzlies beat the Bulls at home and the post-season possibility drama continues in the land of Griss and the one year and done college home of Derrick Rose.

94. Overton Parking-Traffic Study Sees Future Garage -

An Overton Park traffic and parking study released Tuesday, April 5, recommends a phased-approach to creating more parking in and around the park, better coordination of traffic patterns and then a likely move to a 300-space, $7.8 million parking deck on Prentiss Place Drive off McLean Boulevard at the end of 2017.

95. Lawsuit Seeks to Void City Decision on Greensward -

A lawsuit filed in Shelby County Chancery Court Tuesday, April 5, seeks to void the March 1 Memphis City Council vote that gave the Memphis Zoo undisputed control of most of the Overton Park Greensward.

96. Lawsuit Seeks to Void City Decision on Greensward -

A lawsuit filed in Shelby County Chancery Court Tuesday, April 5, seeks to void the March 1 Memphis City Council vote that gave the Memphis Zoo undisputed control of most of the Overton Park Greensward.

97. Conrad Call for De-Annexation Talks Draws Favorable Reviews -

Memphis City Council Chairman Kemp Conrad wants to open talks with county commissioners on possible voluntary de-annexations.

And County Commission Chairman Terry Roland said he is open to the idea.

98. Blight Fight Touts New Pathway, Partnerships -

The local effort to fight blight has been in recent years a machete-like action to cut through bureaucratic red tape and get possession of the most blighted properties.

So there have been a lot of press conferences where bulldozers are featured prominently to demolish the targeted property.

99. Medical Center Planner To Talk District Remake -

It’s the place where about 16,000 employees go to work every day and where 8,000 students are taking courses at some of the city’s premier educational institutions.

Yet even though the Memphis Medical Center is home to major anchors like Regional One Health, the Memphis Bioworks Foundation and Southern College of Optometry, among others, and though it includes some a few hundred acres of property within its boundaries, its potential is only just now beginning to be tapped.

100. Memphis Lags on State Minority Contracts -

The state of Tennessee did $400 million in business with minority- and women-owned businesses in 2015. It’s a share local minority business and civic leaders judge as a good number, considering the state spends $2.5 billion in contracts a year.