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Editorial Results (free)

1. Dobbs’ Health is Priority No. 1 on Road to Being No. 1 -

Tennessee’s football team had nine players earn All-SEC preseason honors and got the nod as favorite to win the East Division as SEC Media Days concluded last week in Hoover, Alabama.

All signs point to the Vols making a return to the SEC Championship Game in Atlanta for the first time since 2007, with their two biggest games are at Neyland Stadium this year against Florida on Sept. 24 and Alabama on Oct. 15.

2. Chism Readying 2018 Bid for County Mayor -

Former Shelby County Commissioner Sidney Chism wants to be the Democratic nominee for Shelby County mayor in 2018, and he plans to begin his campaign after the November presidential election.

3. Memphis Police Officers, Youth Discuss Ways to Improve Relations -

As national headlines trumpet accounts of police-involved shootings, attacks on officers and related protests on an almost daily basis, a diverse group of Mid-South high school students met with Memphis Police Department (MPD) representatives Wednesday, July 20, to open the lines of communication and share their different perspectives.

4. Nonprofits Can Help Mid-South Heal -

We are no different from you, our readers. We have been grappling with emotions, engaged in conversations, and reflecting on our role – and the role of the nonprofit sector – during these times of protest and grief.

5. After Baton Rouge Shootings, Week Begins With Prayer -

A group of 16 ministers and religious leaders prayed for peace Monday, July 18, in the lobby of City Hall, the day after three Baton Rouge, La., police officers were killed and three others wounded in an ambush.

6. Too Big To Ignore: The SEC and Its Ever-Growing Football Media Days -

HOOVER, Ala. – The SEC football preseason always has been loud. More than 30 years ago, the noise came via the Skywriters Tour and the rattle and roar of a DC-3 propeller plane carrying rumpled, hardworking – and often hard-drinking – sports writers to the 10 Southeastern Conference campuses for essentially unfettered access to the league’s coaches and players.

7. Eventually, MSU’s Mullen May Take the Hit -

HOOVER, Ala. – After recent events, it’s good to remember that not everyone is a sell-out.

“I’ve always had a rule as a coach that, if you ever hit a girl, you’re finished,” Steve Spurrier said at SEC Media Days here last year when still a working head coach. “We’ve lost two at South Carolina.”

8. On the Line of Scrimmage, Color Doesn’t Matter -

HOOVER, Ala. – Politicians love to tell us that young people are our future. It’s mostly an empty cliché used to bridge one vague policy position to another, something to fill space instead of trying to offer a real solution to a real problem.

9. Gordon: ‘You’re Not Alone on Your Journey’ -

If you know anything about Kat Gordon at all, it’s likely the Technicolor version that’s clearest in press photos: There she is, gingham apron tied on, smile dazzling, holding a tempting plate of cupcakes or pie from her wildly popular bakery, Muddy’s Bake Shop, which now comprises two retail locations and a commercial kitchen and custom studio.

10. In a Competitive Market, Hemline Maintains Its Boutique Advantages -

As Hemline partner and co-founder Cynthia Saatkamp says, “The (agency’s) name will always be a differentiator.”

But you don’t survive – and thrive – over 12 years by only being a public relations and marketing firm run by women and for women. When Saatkamp and co-founder and partner Kelley Morice started the business, they went right into heavily male-dominated industries.

11. Foundation Supports New Services to Help Parents -

The ACE Awareness Foundation in Memphis is funding what’s become a growing suite of support services for parents in Memphis, everything from a newly launched telephone support line that puts parents in touch with licensed social workers and counselors to Universal Parenting Places.

12. Mayor, DA Discuss Approach To Curb Crime -

Much of the attention in local crime statistics this year goes to the jump in the city’s homicide rate.

But that rate pales in comparison to aggravated assaults.

From January through May, there were 492 aggravated assaults per 100,000 people in Memphis, according to statistics from the Memphis-Shelby County Crime Commission.

13. In a Competitive Market, Hemline Maintains Its Boutique Advantages -

As Hemline Creative Marketing partner and co-director Cynthia Saatkamp says, “The (agency’s) name will always be a differentiator.”

But you don’t survive – and thrive – over 12 years by only being a public relations and marketing firm run by women and for women. When Saatkamp and co-director and partner Kelley Morice started the business, they went right into heavily male-dominated industries.

14. Different But Not Less -

THIS IS MINISTRY, BABY. Sometimes we don’t see the difference we can make right where we are.

Brian McLaren – pastor and celebrated theologian, activist and prolific author – was here a couple of weeks ago, and he shared some thoughts about his visit in The Huffington Post:

15. Grizzlies Like Draft Results, But Still Need Conley to Run the Show -

Not a lot of films have their world premieres in Memphis. But if it is summer and the Grizzlies have a crucial player becoming a free agent, then it’s time for a Craig Brewer short film.

16. Hattiloo’s Bandele: ‘It’s a Supply and Demand Thing’ -

When you see Ekundayo Bandele in his sleek, contemporary Midtown office, dressed sharp in a tie and freshly shined shoes, phone dinging constantly, you might think he was born to be a theater impresario. 

17. Symbols of War Keep Dragging Us Down -

More than 150 years ago, we fought our nation’s most bloody war, a conflagration that claimed 620,000 lives, almost as many as were killed in all other American war efforts combined.

Despite the horror of it all, we just can’t seem to learn a lesson, possibly because of Southern hardheadedness, and a century and a half later, we seem doomed to an eternal task: pushing Sisyphus’ rock to the top of a hill only to have it chase us back to the bottom.

18. Dean: Cities Need Transit Solutions for Growth -

During a busy day in Memphis last week, former Nashville Mayor Karl Dean stopped at City Hall to talk with Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland about a long-range city plan Strickland announced the following day.

19. Born in the Projects, Norman Fights for Social Justice -

Keith Norman makes a habit of rising before the sun – and no wonder. As vice president of government affairs at Baptist Memorial Health Care and president of the Memphis branch of the NAACP, he’s got a lot on his plate. But if you want to see him in his element, stop by First Baptist Church on Broad, Sunday morning at 7:45 a.m.

20. Memphis’ ‘Rampage’ Jackson Fights On -

“I’m not a psychic, but I’m gonna predict I’m gonna whup his ass.” No, this was not LeBron James speaking of Draymond Green late in the NBA Finals – after feelings had been hurt with the B-word.

21. Cox to Lead Asset Management at Lehman-Roberts -

Matt Cox has been promoted to director of asset management at Lehman-Roberts Co. Cox most recently served as total process reliability coordinator for three years. In his new role, he is responsible for the full lifecycle of all construction equipment supplied to Lehman-Roberts’ operations divisions, including acquiring equipment, maintaining nearly 600 pieces of rolling stock and disposing of equipment as necessary.

22. Important Role of Corporate Support for Nonprofits -

Financial and in-kind support from businesses and corporations are so important to the life of nonprofits. Whether through event sponsorships or grants for programs and operations, businesses matter. They provide visibility, funding and talent.

23. Believe It or Not -

Long before Jim Strickland was mayor of Memphis, he was a thirtysomething lawyer and sports fan. Not always in that order. He loved the University of Memphis – his alma mater – and rooted like crazy for the basketball team. And on those less frequent occasions when there was a reason to believe, for the football team, too.

24. With Dad's Help, Ridge Smith Off to Chase His MLB Dream -

Over the years, there wasn’t much down time and not a lot of quiet moments. Over the years, there was a sustained echo – the ping, ping, ping of an aluminum bat, and later the whack, whack, whack of a wood bat, squaring up a baseball.

25. New Big Brothers Big Sisters Leader Has Big Goals for Little Memphians -

Early in her life, Rychetta Watkins learned there is more than one way to help people. Next week, she will start work as executive director of Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Mid-South Inc.

26. Oyler Brings German Efficiency to Memphis Transportation -

Urban planners are born, not made. At least, that’s how it was with Nicholas Oyler. From the time he was in middle school, he couldn’t stop thinking about how cities work.

“I was always doodling skyscrapers,” Oyler recalls. “I remember thinking, ‘Why doesn’t Memphis have more of them? And what can we do to get more?’”

27. Brush With Death Recalled, Part 1 -

I was 50 when I died. April 21, 2002. I can’t forget the date.

A few weeks earlier, I saw an old friend, Cotton, at a memorial service for a mutual friend. In the early 1980s, Cotton and I were in the same golf group. After the service, we reminisced about a golf outing that no one involved could forget.

28. Last Word: A Different Aftermath and Trolleys Aren't Just for Tourists -

A week that will likely end with the funeral of a Memphis Police officer began with a discussion about violent crime that is even at this early point proving to be different from the past discussions we’ve had at times like these.

29. Weekend Crime Rampage Frames Criminal Justice Debate -

Now what? The two-word question was one of many reactions as the week began to a Downtown crime spree Saturday night in which a Memphis Police officer died and three people were shot and wounded – two in critical condition Sunday at Regional One Health center.

30. ‘Prevent’ Defenses: Freeze, Briles Look to Protect Themselves -

It’s safe to say in pretty much every college football program in America that players are made to pay some penalty for the basic infraction of being late to a practice or a team meeting.

Sometimes they are suspended for a quarter. Other times for a half or an entire game against some non-competitive directional school. Sometimes, the players even have a semi-legitimate excuse for being late.

31. Memphis Dentist Pulls Teeth – And Trucks -

Tim Messer is a dentist by profession, a competitive “puller” by avocation. Confused? Don’t be. His first super modified, two-wheel drive truck was called “The Driller.” And he now has one called “Wide Open.”

32. PRSA Memphis Accepting VOX Awards Entries -

The Memphis Chapter of the Public Relations Society of America has opened the entry period for the 2016 VOX Awards. VOX, Latin for voice, is PRSA Memphis’ annual awards event highlighting the work of communications industry professionals across the Mid-South.

33. Cyclist Lucky – And Better Than Ever -

Phillip Poux smiles a lot these days. He laughs a lot and practically gushes about the Wolf River Greenway and the joy of riding his road bike in a safe and scenic environment.

He even says he wishes that he and wife Rhonda had moved to Memphis sooner.

34. Legislators Sweating the Small Stuff -

My late father kept a paper weight on his desk at home that read: “Don’t sweat the small stuff.”

Well, we’re sweating the small stuff – from the federal government down to the states – with this harangue over transgender bathrooms.

35. PRSA Memphis Accepting VOX Awards Entries -

The Memphis Chapter of the Public Relations Society of America has opened the entry period for the 2016 VOX Awards. VOX, Latin for voice, is PRSA Memphis’ annual awards event highlighting the work of communications industry professionals across the Mid-South.

36. Lendermon Sports Medicine Explores Non-Surgical Healing Methods -

Laura Lendermon is amazed at how the body works. As a former college athlete and lifelong runner, she’s familiar with the aches and pains athletes experience. As a doctor, she’s knowledgeable on a much deeper level of the magic of the human body.

37. BRIDGES Celebrates Retirement of CFO Bob Rogalski -

The BRIDGES mission is as clear as it is bold: “To unite and inspire diverse young people to become confident and courageous leaders committed to community transformation.”

But every bridge needs support. For 11 years, Bob Rogalski has served as the nonprofit’s vice president of finance and CFO. He is retiring on June 30, the end of BRIDGES’ 2016 fiscal year. Endowment earnings for this fiscal year were $720,000 and next year’s endowment should be around $765,000, Rogalski said.

38. New FESJC Director Hoping for Clear Skies, Big-Name Leaders -

Sometimes, the moments that determine your future are seemingly small. Only later can you put everything together and realize that’s when you really made your choice.

This is Darrell Smith’s first year as tournament director of the FedEx St. Jude Classic. Because he is only 33 years old, one could argue he got to this position quickly. But that’s not entirely true and does not take into account the fateful moment when he was 14 years old.

39. Latest 'High Gear' Book Maps Success for College Grads, Millennials -

The 21 million U.S. students enrolled in postsecondary schools grew up with technology and the hourly clock of life ticking ever faster. Yet this has not always translated into a generation of young people ready to attack a world that waits for no one.

40. Station to Station -

Even now, Explore Bike Share founder Doug Carpenter does not try to pretend that the initiative will cure all that ails Memphis. 

It won’t wipe out poverty. It can’t cure cancer. It won’t eliminate diabetes and obesity, solve all of the city’s transportation problems or totally bridge cultural and racial gaps that predate the bicycle’s invention.

41. More Than Just Hard Work -

One of the most common messages I received as a child was, “work hard and you will be rewarded.” This sentiment was echoed by loved ones, teachers, and mentors. There’s a good chance you heard the same rumor about life being fair and equitable.

42. Adults Not Helping Childhood Obesity Turn Corner Very Quickly -

Richard Hamburg does not pretend that there is a cure-all for childhood obesity, that just a little exercise will make things all better, that just a few policy changes or improvements in school lunch programs (which is happening), or a reduction of “food deserts” will solve the whole problem.

43. The Week Ahead: May 9-15 -

Alright, Memphis, grab your calendars! Whether you want to book it over to the Ruby Bridges Reading Festival or just baste in the scent of barbecue, there’s plenty to do this week. Here’s our roundup...

44. Tennessee Leads the Nation in Bankruptcies -

Tennessee has a model program for financial literacy in its public schools. All high school students must pass a personal finance course to graduate, and even kindergartners are learning about money under a new initiative to extend the curriculum to primary school.

45. Planning Your Second Act -

Ray’s Take When surveyed, many baby boomers say they plan to do some kind of work in retirement. The reality is that we are living longer, healthier lives than our parents and grandparents. When we reach the traditional retirement age, we probably have a lot of years of living (and spending) left. What to do with those years is changing with the retirement of the boomer generation.

46. Herenton Pitches Two New Schools For Juvenile Offenders -

Former Memphis Mayor Willie Herenton began Wednesday, May 4, with an appeal that got the attention of Shelby County Commissioners. “We don’t want your money,” he told 11 of the 13 commissioners in committee sessions as he pitched two new residential campuses for children in juvenile detention.

47. Akbari Proving to be Worthy Successor to Iconic DeBerry -

Those who wondered how Raumesh Akbari would do in following legendary Memphis legislator Lois DeBerry now have a much clearer picture.

48. Fisher & Phillips Adds David Jones -

Attorney David S. Jones has joined Fisher & Phillips LLP as a partner in the firm’s Memphis office. Jones has more than 15 years’ experience in immigration and employment law, most recently serving as a partner at Jackson Lewis P.C. In his new role, he represents corporate clients in complex matters relating to both immigration benefits and enforcement, as well as export control compliance under the Export Administration Regulations and International Traffic in Arms Regulations.

49. Last Word: BSMF Looks Up, Overton Park Respite and Slow Economic Growth -

The Beale Street Music Festival box office numbers won’t be in for a bit yet. But it looks like the three-day event that ended Sunday evening with Beck and Paul Simon weathered the weather very well, maybe better than usual.

50. Editorial: Our Violence and Our Prosperity -

What did you talk about this week on a beautiful spring day following a beautiful spring weekend?

Some of us talked about the splendor of our city and the possibilities beyond our languor – how far out to plot our hopes and goals.

51. Last Word: The Draft, The Greensward-Council Footnote and The Zoo Beatles -

I’ve never watched an NFL draft before Thursday evening’s in which Paxton Lynch, quarterback for the University of Memphis, was drafted by the Super Bowl champion Denver Broncos as the 26th pick of the first round.

52. Re-Evaluate Your Cash Strategy -

Ray’s take: When it comes to a cash reserve, the standard advice is three to six months of expenses. Do you think that’s enough? It might not be.

Emergency funds are no longer one-size-fits-all.

53. Roster Remix? Grizzlies May Finally Shake Things Up -

As amazing as it was that the Memphis Grizzlies set an NBA record by using 28 players this past season, it’s almost more unbelievable that they had to sign eight different players to 11 separate 10-day contracts.

54. Memphis Jewish Home's Bobby Meadows Wins National Honor -

Bobby G. Meadows III, executive director of Memphis Jewish Home & Rehab, has been awarded the 2016 Young Executive Award by the Association of Jewish Aging Services. The award honors an executive younger than 45 who demonstrates significant potential in health care management by virtue of his or her cumulative achievements or innovative results in management or administration.
As executive director of MJHR, Meadows is responsible for day-to-day operations of the only glatt (strict) kosher, rehab long-term care facility in Tennessee and surrounding states. Operations include the oversight of more than 300 staff members, 160 patients, and a kosher deli.

55. Last Word: Memphis Gets Busy, Elections Future and Past and Dad Rock In C-Y -

While their folks are still getting settled over in the front office at The Commercial Appeal, Gannett announces Monday an $815 million offer to buy Tribune Publishing which would put The Los Angeles Times and The Chicago Tribune in the expanding USA Today family.

56. Regionalism Enhances Recruiting For Cities in Metros -

When Memphis hits a dirty dozen list – whether it’s for crime, or education attainment, or poverty – those ratings are based on Memphis Metropolitan Statistical Area data.

And while Memphis, as the largest city in the MSA, has the lion’s share of economic disparity, those problems don’t just effect the city’s 600,000 citizens.

57. U of M Alumni Association To Present Awards May 21 -

The University of Memphis Alumni Association will present its 2016 Distinguished Alumni Awards on Saturday, May 21, beginning at 6 p.m. The event will be held at the Kemmons Wilson School of Hospitality & Resort Management, 3700 Central Ave.

58. Robots Are Taking Tennessee’s Jobs -

MTSU student Nathan Simpkins found the perfect major when the university started its mechatronics engineering program in 2013, a pursuit practically guaranteeing him a high-paying job in an increasingly automated manufacturing industry.

59. Bridging a Divide -

The Mid-South is united by more than the Mississippi River, but that’s what it took to get the region’s mayors in the same room.

In the aftermath of the 2011 Mississippi River flood, damage stretched from Millington’s naval base to Memphis’ Beale Street. Leaders of the affected municipalities had to come together to apply for FEMA grants and plot their way out of devastation.

60. U of M Alumni Association To Present Awards May 21 -

The University of Memphis Alumni Association will present its 2016 Distinguished Alumni Awards on Saturday, May 21, beginning at 6 p.m. The event will be held at the Kemmons Wilson School of Hospitality & Resort Management, 3700 Central Ave.

61. The Value Of Leadership -

A friend called me recently with a question I was not expecting. He said, “Why is it that all the resumes I get from recent college graduates are packed with their leadership experience? I don’t care about that. I want to know what they can really do for my company, workwise. What are their skills?”

62. Melzie Wilson Appointed To Commerce Advisory Committee -

Melzie Wilson, vice president of compliance at Mallory Alexander International Logistics, has been appointed to the U.S. Department of Commerce’s Advisory Committee on Supply Chain Competitiveness by secretary of commerce Penny Pritzker. In her role at Mallory Alexander, Wilson is responsible for all government regulations the company must comply with, both in the U.S. and globally.
She’s also responsible, along with a compliance team, for ensuring Mallory Alexander’s clients stay compliant.

63. Southern Yankee -

To best understand another man’s baseball passion, you must first understand his baseball pain. So if you hope to truly understand Peter B. Freund, new majority owner of the Memphis Redbirds, you must travel back to his youth.

64. Memphis Gets Proven Commodity in Tubby Smith -

It started immediately, before the hiring was even official. The audible sighs on sports talk radio, the Twitter whining, and the figurative eye-rolling.

Tubby Smith? Really? That old guy?

If they didn’t call him “old” outright, they inferred it in every way imaginable.

65. Legislators Playing Expensive Game With LGBT Issues -

The silly season is in full swing on Capitol Hill, but the “bathroom bill” and any jokes surrounding it are no laughing matter anymore. It’s getting downright expensive.

Tennessee Attorney General Herbert Slatery said this week the bill dealing with transgender student use of restrooms could cost the state more than $1.2 billion in federal funds for K-12 and higher education.

66. Donahoe Named VP at Avison Young -

Michael Donahoe has joined commercial real estate firm Avison Young as vice president of its Memphis branch. Donahoe’s main focus will be overseeing all of the firm’s landlord leasing projects in Memphis and the surrounding areas. Toronto-based Avison Young opened the Memphis office in December, marking its third location in Tennessee and its 50th nationally. 

67. Redbirds Outfielder Tilson Reminds of Cardinals Past -

When Charlie Tilson speaks of the big-league players that have impacted him most, he does so with one eye trained on their past and one eye focused on his future.

“I grew up in Chicago and the guy I loved in 2005 with the White Sox was Scott Podsednik,” said Tilson, in his first year playing center field for the Memphis Redbirds, and a second-round draft pick (79th overall) by the St. Louis Cardinals back in 2011.

68. Last Word: Lipscomb's Successor, MATA School Buses and Roland's Big Breakfast -

Paul Young gets a lot more attention these days than he did when he was the first director of the city-county Office of Sustainability. The attention comes with being the city director of Housing and Community Development where virtually all of the funding comes from the federal government.
That federal funding has changed the face of public housing in the city in the last 25 years. There is only one large public housing project left in the city as a result of the federal funding and its use by Young’s predecessor, Robert Lipscomb.
And what Lipscomb did with the job combined with being the executive director of the Memphis Housing Authority is why a lot of people want to get to know Paul Young these days.
Our centerpiece story by Madeline Faber in Tuesday’s edition makes clear that Young has no desire to wield that kind of power. And it is unlikely anyone in the near future will have the kind of autonomy Lipscomb did.
But beyond that there is still the flow of a lot of federal dollars and Young has some ideas based on his experience in government and finance prior to coming to HCD – everything in government is initials.
It’s a much different experience than Lipscomb’s. Lipscomb coined the phrase “ending public housing as we know it” and at times that slogan wasn’t followed with a lot of detail about what came after public housing was demolished, especially with the first of the projects to fall.
The last public housing project, Foote Homes, will be demolished on Young’s watch which makes his tenure important if more limited than Lipscomb’s tenure.

69. Rapid Transit Option, Route Changes Designed To Make MATA More Relevant -

Budget season is looming, and the Memphis Area Transit Authority is angling for an additional $8 million in operating funds and $5 million in capital improvement dollars to prevent significant cuts to service.

70. Young Cherishes Role of Rebuilding Memphis Neighborhoods -

“I don’t want to be viewed as the most powerful person in Memphis,” said Paul Young, a Memphis native who became director of Housing and Community Development for the city of Memphis in January.

71. Shoot for a Basketball Coaching Star? Memphis Would Have to Pay Big -

Josh Pastner is officially the new head coach at Georgia Tech and the University of Memphis is officially in the coach search business.

72. Last Word: Pastner's Georgia Tech Post-Season, Who Filed and Greensward Invitations -

Not so fast with the off-season. There is a Memphis post-season after all.

And the Grizz found it Thursday like a light at the end of a long-tunnel where a lot of people slipped and fell and can’t get up.
The light was Houston flaming out at home to Phoenix without the Grizzlies having to make a basket.
It’s all about the math. Stay in school, young people.

73. Last Word: Pro Day, Hardwood Patios in C-Y and Memphis' Contested Convention -

It was a windy Pro Day Wednesday at the University of Memphis for Tigers quarterback Paxton Lynch. And if the wind wasn’t for you, you could watch Lynch work out for NFL teams and their representatives on the NFL network.
Don Wade was there to watch in person.

74. Lawmakers Lure Us In With Momentary Sanity, And Then... -

Just when it appears the Tennessee Senate is made up of sensible people – as evidenced by the killing of de-annexation legislation – the body is changing course with a Bible-thumping measure.

75. Grizzlies End 6-Game Skid With Home Win Over Bulls -

If it had been a football game, you could have called it the Desperation Bowl. The Chicago Bulls and Memphis Grizzlies each badly needed a victory.

Behind 27 points and 10 rebounds from power forward Zach Randolph, the Grizzlies got one and snapped their six-game losing streak by defeating the Bulls 108-92 Tuesday, April 5, at FedExForum.

76. Career Fairs Aren’t Just For Kids -

Yesterday, I found myself saying something I often say this time of year: “One of my all-time favorite things is to go to a job fair!” The response I received was not unexpected. The job seeker hadn’t even thought of attending a job fair since college. They seem so juvenile on some level.

77. Gaskins Leads Engineering Office -

Wain Gaskins has joined consulting engineering firm Cannon & Cannon Inc. as manager of the company’s new Memphis office as well as director of West Tennessee operations and business development. 

78. Memphis Baseball Trusting Young Pitchers -

University of Memphis baseball coach Daron Schoenrock looks at his freshmen pitchers and sees talent and promise, even if at times this season “the moments have been a little big for them.”

79. Grizzlies Reeling with Desperate Bulls in Town Tuesday Night -

Guard Bryce Cotton became the 28th player to take the court for the Memphis Grizzlies this season. And if you didn’t know much about Cotton, yet another 10-day contract signee, you’re in good company.

80. Settle? No. UT Needs to Defend Itself in Title IX Suit -

Lots of smoke. But is there a fire? That is the issue at the University of Tennessee, where a Title IX lawsuit alleges the university has a “hostile sexual environment” and violates federal laws dealing with student discipline hearings for sexual assault cases, especially those involving student-athletes.

81. Will Barton Making His Own Path in NBA -

Will Barton, in case you were wondering, still talks with his old college basketball coach.

“I talk to coach (Josh) Pastner all the time,” said Barton, in town to score 25 points and lead the Denver Nuggets past the hometown Grizzlies. “I was talking to him before they played in the conference championship game, giving him advice and encouragement.”

82. Tony Allen Sees his Bleak Chicago Existence in JIFF Kids -

As Tony Allen tells it, “I grew up in some of the hardest parts of Chicago.” And when he says “grew up,” he means survived.

83. Grizzlies Have No Answers for Machine That Is The Spurs -

To find 31 point and 13 rebounds in the Grizzlies’ locker room, you would have had to gather two or three players together. But in the locker room of the San Antonio Spurs, all those points and rebounds were in one place, in the person of forward LaMarcus Aldridge after the Spurs had defeated the Grizzlies 101-87 on Monday, March 28 at FedExForum.

84. Last Word: Saturday In The Park, Lipscomb's Successor and Fred's Looks Up -

Quite the Easter weekend on the Overton Park Greensward.
Greensward partisans planned a Saturday Easter Egg hunt, Memphis Zoo parking crews found the eggs and a crowd of several hundred people blocked overflow parking briefly that afternoon.

85. Dodging a Disaster With Volkswagen? -

Next month will mark five years since the first Passat rolled off the assembly line at Chattanooga’s Volkswagen plant. Most anniversaries are a cause for celebration.

But as Chattanoogans blow out the candles on this particular milestone they’ll be hoping that Volkswagen’s diesel emissions troubles will soon be extinguished, too, and that the new SUV model they’ll start producing this year will help VW emerge from the crisis a better and stronger company than before.

86. Rudd + Bowen + Pastner = PR Nightmare at Memphis -

You keep thinking the story can’t get worse, and then it does. What we have here is an ongoing public relations disaster that is the University of Memphis athletic department as it pertains to all matters regarding the men’s basketball program.

87. Shipmon Joins Lending Team at Paragon -

Thomas “Tee” Shipmon has joined Paragon Bank as senior vice president, specialty lending. In this role, Shipmon is responsible for developing products for Paragon that solve customers’ challenges and that are profitable to the bank. Currently, specialty lending is providing short-term commercial construction loans to companies, often franchisees, that are expanding operations.

88. Clark Butcher is Pedaling to Glory -

It’s 6 a.m. on a rainy Wednesday morning. Outside, the sun has not yet risen. But inside Victory Bicycle Studio, they’re already playing Rihanna. “We’re gonna start with some two-minute openers,” shouts Clark Butcher, over the thump of the music. “I want you at 70 percent of your max. Let’s go!”

89. Last Word: Putt and 1969, Fred Smith on Amazon and Ramsey's Departure -

George Howard Putt died in prison sometime last year state prison officials disclosed Wednesday -- far from the brief time he spent in Memphis but never far from the carnage he left behind in the Memphis of 1969.
The bodies of the first two of the five people killed by Putt between Aug. 14 and Sept. 11, 1969 were discovered just days after the murders of actress Sharon Tate and six others in Los Angeles by the Manson family dominated national news coverage. Less than a year earlier the Boston Strangler movie was in theaters, creating a sensation about the murders committed by serial killer Albert DeSalvo in Boston just a few years earlier.
Bernalyn and Roy Dumas were strangled by Putt in their home in Cooper-Young and Putt mutilated her body in a way that police homicide detectives still wouldn’t talk about decades later. The bodies were found in separate rooms.
Even with no details other than the names of the victims, the city was quickly spooked by the double murder. So when the body of Leila Jackson was found short of two weeks later, the city’s reaction was a palpable fear in which anyone unknown was to be avoided. Memphians didn’t tarry after work. They went home and bolted the doors.
It got worse as more victims turned up with little in common other than four of the five were women. They were of varying ages. Some were strangled and some were stabbed.
Just about any magazine rack of the day include true crime magazines that by the late 1960s were beginning to look very dated in their lurid noir-like covers teasing the most sensational crime narratives of the day.
They were an intentional contrast to the cover images of youth in bright colors in natural settings in other magazines heralding a new future and youth culture.
The murders in a Southern city, whose 1969 conservatism is hard to describe nearly 50 years later, quickly grabbed the covers of the true crime magazines. And the images they offered spoke to the scenic reality where Putt roamed even as the murders continued.
Apartment buildings and boarding houses were the settings for some of the murders but not all.
Glenda Sue Harden
was last seen walking to her car parked on the Cobblestones from the insurance office she worked at nearby. Her body was found in Martin Luther King/Riverside Park hidden under a piece of plywood.
At one of the murder scenes, police found an ice pick stuck in the side of the building with a stocking tied around it.
Putt’s last victim, in an apartment building on Bellevue, screamed as she was stabbed repeatedly and others in the building gave chase with police close behind, arresting Putt near the new and unopened section of the interstate that runs west of Bellevue.
Putt tried to force his way into another apartment nearby but the women inside kept him on the other side of the door.
The killer that panicked an entire city was a skinny utterly forgettable guy in his 20s with sideburns and glasses who appeared to have rarely roamed beyond a community of neighborhood bars, boarding houses and old apartment buildings in the Midtown and Medical Center areas.
It turns out he came to Memphis after walking away from a prison farm in Mississippi and into a Memphis that was slowly but surely changing. And the world that Putt encountered would soon vanish in large part.
Overton Square’s incarnation was about a year away. A new bridge was about to be built across the Mississippi River as part of Interstate 40 which was to go through Overton Park just south of the north-south leg of the interstate where Putt was captured.
Originally sentenced to death, Putt’s sentence was commuted when the U.S. Supreme Court banned the death penalty in the early 1970s.
He was serving a 497-year sentence when he died at the Turney Center Wednesday in Only, Tennessee.
Putt never sought parole and never gave any explanation for why he killed five people in less than a month and his apparently random selection of victims.

90. Sports Notebook: Memphis, UT Vols Shut out of NCAA Tourney; Grizz Keep Grinding; Waino Bullish on Cards -

The University of Memphis won two American Athletic Conference Tournament games but lost to Connecticut for a third time this season in Sunday’s title game. The Tigers were close enough to the Big Dance to hear the music and smell the punch, but nowhere close to getting an at-large invitation.

91. The Week Ahead: March 14-20, 2016 -

How was your weekend, Memphis? Here’s our weekly roundup of local happenings you need to know about, from the first look at the Greater Memphis Chamber’s proposed diversity program to a truly Irish celebration of St. Paddy’s Day.

92. Last Word: Mudslide, The Deannexation Storm and Kilzer at Calvary -

Lots of news on a very rainy day including the flooding from the constant rain that closed some schools and cancelled a lot of other events. And then there was a mudslide on Riverside Drive from the bluff overlooking Tom Lee Park and the Mississippi River. The rain has also pushed the Wolf River to the point that it is now over some parts of the greenway in Germantown.

93. Brandye Lee Training a New Generation of Diverse Dancers -

Brandye Lee is Memphis dance royalty. And like any true queen, she’s impossible to please.

“Jones, pull your tailbone down!” she screams. “No thumbs! And you have to get to fifth faster.”

94. Higher-Ed Shuffle Stokes Fears of UT-TSU Merger -

Anthony Joshua, who moved to Nashville from Madison, Wis., to attend Tennessee State University, says he’s worried his historically black institution could be in for serious change – for the worse.

95. Strickland Backs No-Gang Zones in Legal Challenge -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland says court-ordered zones that forbid alleged gang members from gathering or associating in public within the zone are working as a crime-fighting tactic.

96. Graceland West Up Next as Guest House Tops Out -

As construction crews working on the 450-room Guest House at Graceland resort hotel marked the topping out of that Whitehaven project this week, work is about to begin on the other side of Elvis Presley Boulevard on the Graceland West project.

97. Agricenter President Looks Back on 15-Year Tenure -

Try putting yourself in John Charles Wilson’s dusty work boots for a moment. You’ve served as president of Agricenter International for more than 15 years. In less than six months, you will retire.

98. Once the Paragon of the Sport, Lady Vols Seem to be Fading From the Spotlight -

As the 2015-16 regular season winds down, the Tennessee Lady Vols basketball team is navigating uncharted territory, and the winds aren’t favorable.

The Lady Vols began the season ranked No. 4 in the nation by the Associated Press and picked to finish second in the SEC by coaches and media. They had Final Four aspirations. Their roster was loaded.

99. Debt After Death -

Ray’s Take You can’t take it with you. Debt, that is. And most debt does not get passed to a spouse or other heirs. But debt collectors may try to get the money from family members anyway. For this reason, it’s good to know what happens to various forms of debt that may be left behind when a loved one dies.

100. Post-Gasol: Grizz Doing What They Have To Do, How They Have To Do It -

Marc Gasol has said it. Zach Randolph has said it. Tony Allen has said it ad nauseam.

“We hang our hats on the defensive end.”