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Editorial Results (free)

1. And Now It's Comcast vs. The Wait for the Cable Guy -

NEW YORK (AP) – Did you hear the one about the cable company that's actually improving customer service? The punchline: Comcast and its rivals say it's no joke.

These companies have poured hundreds of millions into new tools and staff to de-agonize the process of getting cable TV, Internet or phone service. It's part of a yearslong effort to assuage customers as the specter of "cord-cutting" – dumping cable for Netflix and the like – haunts the industry. More than 2 million customers have fled from cable and satellite over the past three years, according to research firm SNL Kagan, and the pace has been accelerating.

2. Chism Readying 2018 Bid for County Mayor -

Former Shelby County Commissioner Sidney Chism wants to be the Democratic nominee for Shelby County mayor in 2018, and he plans to begin his campaign after the November presidential election.

3. MSU’s Mullen Defends Simmons At Media Days -

HOOVER, Ala. – In another year and another circumstance, Mississippi State coach Dan Mullen might have spent all his time at SEC Media Days answering questions about having to replace Dak Prescott at quarterback.

4. Gordon: ‘You’re Not Alone on Your Journey’ -

If you know anything about Kat Gordon at all, it’s likely the Technicolor version that’s clearest in press photos: There she is, gingham apron tied on, smile dazzling, holding a tempting plate of cupcakes or pie from her wildly popular bakery, Muddy’s Bake Shop, which now comprises two retail locations and a commercial kitchen and custom studio.

5. Williams Hired for Memphis Blight-Fighting Fellowship -

The city of Memphis and University of Memphis Cecil C. Humphreys School of Law recently hired Brittany J. Williams as the city’s first Neighborhood Preservation Fellow. In that role, Williams will represent the city in Environmental Court lawsuits against property owners who have vacant, abandoned or dilapidated properties that violate city codes.

6. 4 Children Fatally Stabbed in Memphis; Mother Charged -

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) – Four young children were stabbed to death in a gated apartment complex in suburban Memphis on Friday, and the Shelby County Sheriff's Department has charged their mother, Shanynthia Gardner, with first degree murder as well as other charges.

7. Mayor, DA Discuss Approach To Curb Crime -

Much of the attention in local crime statistics this year goes to the jump in the city’s homicide rate.

But that rate pales in comparison to aggravated assaults.

From January through May, there were 492 aggravated assaults per 100,000 people in Memphis, according to statistics from the Memphis-Shelby County Crime Commission.

8. Scotty Moore, Elvis Presley's First Guitarist, Dies At 84 -

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) – Scotty Moore, the pioneering rock guitarist whose sharp, graceful style helped Elvis Presley shape his revolutionary sound and inspired a generation of musicians that included Keith Richards, Jimmy Page and Bruce Springsteen, died Tuesday. He was 84.

9. Symbols of War Keep Dragging Us Down -

More than 150 years ago, we fought our nation’s most bloody war, a conflagration that claimed 620,000 lives, almost as many as were killed in all other American war efforts combined.

Despite the horror of it all, we just can’t seem to learn a lesson, possibly because of Southern hardheadedness, and a century and a half later, we seem doomed to an eternal task: pushing Sisyphus’ rock to the top of a hill only to have it chase us back to the bottom.

10. Chamber Names Simmons Director of Public Policy -

Haley Simmons has joined the Greater Memphis Chamber as the director of public policy, a new position in the chamber’s community development department. In this role, Simmons will be focused on enhancing the chamber’s advocacy efforts to inform and engage its members on important policy issues, and he’ll also be responsible for growing the chamber’s role in education initiatives.

11. Brush With Death Recalled, Part 1 -

I was 50 when I died. April 21, 2002. I can’t forget the date.

A few weeks earlier, I saw an old friend, Cotton, at a memorial service for a mutual friend. In the early 1980s, Cotton and I were in the same golf group. After the service, we reminisced about a golf outing that no one involved could forget.

12. ‘Prevent’ Defenses: Freeze, Briles Look to Protect Themselves -

It’s safe to say in pretty much every college football program in America that players are made to pay some penalty for the basic infraction of being late to a practice or a team meeting.

Sometimes they are suspended for a quarter. Other times for a half or an entire game against some non-competitive directional school. Sometimes, the players even have a semi-legitimate excuse for being late.

13. Legislators Sweating the Small Stuff -

My late father kept a paper weight on his desk at home that read: “Don’t sweat the small stuff.”

Well, we’re sweating the small stuff – from the federal government down to the states – with this harangue over transgender bathrooms.

14. Balink Chosen to Lead The Exchange Club Family Center -

Jennifer Balink has been named executive director of The Exchange Club Family Center, where she’ll begin her duties July 1. In her new role, Balink aims to secure and direct every available resource toward breaking the cycle of child abuse and family violence in the Memphis community. 

15. State Legislature Closed Door On Progress, Invited Ridicule This Session -

The Tennessee General Assembly spent the last four months selecting a state book, attempting to regulate ingress/egress of bathrooms, and putting guns on college campuses. Given this lamentable priority list, we're not surprised that our House of Representatives chose not to vote on a bill that would have helped young kids realize their dreams, lift families out of poverty, and generate revenue for Tennessee.

16. Station to Station -

Even now, Explore Bike Share founder Doug Carpenter does not try to pretend that the initiative will cure all that ails Memphis. 

It won’t wipe out poverty. It can’t cure cancer. It won’t eliminate diabetes and obesity, solve all of the city’s transportation problems or totally bridge cultural and racial gaps that predate the bicycle’s invention.

17. Dave Thomas Named CEO Of Kemmons Wilson Insurance -

Dave Thomas has joined Kemmons Wilson Insurance Group as chief executive officer. In this role, he’s responsible for overseeing day-to-day operations and also is tasked with growing the Memphis-based property and casualty insurance company. Thomas has 40 years of experience in the insurance industry, most recently serving as CEO of Louisiana Citizens Property Insurance Corp.

18. Tennessee Leads the Nation in Bankruptcies -

Tennessee has a model program for financial literacy in its public schools. All high school students must pass a personal finance course to graduate, and even kindergartners are learning about money under a new initiative to extend the curriculum to primary school.

19. Akbari Proving to be Worthy Successor to Iconic DeBerry -

Those who wondered how Raumesh Akbari would do in following legendary Memphis legislator Lois DeBerry now have a much clearer picture.

20. FDA Effort Aims to Curb Smoking in LGBT Community -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Food and Drug Administration's latest anti-smoking campaign takes aim at young adults in the LGBT community, who officials say are nearly twice as likely to use tobacco as their peers.

21. Events -

Memphis College of Art will host an MFA Open House for prospective students on Friday, April 29, from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. at the Nesin Graduate School, 477 S. Main St. The event will take place concurrently with an opening reception for “Hueman: MFA Thesis Exhibition.” Visit mca.edu.

22. Last Word: Memphis Gets Busy, Elections Future and Past and Dad Rock In C-Y -

While their folks are still getting settled over in the front office at The Commercial Appeal, Gannett announces Monday an $815 million offer to buy Tribune Publishing which would put The Los Angeles Times and The Chicago Tribune in the expanding USA Today family.

23. Robots Are Taking Tennessee’s Jobs -

MTSU student Nathan Simpkins found the perfect major when the university started its mechatronics engineering program in 2013, a pursuit practically guaranteeing him a high-paying job in an increasingly automated manufacturing industry.

24. Bridging a Divide -

The Mid-South is united by more than the Mississippi River, but that’s what it took to get the region’s mayors in the same room.

In the aftermath of the 2011 Mississippi River flood, damage stretched from Millington’s naval base to Memphis’ Beale Street. Leaders of the affected municipalities had to come together to apply for FEMA grants and plot their way out of devastation.

25. Tickled Pink -

MEMPHIS IN BLACK AND WHITE. AND PINK. I’m glad Billy Orgel got engaged at Justine’s because that inspired his family to save it, not because they miss the crystal and crabmeat but because the place is personal.

26. FDA Campaign Takes Aim at Chewing Tobacco Use by Rural Teens -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Government health officials will team up with minor league baseball as part of a new $36 million campaign to discourage rural teenagers from using chewing tobacco.

Baseball stadiums will feature the campaign's central message this summer – "smokeless doesn't mean harmless" – via advertising and promotions with players. Ads will also run on local television, radio and online in 35 markets across the U.S., including cities in Michigan, Montana, South Carolina and Tennessee.

27. Southern Yankee -

To best understand another man’s baseball passion, you must first understand his baseball pain. So if you hope to truly understand Peter B. Freund, new majority owner of the Memphis Redbirds, you must travel back to his youth.

28. Legislators Playing Expensive Game With LGBT Issues -

The silly season is in full swing on Capitol Hill, but the “bathroom bill” and any jokes surrounding it are no laughing matter anymore. It’s getting downright expensive.

Tennessee Attorney General Herbert Slatery said this week the bill dealing with transgender student use of restrooms could cost the state more than $1.2 billion in federal funds for K-12 and higher education.

29. Last Word: Lipscomb's Successor, MATA School Buses and Roland's Big Breakfast -

Paul Young gets a lot more attention these days than he did when he was the first director of the city-county Office of Sustainability. The attention comes with being the city director of Housing and Community Development where virtually all of the funding comes from the federal government.
That federal funding has changed the face of public housing in the city in the last 25 years. There is only one large public housing project left in the city as a result of the federal funding and its use by Young’s predecessor, Robert Lipscomb.
And what Lipscomb did with the job combined with being the executive director of the Memphis Housing Authority is why a lot of people want to get to know Paul Young these days.
Our centerpiece story by Madeline Faber in Tuesday’s edition makes clear that Young has no desire to wield that kind of power. And it is unlikely anyone in the near future will have the kind of autonomy Lipscomb did.
But beyond that there is still the flow of a lot of federal dollars and Young has some ideas based on his experience in government and finance prior to coming to HCD – everything in government is initials.
It’s a much different experience than Lipscomb’s. Lipscomb coined the phrase “ending public housing as we know it” and at times that slogan wasn’t followed with a lot of detail about what came after public housing was demolished, especially with the first of the projects to fall.
The last public housing project, Foote Homes, will be demolished on Young’s watch which makes his tenure important if more limited than Lipscomb’s tenure.

30. Last Word: Pro Day, Hardwood Patios in C-Y and Memphis' Contested Convention -

It was a windy Pro Day Wednesday at the University of Memphis for Tigers quarterback Paxton Lynch. And if the wind wasn’t for you, you could watch Lynch work out for NFL teams and their representatives on the NFL network.
Don Wade was there to watch in person.

31. Lawmakers Lure Us In With Momentary Sanity, And Then... -

Just when it appears the Tennessee Senate is made up of sensible people – as evidenced by the killing of de-annexation legislation – the body is changing course with a Bible-thumping measure.

32. From Forest to Flooring, Cafe Ole’s New Deck Has ‘Seen the World’ -

This is a Memphis story. And by now it should be clear that Bill Courtney loves a Memphis story.

33. City Ready to Develop Master Plan for Pinch District -

The Pinch District, one of Memphis’ oldest neighborhoods, is getting its time in the spotlight.

The Downtown Memphis Commission, the city of Memphis Division of Housing & Community Development and the city-county Division of Planning & Development are coming together to develop the Pinch’s first master plan in to bring the area up to date with mixed-use buildings and streetscape improvements.

34. Settle? No. UT Needs to Defend Itself in Title IX Suit -

Lots of smoke. But is there a fire? That is the issue at the University of Tennessee, where a Title IX lawsuit alleges the university has a “hostile sexual environment” and violates federal laws dealing with student discipline hearings for sexual assault cases, especially those involving student-athletes.

35. Dodging a Disaster With Volkswagen? -

Next month will mark five years since the first Passat rolled off the assembly line at Chattanooga’s Volkswagen plant. Most anniversaries are a cause for celebration.

But as Chattanoogans blow out the candles on this particular milestone they’ll be hoping that Volkswagen’s diesel emissions troubles will soon be extinguished, too, and that the new SUV model they’ll start producing this year will help VW emerge from the crisis a better and stronger company than before.

36. Cleaning House -

Every neighborhood in Memphis and Shelby County has the right to be free from the negative effects of vacant, abandoned and blighted properties. That’s the battle cry of the Memphis Blight Elimination Charter, a 23-page pledge that will steer policy and programs dedicated to blight eradication.

37. Rudd + Bowen + Pastner = PR Nightmare at Memphis -

You keep thinking the story can’t get worse, and then it does. What we have here is an ongoing public relations disaster that is the University of Memphis athletic department as it pertains to all matters regarding the men’s basketball program.

38. Last Word: Putt and 1969, Fred Smith on Amazon and Ramsey's Departure -

George Howard Putt died in prison sometime last year state prison officials disclosed Wednesday -- far from the brief time he spent in Memphis but never far from the carnage he left behind in the Memphis of 1969.
The bodies of the first two of the five people killed by Putt between Aug. 14 and Sept. 11, 1969 were discovered just days after the murders of actress Sharon Tate and six others in Los Angeles by the Manson family dominated national news coverage. Less than a year earlier the Boston Strangler movie was in theaters, creating a sensation about the murders committed by serial killer Albert DeSalvo in Boston just a few years earlier.
Bernalyn and Roy Dumas were strangled by Putt in their home in Cooper-Young and Putt mutilated her body in a way that police homicide detectives still wouldn’t talk about decades later. The bodies were found in separate rooms.
Even with no details other than the names of the victims, the city was quickly spooked by the double murder. So when the body of Leila Jackson was found short of two weeks later, the city’s reaction was a palpable fear in which anyone unknown was to be avoided. Memphians didn’t tarry after work. They went home and bolted the doors.
It got worse as more victims turned up with little in common other than four of the five were women. They were of varying ages. Some were strangled and some were stabbed.
Just about any magazine rack of the day include true crime magazines that by the late 1960s were beginning to look very dated in their lurid noir-like covers teasing the most sensational crime narratives of the day.
They were an intentional contrast to the cover images of youth in bright colors in natural settings in other magazines heralding a new future and youth culture.
The murders in a Southern city, whose 1969 conservatism is hard to describe nearly 50 years later, quickly grabbed the covers of the true crime magazines. And the images they offered spoke to the scenic reality where Putt roamed even as the murders continued.
Apartment buildings and boarding houses were the settings for some of the murders but not all.
Glenda Sue Harden
was last seen walking to her car parked on the Cobblestones from the insurance office she worked at nearby. Her body was found in Martin Luther King/Riverside Park hidden under a piece of plywood.
At one of the murder scenes, police found an ice pick stuck in the side of the building with a stocking tied around it.
Putt’s last victim, in an apartment building on Bellevue, screamed as she was stabbed repeatedly and others in the building gave chase with police close behind, arresting Putt near the new and unopened section of the interstate that runs west of Bellevue.
Putt tried to force his way into another apartment nearby but the women inside kept him on the other side of the door.
The killer that panicked an entire city was a skinny utterly forgettable guy in his 20s with sideburns and glasses who appeared to have rarely roamed beyond a community of neighborhood bars, boarding houses and old apartment buildings in the Midtown and Medical Center areas.
It turns out he came to Memphis after walking away from a prison farm in Mississippi and into a Memphis that was slowly but surely changing. And the world that Putt encountered would soon vanish in large part.
Overton Square’s incarnation was about a year away. A new bridge was about to be built across the Mississippi River as part of Interstate 40 which was to go through Overton Park just south of the north-south leg of the interstate where Putt was captured.
Originally sentenced to death, Putt’s sentence was commuted when the U.S. Supreme Court banned the death penalty in the early 1970s.
He was serving a 497-year sentence when he died at the Turney Center Wednesday in Only, Tennessee.
Putt never sought parole and never gave any explanation for why he killed five people in less than a month and his apparently random selection of victims.

39. Tennessee Senate Speaker Ramsey Announces He Won't Run Again -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Senate Speaker Ron Ramsey, a leading figure in the Republican takeover of all three branches of Tennessee state government, announced Wednesday that he won't run for re-election.

40. Council Tallies Damage in 'Day of Bad News' -

Memphis City Council member Berlin Boyd summed up City Hall’s attitude Tuesday, March 15, during the council’s executive session. “Today is the day of bad news,” he said after a briefing from Mayor Jim Strickland on the deannexation bill approved the night before by the Tennessee House.
That was followed by more details on the estimated $60 million it will cost to replace the entire radio system for local first responders from the radios to the towers used to transmit their signals.

41. Last Word: Mudslide, The Deannexation Storm and Kilzer at Calvary -

Lots of news on a very rainy day including the flooding from the constant rain that closed some schools and cancelled a lot of other events. And then there was a mudslide on Riverside Drive from the bluff overlooking Tom Lee Park and the Mississippi River. The rain has also pushed the Wolf River to the point that it is now over some parts of the greenway in Germantown.

42. Higher-Ed Shuffle Stokes Fears of UT-TSU Merger -

Anthony Joshua, who moved to Nashville from Madison, Wis., to attend Tennessee State University, says he’s worried his historically black institution could be in for serious change – for the worse.

43. Anne Dixon Joins BRIDGES as CFO -

Anne Dixon has joined BRIDGES as vice president of finance and chief financial officer. Dixon, who is a Bridge Builders alumna, is responsible in her new role for financial reporting and analysis to help BRIDGES leadership in performing their responsibilities. 

44. Editorial: Your Anger And The Political Process -

The moving national elections that are our presidential primaries have never generated a 40 percent or higher voter turnout in Shelby County.

That goes back to 1972 when the primaries were redesigned to temper a convention process in both parties that had lost touch with voters.

45. Tennessee AD Dave Hart: Sexual Assault Unacceptable Act -

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Tennessee athletic director Dave Hart stood by his embattled football coach during a news conference Thursday at the university, two weeks after a federal lawsuit was filed Feb. 9 in Nashville alleging that Tennessee mishandles assault complaints against athletes.

46. Last Word: Timing and Numbers, Old Dominick Takes Shape and Zip Lines To Spring -

Political opportunity is defined by timing.
Witness a look at the early voting turnout numbers in advance of Tuesday’s election day.

More than half of the more than 43,000 Shelby County voters who cast early ballots voted Monday and Tuesday – the last two days of an early voting period that began Feb. 10 – way back there when Martin O’Malley was the third Democratic presidential contender and Jeb Bush was considered a force to be reckoned with in the Republican primaries.

47. Beale Street Music Festival Marks 40th Year With 64 Acts -

The last time Neil Young played Memphis, it was at the Mid-South Coliseum with a rockabilly band called the Shocking Pinks and Ronald Reagan was president.

48. Neil Young, Paul Simon, Modest Mouse Top Beale Street Music Fest Lineup -

Neil Young, Beck, Paul Simon, Train and Modest Mouse are among the headliners for the 2016 Beale Street Music Festival, April 29-May 1, in Tom Lee Park.

49. Duke Takes Reins at Friends for Life -

Longtime nonprofit administrator Diane Duke recently took the helm of Friends for Life as its new executive director. In her new role, the Los Angeles native leads and oversees an organization that’s helping those affected by HIV/AIDS through the provision of education, housing, food, transportation and healthy life skills training.

50. Cohen Urges Memphis Clinton Supporters To Speak No Ill of Sanders -

U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen told a group of 70 supporters of Democratic presidential contender Hillary Clinton that they should avoid attacking Bernie Sanders, her rival for the Democratic nomination.

51. Cohen Urges Clinton Supporters To Speak No Ill Of Sanders -

U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen told a group of 70 supporters of Democratic presidential contender Hillary Clinton that they should avoid attacking Bernie Sanders, her rival for the Democratic nomination.

52. Meeting the Demands of a Rapidly Aging Population -

When Gov. Bill Haslam gave his annual State of the State address on February 1, he proposed a $34.8 billion plan providing new spending on colleges and universities, road projects and a large deposit into Tennessee’s emergency budget reserves.

53. Commission OKs Contract For Greenline Extension -

Shelby County Commissioners approved a $163,400 contract Monday, Feb. 8, for the design of a part of the Shelby Farms Greenline extension.

54. School Voucher Bill Stalls in House Amid Flagging Support -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — A proposal to create a school voucher program stalled in the House on Thursday despite efforts to drum up support among wary rural lawmakers by limiting the areas of Tennessee where parents could receive state money to pay for private school tuition.

55. Last Word: The First Surrogate, Parkside at Shelby Farms and Manilow Memories -

Here they come, fresh from Iowa and New Hampshire – first the surrogates and in the next two weeks the Presidential contenders themselves.

The nation’s “first surrogate” – former President Bill Clinton is at Whitehaven High School Thursday evening to rally early voters in the heart of a large reliably Democratic middle class community.
And it is that voter base that was integral to Barack Obama carrying Shelby County in the 2008 Democratic Presidential primary even as Hillary Clinton carried the state that year.
As mentioned here Tuesday, the local Bernie Sanders campaign opens its Memphis HQ over the weekend.
Hillary Clinton headquarters in Memphis and Nashville are on the way soon with the Nashville HQ opening Thursday as the former President is in Whitehaven and the candidate is preparing for another television debate Thursday in Milwaukee with Sanders.
And early voting opened Downtown Wednesday.
The first day's turnout Wednesday was 177 early and absentee voters. Combined with another 645 absentee votes cast before the early voting period, that makes 822 early or absentee votes.
Another Republican contender on the ballot in Tennessee is out of the race. New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie dropped out the day after his dismal finish in New Hampshire. He did not have a slate of delegates on the ballot here.

56. Teachers Wary of Haslam’s Push For Increased Pay -

Pushing a budget with more than $100 million for K-12 teacher pay raises, Gov. Bill Haslam says Tennessee is taking education to new levels by raising standards, linking teacher evaluations to student performance and expanding education options.

57. Commission OKs Contract For Greenline Extension Design -

Shelby County Commissioners approved a $163,400 contract Monday, Feb. 8, for the design of a part of the Shelby Farms Greenline extension.

58. Murphy Joins Paragon’s Aircraft Lending -

Ronald Murphy has joined Paragon Bank as vice president, aircraft lending. Murphy – who worked at Paragon from 2005 to 2008 as senior vice president, aircraft lending – will originate and service aircraft loans for the bank by developing relationships with dealers, brokers and end users of business aircraft.

59. Last Word: EW&F, Midtown Rent Rise and A Closer Look At The Pyramid Deal -

One seemingly ordinary winter’s night in Downtown Memphis, I was going from event to event focused on work – specifically trying to stay on a schedule in which several things I wanted to cover were happening at the same time.
That is usually when you miss the experience that is Memphis on an everyday but definitely not ordinary basis.
So I get in a parking garage elevator and on the next floor David Porter – of Stax Records fame – gets on and he introduces me to his friend, Maurice White – the founder of Earth Wind and Fire. They too are trying to be in several places at the same time.
As they went their way and I went mine, I remember thinking this is quite a special place.
The encounter slowed my stride a bit and took some of the edge off the schedule – noticing for the first time how many people were out on a winter’s night in our city having nothing but a good time made better by all of us going our different ways.
White, who was from Memphis, died Thursday with his band’s music stronger and more relevant than ever.
If you grew up listening to EWF when the songs were new, you know that the bright and funky sound and the positive, affirming, and diverse identity of this music was quite intentional at a time when there was plenty going on that could have pushed it the other way.
If your parents or grandparents grew up listening to EWF, this music is a part of your family’s tradition that calls to mind special occasions and even your own mild surprise the first time you found yourself dancing to it with your children.
And if your folks’ vinyl record collection from back in the day included Earth Wind and Fire, that was one of the ones you listened to when they weren’t around and one of the ones you took with you when you got a place of your own.

60. Hinds Joins Martin Tate Law Firm -

Rebecca Hinds has joined Martin, Tate, Morrow & Marston P.C. as an associate attorney in the firm’s litigation section. In this role, Hinds represents clients in civil and commercial litigation matters, including business law, transportation liability, construction disputes, breach-of-contract matters and employment law. She also helps commercial clients obtain tax incentives and advises individuals and businesses in the drafting and negotiation of contracts. 

61. Let’s Hear It for Christine and Patrick! -

This column should be running in late January. Ten years ago, Susan and I flew out to Park City, Utah, for our first (and probably only) Sundance Film Festival. Where “Wordplay,” the award-winning documentary about the crossword puzzle industry, had its world premiere on Jan. 21, 2006.

62. Former Governor, Senator Bumpers Remembered at Service -

Former U.S. Senator and Arkansas governor Dale Bumpers was remembered Sunday by former President Bill Clinton and others for his public service, his wit and his role in ending the segregation of the school in his small western Arkansas hometown.

63. Measure Increasing Seat Belt Fines Among New Tennessee Laws -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Motorists in Tennessee who don't buckle up could face stiffer fines under one of many new Tennessee laws taking effect Friday.

The tougher seat belt law increases the fine for first-time offenders from $10 to $25 and from $20 to $50 for repeat offenders.

64. Grant Program Proving Beneficial To Neighborhood Watch Groups -

With backing from the City of Memphis, local neighborhood associations can receive up to $2,500 to make their neighborhoods safer.

“Responding to criminal offenses and making arrests are part of the efforts to combat crime,” said Lia Roemer, program manager with the Memphis Area Neighborhood Watch department. “The Neighborhood Crime Prevention Fund gives our neighborhoods the opportunity to grow and create crime prevention efforts.”

65. McKinney Appointed as Shelby County Lobbyist -

Assistant County Attorney David E. McKinney is Shelby County government’s new director of legislative affairs.

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell announced McKinney’s appointment Tuesday, Dec. 29, to take effect Jan. 1.

66. McKinney Appointed as New County Government Lobbyist -

Assistant County Attorney David E. McKinney is Shelby County government’s new director of legislative affairs.

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell announced McKinney’s appointment Tuesday, Dec. 29, to take effect Jan. 1.

67. Rotten to the Core: Titans Fail to Develop Talent -

As the Tennessee Titans sink toward the end of another lackluster season, they head into the off-season with still more holes to fill for 2016.

Some of that, of course, is inevitable with any team as an NFL roster. Even on the best teams can have a 20 percent roster turnover in the off-season due to injuries, free agency and new draft picks coming on board.

68. Howard Stern Announces 5-Year Deal With Sirius XM -

NEW YORK (AP) — Much has changed for Howard Stern and SiriusXM since their first deal a decade ago — except for their desire to stay in business together.

The company announced Tuesday its third five-year deal to keep Stern's radio show at SiriusXM, together with a longer-term video arrangement that will allow fans to see as well as hear his program and have access to 30 years of career highlights.

69. AutoZone Liberty Bowl Brings Snyder, Bielema Back Together -

In their last game of the regular season, the Kansas State Wildcats were sitting on five wins and down 10 points at halftime. They rallied to defeat West Virginia 24-23.

And all it took was the usual 97-yard kick return for a touchdown, courtesy of senior Morgan Burns.

70. Tennessee Lawmakers Discuss Syrian Refugee Vetting Process -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Tennessee lawmakers said Wednesday that they continue to get calls from constituents expressing concern about the vetting process for allowing Syrian refugees into the state and sought assurance from security officials that the program is safe.

71. Memphis Tigers Football Hitches Hopes To Young Mike Norvell -

He was Mr. Joe College, the star wide receiver on the football team at Central Arkansas. She was the roommate of a girl on the basketball team that was a friend of his.

Mike Norvell was supposed to take the ballroom dancing class with the basketball player. Didn’t exactly work out that way.

72. Memphis Football Hitches Hopes to Young Mike Norvell -

He was Mr. Joe College, the star wide receiver on the football team at Central Arkansas. She was the roommate of a girl on the basketball team that was a friend of his.

Mike Norvell was supposed to take the ballroom dancing class with the basketball player. Didn’t exactly work out that way.

73. Memphis Football Hitches Hopes to Young Mike Norvell -

He was Mr. Joe College, the star wide receiver on the football team at Central Arkansas. She was the roommate of a girl on the basketball team that was a friend of his.

Mike Norvell was supposed to take the ballroom dancing class with the basketball player. Didn’t exactly work out that way.

74. Memphis Football Hitches Hopes to Young Mike Norvell -

He was Mr. Joe College, the star wide receiver on the football team at Central Arkansas. She was the roommate of a girl on the basketball team that was a friend of his.

Mike Norvell was supposed to take the ballroom dancing class with the basketball player. Didn’t exactly work out that way.

75. Memphis Football Hitches Hopes to Young Mike Norvell -

He was Mr. Joe College, the star wide receiver on the football team at Central Arkansas. She was the roommate of a girl on the basketball team that was a friend of his.

Mike Norvell was supposed to take the ballroom dancing class with the basketball player. Didn’t exactly work out that way.

76. Memphis Football Hitches Hopes to Young Mike Norvell -

He was Mr. Joe College, the star wide receiver on the football team at Central Arkansas. She was the roommate of a girl on the basketball team that was a friend of his.

Mike Norvell was supposed to take the ballroom dancing class with the basketball player. Didn’t exactly work out that way.

77. Summer Jobs Program Begins Taking Applications -

The city of Memphis’ 2016 summer jobs and life skills training programs began taking applications this week.

Participants in the Memphis Ambassadors Program and MPLOY Youth Summer Experience are selected through a lottery drawing in February. Participants in both programs are paid.

78. College Football’s Coaching Carousel Is Still Spinning -

In an ideal world, a kid climbs aboard a carousel and it’s all fun and good times. But the reality is, sometimes the experience is dizzying – even nauseating.

And so it goes with the current college football coaching carousel.

79. Summer Jobs Program Begins Taking Applications -

The city of Memphis’ 2016 summer jobs and life skills training programs began taking applications this week.

Participants in the Memphis Ambassadors Program and MPLOY Youth Summer Experience are selected through a lottery drawing in February. Participants in both programs are paid.

80. North Texas Could Never Upset the Vols, Right? -

No way Tennessee’s football team can lose Saturday’s homecoming game against North Texas, one of the worst teams in college football.

Right?

Tennessee (5-4) was a 40.5-point favorite early in the week coming off a 27-24 victory over South Carolina last Saturday at Neyland Stadium.

81. Hoops & Dreams -

They were but a few words, yet they seemed to capture the mindset of the University of Memphis basketball program’s high-expectation fan base.

“Get back to like it was,” said former Tigers guard Jeremy Hunt.

82. Time for Tuition Equality in Tennessee -

Tennessee has a unique opportunity to help the state economy and support education. Passage of the “Tuition Equality” bill in the upcoming state legislative session will provide a critical chance to educate thousands of Tennessee youth and narrow the skills gap that exists for Tennessee employers.

83. NCRM President Says New Movement Comes With Sacrifice, Hardship -

The president of the National Civil Rights Museum on Wednesday, Nov. 11, told a group of LeMoyne-Owen College students and faculty that there is a new civil rights movement.

And like the movement chronicled in the museum, it comes with tension, sacrifices, hardships and a human toll.

84. Students Find Options via Tennessee Promise -

Siegel High School graduate Davione Williamson wasn’t quite sure he was college material when he entered Motlow State Community College in Smyrna this August on a Tennessee Promise scholarship.

85. Clinton Campaign Names Tennessee Supporters -

U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen and outgoing Memphis Mayor A C Wharton are among the Memphis Democrats who have formally joined former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton’s presidential campaign.

86. Clinton Campaign Names Tennessee Supporters -

U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen and outgoing Memphis Mayor A C Wharton are among the Memphis Democrats who have formally joined former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton’s presidential campaign.

87. Attorney Rob Ratton Joins Fisher & Phillips -

Robert W. Ratton has joined Fisher & Phillips LLP’s Memphis office as of counsel, a role in which he represents employers in a wide range of employment law matters and supports clients with internal investigations and compliance issues. Ratton most recently served as a staff attorney at TruGreen LP.

88. Bolding is Only Tennessean to Teach at 2015 NeighborWorks Institute -

Tim Bolding, executive director of United Housing Inc., is the only Tennessean selected to teach at NeighborWorks America’s 2015 NeighborWorks Training Institute. Bolding has taught coursework at the training institutes, which focus on providing high-quality training to nonprofit housing professionals, for more than 10 years.

89. Mercedes-Benz Hires Heath Elliott as Sales Manager -

Heath Elliott has joined Mercedes-Benz of Collierville as general sales manager. In his new role, Elliott will manage the sales of all new and pre-owned cars sold at the dealership, which opened in 2014.

90. More Music Festivals on the Way in Memphis -

Memphis continues to be filled with the sound of music – specifically, music festivals – with a handful on the docket in coming weeks that will fill stages Downtown as well as the Levitt Shell and elsewhere.

91. NCRM Highlights Teacher Effectiveness Initiative -

It’s not the kind of history you normally see at the National Civil Rights Museum, even with the museum’s 2014 technological update and expanded exhibits.

A temporary exhibit on display through Oct. 4 reviews Shelby County Schools’ historic shift in teacher effectiveness training that began in 2009.

92. A Tasteful List 2015 -

MEMPHIS ON A PLATE. Presenting the fifth helping of the Tasteful List, updated for 2015 – an alphabetical survey of local flavor in one decidedly local man’s opinion.

Could I get another napkin over here?

93. Pastner, Always True to Self, Is Still Doing Things His Way -

Expectations. That’s the word that drives all sports narratives. Remember the record of Josh Pastner’s first University of Memphis team, the ragtag bunch that was left over after John Calipari exited for Kentucky?

94. Memphis Job Corps CenterGets $42.2 Million Contract -

The U.S. Department of Labor has awarded a five-year, $42.2 million contract to the Benjamin L. Hooks Job Corps Center.

The money will support 232 students who live at the Memphis center as well as 55 non-resident students.

95. Memphis Job Corps Center Gets $42.2 Million Federal Contract -

The U.S. Department of Labor has awarded a five-year, $42.2 million contract to the Benjamin L. Hooks Job Corps Center.

The money will support 232 students who live at the Memphis center as well as 55 non-resident students.

96. Bona Fide -

When the Bona Fide Blues Festival takes a set of stages in Overton Square and the Cooper-Young neighborhood next month, it will mark a return that’s been a long time coming.

But it also will offer something new.

97. Vols Nearly Set on Offense as Season Approaches -

With Tennessee’s football team three weeks into fall camp, the offensive depth charts are set at some positions, while others remain open.

UT coach Butch Jones enters the 2015 season with no questions at quarterback or running back. His has plenty of receivers and all should get their share of playing time.

98. Jernigan Sees Big Market for Company He's Moving to Memphis -

Dean Jernigan spent the better part of a roughly 40-minute earnings presentation to analysts early Wednesday, Aug. 12, detailing not just the latest quarterly results for his newly public company, Jernigan Capital, but also why it exists in the first place.

99. Summer Jobs Programs Mark End of Season -

With the school year about to begin, two summer jobs and job-training programs marked the end of their work for the summer.

The Earn and Learn Summer Youth Experience of the Workforce Investment Network graduated 19 teenagers and young adults, ages 16-21, Thursday, July 30. The graduates earned information technology certification while making about $13 an hour for eight weeks.

100. Summer Jobs Programs Mark End of Season -

With the school year about to begin, two summer jobs and job-training programs marked the end of their work for the summer.

The Earn and Learn Summer Youth Experience of the Workforce Investment Network graduated 19 teenagers and young adults, ages 16-21, Thursday, July 30. The graduates earned information technology certification while making about $13 an hour for eight weeks.