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Editorial Results (free)

1. Last Word: Return of the Balloon Note, SCS and Migrant Teens & Greensward Doubts -

One of the prime culprits in the housing bubble burst that played a role in the worst economic downturn since the Great Depression is back – the adjustable rate mortgage.

Numbers from Chandler Reports, the real estate information company that is part of The Daily News Publishing Co. Inc, show the number of such loans has spiked in the first half of this year and are the highest they’ve been since 2008, the year after the bubble burst nationally.

2. Collierville Center Named for Late Mayor -

The College Street Recreation Center in Collierville is being named in honor of the late Collierville Mayor Linda Kerley.

3. Collierville Recreation Center Named for Late Mayor -

The College Street Recreation Center in Collierville is being named in honor of the late Collierville Mayor Linda Kerley.

4. Council Accepts Donations For Bridge LED Lighting -

Two of the four bridges crossing the Mississippi River will be framed with LED lighting for a fall debut on the city’s riverfront with the October formal opening of the Big River Crossing.

The Memphis City Council approved Tuesday, June 7, accepting $12 million in private donations for the lighting of the Harahan Bridge as well as a conversion of the existing lighting on the Hernando DeSoto Bridge to LED lighting.

5. Council Accepts Donations for Bridge LED Lighting -

Two of the four bridges crossing the Mississippi River will be framed with LED lighting for a fall debut on the city’s riverfront with the October formal opening of the Big River Crossing.

The Memphis City Council approved Tuesday, June 7, accepting $12 million in private donations for the lighting of the Harahan Bridge as well as a conversion of the existing lighting on the Hernando DeSoto Bridge to LED lighting.

6. Last Word: Lipscomb's Successor, MATA School Buses and Roland's Big Breakfast -

Paul Young gets a lot more attention these days than he did when he was the first director of the city-county Office of Sustainability. The attention comes with being the city director of Housing and Community Development where virtually all of the funding comes from the federal government.
That federal funding has changed the face of public housing in the city in the last 25 years. There is only one large public housing project left in the city as a result of the federal funding and its use by Young’s predecessor, Robert Lipscomb.
And what Lipscomb did with the job combined with being the executive director of the Memphis Housing Authority is why a lot of people want to get to know Paul Young these days.
Our centerpiece story by Madeline Faber in Tuesday’s edition makes clear that Young has no desire to wield that kind of power. And it is unlikely anyone in the near future will have the kind of autonomy Lipscomb did.
But beyond that there is still the flow of a lot of federal dollars and Young has some ideas based on his experience in government and finance prior to coming to HCD – everything in government is initials.
It’s a much different experience than Lipscomb’s. Lipscomb coined the phrase “ending public housing as we know it” and at times that slogan wasn’t followed with a lot of detail about what came after public housing was demolished, especially with the first of the projects to fall.
The last public housing project, Foote Homes, will be demolished on Young’s watch which makes his tenure important if more limited than Lipscomb’s tenure.

7. Graceland Offering ‘Scouts Rock Day’ -

There isn’t a Elvis merit badge for Boy Scouts or Girl Scouts.

But scouts can get an Elvis sticker and patch Saturday, April 2, during the 10th annual Scouts Rock at Graceland Day.

The paid event at Graceland includes Cub Scouts and Brownies.

8. Collierville Tulips Bloom in Brief Annual Appearance -

A new crop of tulips planted in some familiar and some new areas of Collierville are making their annual appearance in the town square and other locations, including the Collierville Town Hall.

The tulips generally hold their brightly colored petals for two to three weeks, said Collierville Parks Maintenance Manager Neil Wiseman.

9. The Week Ahead: March 28-April 3 -

Alright, Memphis, are you sure you found all your Easter eggs? Before you make one more sweep of the yard, check out this week’s roundup of local happenings – from the sweet sounds of “Zelda” to what’s being dubbed a “Mini-MEMFix” in East Memphis…

10. Bill to Allow Guns Bans in Ticketed Venues Fails in House -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A bill seeking to allow Tennessee cities to ban guns from being carried at ticketed events has failed in a House subcommittee.

The Republican-controlled Civil Justice Subcommittee voted 3-2 along party lines on Wednesday to kill the measure sponsored by Democratic Rep. John Ray Clemmons and supported by the Tennessee Association of Chiefs of Police.

11. Overton Park Conservancy, Agricenter Turn to Ioby -

Agricenter International is raising money on ioby to replace a gate on a bike trail that runs parallel to Walnut Grove Road from Farm Road to the Farmers Market.

The gate would be replaced by a set of bollards – posts that allow for easier bicycle access while preventing vehicles from entering the trail.

12. Overton Conservancy Raises Money for Playground -

The Overton Park Conservancy is raising money through the crowdfunding platform ioby to make some repairs to the park’s East Parkway playground.

The goal is to raise $3,125 for new surfacing of the playground and the conservancy has already raised $800 toward the goal.

13. Bipartisan Skeptics Doubt Haslam’s Outsourcing Plan -

Poor timing and questionable numbers: That’s how legislators are viewing a business justification plan for outsourcing facilities management across Tennessee.

The Office of Customer Focused Government tells state senators, if all departments opt in, the state could save $35.8 million by the second year of a contract under study for building operations and services – without laying off state workers or cutting pay and benefits.

14. Overton Conservancy Raises Money for Playground Update -

The Overton Park Conservancy is raising money through the crowdfunding platform ioby to make some repairs to the park’s East Parkway playground.

The goal is to raise $3,125 for new surfacing of the playground and the conservancy has already raised $800 toward the goal.

15. Michael Brown’s Attorney Keynotes NAACP Luncheon -

The attorney for the families of Trayvon Martin and Michael Brown is the featured speaker at the Memphis Branch NAACP’s annual Freedom Fund Luncheon.

Benjamin J. Crump, who also serves as the president of the National Bar Association, will speak at the March 29 event, to be held at the Memphis Cook Convention Center, 255 N. Main St.

16. Michael Brown’s Attorney to Keynote NAACP Luncheon -

The attorney for the families of Trayvon Martin and Michael Brown is the featured speaker at the Memphis Branch NAACP’s annual Freedom Fund Luncheon.

17. Last Word: Hedgepeth Speaks, Josh Pastner's Future and Big Box Liquor -

Where else is there to begin but the Greensward controversy.
And we start with an email from Memphis City Council member Reid Hedgepeth in what is rapidly becoming a Last Word tradition and institution – the email in full.

18. Rare Wins for Democrats on Guns, Outsourcing -

Legislative Democrats got a chance to beat their chests a little bit after a proposal to allow guns in the state Capitol and Legislative Plaza failed, and they hope to do the same with outsourcing.

19. Impatient Clemmons Anxious for Minority Voice to Be Heard -

Democratic state Rep. John Ray Clemmons is only halfway through his first two-year term representing District 55 in Nashville. But he’s not willing to wait years to speak out or push for change.

20. Tennessee Legislature Opens 2016 Session on Capitol Hill -

The Tennessee General Assembly's 2016 session will be a short one, likely done by early April. The gavels fall in the House and Senate chambers in Nashville at noon Tuesday, Jan. 12, opening the election year session.

21. Refugees, Regents, Privatization On Tap for New Session -

State Sen. Ken Yager isn’t quite ready for the state of Tennessee to reclaim the Refugee Resettlement Program from Catholic Charities.

22. Grant Program Proving Beneficial To Neighborhood Watch Groups -

With backing from the City of Memphis, local neighborhood associations can receive up to $2,500 to make their neighborhoods safer.

“Responding to criminal offenses and making arrests are part of the efforts to combat crime,” said Lia Roemer, program manager with the Memphis Area Neighborhood Watch department. “The Neighborhood Crime Prevention Fund gives our neighborhoods the opportunity to grow and create crime prevention efforts.”

23. Deadly Shooting in Chattanooga Voted Top Story of 2015 -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – The fatal shooting of four Marines and a sailor in Chattanooga has been voted the top Tennessee news story of 2015.

Muhammad Abdulazeez, a 24-year-old naturalized U.S. citizen, opened fire on a recruiting center and a reserve facility on July 16. The FBI recently described the attack as an act "inspired and motivated by foreign terrorist propaganda."

24. Council's New Crop -

They ran in the considerable shadow of the most competitive Memphis mayoral race in a generation. The new Memphis City Council that takes office with Mayor-elect Jim Strickland in January isn’t necessarily a generational shift. It doesn’t signify a wholesale ousting by the electorate, either.

25. No Bids Submitted in Haslam's Parks Privatization Plan -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Republican Gov. Bill Haslam's effort to outsource hospitality operations at 11 state parks has failed to draw any interest from private vendors.

Haslam has long cited the operation of park services like restaurants, golf courses, inns and marinas as prime examples of areas where private vendors could do a better — and cheaper — job than state government.

26. GPS Collars to be Used to Track Wild Hogs in National Parks -

GAITLINBURG, Tenn. (AP) — With wild hogs plaguing two national parks in Tennessee and neighboring states, officials are using GPS technology to keep an eye on where they roam.

The Great Smoky Mountains National Park and the Big South Fork National River and Recreation Area have been approved to share 20 GPS collars that would allow biologists to track some of the hogs.

27. Strickland: Police Director Armstrong Stays, For Now -

The city of Memphis eventually will have a new Memphis Police Department director, but, for now, current director Toney Armstrong will continue to hold the job.

Mayor-elect Jim Strickland announced Friday, Nov. 20, that Armstrong will remain in the job while he searches for a replacement.

28. Strickland: Police Director Armstrong Stays, For Now -

The city of Memphis eventually will have a new Memphis Police Department director, but, for now, current director Toney Armstrong will continue to hold the job.

Mayor-elect Jim Strickland announced Friday, Nov. 20, that Armstrong will remain in the job while he searches for a replacement.

29. Tennessee’s Landlords Find Hidden Costs of Privatization -

Murfreesboro businessman Tom Hyde felt the sting of Tennessee’s privatization practices two years ago when a representative of Jones Lang Lasalle notified him he would have to pay the company a commission as part of his next lease agreement.

30. Haslam Uncertain About Seeking Lawmakers' OK on Outsourcing -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Gov. Bill Haslam says he's uncertain whether he would seek approval from fellow Republicans in the Tennessee General Assembly about potential plans to privatize state operations.

31. Protesters Speak Out Against Outsourcing at Tenn. Capitol -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — A group of protesters has gathered at the Tennessee Capitol to speak out against Republican Gov. Bill Haslam's administration mulling over privatization of operations in state government.

32. Ramsey Springs to Haslam's Aid on Tennessee Outsourcing Talk -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Senate Speaker Ron Ramsey is dismissing rising concerns among fellow Republicans about Gov. Bill Haslam's efforts to privatize elements of state government as a result of complaints from "squeaky wheels" in their districts.

33. Bipartisan Brakes for Governor Haslam’s Privatization Push -

Plans to put Tennessee’s real estate and government operations in the hands of private business are much further along than Gov. Bill Haslam would like people to think.

A master of downplaying big issues, Haslam says he’s simply looking for ways to make government run more efficiently and save money.

34. Haslam Defends Recommendation for Advisers to Avoid Email -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Gov. Bill Haslam is defending a practice among his outsourcing advisers to avoid email correspondence to prevent information getting out to the public.

The Republican governor told reporters after an economic development conference this week that it's a standard practice of "sharing some wisdom" with new employees who have come to government from the private sector that all of their correspondence is subject to Tennessee's open records laws.

35. Haslam Paying $612,000 Annually to 3 Outsourcing Consultants -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Three part-time outsourcing consultants stand to be paid $612,000 annually by the state even as Republican Gov. Bill Haslam insists that no decision has been made about privatization efforts.

36. Haslam: No 'Bias' Toward Outsourcing Building Management -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Republican Gov. Bill Haslam insisted last week that he has no "bias" toward privatizing state government activities.

Haslam told reporters Thursday, Sept. 17, that any decision is still months away on whether to proceed with outsourcing building management at the state's colleges and universities, prisons, armories or parks. Haslam said his aim is simply to find ways to save money, and that criticism of his administration exploring outsourcing is misplaced.

37. Is State’s Role to Provide a Service or Turn a Profit? -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam appears to be on the brink of privatizing state government. But he won’t be able to do it without a battle, especially from university unions and Democratic lawmakers.

38. Tennessee Dems Introduce Bill to Allow Gun Ban at Sports, Music Venues -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Two Democrats are introducing legislation to allow all firearms to be banned at major sports and music venues.

Senate Minority Leader Lee Harris of Memphis and state Rep. John Ray Clemmons of Nashville say their bill would create an exemption to the new state law that bans local governments from prohibiting people with handgun carry permits to be armed in parks.

39. Timeline Shows Massive Privatization on Potential Fast Track -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Gov. Bill Haslam says no decision has been made on whether to move forward with the outsourcing of a wide range of government facilities.

But a timetable obtained by WTVF-TV shows officials planned to take the next step within days of the Aug. 21 deadline for responses to a request for information from potential vendors.

40. Gov. Haslam Encounters Privatization Picket Line -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam encountered protesters Tuesday, Aug. 25, during a stop at Southwest Tennessee Community College.

Haslam’s visit to the campus on Macon Cove was to mark the start of the higher education academic year – the first school year of the Tennessee Promise program, which offers Tennessee high school graduates two years of free community college.

41. Gov. Haslam Encounters Privatization Picket Line -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam encountered protesters Tuesday, Aug. 25, during a stop at Southwest Tennessee Community College.

Haslam’s visit to the campus on Macon Cove was to mark the start of the higher education academic year – the first school year of the Tennessee Promise program, which offers Tennessee high school graduates two years of free community college.

42. Confederate Parks Renaming Court Ruling Charts Path of Controversy -

The Tennessee Court of Appeals concluded last week that the city of Memphis was involved in the placement of a concrete marker in what used to be Forrest Park that set off an ongoing chain of events.

43. Affordable Homes in an Unaffordable Market -

The gold rush of residential development throughout Middle Tennessee conceals what some in the region say is a growing crisis in affordable housing.

New homes and condos come on to the market every day, and even more are under construction or still in the planning stage, but those homes are often on the higher end of the price scale.

44. Haslam: No Discussion With AG About Supreme Court Vacancy -

MURFREESBORO, Tenn. (AP) — As observers wait to see whether Attorney General Herbert Slatery has any interest in filling an upcoming vacancy on the Tennessee Supreme Court, Gov. Bill Haslam said he hasn't had any discussion about it with his close friend and former top legal adviser.

45. Democrats Criticize Haslam for Exploring More Outsourcing -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Democrats claimed on Tuesday that Republican Gov. Bill Haslam is displaying hostility toward state workers by looking to outsource the management of more government functions to the private sector, but Haslam dismissed the allegation as politics.

46. Final Forrest Statue Vote Moves Controversy to Planning Stage -

Memphis City Council members closed out a series of votes Tuesday, Aug. 18, on moving the statue and disinterring the remains of Nathan Bedford Forrest from Health Sciences Park near Downtown Memphis.

47. Hulsey, Hunt & Parks Opens Memphis Office -

The law firm of Hulsey, Hunt & Parks has opened a Memphis office at Clark Tower, 5100 Poplar Ave.

48. Hulsey, Hunt & Parks Opens Memphis Office -

The law firm of Hulsey, Hunt & Parks has opened a Memphis office at Clark Tower, 5100 Poplar Ave.

49. Haslam: Guns-in-Parks Bill Worth Reviewing for Clarity -

Gov. Bill Haslam says he believes a recent state attorney general’s opinion is at least one reason lawmakers should consider reviewing the law that allows handgun carry permit holders to bring firearms to parks, playgrounds and sports fields.

50. Forrest Birthday Observance Draws Large Crowd -

Confederate groups’ observance of Nathan Bedford Forrest’s birthday Sunday, July 12, drew a larger-than-usual crowd of several hundred people to the city park once named in honor of the Confederate general, slave trader and Ku Klux Klan grand wizard.

51. Forrest Vote Signals Change in General’s Legacy -

When the city of Memphis voted to rename Forrest Park and two other Confederate-themed parks in Downtown Memphis two years ago, City Council member Bill Boyd criticized the move and extolled Nathan Bedford Forrest’s virtues.

52. New Forrest Front -

The political battle over an equestrian statue of Nathan Bedford Forrest and the park that houses it has opened a new front.

53. Wharton Proposes to Move Forrest Statue and Grave -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. is proposing to remove the statue of Confederate General, slave trader and Ku Klux Klan Grand Wizard Nathan Bedford Forrest from the park formerly named in his honor.

54. Haslam Needs to Back Up Call for More Local Control -

If Gov. Bill Haslam is trying to build political capital, he’s making the right move by trying to light a fire under local officials.

He might also want to turn up the flame on his own game.

55. Green Projects in Memphis, Millington Get State Grants -

A 50-kilowatt solar array at Lichterman Nature Center and an upgrade of lighting and HVAC systems in the Millington police and court buildings were both funded by Tennessee state government Clean Tennessee Energy grants announced Monday, June 15.

56. Green Projects in Memphis, Millington Get State Grants -

A 50-kilowatt solar array at Lichterman Nature Center and an upgrade of lighting and HVAC systems in the Millington police and court buildings were both funded by Tennessee state government Clean Tennessee Energy grants announced Monday, June 15.

57. Overbey Has No Regrets for Sponsoring Insure Tennessee -

Republican Sen. Doug Overbey took the road less traveled this year when he sponsored Insure Tennessee at the request of Gov. Bill Haslam.

Despite the legislation’s failure in special and regular sessions, he has no regrets and looks forward to continuing the fight in 2016 for a market-based plan to obtain roughly $1 billion annually through the Affordable Care Act to provide coverage to some 280,000 Tennesseans who are caught in a gap between TennCare and the federal plan.

58. Haslam Calls on Locals to Influence 'Changing Legislature' -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Gov. Bill Haslam on Tuesday issued an appeal to officials from Tennessee cities and towns to help influence what he described as a "changing" state Legislature less concerned with the interests of traditional institutions.

59. Ramsey: No Medicaid Expansion Until 2017 -

The Tennessee legislative session ended in late April, giving itself a little more than two and a-half months to handle the state’s business. That’s plenty of time, according to Lt. Gov. Ron Ramsey.

60. Nashville's Next Mayor Must Solve Traffic, Education Woes -

“Traffic is getting worse by the day.” I must have heard that complaint six times last week. Those exact words.

Perhaps some road construction coupled with Vanderbilt’s graduation complicated the situation, but that seems to be the feeling here.

61. Will Tennessee Republicans Ever Be Truly Happy? -

Why aren’t Tennessee Republicans happier?

With the GOP so dominate in the Tennessee General Assembly and losses so rare – on the Hill or in elections – the party’s lawmakers should be jubilant with this year’s session. But it’s never enough.

62. Haslam Signs Bill to Allow Guns in All Tennessee Parks -

Local governments in Tennessee can no longer bar people with handgun carry permits from bringing firearms to parks, playgrounds and sports fields under legislation signed Friday by Republican Gov. Bill Haslam.

63. Haslam Signs Bill to Allow Guns in All Tennessee Parks -

Local governments in Tennessee can no longer bar people with handgun carry permits from bringing firearms to parks, playgrounds and sports fields under legislation signed Friday by Republican Gov. Bill Haslam.

64. Sounds Like a Hit for Neighbors -

For months, sounds of construction surrounded the Nashville Sounds’ sparkling new First Tennessee Park in Germantown.

The constant thump-thump-thump of pounding jackhammers competed with the irritating, high-pitched beeps of vehicles backing up. Ka-ching! Cranes lifted steel beams into place, keeping time with a syncopated thrumming of never-ending drilling. Ka-ching!

65. Haslam to Decide This Week on Tennessee Guns-in-Parks Bill -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Republican Gov. Bill Haslam said Thursday that he will decide this week whether to sign a bill to allow people with handgun carry permits to be armed in city parks near schools.

66. A Look at Winning and Losing Bills in Tennessee Legislature -

A look at some of the winning and losing legislation during the 2015 session of the Tennessee General Assembly.

WINNERS:
TENNESSEE BUDGET: Appropriating the state's annual $33.8 billion budget. SB1399.

67. Roundup: Defeat of Insure Tennessee Proposal Set Tone in 2015 Session -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – The defeat of Gov. Bill Haslam's proposal to extend health coverage to 280,000 low-income Tennesseans set the tone for the 2015 session of the state Legislature.

68. Biblical Lessons Lost in Lack of Health Care Debate -

Tennessee’s legislators spent hours this session arguing over guns and whether to pass a law making the Bible the state book of Tennessee.

In fact, the Bible bill took two days of debate in the House, where it passed, and thorough discussion in the Senate, before it died – at least until next year.

69. Tenn. House Member Seeks Protection Against Haslam Vetoes -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A state House member is seeking to delay votes on Gov. Bill Haslam's legislative proposals to insure against vetoes of embattled measures such as allowing people with handgun carry permits to be armed in city parks.

70. Guns-in-Parks Bill Likely Headed to Special Committee -

Tennessee lawmakers anticipate a special committee will be needed to work out differences in a proposal that would allow people with handgun carry permits to be armed in all of the state’s parks.

71. This week in Memphis history: April 10-16 -

2010: Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. tells City Council members that Bass Pro Shops at The Pyramid will open in November 2011. He also circulates a draft lease agreement between the city and the outdoors retailer, with more discussions to come on a possible redevelopment of the adjoining Pinch district. The city’s plan is to sign a deal with Bass Pro within a month, with work starting immediately.

72. Tenn. Lawmakers Can't Agree on Guns Bill Drafted as NRA Gift -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – It was supposed to be a welcoming gift from Tennessee lawmakers to the more than 70,000 people coming to the National Rifle Association's annual convention in Nashville this weekend.

73. House Votes to Take Tennessee Capitol Complex Off Guns Bill -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – The House voted Monday to remove the Tennessee Capitol from a bill to expand the areas where people with handgun carry permits can be armed, a move supported by Republican Gov. Bill Haslam.

74. Haslam Says He Favors Stripping Guns-at-Capitol Provision -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Gov. Bill Haslam said Monday that he favors House lawmakers stripping a provision inserted into a guns-in-parks proposal that would allow handgun carry permit holders to be armed on the grounds of the state Capitol.

75. NRA Conventioneers: These are Your Gun Rights in Nashville -

Concealed or open carry of a handgun in Tennessee is legal with a permit issued by the state Department of Safety.

The state must issue a handgun carry permit to any applicant who is at least 21 years old, a resident, and not prohibited from purchasing or possessing a firearm under federal or state law.

76. What Better Place for an NRA Convention? -

When the National Rifle Association announced that it would hold its 2015 convention in Nashville, the timing was propitious.

In 2010, gun sales and handgun permits were booming, and Tennessee had just enacted a controversial and contested new “guns in bars” law that allowed people with handgun permits to carry concealed firearms into bars and restaurants that serve alcohol.

77. GOP Leader: 1-Time School Use Enough to Ban Guns in Parks -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A top Republican supporter of a bill to strip local governments of the power to bar handgun carry permit holders from being armed in parks, playgrounds and ball fields said Thursday that even if a school uses a park, playground or ball field for just one event per year, that would enable the school to ban guns there.

78. State Senate Votes to Allow Handguns at Tennessee Capitol -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – People with handgun carry permits would be able to carry their weapons on the grounds of the state Capitol under a provision inserted into a guns-in-parks proposal that overwhelmingly passed the Senate on Wednesday.

79. Moms Demand Action Seeks Common-Sense Gun Restrictions -

It’s another blood-pressure-raising Tennessee legislative session – at least for a politically active group of moms concerned about their children potentially being shot.

This spring, lawmakers who want to loosen gun restrictions will get a morale boost from a three-day National Rifle Association convention. It coincides with consideration of several gun-related bills, including one that would eliminate the need for a firearms permit altogether.

80. State Legislators Misfire In Rush to Impress NRA Attendees -

With the National Rifle Association bringing 75,000 people to Nashville for its April 10-12 convention, the timing is seemingly right for the General Assembly to impress by passing a bevy of gun bills.

81. Bid to End Tennessee Carry Permit Requirement Fails in House -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A proposal to eliminate Tennessee's requirement to obtain a state-issued permit to openly carry handguns was defeated in a House subcommittee on Wednesday.

Republican Rep. Micah Van Huss Jonesborough said he introduced the measure because he believes that "current laws here in Tennessee infringe on the Second Amendment of our U.S. Constitution."

82. Haslam: Don't Rush Gun Bills Before NRA Meeting in Nashville -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Gov. Bill Haslam is urging fellow Republicans in the Tennessee General Assembly not to let the upcoming convention of the National Rifle Association in Nashville influence their consideration of a slew of bills seeking to loosen state gun laws.

83. Tennessee Mulls Removing Control Over Guns in Parks -

Community parks, playgrounds and sports fields are among the few areas in Tennessee where local governments can ban people with handgun carry permits from being armed. Now gun-friendly state lawmakers are looking to change that.

84. Tennessee House Advances Guns-in-Parks Bill Opposed By Haslam -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A bill seeking to strip city and county governments of the power to ban guns at local parks, playgrounds and athletic fields is advancing in the Tennessee House.

85. Fogelman Partners with City on Summer Camp -

Memphis businessman and philanthropist Avron Fogelman is partnering with the city of Memphis to send more than 1,000 children to summer camps free of charge.

The summer camp program is part of Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr.’s initiative through the city’s Parks and Neighborhoods division.

86. Eliminating Hall Income Tax Raises New Problems -

Republican lawmakers are lining up legislation to reduce or phase out Tennessee’s Hall income tax on investments, even though Gov. Bill Haslam is concerned about losing revenue amid the state’s economic ups and downs.

87. Fogelman Partners With City on Summer Camp -

Memphis businessman and philanthropist Avron Fogelman is partnering with the city of Memphis to send more than 1,000 children to summer camps free of charge.

The summer camp program is part of Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr.’s initiative through the city’s Parks and Neighborhoods division.

88. Spokeswoman: Republican Rep. Nunnelee of Mississippi Dies -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) – U.S. Rep. Alan Nunnelee of Mississippi, a fiscal and social conservative elected to Congress in a Republican wave of 2010, has died. He was 56.

Elizabeth Parks, the spokeswoman in Nunnelee's congressional office, said he died Friday in his hometown of Tupelo, Mississippi.

89. Short stay? Travel Site Also Lauds Knoxville Area -

People with an eye for inexpensive yet great vacation or short getaway destinations are likely to land in Knoxville.

Knoxville ranks ninth in the nation on hotel search trivago.com for Best Value City with a ranking of 91.59, coming in between Springfield, Mo., and Little Rock, Ark.

90. Germantown Was Into Mixed-Use Before It Was Cool -

Even before Mayor Karl Dean’s announcement that the $60 million ballpark would be constructed in Germantown, the area was flourishing – not to the extent that it is now, but it was experiencing growth and development.

91. Recruiter’s Career Twist -

Ask Janet Miller about her remarkable career at the Nashville Area Chamber of Commerce and she’ll likely attribute it to good timing or pass credit onto others.

92. Office of Preparedness Director Leaves -

Bob Nations is leaving the Shelby County Office of Preparedness, part of second-term changes by Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell.

93. Reshaping a City, One Lot at a Time -

John G. Brittle Jr. doesn’t have an office. He has a war room. The space, crowded with maps, charts, books, piles of paper and marked-up spreadsheets, is ground zero for InfillNashville, the 10-person team of site selection specialists that Brittle leads at Village Real Estate Services.

94. We’re All Invited -

MEMPHIS, SERVED IN THE SHELL. Following up last week’s column, this from a reader:

“We have no civic pride, half the population is intent on killing as many as they can and the other part lives behind walls or gates. There was a time in the fifties when you could leave your front door unlocked and keys in the car.”

95. Memphis Bar Judicial Poll Released -

The Memphis Bar Association poll of attorneys on the judicial races on the Aug. 7 ballot shows 16 percent to as high as 38 percent of the attorneys participating have no opinion in many of the judicial races.

96. Hollingsworth Buys Mississippi Industrial Property -

The Hollingsworth Cos., which operates a prominent industrial development company with holdings across the South, has acquired an industrial building in Senatobia, Miss.

Clinton, Tenn.-based Hollingsworth recently acquired the 198,450-square-foot building at 795 Shands Bottom Road in Senatobia from BMW.

97. Poll Shows Tennessee Voters Favor Free Tuition Plan -

NASHVILLE (AP) – A majority of Tennessee voters support Gov. Bill Haslam's program to cover a full ride at two-year colleges for any high school graduate, as well as higher education standards, according to the latest Vanderbilt University poll released Wednesday.

98. Congress Revives Bill for Women’s History Museum -

Citing history textbooks, national parks and landmarks that mostly leave women out, lawmakers Wednesday are reviving a long-stalled effort to create a National Women’s History Museum in the nation’s capital.

99. Congress Considers Bill for Women's History Museum -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Citing history textbooks, national parks and landmarks that mostly leave women out, lawmakers Wednesday are reviving a long-stalled effort to create a National Women's History Museum in the nation's capital.

100. Across the River -

The Arkansas land between the bridges across the Mississippi River at Memphis doesn’t have a name, at least not yet.

If graffiti is any indication, lots of people go there. And they cross numerous boundaries on dirt and gravel roads and paths that can end abruptly and are posted with “no trespassing” signs and other warnings as well as railroad video cameras.