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Editorial Results (free)

1. Strickland, Haslam Promote Employment Efforts -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland and Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam visited several Memphis churches Sunday, April 22, as part of an “Opportunity City” awareness campaign.

2. Opioid Litigation, FedExForum NonCompete Top Local Law Developments -

Here are some of the legal issues making news in recent months.

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Tennessee Attorney General Herbert Slatery says lawsuits by local prosecutors over the opioid epidemic are complicating his efforts to reach a multistate settlement with drug companies. In response, the prosecutors, who represent about half of Tennessee's counties, say local communities lose out when lawsuits like theirs are rolled into one settlement.

3. Mississippi University Tuition to Rise 4 Percent, on Average -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — Mississippi's eight public universities plan to raise tuition by an average of 4 percent next fall, saying lingering effects from state budget cuts two years ago require them to get more revenue from students.

4. Sex Week Seems Tame Compared to Session Antics -

Why should UT Knoxville be limited to its annual Sex Week when Tennessee legislators are celebrating year-round?

Based on the scurrilous reports published in these parts over the last couple of years, state legislators are doing more than collecting per diems in Nashville, and there’s plenty of evidence to prove it.

5. Last Word: Failed Test, Trolley Back Story and Violent Crime Down City and County -

The state’s third problem with online student achievement testing in three years is gathering political force in Nashville. And that force is aimed for the most part at testing in general and the role it plays in evaluating teachers and students.

6. What Statewide Candidates Say About Opioid Crisis, Public Safety -

The spread of opioid abuse claimed over 1,600 lives in Tennessee in 2016, and it is getting worse. Methamphetamine abuse, while not getting the headlines, has increased. Gun violence and murder is increasing. What proposals do our candidates have to help Tennesseans address these public safety issues?

7. UT Board of Trustees Appointees Go Awry -

NASHVILLE – One of Gov. Bill Haslam’s main legislative pushes ran afoul of a Legislature angry about everything from Sex Week at the University of Tennessee to the handling of the football coach hiring at the Knoxville campus.

8. UT Board of Trustees Appointees Go Awry -

NASHVILLE – One of Gov. Bill Haslam’s main legislative pushes ran afoul of a Legislature angry about everything from Sex Week at the University of Tennessee to the handling of the football coach hiring at the Knoxville campus.

9. Ryan Bowing Out, Sending Ripples of Uncertainty Through GOP -

WASHINGTON (AP) – House Speaker Paul Ryan announced Wednesday he will retire rather than seek another term in Congress as the steady if reluctant wingman for President Donald Trump, sending ripples through a Washington already on edge and spreading new uncertainty through a party bracing for a rough election year.

10. Cooper-Young Overlay OK’d With Footnote -

Memphis City Council members gave final approval Tuesday, April 10, to a historical overlay district for Cooper-Young – the first historic district status granted by the city in 20 years.

But the 7-3 vote on third and final reading will require approval of a companion ordinance further defining what can and cannot be built there or how properties can be changed so the local Landmarks Commission can properly enforce terms of the overlay district.

11. Last Word: Play Ball, Porch & Parlor and A New Bus System -

If you go to enough political gatherings you start to see parallels. Sometimes you see things that aren’t there but that’s another story. Many political gatherings begin with the pledge of allegiance and a prayer as well. Sometimes the pledge isn’t enough and there is someone there to sing the National Anthem.

12. City Council Grants Historic Overlay Status to Cooper-Young -

Memphis City Council members gave final approval Tuesday, April 10, to a historical overlay district for Cooper-Young – the first historic district status granted by the city in 20 years.

But the 7-3 vote on third and final reading likely isn’t the end of the discussion about how decisions will be made by the local Landmarks Commission enforcing terms of the overlay that govern what can and cannot be built there or who it can be changed.

13. State of Flux -

Anyone paying attention to recent news headlines alone should have a pretty good indication that health care in the U.S. – really anywhere you look, on local, state or national levels – remains a byzantine, expensive proposition. Health care keeps getting more expensive. It involves navigating a lot of paperwork with bureaucratic legalese that bears the fingerprints of a tangle of stakeholders, including insurers, doctors and lawmakers.

14. Local Experts To Tackle Health Care Changes -

Eight years after the enactment of the Affordable Care Act, health care can still spark contentious debates around the country, though there are nevertheless a few things people can agree on.

Costs keep going up. Insurers have continued to pull out of the individual ACA marketplace, leaving that market segment volatile and uncertain. And there’s still no widespread consensus on how to plug the gaps that still exist in the country’s health care system.

15. King's Children See New Movements, Same Challenges 50 Years After Mountaintop -

The bright and multi colored lights at Mason Temple Church of God In Christ gave way for a few minutes Tuesday, April 3, to a single white spotlight on the empty pulpit of the South Memphis church and a recording of part of the speech Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. delivered from the pulpit 50 years ago Tuesday.

16. Cellphones Gaining Acceptance Inside US Schools -

BUFFALO, N.Y. (AP) – Cellphones are still absent from most U.S. schools but new data shows them steadily gaining acceptance as administrators bow to parents' wishes to keep tabs on their kids and teachers find ways to work them into lessons.

17. Last Word: MLK 50 Arrives, Heritage Trail and Medical Marijuana's Comeback -

This will be a big week in the national spotlight for the city. But whenever someone with a megaphone like a newspaper or a television station says that in Memphis there is something that happens that gives me pause and I think gives a lot of other Memphians pause. Some of us start to open the floodgates of our long-held need to please at all costs.

18. In-State Immigrant Tuition Bill Dead in Tennessee -

A bill to offer in-state tuition for Tennessee public college students whose parents brought or kept them in the country illegally has stalled because House leadership won’t let it go forward, the sponsor said Wednesday.

19. MLK50 Events: A Roundup of Memphis Happenings -

Here's a selection of events in Memphis marking the 50th anniversary of the 1968 sanitation workers' strike and the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. April 3 is the 50th anniversary of King’s last speech – the “Mountaintop” speech at Mason Temple, while April 4 is the 50th anniversary of his assassination on the balcony of the Lorraine Motel.

20. Last Word: Opening Day, Slowing the Flow and 30 Years of Shangri-La -

There is something about opening day of the Major League Baseball season – especially when it is opening day for just about every team at the same time. Just seeing the green fields with a solitary outfielder, the low brick walls behind the symmetry of batter, catcher and umpire renews my love for the game. I don’t really pay attention to players – don’t know any of their names. And how and when did the Astros wind up in the American League and the Brewers in the National League? I just like watching the game in a sport where the team and the individual coexist as in no other sport.

21. MLK 50 Years Later -

Bernard Lafayette remembers being in Memphis April 3, 1968, and a dejected Martin Luther King Jr. being roused from his room at the Lorraine Motel to speak at Mason Temple on a rainy night.

22. In-State Immigrant Tuition Bill Halted in Tennessee in House -

A bill to offer in-state tuition for Tennessee public college students whose parents brought or kept them in the country illegally has stalled because House leadership won’t let it go forward, the sponsor said Wednesday.

23. Experts To Weigh In On Health Care Landscape -

Eight years after the Affordable Care Act was signed into law, the cost of health insurance premiums bought in marketplace exchanges locally has seen a big spike so far in 2018.

That’s according to a new report out from the Urban Institute, which notes among other things an average 32 percent jump nationwide between 2017 and 2018 for the exchanges’ lowest-priced “silver” plans.

24. Trump Signs $1.3 Trillion Budget After Threatening Veto -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump signed a $1.3 trillion spending measure Friday, averting a midnight government shutdown just hours after declaring he was considering a veto.

Trump said he was "very disappointed" in the package, in part because it did not fully fund his plans for a border wall with Mexico and did not address some 700,000 "Dreamer" immigrants who are now protected from deportation under a program that he has moved to eliminate.

25. Prescription for Tragedy -

He has his own GPS, an internal shield that keeps him from driving anywhere near 637 Poplar Ave. Home to the Memphis morgue. That’s where they showed Jerry Davidson his 22-year-old son, Oliver, his eyes closed and his lips purple.

26. Plan to Expand Pre-K Would Leverage Private Funds -

After voters defeated two ballot questions in two years for sales tax increases – city and county – to fund an expansion of prekindergarten classrooms primarily in Memphis, the effort is back with a momentum that seemed unlikely five years ago.

27. A Look Back At UT’s History In NCAA Tourney -

Basketball coach Rick Barnes was fired by Texas in late March of 2015 when he refused to fire members of his coaching staff.

28. Florida’s Epiphany On Guns Means Little in Tennessee -

Memphis resident Stevie Moore has been waging a war to take illegal guns off the streets since someone shot his son in the head with an AK-47 15 years ago.

“It’s my mission to fight these guns whatever way I can,” says Moore, who founded the organization Freedom From Unnecessary Negatives in an effort to steer youth away from violence.

29. Tennessee In-State Immigrant Tuition Bill Clears 1st Hurdle -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A Tennessee House subcommittee has approved legislation with in-state tuition for public college students whose parents brought or kept them in the country illegally.

30. High School Student Starts New St. Jude Fundraiser, Heels 4 Healing -

Students of all ages are getting involved in service and fundraising earlier in life, and one local Memphis high school senior is no exception.

Samantha Tancredi, a senior at Hutchison School, will be hosting Heels 4 Healing on March 24 at 9 a.m. at Shelby Farms Park. The event is a 5K race and community celebration with live music, food trucks and other fun activities to benefit St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital.

31. Council OKs Financing For Convention Center Work -

Memphis City Council members approved $175 million in general obligation bond financing Tuesday, March 6, for the renovation of the Memphis Cook Convention Center. The dollar figure matches the total estimate of the renovation, which will include significant changes to the interior of the early 1970s facility and exterior changes that include a view of the Mississippi River.

32. Digest -

Memphis Grizzlies Suffer 15th Consecutive Loss

The Grizzlies lost their 15th straight game, 119-110 at Chicago, on Wednesday, March 7.

The team has not won since defeating the Phoenix Suns at FedExForum on Jan. 29.

33. Trump Meets With Video Game Execs and Critics -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Donald Trump revived a debate over the link between gun violence and graphic depictions of violence in video games Thursday, bringing members of the video game industry and some of their most vocal critics to the White House.

34. Tennessee Panel Kills Bill to Outlaw Child Marriage -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A Republican-led Tennessee House panel has killed a bill to ban child marriage because a socially conservative lobbyist argued it interferes with his state legal challenge of same-sex marriage.

35. Civil War Re-Enactor Outflanked On Statues, Medicaid Expansion -

When state Rep. Steve McDaniel was a youngster he often read the historical marker at the intersection of Highway 22 and Wildersville Road detailing Confederate Lt. Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest’s first West Tennessee raid in the Battle of Parker’s Crossroads.

36. Council OKs Financing For Convention Center Work -

Memphis City Council members approved $175 million in general obligation bond financing Tuesday, March 6, for the renovation of the Memphis Cook Convention Center. The dollar figure matches the total estimate of the renovation, which will include significant changes to the interior of the early 1970s facility and exterior changes that include a view of the Mississippi River.

37. What’s Best for State, Education or Punishment? -

Carlos Reyes, a graduate of Murfreesboro Oakland High School’s Class of 2017, would be in his second semester at MTSU majoring in business administration – if he could afford it.

38. Mississippi GOP Governor Won't Appoint Himself to US Senate -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) – Mississippi's Republican governor took himself out of the mix Tuesday for the U.S. Senate seat being vacated by Thad Cochran, saying he'll find another strong contender to keep the seat firmly in GOP hands for decades, as Cochran did.

39. Trump Urges Lawmakers to Buck NRA Every Once in a While -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Donald Trump declared he's willing to take on the National Rifle Association over gun legislation, but Republicans who control Congress aren't so sure. They prefer to consider only modest changes to firearms limits in response to the mass shooting at a Florida high school.

40. Supreme Court Declines to Decide Fate of 'Dreamers' Just Yet -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Supreme Court on Monday rejected the Trump administration's highly unusual bid to bypass a federals appeals court and get the justices to intervene in the fate of a program that protects hundreds of thousands of young immigrants from deportation.

41. Fire Station Shuffle Outlined for City Council -

Memphis City Council members heard plans in Tuesday, Feb. 20, committee sessions from Memphis Fire Director Gina Sweat to close the city fire station on the northwest corner of Union Avenue and Front Street and build a new station on the northeast corner of Danny Thomas Boulevard and Adams Avenue.

42. CRE Owners Look To Reap Rewards Of New Tax Cuts -

The start of the year enjoyed a flurry of commercial real estate sales and building permits, on the heels of federal tax cuts passed late last year that are expected to benefit CRE owners and possibly impact the number of new projects and sales announced this year.

43. Fire Station Shuffle Outlined for City Council -

Memphis City Council members heard plans in Tuesday, Feb. 20, committee sessions from Memphis Fire Director Gina Sweat to close the city fire station on the northwest corner of Union Avenue and Front Street and build a new station on the northeast corner of Danny Thomas Boulevard and Adams Avenue.

44. Election Methods and Murals Dominate Light Council Day -

Memphis City Council members doubled down Tuesday, Feb. 20, on calling for a cover-up of six murals near Lamar Avenue. And the council’s attorney said ranked-choice or instant-runoff voting isn’t needed in Memphis.

45. BSMF Lineup Features Diverse Mix of New and Familiar -

The Beale Street Music Festival's 2018 lineup is out, and it features a mix of BSMF first-timers and familiar faces for longtime attendees of the three-day music fest in Tom Lee Park.

Headliners for the May 4-6 event include Tyler, the Creator, Jack White, R&B singer-songwriter Erykah Badu, rapper Post Malone, the EDM duo Odesza and Queens of the Stone Age, along with Alanis Morissette and Incubus.

46. Last Word: Patio Test, St. Jude's Edge and Bredesen Runs For the Center -

All across the city Monday afternoon into the evening, the city was tested just about a month away from spring by the calendar. And I am happy to report that the dry run for the patio season proved Memphis is vigilant and prepared. The test, in extreme temperatures that reached 77 degrees – breaking the record of 76 degrees set in 1986, prompted some of you to break out the running gear and give it a spin just before the early sunset. Others among you were spotted on patios pondering what ever became of Mr. Mister and Glass Tiger.

47. Last Word: Filing Deadline, Case & Vance In May and Paul Manafort at the Rivermont -

By our count, when the noon Thursday deadline for candidates in the May county primaries has come and gone, there could be -- could be -- four incumbent county commissioners who are effectively re-elected to their seats for another four-year term. And we already know the commission will have at least seven new faces in September. More interesting is that there are only four sets of primaries – all for countywide offices – that have multiple contenders in each primary. That’s out of 23 offices on the primary ballot.

48. Is Inflation Rising as Investors Fear? 5 Ways to Keep Track -

WASHINGTON (AP) — After nearly a decade of being all but invisible, inflation — or the fear of it — is back.

Tentative signs have emerged that prices could accelerate in coming months. Pay raises may be picking up a bit. Commodities such as oil and aluminum have grown more expensive. Cellphone plans are likely to appear costlier.

49. Rhodes’ Hass Defends Liberal Arts Education -

The president of Rhodes College says trade schools, associate degrees and certification in specific skills can’t be the city’s only economic driver.

“I think we can all agree that we do not and cannot foresee an economy in which the trades are the only drivers,” said Rhodes president Marjorie Hass on the WKNO/Channel 10 program “Behind The Headlines.”

50. Council Debate on MLGW Rates Reveals Trust Issues -

It began after the Tom Lee storm last Memorial Day weekend – a burst of sudden, intense winds that knocked out power to 188,000 homes and businesses as well as toppling the circa-1950s obelisk memorial to Tom Lee Downtown.

51. Last Word: MLGW Rate Hike, The May Ballot So Far and Old Dominick's Taxes -

The Tobacco Corner, a Poplar Corridor landmark, is closing in April. There was once a set of Tobacco Corners that look like the one at Poplar and Mendenhall and they included “newsrooms” – places to buy magazines, sometimes adult, and newspapers -- after buying tobacco. In almost 50 years, none of those product lines are what they once were. And the legacy of a homegrown business is disapperaring, too. 

52. Last Word: Super Bowl From A Distance, More School Plans and DACA -

Eagles over Patriots 41-33. Also at the Super Bowl – no Prince hologram in the JT halftime show but plenty of choreography and a nightclub beneath the stage … the NFL catch rule has its last hurrah – probably … Patriots-haters have the offseason to become Eagles-haters. And Philadelphia Police use hydraulic fluid to stop Eagles fans from climbing utility poles. Irony lives.

53. This Week In Memphis History: February 2-8, 2018 -

1948: On the front pages of The Daily News, the city commission approves paying Pidgeon-Thomas Iron Co. a final payment of $6,691.62 for 45 fire hydrants. Illinois Central Railroad is granted a right of way to construct a spur track across Broadway. The commission is also converting lots of land along U.S. 51 in Frayser from agricultural to residential – including property along what is now Carrolton Road, the land south of Floyd on the west side of the highway and Woodland Heights on the southeast corner of Millington and U.S. 51. The city makes a payment of $1 million to cover the deficit run by the Auditorium and Market Commission for the last three months of 1947. And the city zones all of the land on the west side of East Parkway between Nelson and Young as “A” residential.

54. Dreamers Deferred -

You never really get to the point where you can stand at a particular moment in time and forecast with any certainty how your life is going to turn out, how things are going to look or what’s going to be different over a long time horizon. That’s certainly the way it’s been, and still is, for Mauricio Calvo and Memphians like him.

55. Ford Outlines Budget Process As Memphis’ New CFO -

Shirley Ford has been named chief financial officer for the city of Memphis. Ford, who was selected to be CFO by Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland and confirmed by the City Council, has served as the city’s comptroller since 2014. She has more than 30 years of financial, accounting and managerial experience. In addition, she is a certified public accountant and a certified municipal finance officer as designated by the state comptroller.

56. Last Word: Eureka Education, Confederate Monuments in Court and Dillon Brooks -

Supermarkets are hard. That is the tag line in every discussion about getting a supermarket or grocery store for a given part of town that doesn’t have one. And once a new supermarket goes up somewhere else, there is inevitably word that a competitor or two is going to build nearby. The discussion always includes the mandatory recitation of the 3 to 4 percent profit margin stores operate on, which even knowledgeable critics of the decisions about where to locate and not to locate stores acknowledge is accurate.

57. Trucking Taxation on Rise, But Driver Shortage Remains Largest Challenge -

Trucking companies pay one of the highest tax rates of any business sector. According to a study published by New York University, only the 27.28 percent average tax rate in the homebuilding sector was higher, with trucking second at 26.74 percent.

58. Council Reopens MLGW Rate Hike Consideration, Approves Term Limit Referendum -

Memphis City Council members decided Tuesday, Jan. 23, to take a second look at the gas and electric rate-hike proposals they rejected two weeks ago, but put off any new votes on the matter until February.

59. Immigrant Tuition Splits Tennessee Governor's Field in Forum -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Candidates for governor in Tennessee largely agreed on broad issues facing education during the race's first televised forum Tuesday, except for a partisan split on in-state tuition for immigrants whose parents brought or kept them in the country illegally.

60. Council Reopens MLGW Rate Hike Consideration, Approves Term Limit Referendum -

Memphis City Council members decided Tuesday, Jan. 23, to take a second look at the gas and electric rate hike proposals they rejected two weeks ago. But they put off any new votes on the matter until the first council meeting in February after what is expected to be a lengthy discussion in committee earlier that same day at City Hall.

61. Last Word: Shutdown Over?, Glen Farms Plans and Billy Richmond - Wing Guru -

The federal government shutdown for many of us outside the Beltway amounted to a message on a website saying the agency we were looking up was closed Monday. And Monday was the third and final day of the most recent shutdown. But the immigration policy known as DACA – Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals – is the issue to be explored by Congress in the three weeks that the continuing resolution covers. It’s an issue that there has been plenty of local discussion about

62. Council Talks With Head of TVA, Votes on Two More Ballot Questions -

Memphis City Council members talk with Tennessee Valley Authority president Bill Johnson Tuesday, Jan. 23, meet Mayor Jim Strickland’s nominee to replace retiring Memphis Light, Gas and Water Division president Jerry Collins and may renew discussions of electric and gas rate hikes proposed by MLGW that it voted down two weeks ago.

63. Despite Need, Expanding Health Care Not in Cards -

Springfield resident Felicity Palma struggled mightily when she moved to Tennessee from Florida two years ago after suffering health problems and losing her job.

The 47-year-old former social worker became homeless for a period when she came here, and now she finds herself in a health insurance coverage gap as she tries to get treatment for ulcers, sciatica, fibroids and thyroid disease. Debt is piling up on her, too, for the care she does receive.

64. Nomination Deadline For Dunavant Awards Feb. 1 -

Memphis is lucky to have an abundance of residents with a passion for public service and it is time once again to honor their commitment to improving this community.

Each year the Rotary Club of Memphis East recognizes the importance of public service by hosting the Dunavant Public Servant Awards.

65. Tennessee House Speaker Proposes Medicaid Work Requirements -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Tennessee House Speaker Beth Harwell has filed legislation to pursue TennCare work requirements for able-bodied adults without young children.

66. Dunavant Awards Spotlight Public Servants -

Being a public servant often is thankless job, but each year the Rotary Club of Memphis East recognizes the importance of public service to the community by hosting the Dunavant Public Servant Awards.

67. Trump Suggests 2-Phase Immigration Deal for 'Dreamers' -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Seeking a bipartisan compromise to avoid a government shutdown, President Donald Trump suggested Tuesday that an immigration deal could be reached in two phases – first by addressing young immigrants and border security with what he called a "bill of love," then by making comprehensive changes that have long eluded Congress.

68. Younger Candidates Weighing New Political Moves -

George Monger listened to his critics and his backers late last year as he contemplated another run for office 11 years after his first try.

69. Tennessee Lawmakers Head Into Session With Elections Looming -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Tennessee lawmakers return Tuesday for a session colored by upcoming elections and Gov. Bill Haslam's final lap before he hits his term limits.

This year, the Republican-led General Assembly likely won't face a monthslong fight over one topic, like the roads-funding package with gas tax hikes and other tax breaks that Haslam ushered into law in 2017.

70. Akbari Pulls Petition To Run for State Senate -

Democratic state Rep. Raumesh Akbari has decided to run for the District 29 state Senate seat being vacated by Lee Harris in the Shelby County legislative delegation.

71. Last Word: Tax Reform Pay Raises, Minority Business Kinks and Elvis at 83 -

A busy but ultimately slow weekend on the Confederate monuments front as a total of fewer than 100 opponents of the removal of the city’s two most visible monuments actively protested Saturday either on the interstate loop or in the “protest area” by Health Sciences Park.

72. Legislators Can’t Get Past Threat of Medical Weed -

Heading into the 2018 legislative session, Rep. Jeremy Faison is looking to send a message about his medical marijuana bill: Tennessee won’t open the door to recreational pot without General Assembly action.

73. Candidates in August State and Federal Primaries Start Pulling Petitions Friday -

Contenders for the May Shelby County primaries are still coming out of the political woodwork. And starting Friday, Jan. 5, candidates in the August state and federal primaries can begin pulling qualifying petitions for the second of three elections in 2018.

74. Mayor Says Memphis 'Will Be Prepared' for Statue Protests -

If opponents of the removal of the city’s two most visible Civil War monuments follow through on plans for a Memphis protest Jan. 6, Mayor Jim Strickland said city government will be ready.

75. Final Goodbye: Roll Call of Some Who Died in 2017 -

They made music that inspired legions of fans. Rock 'n' roll founding fathers Chuck Berry and Fats Domino, rockers Tom Petty and Gregg Allman, grunge icon Chris Cornell, country superstar Glen Campbell and jazz great Al Jarreau were among the notable figures who died in 2017, leaving a void in virtually every genre of music.

76. Last Word: Liberty Bowl Sell-Out Prep, Beale's Year and Tubby Talks -

The AutoZone Liberty Bowl is a sell out as of Thursday. And while your thoughts may turn to the sight of a full stadium at the Fairgrounds, at least some of you who are going are thinking about what traffic will be like in the area. Here is the parking and shuttle game plan at the outset and a day in advance. The Liberty Bowl Parade on Beale is at 3 p.m. Friday followed by a pep rally in the entertainment district and all are welcome.

77. Liberty Bowl Game Parking, Shuttle Services Announced -

With a sold-out AutoZone Liberty Bowl on Saturday, Dec. 30, parking spaces at the Fairgrounds are expected to go fast and there will be shuttle services available.

The stadium parking lots open at 6 a.m. at $20 per space, cash only. The stadium gates open at 9:30 a.m. with kickoff at 11:30 a.m.

78. Plans for Liberty Bowl Game Parking, Shuttles Announced -

With a sold-out AutoZone Liberty Bowl on Saturday, Dec. 30, parking spaces at the Fairgrounds are expected to go fast and there will be shuttle services available.

The stadium parking lots open at 6 a.m. at $20 per space, cash only. The stadium gates open at 9:30 a.m. with kickoff at 11:30 a.m.

79. His Way: Tubby Smith Figured Out Who He Was Long Ago and He’s Not Changing -

When his visitor was about to leave, Orlando Tubby Smith had one more story. About a time his father had given him an assignment on the family farm in Maryland. 

Tubby was one of 17 children. He had older siblings and younger siblings. He also, at age 12 or 13, already had a sense for what it was to lead and manage.

80. US Industries Can Start Counting Their Benefits From Tax Law -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Craft breweries are raising a glass to the Republicans' new tax overhaul: It cuts the excise tax on beer. Retailers, long saddled with heavy tax bills, will get relief. So will some high-profile names in corporate finance, led by Wells Fargo.

81. Memphis Sound at 60 -

As Stax Records and Royal Studios both wrap up a year of celebrating their 60th anniversary, The Memphis News looks back at the creators and purveyors of the Memphis sound and its significance, both in its heyday and today.

82. GOP Tax Overhaul Will Be Felt by State, Local Governments -

With Congress sending President Donald Trump a tax overhaul, state and local governments are preparing for some fallout.

A look at some of the ways it might affect them:

FEDERAL-STATE CONNECTIONS

83. Seeking Independence -

Former U.S. Rep. Zach Wamp of Chattanooga came to Memphis this week for the first time in seven years to call for a new generation of independent candidates for office he says can stop 20 years of elected leaders in Washington putting “party before country.”

84. Poll: Tennessee Voters More Moderate Than Some Think -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Tennesseans are more moderate than their neighbors think they are, and their views of Congress and President Donald Trump have soured some in the past few months, according to a Vanderbilt University poll released Thursday.

85. Cohen: Tax Bill Really a Bad Health Care Bill -

The Republican tax bill is advertised as a tax cut for the middle class, yet is anything but. In actuality, this bill is a scam to benefit the ultra-wealthy and corporate interests. Worse yet, it is a health care bill disguised as a tax bill, and a not very well thought-out one at that. If passed, this bill would repeal the individual mandate, a critical component of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA). This is outrageous.

86. Last Word: Grizz Ownership Moves, Confederate Deadline and Medical Family Tree -

As many of us were focused on Tigers football and the journey to Orlando last week, there was word that either both or one of the two minority owners of the Grizz had exercised a buy-sell provision in the NBA team’s unique ownership agreement. And what could be a fight for control of the team’s ownership is underway. The sports website The Athletic broke the story last Thursday. Here it is. It also talks about the timing of this coming with the controversial sacking of David Fizdale, an interim coach at the helm of a changing team and lead owner Robert Pera’s lack of visibility in all things Grizz around the city.

87. Tennessee’s Hot Seat Finds a New Office -

Tennessee football isn’t what it used to be. Nor is the attraction of being UT’s football coach.

It became more and more apparent this week as first-year UT athletics director John Currie tried to hire his first football coach as an AD.

88. Big Tobacco's Anti-Smoking Ads Begin After Decade of Delay -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Decades after they were banned from the airwaves, Big Tobacco companies return to prime-time television this weekend – but not by choice.

Under court order, the tobacco industry for the first time will be forced to advertise the deadly, addictive effects of smoking, more than 11 years after a judge ruled that the companies had misled the public about the dangers of cigarettes.

89. Wiping Slate Clean: Now Less About Who Can Afford It -

The scales of justice in Tennessee are slowly tipping back toward the poor – and not so poor – helping them regain traction lost to often-minor transgressions.

Change is taking place in court battles and in the Republican-controlled Legislature, believe it or not.

90. Hard to Believe: Some Consumers Find Free Health Insurance -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Consumers are getting the word that taxpayer-subsidized health plans are widely available for next year for no monthly premium or little cost, and marketing companies say they're starting to see an impact on sign-ups.

91. Political Opening -

The Shelby County Election Commission is moving its Downtown office Friday, Nov. 17, the same day that candidates can begin pulling qualifying petitions there and at its Shelby Farms offices to run in the 2018 county primaries.

92. Expanding Its Reach -

His was a story as tragic as it is familiar. E. Young had immediate family members in a gang. More than one gang tried to recruit him. His parents were in no way equipped to raise him.

When he moved in with an aunt, Phyllis Brown, he was by his own words “angry, depressed.”

93. Last Word: The Year of Tyreke Evans, Opioid Ruling and Installing a Jumper -

The Tigers basketball home opener is a come from behind win Tuesday at the Forum over Little Rock 70-62. Still not enough to determine where this new team in so many ways is bound. But that won’t stop the early speculation … or the later speculation starting with the New Orleans game at the Forum in another week. The Grizz take their turn Wednesday with the Pacers kicking off a Grizz home stand followed by the Rockets Saturday for the third time in this young season, Trail Blazers Monday and Mavericks Wednesday. But let’s not get too far ahead here.

94. Last Word: Mega-Site, New Chandler Real Estate Numbers and Grizz Second Unit -

When the state’s new commissioner of Economic and Community Development met several months ago with local leaders in Arlington, Bob Rolfe said Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam had made it clear that Rolfe’s primary task between then and when Haslam leaves office at the end of 2018 is to find a tenant for the west Tennessee megasite in Haywood County. Toyota-Mazda executives told the state this week that their $1.6 billion electric car plant to be built in the U.S. and create 4,000 jobs will not be considering the megasite and another un-named prospect has also walked away, according to the state.

95. Making Best Better -

More than a decade ago, Carolyn Hardy was a vice president with the Coors Brewing Co. in Memphis when she attended the Leadership Development Intensive (LDI), a personal leadership training ground stretched across 3 1/2 days.

96. AutoZone Closing Book on Unusual 2017 Performance -

A new Raymond James analyst report covering the auto parts industry suggests a few slightly concerning trends for retailers like AutoZone Inc., including a decrease in the growth rate of vehicle miles driven and an uptick in gas prices.

97. GOP Senators Say Fate of 'Dreamers' Must Wait for Next Year -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Donald Trump and Republican senators agreed Thursday not to deal with a needed fix for young immigrants in must-pass year-end spending legislation, according to some GOP lawmakers.

98. Events -

Mama Gaia will donate 25 percent of all sales made at both its locations Thursday, Nov. 2, to St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. The Crosstown Concourse location (1350 Concourse Ave., suite 137) is open from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.; the Overton Square location (2144 Madison Ave.) is open 8:30 a.m. to 8 p.m. Visit mamagaia.net for details.

99. Events -

The Indie Memphis Film Festival 2017 takes place Wednesday through Monday, Nov. 1-6, featuring a wide selection of screenings at multiple venues; MLK50, a special program of films to commemorate the upcoming 50th anniversary of Dr. Martin Luther King’s assassination and highlight civil rights issues; special guest appearances; panels and talks; and a three-day Midtown block party. Festival passes and single tickets available. Visit indiememphis.com for a schedule.

100. Goodin Joins Hagwood Adelman As Memphis Managing Attorney -

Michael T. Goodin has joined Hagwood Adelman Tipton PC as managing attorney of the Memphis office. In that role, he provides legal services to HAT’s clients in matters such as medical malpractice and senior housing litigation for health care providers along the continuum of care, including skilled nursing, assisted living, behavioral health, home health and hospice litigation. In addition, he assists in supervising the attorney and paraprofessional teams.