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Editorial Results (free)

1. Tigers Men’s Basketball Releases AAC Schedule -

The American Athletic Conference has released the 2018-19 men’s basketball league schedule and the University of Memphis, under first-year coach Penny Hardaway, will play single games against four opponents – UConn, SMU, Houston and USF – and home-and-away games with the seven other league schools.

2. Tigers Men’s Basketball Releases AAC Schedule -

The American Athletic Conference has released the 2018-19 men’s basketball league schedule and the University of Memphis, under first-year coach Penny Hardaway, will play single games against four opponents – UConn, SMU, Houston and USF – and home-and-away games with the seven other league schools.

3. Harris and Lenoir Clash in First General Election Mayoral Debate -

The two contenders for Shelby County mayor on the Aug. 2 ballot differed Wednesday, June 13, on leadership experience and whether county government has been breaking ground on important issues or has taken too long to act on those issues.

4. Line Between ‘Get Out the Vote,’ ‘Crossover’ Melts In Campaign Heat -

Get Out The Vote – the plan known among politicos by the shorthand GOTV – has slipped across the line that separates it from “crossover” – the sometimes-controversial act of pushing to get those on the other side of the partisan divide to cross political lines and vote for the other party’s nominee.

5. Evidence to Action -

She remembers the government cheese – “It was delicious” – but she would like to forget the taste of those dried eggs. “I absolutely hated those eggs,” said Dr. Renee Wilson-Simmons, new executive director of the ACE Awareness Foundation in Memphis. “To this day, I don’t like eggs. I still have that can. It’s a reminder of where I came from.”

6. Merging Past, Present -

The Medical Arts Building at the corner of Madison Avenue and Fourth Street in Downtown Memphis, much like its hometown, has seen its share of ups and downs for nearly a century.

But as the city continues to reinvent itself, Walk-Off Properties, the building’s current owner, is also in the process of reimaging the iconic property.

7. Penny Mania -

Derek Jett was coming home from a business trip on the West Coast and making a connection at the airport in Dallas. It was football season, and because it was football season (and not basketball season), he was wearing his University of Memphis cap.

8. Last Word: Monuments Ruling, The Open Council Seat and Not So Great Streets -

It is likely just the first round. But the city of Memphis prevailed on every major point in the Wednesday ruling out of Nashville by Chancellor Ellen Hobbs Lyle upholding the removal of Confederate monuments this past December from two city parks.

9. Commission Reappoints Bolton As Adviser, Questions His Role -

Shelby County commissioners reappointed former commissioner Julian Bolton as their legislative policy adviser Monday, May 14, sending his reappointment, effective to the end of September, to Mayor Mark Luttrell, who vetoed an earlier version of the appointment in April.

10. Commission Reappoints Bolton As Advisor Amid Questions About His Role -

Shelby County commissioners reappointed former commissioner Julian Bolton as their legislative policy advisor Monday, May 14, sending the reappointment to the end of September to county mayor Mark Luttrell who vetoed an earlier version in April.

11. East Meets West as 2 Legislators Run Out of Time -

It wasn’t quite a constitutional crisis, but when Reps. Micah Van Huss and Joe Towns start teaming up, something is amiss.

12. Last Word: Primary Results and Analysis, Bike Launch, Gibson's Bankruptcy -

The immediate headline of Tuesday’s county primary elections is Lee Harris and David Lenoir battling in the August county general to see who becomes the next county mayor. But there were lots of other stories in the results. Here's the roundup of that and the other countywide primaries.

13. Players’ Experience -

In his piece on John Calipari at theringer.com, writer Jordan Ritter Conn makes the case that the former University of Memphis coach is the best recruiter in college basketball history. His evidence includes this statistic: Since coming to Kentucky in 2009, Calipari has landed 30 McDonald’s All-Americans and sent 33 players to the NBA.

14. Cordova’s Tyler Harris Chooses Memphis Tigers -

Cordova guard Tyler Harris on Friday signed a national letter of intent to play at the University of Memphis. Harris led the city in scoring this past season with a 30.3 average.

Harris joins East High’s Alex Lomax in new coach Penny Hardaway’s first wave of recruits. They’re the first local players to sign with Memphis in three years.

15. Last Word: 'Poking The Bear,' National Walk Out Day and McQueen on Capitol Hill -

The state House’s Tuesday action cutting $250k in funding for Memphis from Gov. Bill Haslam’s budget proposal is turning into a cause back here, starting with a GoFundMe page. Elsewhere on social media, you can see the unmistakable outline of a party or parties for the cause beginning to form. This is near the end of session for the Legislature when the budget is the last action before going back to the district to run for re-election. Different timing over here, with multiple crawfish outings leading into Memphis in May.

16. Hardaway and Tigers Get Two More Signees -

University of Memphis coach Penny Hardaway has added two more players to his roster. Shooting guard Antwann Jones signed with the Tigers after being released from his national letter of intent with Texas A&M. Isaiah Maurice signed after playing one season at Kansas State and one season at South Plains junior college.

17. Cordova’s Tyler Harris Chooses Tigers; Hardaway’s Staff in Flux -

Cordova guard Tyler Harris on Friday signed a national letter of intent to play at the University of Memphis. Harris led the city in scoring this past season with a 30.3 average.

Harris joins East High’s Alex Lomax in new coach Penny Hardaway’s first wave of recruits. They’re the first local players to sign with Memphis in three years.

18. Prospect Lomax Signs With Memphis Tigers -

Guard Alex Lomax (East High School) officially signed his national letter of intent on Wednesday, April 11, to play for Penny Hardaway at the University of Memphis.

19. Prospect Lomax Signs With Memphis Tigers -

Guard Alex Lomax (East High School) officially signed his national letter of intent on Wednesday, April 11, to play for Penny Hardaway at the University of Memphis.

20. Lots of Noise, But Few Results in Legislature -

Just when you think the Tennessee Legislature is going off the deep end, someone will throw them a bungee cord. Maybe a rope made out of hemp would work better because a bungee cord leaves people bouncing, never quite reeling them in.

21. Early Voting Opens for May County Primaries -

Early voting in the first of three 2018 elections in Shelby County opens Wednesday at 21 sites across the county and runs through April 26.

The primaries are led by contests for county mayor, all 13 seats on the county commission and most of the county’s elected offices. The remainder are in the other even-year election cycle or have an eight-year term of office that comes around next in 2022.

22. Who Starts on Defense? You’ll Have to Wait -

Jeremy Pruitt hasn’t been afraid to change things around during his first spring practice as Tennessee’s head football coach.

23. Last Word: Graceland's New Lawsuit, Memphis March For Our Lives and Trolley Test -

Remember the comment from last week’s EDGE meeting by EDGE board member Tom Dyer who said the economic development body was likely to be sued no matter what it did on Graceland’s application for tax breaks on its “convention center” plan in Whitehaven? At week’s end, Graceland followed through with a lawsuit in Chancery Court against EDGE for delaying a decision on the matter. The lawsuit contends EDGE has no intention of making a decision on incentives and that Graceland is entitled to those incentives.

24. Harris, Chism Say PILOTs Not Effective Economic Development -

The two Democratic contenders for Shelby County mayor say they don’t think tax abatement incentives, primarily payments in lieu of taxes – or PILOTs – are working as an economic development tool in Shelby County.

25. A Look Back At UT’s History In NCAA Tourney -

Basketball coach Rick Barnes was fired by Texas in late March of 2015 when he refused to fire members of his coaching staff.

26. Candidates’ Choices -

Polls, phone banking, messaging, yard signs, who is paid and who is a volunteer – all are elements of a campaign. And each is part of an overall strategy.

But most campaigns struggle with a schedule of which events to attend and which to forgo. And in the 2018 campaign season, the number of events is only growing as the May 1 county primary elections near, followed by the county general election and state and federal primaries in August, then the state and federal general elections in November.

27. Tigers Land Guard From Birmingham -

Myreon Jones, of Birmingham, Alabama, has committed to the University of Memphis. Jones announced his decision via social media.

A 6-foot-3 guard, Jones was the 101st-ranked recruit in the 2018 class, according to 247sports.com. Coach Tubby Smith in recent weeks also has ramped up the recruitment of Cordova High School guard Tyler Harris, who has yet to announce a decision on his college choice.

28. Digest -

Memphis Grizzlies Suffer 15th Consecutive Loss

The Grizzlies lost their 15th straight game, 119-110 at Chicago, on Wednesday, March 7.

The team has not won since defeating the Phoenix Suns at FedExForum on Jan. 29.

29. Republican Mayoral Candidates Find Ways to Differentiate -

The three contenders in the May Republican primary for Shelby County mayor didn’t disagree on much when they met this week at the Southwind clubhouse. But David Lenoir, Joy Touliatos and Terry Roland did try to distinguish themselves from the other two in a relatively spark-free first encounter as a trio.

30. Tigers Land Guard From Birmingham -

Myreon Jones, of Birmingham, Alabama, has committed to the University of Memphis. Jones announced his decision via social media.

A 6-foot-3 guard, Jones was the 101st-ranked recruit in the 2018 class, according to 247sports.com. Coach Tubby Smith in recent weeks also has ramped up the recruitment of Cordova High School guard Tyler Harris, who has yet to announce a decision on his college choice.

31. Local Political Partisans Begin Looking Beyond Trump -

The founder of one of the city’s Trump “resistance” groups is among those looking for something beyond the resistance.

“We don’t want to resist Trump forever,” Emily Fulmer, the founder of Indivisible Memphis, told a gathering of 50 Friday, Feb. 23, at the National Civil Rights Museum under the “Take Back Tennessee” banner. “The goal is not to be in a state of resistance forever.”

32. Memphis Symphony Enters Midseason Programming -

The Memphis Symphony Orchestra’s midseason programming begins Saturday, Feb. 24, and will feature pieces from the most renowned names in classical music.

The symphony will present the next installment of its Classic Accents series, titled “Beethoven Seven.”

33. Pre-K Expansion Faces Resistance in Push for Sunday Wine Sales -

NASHVILLE – Legislation sending revenue from Sunday wine sales to prekindergarten expansion faces a battle on several fronts when it reaches a committee in early March.

The bill sponsored by state Sen. Lee Harris is designed to take the state tax dollars from the sale of wine on Sundays, if that separate bill passes this session, and divert it to a fund designed to increase access for low-income children to prekindergarten classrooms in Tennessee. The bill is set to be heard March 6 in the Senate State and Local Government Committee.

34. Events -

Hattiloo Theatre will perform “Selma: A Musical Tribute to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.” Friday, Feb. 23, through March 18 at Hattiloo, 37 S. Cooper St. The dramatic musical captures prominent moments such as the Montgomery Bus Boycott and the crossing of the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Alabama. Visit hattiloo.org for showtimes and tickets.

35. Memphis Symphony Enters Midseason Programming -

The Memphis Symphony Orchestra’s midseason programming begins Saturday, Feb. 24, and will feature pieces from the most renowned names in classical music.

The symphony will present the next installment of its Classic Accents series, titled “Beethoven Seven.”

36. Consensus on Gun Legislation? Not on Your Life -

That burning smell emanating from the General Assembly isn’t coming from the flame of bipartisanship. More likely it’s the result of scorched-earth politics.

Even though a weapons measure called the “carry-like-a-cop” bill died recently in a House committee, the gap between Republicans and Democrats on gun legislation is, for the most part, about as wide as the range of a Barrett .50-caliber rifle, more than 2.5 miles.

37. Signing Class Disappointing, But Groundwork Laid -

Tennessee football fans are hoping for a better National Signing Day in 2019. This year’s was a relative dud.

New coach Jeremy Pruitt, hired on Dec. 7, signed six players on Feb. 7 but whiffed on several high-profile recruits he and his staff were pursuing. He had signed 14 players during the first-ever early signing period Dec. 20-22.

38. The Metrics Mayor -

At times in the last two years, political supporters of Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland have been worried. They agree with what got him elected, his “brilliant at the basics” philosophy that makes basic services and fundamental play-it-safe financial strategies the priority at City Hall.

39. McDaniel to Fashion Loophole Bill for State Monuments -

NASHVILLE – The House sponsor of the Tennessee Heritage Protection Act is preparing legislation to close a “loophole” Memphis used to spur removal of Confederate monuments from parks property it sold to a nonprofit group.

40. Three(i) Creative Evolving With A Focus on Political Communications -

Kenneth Worles Jr. has been passionate about politics since the 2008 election when he got involved in projects for former city Mayor A C Wharton and the congressional campaign of Ricky Wilkins. His friends describe him as an “urban politico.”

41. Tigers Winning, Could Use Better Recruits to Coach Up -

Right after Christmas I sat down with Tubby Smith in his office for a lengthy Q & A, which you can still find here (http://bit.ly/2DLJbCk). At one point in our conversation I asked Tubby about “coaching guys up,” if that was maybe the part of the job he enjoyed most.

42. Last Word: Tax Reform Pay Raises, Minority Business Kinks and Elvis at 83 -

A busy but ultimately slow weekend on the Confederate monuments front as a total of fewer than 100 opponents of the removal of the city’s two most visible monuments actively protested Saturday either on the interstate loop or in the “protest area” by Health Sciences Park.

43. Attorney, Former Political Activist Lewis Donelson Dies at 100 -

In a century of life that began in Memphis, Lewis Donelson was many things including an attorney, politician and strategist. In all of those pursuits and others, he was one of the city’s most influential citizens and a force in some of the most historic moments in the city’s history as well as the state’s history.

44. Last Word: Liberty Bowl Sell-Out Prep, Beale's Year and Tubby Talks -

The AutoZone Liberty Bowl is a sell out as of Thursday. And while your thoughts may turn to the sight of a full stadium at the Fairgrounds, at least some of you who are going are thinking about what traffic will be like in the area. Here is the parking and shuttle game plan at the outset and a day in advance. The Liberty Bowl Parade on Beale is at 3 p.m. Friday followed by a pep rally in the entertainment district and all are welcome.

45. Attorney Wooten Joins Evans Petree as Shareholder -

Attorney William Allen Wooten has joined Evans Petree PC as a shareholder, working in the firm’s Memphis office as well as its new location at the current Wooten Law Firm in Covington, Tennessee.

46. Memphis Sound at 60 -

As Stax Records and Royal Studios both wrap up a year of celebrating their 60th anniversary, The Memphis News looks back at the creators and purveyors of the Memphis sound and its significance, both in its heyday and today.

47. Forrest Down -

It’s hard to know where the equestrian statue of Nathan Bedford Forrest is when there aren’t lights on it.

That was the case Wednesday, Dec. 20, as the spotlights normally illuminating the likeness of the Confederate general, slave trader and Ku Klux Klan grand wizard were doused.

48. New Memphis Promotes Dakin to Pilot ‘Launch’ Initiative -

Frankie Dakin has been promoted to director of strategic initiatives at New Memphis, a role in which he’ll pilot the organization’s new Launch: Campus to Career program. The initiative, which builds on New Memphis’ Summer Experience, connects college students with professional opportunities and networks to inspire them to launch careers in Memphis. Dakin will lead the program, encouraging area students to find and prepare for internships with local employers.

49. Tigers DB Hall Named To CoSIDA District Team -

University of Memphis sophomore Austin Hall has been named to the CoSIDA Academic All-District Team and will now appear on the CoSIDA Academic All-America ballot.

50. Tigers DB Hall Named To CoSIDA District Team -

University of Memphis sophomore Austin Hall has been named to the CoSIDA Academic All-District Team and will now appear on the CoSIDA Academic All-America ballot. Hall, who is a junior in the classroom, carries a 3.45 GPA in criminal justice and is the Tigers’ leading tackler with 66 total tackles.

51. The Next Four Years -

A week before candidates for the 2018 Shelby County elections could pull qualifying petitions to run, Shelby County Commissioner David Reaves was thinking out loud on Facebook.

“Next four years,” was how it began.

52. Memphis Basketball: A Program in Decline -

They’ve only played two games. The early signing period for the class of 2018 has just passed. And yet it feels like the University of Memphis basketball program’s ceiling for this season and the foreseeable future is dropping.

53. Chism Vows Democratic Primary Battle with Harris for County Mayor -

Former Shelby County Commissioner Sidney Chism kicked off his bid for county mayor last week by vowing to “beat up on” rival Democrat and state Sen. Lee Harris in the May 2018 countywide primary.

54. Last Word: Changes Behind Highland Row, Lee Harris Opens and Ron Olson Moves -

Shelby County Commission chairwoman Heidi Shafer says the commission, through its attorneys, is in ‘the final stages of launching litigation” against big pharma over the opioid problem locally. And in a written statement Thursday she said she believes the litigation “will result in significant recovery for hundreds of millions of dollars that Shelby County has spent trying to heal, save, nurse and otherwise deal with the opioid crisis.” Shafer specifically announced the hiring on a contingency basis of a national law firm.

55. Harris Cites Effects of ‘Trump Approach’ on County Races -

Three weeks into his run for Shelby County mayor on the 2018 ballot, state Sen. Lee Harris told a group of 30 supporters in Victorian Village Wednesday, Nov. 1, that he is running as a response to the “Trump approach.”

56. Not Worried About Bama? Just Wait Until Kickoff -

Tennessee’s football team will make history Saturday against No. 1-ranked Alabama (7-0, 4-0 SEC), no matter what happens with the game.

The Vols (3-3, 0-3 SEC) were 34-point underdogs early in the week for the 3:30 EDT game (TV: CBS) in Tuscaloosa. The 34-point spread is the largest ever in the UT-Alabama series.

57. Law Firm Leases Keep East Submarket Strong in Q3 -

Despite a growing trend of major businesses relocating Downtown, the East submarket still led the way by a large margin in office leasing volume in the third quarter.

In total, the Memphis office market absorbed 156,280 square feet of space, which marks the third consecutive quarter of positive absorption, according to Cushman & Wakefield/Commercial Advisors’ Q3 Office MarketBeat report. This brings the year-to-date net absorption to 625,707 square feet, a drastic increase from the negative 59,344 square feet absorbed in the first three quarters a year ago.

58. Last Word: Bredesen's Note, Serious Sewer Talks and Protest Vs. Process -

Another lively week in state politics as former Tennessee Gov. Phil Bredesen says he is considering a run for the U.S. Senate seat Bob Corker is giving up. This came Monday in a note to the Associated Press in which Bredesen said he will make his decision quickly about an entry into the Democratic primary.

59. Last Word: The Chamber on Forrest, Different Amazon News & More 2018 Dominoes -

The Greater Memphis Chamber rolls out its part of the push by the city administration to get a state waiver for the removal of the Nathan Bedford Forrest statue. Next week is the meeting of the Tennessee Historical Commission with Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland showing up to make his pitch. That is even though the chairman of the body has told him the commission will not take up a waiver at the meeting.

60. Lane Touts Luttrell Endorsement in Sheriff's Race -

Republican contender for Shelby County Sheriff Dale Lane is touting the support of every suburban mayor in the county, current Shelby County Mayor and former sheriff Mark Luttrell, and former county mayor Jim Rout.

61. ‘Divisive Symbols’: Mississippi Case Offers Hope for Forrest Bust Removal -

State Sen. Lee Harris is encouraged by the U.S. Supreme Court’s request for the state of Mississippi to respond to a lawsuit seeking to remove the Confederate battle flag from its state flag.

62. Outsourcing by Any Other Name Still Not So Sweet -

Outsourcing is starting to become a four-letter word in state government.

Gov. Bill Haslam’s administration told lawmakers during a summer study session it’s giving up on privatization of state parks, including a plan to hire a company to raze the inn at Fall Creek Falls and build a new one, at a cost of more than $22 million, then take over the keys and the profits.

63. Last Word: ICE Raids, Who's Buying Afton Grove and Malco Powerhouse Plans -

A protest Sunday evening at the Prescott Place Apartments after federal ICE agents – Immigration and Customs Enforcement – took people into custody there and at Emerald Ridge and Corner Park apartments Sunday morning. The group of organizations protesting the federal action – Memphis Coalition of Concerned Citizens, Cosecha and SURJ Memphis -- say Memphis Police assisted in the immigration operation. Memphis Police deny they were involved in any way. No estimate from ICE on how many people were detained.

64. Revival of Ranked Choice Voting Marks Phillips’ Attention to Detail -

The use of Ranked Choice Voting or instant-runoff voting in Memphis elections was a moot point even before Memphis voters approved it in 2008 in a city charter amendment.

The Shelby County Election Commission had concluded before the charter referendum that its voting systems couldn’t accommodate a method of voting that ranked candidates in a single race by a voter’s preference, instead of a voter picking one and only one candidate.

65. Last Word: Harold Ford Jr. on Change, Tourism Turns a Corner and Sim at UTHSC -

Very different outlooks along party lines still in our delegation to Washington over the Senate’s version of Trumpcare.

On the day the Congressional Budget Office estimated the proposal would end health insurance coverage for 22 million Americans, Republican U.S. Sen. Lamar Alexander’s reaction:

66. Last Word: Wahlburgers, CA For Sale and Council Day -

We really go for hot food brands around here – whether its restaurants or supermarkets. And it makes us suckers to some degree. I don’t mean that in a bad way. Memphis without being open to all possibilities and what others see as impossible is just not Memphis. But when it comes to the business of brands sometimes you start to wonder. We may be guilty of putting too much weight on a brand to solve problems that no brand anywhere can solve.

67. Lawmakers: Talk, Action On Crime Don’t Match -

State Senate Minority Leader Lee Harris of Memphis says some of the rhetoric about criminal justice reform – not locking up as many nonviolent offenders for longer sentences – doesn’t match the push for legislation in Nashville.

68. The Week Ahead: June 19-25 -

Hello, Memphis! Summer officially arrives in our Central time zone at 11:24 p.m. on Tuesday, according to The Old Farmer’s Almanac. Well, we know what summer in Memphis means – a heapin’ helpin’ of humidity. Stay cool with all these hot happenings in The Week Ahead...

69. Last Word: Bar-Kays & ConFunkShun, Suburban Politics and Tom Bowen's 5 Years -

The Bar-Kays and ConFunkShun -- there’s a double shot of the deepest funk from the 1970s and 1980s. And they are together again Friday at the Cannon Center for the Juneteenth Urban Music Festival. It is also Larry Dodson’s last hometown show fronting The Bar-Kays.

70. Century Mark -

During a visit to Memphis in April, Andrew Young was talking with reporters about his lengthy public history – being part of Dr. Martin Luther King’s inner circle, a congressman, mayor of Atlanta, U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations. It was as he talked about King’s death in Memphis that Young, without any prompting, talked about a trio of Memphis attorneys – Benjamin Hooks, Russell Sugarmon and A. W. Willis – that were the key to his and King’s efforts to get things done in Memphis and the surrounding region.

71. For St. Jude and Golf Fans, FedEx St. Jude Classic is Thriving -

Perspective can be too easy of a word. It can get thrown around casually, especially in big-time sports settings. But at the FedEx St. Jude Classic, “perspective” isn’t just a clichéd line for a moment in time.

72. Last Word: Double Berger, The CEO of Baptist and Storm Reflections -

The Overton Park Conservancy raised $1 million by the Monday deadline to move ahead with the Overton Park-Memphis Zoo parking compromise. The conservancy announced Sunday afternoon that it met the goal with hours to spare with more details to come Monday on how this came together.

73. Wide Receiver U? That’s So 20 Years Ago -

At the 2015 SEC Media Days, Tennessee coach Butch Jones referred to his school as “the original Wide Receiver U.”

The reference goes back to the days when the Vols were loaded with fast, talented pass receivers on the perimeter. In a heady stretch from 1982-91, UT had six wide receivers selected in the first round of the NFL draft – Anthony Hancock, Willie Gault, Clyde Duncan, Tim McGee, Anthony Miller and Alvin Harper.

74. Unwilling Private Sector Gives Park Workers a Victory -

Two state parks are celebrating victories in an atmosphere of uncertainty created by the governor’s penchant for privatizing state functions.

Fall Creek Falls drew no bidders for a $20 million plan to hire a vendor who would tear down its inn, construct a new one and take over operations for 10 years. Henry Horton State Park, meanwhile, is set for $10 million in improvements this coming fiscal year, including upgrades to its hospitality facilities, plus a new visitors center, rather than a proposal to raze its inn and not rebuild.

75. Bike Summit Features Call for Changes in Push for Bike Ways -

The city’s former bicycle and pedestrian coordinator who put the city on the map nationally for bike lanes and bikeways says bicycle advocates have to think differently.

Kyle Wagenschutz is currently director of local innovation for “People for Bikes” – a Boulder, Colorado advocacy and advisory organization that works with cities nationally.

76. Unhealthy Motives -

WE DON’T CARE ABOUT HEALTH CARE. WE CARE ABOUT INSURANCE. Like casinos, the insurance business is a bet, you know, like a roll of the dice. And like casinos, the house always wins. An army of actuaries hedges every bet. If you buy life insurance, they’re going to charge you enough to make money before you die. They win. If you buy health insurance, they’re going to charge you enough to make money if you get sick. They win.

77. Privatization Opposition Renewed as No Bids Come in for Falls Creek Falls Project -

The lack of bidders for a $20 million inn reconstruction project at Fall Creek Falls could spur legislative hearings this summer on parks funding and privatization amid growing lawmaker concern about the governor’s outsourcing plans.

78. Legislature Passes Slate of Bills, Adjourns -

NASHVILLE – The Legislature wrapped up its business for the year, adjourning Wednesday after taking up a spate of last-minute bills, including postponing a bill increasing the amount of campaign contributions lawmakers could accept.

79. Tennessee Legislature Adjourns After Voting on Last-Minute Bills -

The Legislature wrapped up its business for the year, adjourning Wednesday after taking up a spate of last-minute bills, including postponing a bill increasing the amount of campaign contributions lawmakers could accept.

80. Last Word: Council Day Issues, 'A Man Of Color' and East Memphis 'Novel' -

A busy day at City Hall Tuesday by the City Council agenda and by at least one completely unplanned moment during council budget committee sessions. It was so busy that at the start of Tuesday’s council session, chairman Berlin Boyd couldn’t find his gavel and technical glitches prompted him to ask for a can of WD-40. Throw in a visit to City Hall by civil rights leader Rev. Jesse Jackson and you have our comprehensive same night rundown of how it went and for whom it went.

81. University of Memphis, UTHSC May Soon Face Outsourcing Decisions -

Forty-one state lawmakers signed a letter requesting the state put a hold on its outsourcing plans until the General Assembly can scrutinize its effect on state workers and services.

The state is set to sign a contract April 28 with Chicago-based JLL for facilities management work that could be used by universities and departments statewide. Even local government jobs could be doled out to the contractor.

82. Memphis Gets Nod for New Hotel Tax, Nashville Having Pipeline Problems -

The state Senate approved legislation enabling the Memphis City Council to consider an ordinance to create a new hotel/motel tax of no more than an aggregate of 5 percent to go toward the city-owned Memphis Cook Convention Center.

83. Memphis Gets Nod for New Hotel Tax, Nashville Having Pipeline Problems -

The state Senate has approved legislation enabling the Memphis City Council to consider an ordinance to create a new hotel/motel tax of no more than an aggregate of 5 percent to go toward the city-owned Memphis Cook Convention Center.

84. U of M Students, Faculty Do Social Work on the Hill -

The University of Memphis Department of Social Work recently participated in the annual Social Work Day on the Hill.

More than 50 students and six faculty members in bachelor’s and master’s programs traveled to Nashville to gain practical experience in speaking to legislators, building interdisciplinary professional relationships, and advocating for policies primarily related to mental health and child welfare.

85. U of M Students, Faculty Do Social Work on the Hill -

The University of Memphis Department of Social Work recently participated in the annual Social Work Day on the Hill.

More than 50 students and six faculty members in bachelor’s and master’s programs traveled to Nashville to gain practical experience in speaking to legislators, building interdisciplinary professional relationships, and advocating for policies primarily related to mental health and child welfare.

86. Senate Campaign War Chests Could Swell -

NASHVILLE – Legislation enabling state lawmakers to raise campaign funds during even-year session recesses evolved into a markedly different bill this week – one allowing significant contribution increases for Senate candidates.

87. Democrats Put Squeeze on Republicans To Defeat Outsourcing of State Assets -

Legislative Democrats are calling on Republicans to join them in passing a slate of bills to combat Gov. Bill Haslam’s outsourcing plans for everything from state parks to facilities management at universities.

88. Democrats Put Squeeze on Republicans to Defeat Outsourcing -

Legislative Democrats are calling on Republicans to join them in passing a slate of bills to combat Gov. Bill Haslam’s outsourcing plans for everything from state parks to facilities management at universities.

89. Lawmakers Blast Haslam Administration for Process Toward JLL Contract -

The Tennessee Department of General Services is set to award a statewide contract for facility management services to Jones Lang LaSalle, a company that already handles 10 percent of state office space and estimates a 15.9 percent savings if all higher education institutes participate.

90. Bill to Ban Outsourcing Sails Through Committee -

A Senate panel approved legislation Monday prohibiting the outsourcing of jobs at state parks less than a week after the State Building Commission renewed plans for rebuilding and privatizing the inn at Fall Creek Falls.

91. Inn Construction, Private Management Plan Draw Ire of State Sen. Lee Harris -

State Sen. Lee Harris is criticizing Gov. Bill Haslam’s decision to renew an outsourcing plan for development and operations at Fall Creek Falls State Park, calling it a move to bolster profits for a private company.

92. Bill to Create Criminal Trespassing at Apartment Complexes Could Face Legal Challenges -

NASHVILLE – Two Memphis lawmakers are pushing legislation designed to clear apartment complexes of trespassers, in some cases to ensure that emergency personnel avoid intimidation and threats when they answer calls dealing with shootings.

93. View From the Hill: Outsourcing Win More About Turf Than Trends -

As Fall Creek Falls folks celebrate a state decision to postpone park privatization, the question is whether public opposition or failure to follow long-standing state protocol led to the plug-pulling.

94. View From the Hill: House Leaders Still Figuring Out Sexual Harassment Policy -

In a case of déjà vu all over again, Democratic state Rep. Bo Mitchell isn’t willing to give Republican House leaders a break on their handling of former Rep. Mark Lovell’s resignation for alleged sexual misconduct.

95. Fall Creek Falls Park Contract Postponed Indefinitely -

NASHVILLE – The state is putting an indefinite hold on a proposed contract for a private company to redevelop and operate Fall Creek Falls State Park.

The Department of General Services is postponing the request for proposals process from vendors for a contract to oversee construction of a new inn at the park and to run its hospitality services after the $22 million project is complete.

96. Last Word: How Do You Get On The List, Sedgwick & Thornwood and Musicals -

Monday was Presidents Day and thus a holiday at City Hall. But for the occupant on City Hall’s top floor it was anything but a holiday. The list Memphis Police made for who has to have a uniformed police officer next to them to go anywhere in City Hall is turning into a controversy over possible surveillance of citizens participating in the last year or so of protests around the city.

97. View From the Hill: Outsourcing, Rates Worry Park Fans -

Dunlap resident Kathy Gilbert opposes privatization of Fall Creek Falls on a number of fronts.

If a vendor comes in to run the state park, as planned by Gov. Bill Haslam’s administration, she’s worried about the possible loss of jobs or pay and benefits by state employees, the funneling of revenue to private investors and the raising of rates at the state park’s lodge when it’s rebuilt, potentially making it less affordable for families to visit.

98. Flurry of Bills Affecting LGBT Community Filed in State Legislature Before Deadline -

NASHVILLE – Tennessee lawmakers met last Thursday’s legislation-filing deadline with a host of social measures one Memphis representative describes as “wedge bills” because they drive people apart.

99. Bills Affecting LGBT Community Filed Before Deadline -

NASHVILLE – Tennessee lawmakers met last Thursday’s legislation-filing deadline with a host of social measures one Memphis representative describes as “wedge bills” because they drive people apart.

100. TVA Drilling Controversy May Change Well Actions -

The controversy over Tennessee Valley Authority drilling water wells into the Memphis aquifer for the new TVA power plant in southwest Memphis is becoming a push for more public notice of such plans and better mapping of the water supply under the city.