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Editorial Results (free)

1. County Leaders Face New Budget Anxiety -

Shelby County commissioners meet in special session Wednesday, July 23, to cross the last “t” of the spring budget season some 27 days after the start of the new fiscal year.

That’s “t” for taxes.

2. Will Mariota’s Second Season Resemble Luck or RG3? -

The Tennessee Titans’ offensive playbook has been rewritten. The verbiage for calling plays has been edited. The line has been revamped with three new starters.

Why? The team’s ownership and coaches desperately want to get the most out of quarterback prodigy Marcus Mariota.

3. Scramble in the 8th District -

You might call it the calm before the storm. The Aug. 4 election, for which early voting starts July 15, is calmer than usual for the election cycle before a November presidential general election – the only election that more than half of Shelby County voters regularly show up for.

4. Court Upholds Net Neutrality Rules on Equal Internet Access -

WASHINGTON (AP) – In a big win for the Obama administration, a federal appeals court on Tuesday upheld the government's "net neutrality" rules that require internet providers to treat all web traffic equally.

5. May 27-June 2: This week in Memphis history -

1990: On the front page of The Daily News, the large cavitation channel being built on Presidents Island is nearing completion. Its formal name is the David Taylor Research Center. The chamber, 240 feet long by 65 feet high, is to hold 1.5 million gallons of water to test water flow effects, or cavitation characteristics, for ships and submarines.

6. Ifs, Etc. -

A wordier version of this column ran in 2008. That would have been shortly after the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette ran a certain editorial. In which it asserted that to say there are “no ifs, ands or buts” is wrong. The correct phrase, it averred, is “no ifs, ans or buts.”

7. Last Word: Behind Brown, Selling 128 Adams and Preparing for School's Out -

It was a dark and stormy night. Well, dark but not really stormy – a little rain which is more than enough to activate all kinds of television mayhem and warnings that make your iPhone rattle and hum.

8. Last Word: Memphis Gets Busy, Elections Future and Past and Dad Rock In C-Y -

While their folks are still getting settled over in the front office at The Commercial Appeal, Gannett announces Monday an $815 million offer to buy Tribune Publishing which would put The Los Angeles Times and The Chicago Tribune in the expanding USA Today family.

9. Last Word: Lipscomb's Successor, MATA School Buses and Roland's Big Breakfast -

Paul Young gets a lot more attention these days than he did when he was the first director of the city-county Office of Sustainability. The attention comes with being the city director of Housing and Community Development where virtually all of the funding comes from the federal government.
That federal funding has changed the face of public housing in the city in the last 25 years. There is only one large public housing project left in the city as a result of the federal funding and its use by Young’s predecessor, Robert Lipscomb.
And what Lipscomb did with the job combined with being the executive director of the Memphis Housing Authority is why a lot of people want to get to know Paul Young these days.
Our centerpiece story by Madeline Faber in Tuesday’s edition makes clear that Young has no desire to wield that kind of power. And it is unlikely anyone in the near future will have the kind of autonomy Lipscomb did.
But beyond that there is still the flow of a lot of federal dollars and Young has some ideas based on his experience in government and finance prior to coming to HCD – everything in government is initials.
It’s a much different experience than Lipscomb’s. Lipscomb coined the phrase “ending public housing as we know it” and at times that slogan wasn’t followed with a lot of detail about what came after public housing was demolished, especially with the first of the projects to fall.
The last public housing project, Foote Homes, will be demolished on Young’s watch which makes his tenure important if more limited than Lipscomb’s tenure.

10. Time for Strunk to Become Titans' Most Valuable Player -

Quick question about the Titans: Who has the most to prove?

Is it Mike Mularkey, a two-time loser as a head coach?

Is it Jon Robinson, a first-time general manager?

11. Conrad Call for De-Annexation Talks Draws Favorable Reviews -

Memphis City Council Chairman Kemp Conrad wants to open talks with county commissioners on possible voluntary de-annexations.

And County Commission Chairman Terry Roland said he is open to the idea.

12. Last Word: Back to Nashville, Dentistry & Genomes and Living The Fable -

The Memphis traffic is again heavy on the Interstate to Nashville as the Senate state and local government committee meets Tuesday to pick up where it left off with the still-forming version the upper chamber is crafting of the de-annexation bill.

13. Commission Takes Second Vote on Term Limits Referendum -

Shelby County Commissioners take up the second of three readings Monday, March 28, of an ordinance that would ask voters to do away with term limits for the commission, the office of Shelby County Mayor and five other countywide elected positions.

14. Cleaning House -

Every neighborhood in Memphis and Shelby County has the right to be free from the negative effects of vacant, abandoned and blighted properties. That’s the battle cry of the Memphis Blight Elimination Charter, a 23-page pledge that will steer policy and programs dedicated to blight eradication.

15. Last Word: Presidential Distractions, Dude Perfect and The Kirby Farm House -

When it comes to political surprises, the presidential contenders may be the next group on the ballot locally. But they need to up their game if they are going to hold the attention of Memphis voters.
With three of the Republican contenders on their way to Shelby County this weekend and probably more making plans, the attention Tuesday shifted dramatically to the open 8th District Congressional seat that isn’t on the ballot until the August primaries.

16. David Lusk Gallery Turns Page in New Space -

More than most weeks, David Lusk is especially ready for Friday this week. Eight months after renovation work began, Lusk is ready to host a public celebration officially unveiling his longtime art gallery’s new home at 97 Tillman St. on Feb. 26.

17. The Week Ahead: Feb. 1, 2016 -

How was your weekend, Memphis? The good news is you officially made it through January. Here’s a look at what’s happening this week, from a frigid swim to a FedExForum double-header…

18. The Grind -

For Memphis musicians like John Paul Keith, the grind is not a catchy rallying cry or slogan. It’s a philosophy, a work ethic that allows musicians like him to earn a living dedicating themselves to their craft in one of the most important music cities in the world.

19. Tenn. AG Opinion Raises Questions About $1B Schools Liability Shift -

A legal opinion from the Tennessee Attorney General’s office says the Shelby County Commission has to specifically vote to assume the indebtedness from employees benefits of the old Memphis City Schools system.

20. Memorable Events of 2015 will Spill Into 2016 -

When you really get down to it, history is a collection of moments, moments that, when they fall one after the other over the long arc of time, eventually form the tapestry representing who we are.

21. This Week in Memphis History: November 27-December 3 -

2014: A “die-in” in the National Civil Rights Museum courtyard begins a series of local protests that mirror national demonstrations over the recent deaths of black suspects in police encounters or in police custody. The protests begin to coalesce as the Black Lives Matter movement.

22. Three Tennessee Appeals Judges Finalists for Supreme Court Vacancy -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Three state appeals judges appointed by Gov. Bill Haslam were selected Tuesday as finalists to fill a vacancy on the Tennessee Supreme Court.

The Governor's Council for Judicial Appointments interviewed nine applicants during a public hearing before narrowing the field to three and sending the names to the Republican governor.

23. Haslam Report to Bond-Rating Agencies Mentions Outsourcing -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — While Gov. Bill Haslam says he has not decided whether to outsource management of more state-owned buildings, a document used earlier this month in presentations to New York bond-rating agencies says he's eyeing that possibility.

24. Luttrell Pushes Budget Summit for New Commission Chair -

When Shelby County Commissioners meet Monday, Sept. 14, the group will have a new chairman – but not a permanent one – and will try to set a date for a budget summit.

Chairman pro tempore Van Turner will be the acting head as the 13-member body tries to do what it couldn’t at its Aug. 10 meeting: elect a leader for the next year. Outgoing chairman Justin Ford’s one-year term ended Sept. 1.

25. Hooker Fights for Right to Die on His Terms -

John Jay Hooker, a household name in Middle Tennessee if nowhere else, is suffering from stage 4 metastatic cancer with weeks, not months to live.

26. Deciphering Google’s Algorithms No Easy Task -

Much can ride on a Google search. People use the search engine to find information on every aspect of their lives, from finding a plumber who works on Sunday to digging up information on a blind date.

27. Dog Daycare Bringing New Life to East Memphis Retail Center -

A new doggy daycare and camp is coming to East Memphis.

Becky and Tim Simcoe have leased 8,875 square feet at the Balmoral Shopping Center at Quince Road and Ridgeway Road in East Memphis to open a Camp Bow Wow franchise.

28. Events -

Page Robbins Adult Day Center will host a free dementia care presentation Monday, June 15, from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. or 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at Germantown Presbyterian Church, 2363 Germantown Road S. David Troxel, co-founder of the Best Friends Approach, will speak followed by a Q&A. Cost is free. Visit pagerobbins.org.

29. Events -

Luna Nova Ensemble will present the ninth annual Belvedere Chamber Music Festival Wednesday, June 17, through Saturday, June 20. Evening concerts are at 7:30 p.m. each night at Grace-St. Luke’s Episcopal Church, 1750 Peabody Ave. Afternoon concerts are Friday and Saturday at 3:30 p.m. at the Beethoven Club, 263 S. McLean Blvd. Admission is free. Visit lunanova.org.

30. Will Tennessee Republicans Ever Be Truly Happy? -

Why aren’t Tennessee Republicans happier?

With the GOP so dominate in the Tennessee General Assembly and losses so rare – on the Hill or in elections – the party’s lawmakers should be jubilant with this year’s session. But it’s never enough.

31. Hello, Josephine! -

Wikipedia indicates that a song written by Fats Domino and Dave Bartholomew “charted #7 on the Billboard R&B charts and #14 on the Billboard pop charts” in 1960. The actual title of the song was “My Girl Josephine,” although “in various cover versions,” it became known as “Hello Josephine.” It’s a bluesy number, easy to play on the guitar, and the lyrics begin:

32. Rudd Defends Relay Partnership For Teachers -

The University of Memphis’ College of Education produced 19 teachers last year who are teaching in the 59 lowest performing schools in the Shelby County Schools system.

University of Memphis president David Rudd wants the number to be around 600 a year and he wants the school’s College of Education to partner with the nonprofit Relay Graduate School of Education to meet that goal.

33. UofM Faculty Express Concerns About Program -

Faculty members at the University of Memphis say they have concerns about a new teacher training program under consideration.

The Commercial Appeal reports the newspaper and faculty obtained Relay Graduate School of Education's 448-page application last month through the Freedom of Information Act. The university has offered Relay free classroom and office space for the program that it proposes to start next summer.

34. University of Memphis Faculty Express Concerns About Program -

Faculty members at the University of Memphis say they have concerns about a new teacher training program under consideration.

The Commercial Appeal reports the newspaper and faculty obtained Relay Graduate School of Education’s 448-page application last month through the Freedom of Information Act. The university has offered Relay free classroom and office space for the program that it proposes to start next summer.

35. Recruiting Wars -

Memphis Grizzlies point guard Mike Conley is in his eighth year in the NBA. But he’s just 27 years old and his 10-year class reunion at Lawrence North High School in Indianapolis is still an event in the future.

36. Newby's Owner Raising Money to Keep Doors Open -

Newby’s owner Todd Adams has turned to crowdfunding to help him raise money that will be used to keep his bar and music venue on the Highland Strip open.

Adams has set up a GoFundMe account to raise $25,000 to help keep the doors open at Newby’s, which Paragon Bank foreclosed on this summer. The owner of Newby’s since 1997, Adams wants to get to the point where he can buy back the property, after which he then has a plan to reshape its layout and include a bevy of additions.

37. Real Estate Experts Look at Impact of North Mississippi -

Six years after the real estate bubble burst nationally, the recovery of the commercial and residential sectors in Memphis is slower than in other parts of the country. But they are recovering on their own new terms, say the incoming president of the Memphis Area Association of Realtors, the president of the West Tennessee Home Builders Association and a mortgage lender.

38. Fueling Film -

FuelFilm, a nonprofit that wants to serve as a launch pad of sorts for independent filmmakers and to kick the Memphis film industry up a notch, is ready for its close-up.

The organization has already seen a productive 2014 and is moving forward with big plans for the 5-year-old nonprofit. Already, for example, it’s raised more than $40,000 in outside funding and supported the creation of more than two dozen short films and five features, not to mention the 35 workshops, panels and events it has run.

39. Wine Referendums Down to Final Day -

The deadline for signatures to be gathered on the still-forming proposed referendums to allow wine in grocery stores is Thursday, Aug. 21.

The deadline for candidates to file in the set of Bartlett, Germantown, Collierville and Millington municipal elections on the November ballot is at noon the same day.

40. FedEx Could Face $1.6 Billion Fine for Drug Shipments -

Starting around 1998, Internet pharmacies – some of which did not require a doctor’s visit or prescription – began proliferating online, turning a corner of the Web into a black market bazaar for prescription pills.

41. Memphis Bar Judicial Poll Released -

The Memphis Bar Association poll of attorneys on the judicial races on the Aug. 7 ballot shows 16 percent to as high as 38 percent of the attorneys participating have no opinion in many of the judicial races.

42. More ‘Unicorns,’ More Rosenfelt -

When I wrote about the 2014 Little Rock Film Festival, I reviewed, in three paragraphs, “I Believe in Unicorns.” This just in from that film’s director, Leah Myerhoff: “I appreciate your thoughtful response to the film. However, [please] make one correction: the lead actress is Natalia Dyer, not Amy Seimetz.”

43. New Rosenfelt Novel Delivers -

David Rosenfelt has done it again! Kept me in my chair for two whole hours, that is. Once I got to page 100 of “Without Warning,” I had to just go ahead and finish it. You know, to see how it would end.

44. Miller Named Partner at Signature Advertising -

Kevin Miller, creative director at Signature Advertising, has been named a partner at the Memphis-based agency. Miller joined Signature more than 10 years ago as a senior copywriter and has won numerous awards for creative excellence.

45. Jones, Reaves Look to Commission Terms -

For David Reaves and Eddie Jones, the 2014 election year is over.

46. Schools Demerger Reflects Cooperation, Competition -

For now, Shelby County’s seven public school systems are cooperating and competing with one another often at the same time on the way to the demerger of public education in August.

The same dual existence is playing itself out between the Shelby County Schools board and parents of children who have attended schools about to be in the suburban school systems but who live outside the six cities and towns.

47. Shelby County Party Heads Look Ahead to Primaries -

As Shelby County Democrats try to improve on losing every countywide office to Republicans in the 2010 county elections, party leaders are also warning political figures who identify as Democrats not to cross party lines.

48. Oxymoronic and Iconic -

The phrase “civil war” is an oxymoron, a contradiction in terms. And, of course, it’s generally used to refer to open hostilities between factions that occupy a common geographical sphere.

49. This week in Memphis history: February 21-27 -

2013: The Salvation Army Kroc Center opened at the Mid-South Fairgrounds.

1974: On the front page of The Daily News, Albertine McCrory developers announced a 1,500-home planned community at Interstate 40 and Whitten Road called Hillshire. The plans called for single-family homes, townhouse condominiums, garden apartments, duplexes and commercial areas as well as an office industrial park for an estimated 12,000 people or a community about the size of Parkway Village at the time.

50. Trustee to Hold Workshops for Delinquent Taxpayers -

Shelby County Trustee David Lenoir has announced the 2014 schedule for the Project H.O.M.E. (Home Ownership Made Easier) financial literacy workshop series, increasing the number of workshops from 11 to 15.

51. Trustee to Hold Workshops on Delinquent Taxes -

Shelby County Trustee David Lenoir has announced the 2014 schedule for the Project H.O.M.E. (Home Ownership Made Easier) financial literacy workshop series, increasing the number of workshops from 11 to 15.

52. Judicial Campaign Season Emerges With Different Rules -

Fundraisers and other campaign events for judicial candidates are difficult.

Sometimes there are more candidates for other offices at them than citizens with no direct political interest who are undecided on who to vote for. And more so than in any other field of candidates, judges are limited by ethics in what they can say when trying to persuade someone to vote for them.

53. The Economy in 2013: Naughty and Nice -

Thanks to the Federal Reserve’s dedication to increasing your net worth, 2013 will go down as one of the most prosperous years on file. Stock prices have increased more than 20 percent and U.S. home prices have increased nearly 15 percent. These gains hit national headlines, but the gains for back-page asset classes are equally impressive.

54. Affordable Care Act -

On Oct. 1, a new shopping website will launch in Tennessee.

Much like Amazon.com, it will offer a place where consumers can compare products from different sellers and buy the one that best suits their needs.

55. County Trustee Lenoir Runs for Re-Election -

Shelby County Trustee David Lenoir’s campaign website and Facebook page went up Thursday, Sept. 12, signaling his intent to seek a second four-year term in the 2014 county elections, starting with the May 6 Republican primaries.

56. County Trustee Lenoir Runs for Re-Election -

Shelby County Trustee David Lenoir’s campaign website and Facebook page went up Thursday, Sept. 12, signaling his intent to seek a second four-year term in the 2014 county elections, starting with the May 6 Republican primaries.

57. Commission Appoints Avant To School Board, Keeps Shafer As Budget Chair -

Shelby County Commissioners appointed Shante Avant, a mother who has worked for the Women’s Foundation and other local nonprofits for 17 years, as the newest members of the countywide school board.

58. Commission Appoints Avant To School Board, Keeps Shafer As Budget Chair -

Shelby County Commissioners appointed Shante Avant, a mother who has worked for the Women’s Foundation and other local nonprofits for 17 years, as the newest members of the countywide school board.

59. County Commission to Fill School Board Vacancy -

Shelby County Commissioners bring the countywide school board up to its full strength of seven members Monday, Sept. 9, by appointing someone to the open District 6 seat.

The commission meets at 1:30 p.m. at the Vasco Smith County Administration Building, 160 N. Main St.

60. US Requires Car Makers to Offer Data About Recalls -

DETROIT (AP) – Starting next summer, U.S. consumers will be able to search a giant database to find out if their cars or motorcycles have been recalled and if the vehicles have been fixed.

61. August 9-15, 2013: This week in Memphis history -

2010: Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. announced Tobey Park would be the site for the city’s first neighborhood skatepark. The $440,000 project was completed and opened in November 2011.

2008: Grays Creek residents and others in Cordova began organizing opposition to plans for a new Walmart Supercenter on the northwest corner of Houston Levee and Macon Roads. The project would later be voted down by the Shelby County Commission.

62. ‘Unleashed’ Delivers -

I’ve written before of David Rosenfelt, whose 10th Andy Carpenter novel, “Unleashed,” has just been unleashed – uh, released. Andy Carpenter is a fictional solo-practitioner in Paterson, N.J. He’s independently wealthy, via inheritance and an early-career jackpot judgment in a civil case.

63. Ady Joins Ballet Memphis as Ballet Master -

James Ady has joined Ballet Memphis as ballet master. In his new role, Ady will teach morning technique classes, assist with community outreach programs, and rehearse and coach dancers for upcoming performances.

64. Events -

ArtsMemphis will present the Stax to the Max music festival Saturday, April 27, from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. outside the Stax Museum of American Soul Music, 926 E. McLemore St. Admission to the festival is free; discounted museum tickets are $2 between noon and 5 p.m. Visit staxmuseum.com.

65. The New Beale -

Over the last four years, the next chapter in the development of Beale Street has been a stop-and-go affair. First would come announcements followed by silence from official channels.

Along with that silence, though, was quiet activity on the side, a movement that culminated with the March announcement of Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr.’s strategic planning committee’s report, “A Framework for Beale Street.”

66. Haslam School Voucher Bill Dead This Session -

NASHVILLE (AP) – The Republican leader carrying Gov. Bill Haslam's proposal to create school vouchers in Tennessee said he's decided to let it die this session because he's tired of the "gamesmanship."

67. Lofty Company -

For creating the overnight package-delivery business four decades ago, and for everything his company has done since, FedEx Corp. founder Fred Smith has been placed among an elite group of chief executives by the business magazine Barron’s.

68. Trustee Releases Slate of Financial Literacy Workshops -

Shelby County Trustee David Lenoir’s office has worked with almost 800 financially struggling taxpayers since the summer of 2011 to educate them via the trustee’s Project H.O.M.E. financial literacy workshop series.

69. Reardon Cautions Downtowners About Heritage Trail -

The University of Memphis professor spearheading the opposition of demolishing the city’s last remaining public housing project in the Vance Avenue neighborhood says that while the Heritage Trail Community Redevelopment Plan appears to be on “indefinite hold,” it is not dead, and Downtowners should beware.

70. ‘Judge-Sicle’ Murder Mystery Thrills to the End -

How could I not read the latest David Rosenfelt novel, “Airtight?” How could I not?! The author’s very publicist himself sent me an advance reading copy, asking that I do so. That, plus the book starts out with the murder of a judge, and I obviously want that case cracked, right?

71. Court: Obama Appointments are Unconstitutional -

WASHINGTON (AP) – In a setback for President Barack Obama, a federal appeals court ruled Friday that he violated the Constitution in making recess appointments last year, a decision that could severely curtail the president's ability to bypass the Senate to fill administration vacancies.

72. Google Emerges From Federal Probe Relatively Unscathed -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) – Google has settled a U.S. government probe into its business practices without making any major concessions on how the company runs its Internet search engine, the world's most influential gateway to digital information and commerce.

73. Handbag Enthusiasts Flock to Katie Kalsi’s Creations -

The fan comments on Memphis handbag designer Katie Kalsi’s company Facebook page are effusive, enthusiastic and frequently punctuated with energetic exclamation points.

“I love my bag!!!”

74. Bass Berry Law Firm Honored for Recent Deals -

The law firm of Bass, Berry & Sims PLC has won the mergers and acquisitions “deal of the year” award in the $50 million to $100 million category from M&A Advisors.

The deal for which Bass Berry won the award was announced earlier this year. It involved Luminex Corp. – a health care and life sciences research company – acquiring privately held GenturaDx, a molecular diagnostics company focused on making nucleic acid testing affordable and practical for any lab.

75. Make Sure Your Organization is Mobile -

Part one of a three-part series. Life has gone mobile. For many, life is lived on the move and cell phones and mobile devices are our guides helping with communication, directions, purchases, music, news updates, videos and more. “Mobile” has become the way much of America is using their computer. IPhones, Androids and BlackBerries are replacing laptops and desktop computers. Tablets and mobile phones are replacing the way that people access the information when they are on the road.

76. Commission Takes Applications for School Board -

The Shelby County Commission is about to fill two vacancies on the countywide school board created by the Aug. 2 election results.

David Reaves and David Pickler won school board races for two of the seven district seats that will be the countywide school board after the schools merger begins in August 2013. Both had been members of the old Shelby County Schools board who continue serving with members of the old Memphis City Schools board on the 23-member transition board up to the merger date.

77. Kickstarter Projects Generate Millions of Dollars -

NEW YORK (AP) – A funny thing happens on Kickstarter, the website where people ask for money to finance their projects. Sometimes, they get more money than they ask for.

Sometimes, they get millions more.

78. Airline Bid to Block Consumer Protections Rejected -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The government can require airlines to show consumers a total ticket price that includes taxes and fees in print and online ads, the U.S. Court of Appeals said Tuesday, rejecting an industry challenge to a series of consumer protection regulations.

79. Challenge of Voter ID Law Comes Into Focus -

The way to a court challenge of Tennessee’s voter identification law from Memphis takes a few twists and turns away from the polling place.

And while Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. as well as several attorneys outside City Hall say they are ready to make the challenge, it will depend on who is willing to not have their vote counted in the Aug. 2 elections after they present a Memphis library card as photo ID to election officials.

80. Trustee Conducts Workshop for Taxpayers June 26 -

Shelby County Trustee David Lenoir will conduct a Project H.O.M.E. Workshop Tuesday, June 26, at the Charles Powell-Westwood Community Center at 810 Western Park.

81. Settlement Brings Milestone in Wells Fargo Case -

The announcement that Wells Fargo & Co. has agreed to settle a three-year-old lawsuit filed by Memphis and Shelby County governments over the company’s lending practices – with the settlement including certain local lending commitments on Wells’ part – was certainly a denouement in the case.

82. State Treasurer: Charter Schools Not a Hardship -

For several months, the Tennessee treasurer and comptroller struggled to get and reconcile basic head counts for both of Shelby County’s public school systems to make a decision on whether 17 new charter schools to open in August would be too much of a financial drain on the systems.

83. New Charter Schools Can Open in August -

Add 17 charter schools in Shelby County when the new school year begins in August.

Tennessee Treasurer David Lillard ruled Wednesday, April 4, that the countywide school board was wrong in one of its first major decisions when it denied en masse the applications for the charter schools in November.

84. Mistrial Motion Denied In Petties Drug Org Trial -

Memphis Federal Court Judge Hardy Mays has denied a motion by defense attorneys for a mistrial in the Petties drug organization trial.

The decision by Mays in a 15-page written ruling, clears the way for the defense in the drug conspiracy, racketeering and murder for hire case to begin telling its side of the story Wednesday, March 14.

85. Viewer Faults Columnist For New Habits -

I can’t stop reading “Lio.” Even though it’s the unfunniest funny ever. Today, Lio sees the newspaper boy’s satchel abandoned on the sidewalk. In panel two Lio is visibly shocked, looking at something we can’t see. Panel three shows Lio in the vet’s waiting room with a dragon, whose bloated shape suggests that he’s eaten the newspaper boy.

86. Autonomy Plan Part of Schools Consolidation Proposal Unveiled Thursday -

The schools consolidation transition planning commission will get two recommendations Thursday, Feb. 23, for the structure of a countywide consolidated public school system.

One is a “united” centralized school system leadership structure with what are described in an executive summary as “lean regional offices to support and manage principals.”

87. Author Rosenfelt as Witty as His Novel’s Characters -

In the last two columns, I’ve let it be known that I am reading the novels of David Rosenfelt in order. I’ve provided teaser-type blurbs for the first five: “Open and Shut,” “First Degree,” “Bury the Lead,” “Sudden Death” and “Dead Center.” Since last week’s column, I’ve read No. 6, “Play Dead” (2007), and started “New Tricks” (2009).

88. Quality Check Of 2012 Rally -

Rally Quality Check So far, 2012 has struck a bullish tone. However, we should look beyond the pop indices and examine the supporting evidence to determine the quality of the current rally. This column should make you more qualified to translate the “Market Data” page of the WSJ’s Money and Investing section. Let’s take a quick tour and highlight the quality indicators with context. Once you have completed this, you will have earned your rally inspector merit badge.

89. Trading Hands -

It’s been something of a roller coaster ride for a little more than six months in the drawn-out process by Regions Financial Corp. to sell Morgan Keegan & Co. Inc., its Memphis-based investment unit.

90. Compliance Brings More Accountability -

EuroZone 2.0 Rather than bore you this week with the details of the most recent EU rescue flare, let’s take a look back at the bigger picture. After a 30-year global credit binge, credit is no longer flowing to the irresponsible or over-indebted. Based upon the rules defined in the Maastricht Treaty, entrants into the euro must have a debt-to-GDP ratio below 60 percent and budget deficits below 3 percent of GDP.

91. Recorded History -

It began as a handwritten single piece of paper hand-delivered to 25 people in what was once the city of Memphis.

It was 125 years ago that the publication now called The Daily News was founded.

92. Yahoo, ABC Joining Forces in News Partnership -

NEW YORK (AP) – ABC News and Yahoo Inc. are joining to deliver more online news to their audiences. With the deal, ABC News content will be prominently featured on Yahoo News, the most visited news website in the world. It will also show up on Yahoo's popular front page.

93. First Schools Meeting Addresses Blueprint -

The two groups that will do much of the political and organizational heavy lifting in the consolidation of Shelby County’s two public school systems first will do a lot of listening in the weeks to come.

94. Millington Probe Highlights Volatile Relationship -

The relationship between Millington Mayor Richard Hodges and the police chief he appointed, Ray Douglas, has been brief and volatile.

95. Light of Day -

A Collierville program is making a profound difference in the quality of life for those suffering from memory loss by providing a safe, stimulating, home-away-from-home experience, and by providing caregivers much-needed respite.

96. Cargill Shifts Senior Management Responsibilities -

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) – Privately held agribusiness conglomerate Cargill Inc. is shifting management responsibilities for its senior executives, with an eye on expansion in Latin America, Europe and Asia.

97. Big Easy Haiku Conference -

NEW ORLEANS – How can I not write about the Haiku Society of America’s South Region annual meeting in New Orleans?

How can I not?!

This event, largely planned by the New Orleans Haiku Society, and its leader, Xavier University English professor David Lanoue, was the focus of a recent road trip.

98. Collection of Puns Entertains -

A few weeks back, I advocated the use of puns. Within days, maybe hours, of that column’s appearance, I received an email from David R. Yale, the “Pundit of Double Entendres,” as he is referred to on the title page of his book.

99. Six-Year Divorce Case Picture of Legal Wrangling -

Shem and Danielle Malmquist arrived at the Tennessee Court of Appeals in Jackson this past October without attorneys. They each represented themselves in an appeal of a Shelby County divorce case that has lasted six years over a marriage that lasted less than five months.

100. White House: Obama to Lay Out Spending Plan -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Barack Obama this week will outline a broad plan to reduce the nation's deficit, shifting from immediate budget concerns to the debate over the nation's long-term economic health. Obama is expected to call for cuts to Medicare and Medicaid and tax hikes for the wealthy.