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Editorial Results (free)

1. Conyers Resigns From Congress Amid Harassment Allegations -

DETROIT (AP) – Besieged by allegations of sexual harassment, Democratic Rep. John Conyers resigned from Congress on Tuesday, bringing an abrupt end to the civil rights leader's nearly 53-year career on Capitol Hill.

2. Last Word: Lake District Recycling, The New First and The AAC 'Glass Ceiling' -

The U.S. Senate vote on a tax reform plan is now set for 10 a.m. our time Friday morning following more debate in D.C. that began Thursday as the trigger provision to raise tax rates if economic growth from the proposed tax cuts doesn't materialize was ruled out of order by the Senate parliamentarian. This was the provision on which the support of U.S. Senator Bob Corker of Tennessee hinged. And Corker is leading a group of deficit hawks whose block of votes is considered crucial in what happens to a proposal that was being reshaped as midnight approached. Here's Politico with comments from Corker as of late Thursday

3. Tigers' New Basketball Facility a Palatial Recruiting Tool -

When you donate $10 million toward the construction of new basketball practice facility that bears your name, you are entitled to make a joke. So former Tiger Bill Laurie, who played on the 1972-73 Memphis State team that was NCAA runner-up, went for the laugh at the recent ribbon cutting ceremony for the University of Memphis’ $21 million Laurie-Walton Family Basketball Center on south campus named after Laurie and his wife, Nancy Walton Laurie.

4. Haslam: No Retaliation For Outsourcing Decisions -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam says his administration won’t retaliate against several University of Tennessee campuses that opted against his effort to privatize facilities management services at higher education institutions.

5. Haslam: Campuses That Don’t Outsource Face No Retaliation -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam says his administration won’t retaliate against several University of Tennessee campuses that opted against his effort to privatize facilities management services at higher education institutions.

6. Events -

The Indie Memphis Film Festival 2017 takes place Wednesday through Monday, Nov. 1-6, featuring a wide selection of screenings at multiple venues; MLK50, a special program of films to commemorate the upcoming 50th anniversary of Dr. Martin Luther King’s assassination and highlight civil rights issues; special guest appearances; panels and talks; and a three-day Midtown block party. Festival passes and single tickets available. Visit indiememphis.com for a schedule.

7. Events -

Memphis Botanic Garden wraps up its 2017 Vine to Wine wine-tasting series with “Spooky Spirits” Tuesday, Oct. 31, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at MBG, 750 Cherry Road. Indulge in adult “spirits” and frighteningly delicious hors d’oeuvres – and come in costume, if you dare. Tickets are $30 for members and $45 for nonmembers. Visit memphisbotanicgarden.com/winetastings for details.

8. Events -

New Memphis will host the Celebrate What’s Right: Urban Renaissance luncheon and panel discussion Monday, Oct. 30, from noon to 1:30 p.m. at the Holiday Inn University of Memphis, 3700 Central Ave. The panel features four local leaders and experts who have been catalysts for the city’s urban renaissance. Tickets are $30. Register at newmemphis.org.

9. Events -

The 2018-Model Memphis International Auto Show takes place Friday through Sunday, Oct. 27-29, at Memphis Cook Convention Center, 255 N. Main St. Experience the latest in-car technology, research your next vehicle and test drive more than a dozen vehicles on site. Buy discount e-tickets at memphisautoshow.com.

10. The Week Ahead: Oct. 16-22 -

Hey, Memphis! Fall is definitely in the air now, as the slate of festivals and fun outdoor activities continue to roll on in the Bluff City. The Memphis Grizzlies open their 2017-2018 season at FedExForum against Tony Allen’s new team and don’t be surprised if you start seeing some ghosts and goblins by this weekend.

11. Last Word: The Chamber on Forrest, Different Amazon News & More 2018 Dominoes -

The Greater Memphis Chamber rolls out its part of the push by the city administration to get a state waiver for the removal of the Nathan Bedford Forrest statue. Next week is the meeting of the Tennessee Historical Commission with Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland showing up to make his pitch. That is even though the chairman of the body has told him the commission will not take up a waiver at the meeting.

12. Republicans Unveil Long-Shot Effort on Health Care -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Senators on Wednesday rolled out competing plans for the nation's health care system, with a group of GOP senators making a last, long-shot effort to undo Barack Obama's Affordable Care Act and independent Sen. Bernie Sanders proposing universal government-run coverage.

13. ‘Divisive Symbols’: Mississippi Case Offers Hope for Forrest Bust Removal -

State Sen. Lee Harris is encouraged by the U.S. Supreme Court’s request for the state of Mississippi to respond to a lawsuit seeking to remove the Confederate battle flag from its state flag.

14. Financial Services Firm Takes Floor in Clark Tower -

In this week’s Real Estate Recap, a financial services firm inks a full floor in Clark Tower and Crosstown High School files a $4.1 million permit to build-out space in the Crosstown Concourse for its charter school that is scheduled to open next fall. 

15. Nathan Bedford Forrest Bust to Stay in Capitol -

The Tennessee Capitol Commission blocked Gov. Bill Haslam’s request Friday, Sept. 1, to move the embattled Nathan Bedford Forrest bust out of the State Capitol to the Tennessee State Museum.

16. Financial Services Firm Takes Floor in Clark Tower -

In this week’s Real Estate Recap, a financial services firm inks a full floor in Clark Tower and Crosstown High School files a $4.1 million permit to build-out space in the Crosstown Concourse for its charter school that is scheduled to open next fall. 


17. Statue of Martin Luther King Jr. Unveiled in his Hometown -

ATLANTA (AP) – The daughter of civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. stood beside her father's newly unveiled statue Monday, just a few blocks from where he grew up, handing out hugs and telling each well-wisher: "It's about time."

18. State Panel Sheds New Light on Racial Atrocities -

State Rep. Johnnie Turner has seen what can happen when old wounds are never allowed to heal.

She’s seen it most recently in clashes between neo-Nazis, Ku Klux Klansmen and white supremacists and those who resisted their hatred in Charlottesville, Virginia, where a counter-protester was killed and 19 were injured when a car was intentionally driven into a group of counter protesters. Two state troopers also died in a helicopter crash that weekend.

19. Confederate Monuments Controversy Comes to City Hall -

The question of timing in removing two Confederate monuments from city parks arrives at City Hall Tuesday, Aug. 22.

A Memphis City Council resolution that would instruct the city administration to immediately remove and/or sell Confederate monuments in city parks is scheduled for discussion at the 2:15 p.m. executive session and could be added to the council agenda or voted on later at the first council session in September.

20. King’s Daughter Among Freedom Award Recipients -

The daughter of Martin Luther King Jr., the co-founder of the Southern Poverty Law Center and a groundbreaking South African jazz trumpeter and composer are the recipients of the National Civil Rights Museum’s annual Freedom Awards.

21. Monument Effort Reflects Differing Strategies -

The call to remove Confederate monuments in Memphis city parks is increasingly meeting with local officials pointing toward Nashville and state officials. And local activists are pointing to a clock.

22. Deadly Rally Accelerates Removal of Confederate Statues -

In Gainesville, Florida, workers hired by the Daughters of the Confederacy chipped away at a Confederate soldier's statue, loaded it quietly on a truck and drove away with little fanfare.

In Baltimore, Mayor Catherine Pugh said she's ready to tear down all of her city's Confederate statues, and the city council voted to have them destroyed. San Antonio lawmakers are looking ahead to removing a statue from a prominent downtown park.

23. ‘I Am a Man’ Plaza Initial Design Unveiled -

The initial design of a public plaza south of FedExForum commemorating the 1968 sanitation workers strike calls for a central sculpture with the words “I Am a Man” in 15-foot-tall stainless steel letters, along with quotes from speeches by civil rights leaders on other parts of the built environment and on the letters of the sculpture.

24. UrbanArt Commission Will See Tighter City Guidelines -

Memphis City Council chairman Berlin Boyd put his move to abolish the UrbanArt Commission on hold Tuesday, July 25, in favor of tighter oversight of the UAC’s public art program, which totals 1 percent of city expenditures on capital projects.

25. UrbanArt Commission to See Tighter City Guidelines -

Memphis City Council chairman Berlin Boyd put his move to abolish the UrbanArt Commission on hold Tuesday, July 25, in favor of tighter oversight of the UAC’s public art program, which totals 1 percent of city expenditures on capital projects.

26. Resolution, Dollar-Figure Miscues Raise Sanitation Workers’ Grants by $20,000 -

After all of these years, maybe what happened Tuesday, July 25, to the city’s plan to pay the 14 surviving sanitation workers from 1968 a grant of $50,000 each was part of the larger narrative of the enduring turmoil of that historic time.

27. Last Word: Freeze Warning, Corker on Obamacare Repeal and The Disney Example -

What do you call it when you expect a lot of trouble coming from a specific direction – with a detailed roadmap -- and a completely different controversy comes in from a different direction, hits and leaves a crater. Whatever you call it, that is what happened to Ole Miss football coach Hugh Freeze Thursday evening. Or did it?

28. Last Word: Closing the Door, Midtown Rents and Red West's Many Roles -

It didn’t take the Shelby County Commission very long Wednesday to close the door on its budget season – about 20 minutes in the day’s special meeting to approve a county property tax rate of $4.11 on third and final reading. That’s not a quick up or down vote. And it took just a bit longer because there is still some discussion about whether this was a reduction in the tax rate or a tax cut in the sense that a homeowner in Shelby County would understand the term.

29. Council Delays Discussion About Future of DMC, RDC -

Memphis City Council members put off a discussion Tuesday, July 11, on a call to look at restructuring or abolishing the Downtown Memphis Commission and the Riverfront Development Corp.

30. Council Delays Discussion About Future of DMC, RDC -

Memphis City Council members put off a discussion Tuesday, July 11, on a call to look at restructuring or abolishing the Downtown Memphis Commission and the Riverfront Development Corp.

31. Bridge Protest Anniversary Draws More Action, Reflection -

A year after the spontaneous protest march that ended with more than 1,000 people shutting down the Hernando DeSoto Bridge for several hours, the leader of that effort was again moving north along B.B. King Boulevard on Sunday, July 9.

32. Saturday Legal Aid Clinic To Celebrate 10 Years -

A ceremony and reception will be held Saturday, July 8, to celebrate the 10th anniversary of the 2nd Saturday Legal Aid Clinic, or 2SLAC, serving the Memphis community.

The event will be from 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. at the Benjamin L. Hooks Central Library, 3030 Poplar Ave.

33. Cooper-Young Getting New Coffee House -

945 Cooper St.
Memphis, TN 38104

Permit Amount: $85,750

Application Date: July 2017

34. Last Word: Harold Ford Jr. on Change, Tourism Turns a Corner and Sim at UTHSC -

Very different outlooks along party lines still in our delegation to Washington over the Senate’s version of Trumpcare.

On the day the Congressional Budget Office estimated the proposal would end health insurance coverage for 22 million Americans, Republican U.S. Sen. Lamar Alexander’s reaction:

35. Last Word: Your Neighbor Has Power, City Budget Wrap Take One and BBQ -

We are at the point in our storm recovery where the novelty and sense of adventure have reached the end of their very short lives in areas where the power is still out. And the restoration of that service is at a point where you now have people on one side of a street with power and those on the other side may still be in the dark and the heat.

36. Last Word: Carousel Preview, New Crime Stats and EDGE Does Multi-Family -

The group Friends of the Fairgrounds got together Thursday evening at the Children’s Museum of Memphis and got the first group tour of the Grand Carousel center under construction at CMOM. This is as the museum focuses more on fundraising for the $6 million project that has already raised the money for the restoration of the carousel itself and now sets about the task of paying for the building around it including a banquet hall. Here’s a look from our Facebook page with more to come on CMOM and the Fairgrounds for the Monday edition that will probably go up on line Friday.

37. Unhealthy Motives -

WE DON’T CARE ABOUT HEALTH CARE. WE CARE ABOUT INSURANCE. Like casinos, the insurance business is a bet, you know, like a roll of the dice. And like casinos, the house always wins. An army of actuaries hedges every bet. If you buy life insurance, they’re going to charge you enough to make money before you die. They win. If you buy health insurance, they’re going to charge you enough to make money if you get sick. They win.

38. Jackson Visits City Hall In Push for Career Education -

At the top of the Tuesday, May 9, Memphis City Council session, the council heard from civil rights leader and two-time presidential contender Rev. Jesse Jackson.

39. Jackson Visits City Hall In Push for Career Education -

At the top of the Tuesday, May 9, Memphis City Council session, the council heard from civil rights leader and two-time presidential contender Rev. Jesse Jackson.

40. Clark Tower Wraps Up $8 Million Renovation -

Commercial real estate firm Colliers International has announced the owner of Clark Tower, In-Rel Properties, has finished an $8 million renovation of the iconic East Memphis office building. Details on that and other top deals in this week's Real Estate Recap...

41. The Week Ahead: May 8-14 -

Happy Monday, Memphis! Festival season rolls on this week with plenty of reasons to get outside, celebrate and … well, be festive. Plus, we’ve got details on a couple of great concerts to check out and the (completely unrelated) reason you might hear drumming around Mud Island in The Week Ahead…

42. ASD Loses 29 Employees in ESSA Shift -

The state-run Achievement School District is losing 29 employees including 13 who are involved in running the first schools in Frayser taken over by the district in 2012.

The changes, which include another 16 positions in the central office, are the most significant ever for the ASD, which takes over state schools in the bottom 5 percent in terms of academic achievement.

43. ASD Sheds 29 Employees in ESSA Shift -

The state-run Achievement School District is losing 29 employees including 13 who are involved in the direct running of the first schools in Frayser taken over by the district in 2012.

The changes, which include another 16 positions in the central office, are the most significant change to the district for the bottom 5 percent of public schools in the state in terms of academic achievement.

44. Americans Hang Up on Landlines as Cellphone Homes Dominate -

NEW YORK (AP) – Deborah Braswell, a university administrator in Alabama, is a member of a dwindling group – people with a landline phone at home.

According to a U.S. government study released Thursday, 50.8 percent of homes and apartments had only cellphone service in the latter half of 2016, the first time such households attained a majority in the survey. Braswell and her family are part of the 45.9 percent that still have landline phones. The remaining households have no phone service at all.

45. Neighborhood Preservation Awards $10K to MLK Prep -

Neighborhood Preservation Inc. has awarded Frayser Community Schools, the charter school company that operates Martin Luther King Jr. College Preparatory High School in Frayser, a $10,000 grant to improve the baseball field and other athletic and recreational facilities on the high school’s campus, 1530 Dellwood Ave.

46. Pinch Concept Plan Passes Council’s First Reading -

The concept plan that would guide development of the nine-block area between Bass Pro Shops at the Pyramid and St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital was approved by the Memphis City Council Tuesday, April 25, on the first of three required readings.

47. Pinch Concept Plan Passes Council’s First Reading -

The concept plan that would guide development of the nine-block area between Bass Pro Shops at the Pyramid and St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital was approved by the Memphis City Council Tuesday, April 25, on the first of three required readings.

48. Neighborhood Preservation Awards $10K to MLK Prep -

Neighborhood Preservation Inc. has awarded Frayser Community Schools, the charter school company that operates Martin Luther King Jr. College Preparatory High School in Frayser, a $10,000 grant to improve the baseball field and other athletic and recreational facilities on the high school’s campus, 1530 Dellwood Ave.

49. Governor’s Supplemental Budget Includes More Transportation Funding -

Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris calls the governor’s $125 million supplemental budget a “strong foundation” for completing work on the IMPROVE Act.

50. Last Word: Two Science Marches, Bill Lee Kicks Off and Andrew Young on Ben Hooks -

Rainy Sunday in the city with ponchoed partisans of the Porter-Leath Ragin' Cajun gathering and Africa in April overlapping from the riverfront to Danny Thomas Boulevard. In Germantown, it was a soggy but colorful 5k for the Germantown Municipal School District with shades of blue, orange and of course pink, or was it red?, at different parts of the run.

51. Bill O'Reilly Out at Fox News Channel After 20 Years -

NEW YORK (AP) – Fox News Channel's parent company fired Bill O'Reilly on Wednesday following an investigation into harassment allegations, bringing a stunning end to cable television news' most popular program and one that came to define the bravado of his network over 20 years.

52. The Press Box: For Tigers Basketball, No Easy Way Forward -

Questions – and to the extent possible – answers about the reeling University of Memphis basketball program.

Q: Is this as simple as athletic director Tom Bowen and President M. David Rudd making a more than $15 million five-year mistake in hiring Tubby Smith?

53. Lawsons Going to Kansas; Tigers Lose More Players -

Dedric and K.J. Lawson are transferring to the University of Kansas to play for coach Bill Self, The Kansas City Star reported. The brothers, who announced last week they would be leaving the University of Memphis basketball program, will have to sit out next season before being eligible.

54. Civil Rights Activist Owens Calls Out Memphis Lawmaker -

Memphis civil rights activist Bill Owens, who campaigned for Republican Donald Trump in the 2016 presidential race, is criticizing a state legislator who refused to back his political efforts in a statement on the House floor.

55. Memphis Civil Rights Sites Would Benefit From Bill -

Mason Temple Church of God in Christ and the National Civil Rights Museum would get technical assistance toward preservation and interpretation from the National Park Service under a bill sponsored by U.S. Sen. Lamar Alexander.

56. Memphis Civil Rights Sites Would Benefit From Bill -

Mason Temple Church of God in Christ and the National Civil Rights Museum would get technical assistance toward preservation and interpretation from the National Park Service under a bill sponsored by U.S. Sen. Lamar Alexander.

57. Last Word: Lawsons Exit, LaRose Lessons and No Medicaid Expansion This Year -

The Lawson Brothers exit Tigers basketball seeking a release from the University of Memphis. The statement from Dedric and K.J. Lawson was all sweetness and light and apparently about as sincere as one of those interviews where players and coaches declare that if they will just play hard and put more points on the board than the other team then they should win.

58. Last Word: Police Presence on MLK Day, 'R on R Crime' and Fashion on Flicker -

I’m going to err on the side of caution and say that the helicopter constantly circling over the National Civil Rights Museum Tuesday during the otherwise solemn observance of the anniversary of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s assassination could have been one used by one of the television stations. It also could have been a police helicopter and that would fit with the highly visible presence Memphis Police have chosen to take in the last year or so of protest in the city.

59. Last Word: The Catechism of 1968, Downtown Hotels and Earth Day on Auto Row -

What happened 49 years ago this week in our city began long before the first sanitation worker walked off the job or the first “I Am A Man” sign was made. Maybe it was that long arc that explains the timing of what happened here in late March into the first week of April of 1968. For just about half a century now we have thought and thought again about that chronology, reviewed the details. And what we have is a sort of catechism of moments that if they had happened differently, we can’t help thinking, might have produced a different result.

60. House Bill is Back Declaring God As Source of Liberty -

A previously defeated proposal to amend the state constitution to say that God is the source of Tennesseans’ liberties has been resurrected in the House.

The measure sponsored by Republican Rep. Micah Van Huss of Jonesborough had failed on a 3-3 vote in the House Civil Justice Subcommittee earlier this month. But Republican Rep. Martin Daniel of Knoxville made a motion to reconsider the bill, so it is scheduled to be heard again on Wednesday.

61. Lawmakers Blast Haslam Administration for Process Toward JLL Contract -

The Tennessee Department of General Services is set to award a statewide contract for facility management services to Jones Lang LaSalle, a company that already handles 10 percent of state office space and estimates a 15.9 percent savings if all higher education institutes participate.

62. Parkinson Rejects Owens’ Politics in Legislature -

NASHVILLE – Recognition for the Rev. Bill Owens turned into a rebuke on the House floor when a Memphis legislator discovered the activist pastor campaigned for President Donald Trump and urged black voters to leave the Democratic Party.

63. Parkinson Rejects Owens’ Politics After He is Honored -

NASHVILLE – Recognition for the Rev. Bill Owens turned into a rebuke on the House floor when a Memphis legislator discovered the activist pastor campaigned for President Donald Trump and urged black voters to leave the Democratic Party.

64. Arkansas Lawmakers Vote to Remove Lee From King Holiday -

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) – Arkansas lawmakers gave final approval Friday to legislation removing Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee from the holiday honoring slain civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr.

65. Workers’ Comp Bureau Gets New Memphis Judge -

Jackson, Tennessee, attorney Deana Seymour is the new Memphis trial judge for the state Court of Workers' Compensation Claims.

66. March 17-23, 2017: This week in Memphis history -

1968: 16.1 inches of snow fall on the city of Memphis, cancelling plans for striking city sanitation workers to march with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. at the front of their ranks from Clayborn Temple to City Hall. King would return to the city to lead the march on March 28, a march that would end before it got to City Hall because of violence. The violent end would prompt King to return to the city to lead another march April 5.

67. Workers' Comp Bureau Gets New Memphis Judge -

Jackson, Tennessee, attorney Deana Seymour is the new Memphis trial judge for the state Court of Workers' Compensation Claims.

68. What a Strange Twist of Events in Hiring of Currie -

John Currie is the new athletics director at the University of Tennessee. Has it sunk in yet? Currie, previously the athletic director at Kansas State, was introduced last week by new UT chancellor Beverly Davenport during a ceremony featuring fans, boosters, coaches and, of course, former Tennessee and NFL quarterback Peyton Manning.

69. 'Heartbeat Bill' Put Off a Year -

NASHVILLE – Legislation outlawing abortions once a fetal heartbeat is detected is being postponed until 2018, but a House panel voted Wednesday to restrict abortions after the 20th week, a shift from the 24-week period defining “viability.”

70. New Vols AD Currie Says His Tennessee Experience Should Help -

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – New Tennessee athletic director John Currie has some shopping to do.

71. Bill Filed to Strip Lee From King Holiday in Arkansas -

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) – A proposal filed Tuesday to remove Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee from the Martin Luther King Jr. holiday in Arkansas would also require the state to expand what is taught about the civil rights movement and the Civil War in the public schools.

72. Last Word: 'Sun Records,' Ole Miss's Lack of Control and Haslam in 2018 -

I am not going to be one of those people who at this late date in the history of television dramas based on real people points out every departure from reality. The first episode of the CMT television series “Sun Records” Thursday was a scene-setter and introduction of sorts to an ensemble cast with plenty of opportunities to name that place in Memphis. That usually means a pretty complex story line to come and there are more than enough memorable characters in the story of Sun.

73. Daniel’s ‘Milo Bill’ Evolves In Freedom of Speech Debate -

NASHVILLE – A Knoxville lawmaker pushing free speech on college campuses stopped calling his legislation the “Milo bill” after a video resurfaced of now-former Breitbart News columnist Milo Yiannopoulos approving of pedophilia.

74. Last Word: How Do You Get On The List, Sedgwick & Thornwood and Musicals -

Monday was Presidents Day and thus a holiday at City Hall. But for the occupant on City Hall’s top floor it was anything but a holiday. The list Memphis Police made for who has to have a uniformed police officer next to them to go anywhere in City Hall is turning into a controversy over possible surveillance of citizens participating in the last year or so of protests around the city.

75. Lawmakers OK New Board Appointments at 6 Public Universities -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – The House and Senate have approved Gov. Bill Haslam's nominations for new boards for six public universities.

The new boards are part of the Republican governor's initiative to spin six four-year public universities out of the Tennessee Board of Regents system. Each board will control budgets, tuition and the selection of university presidents.

76. View From the Hill: Haslam Plan Tilts Broadband Playing Field -

State Reps. Pat Marsh and Art Swann emerged from a meeting underwhelmed by Gov. Bill Haslam’s legislation to spread broadband internet access across Tennessee.

“I thought there would be a lot more to it,” says Marsh, a Shelbyville Republican, calling the proposal “a drop in the bucket” financially but at least a starting point.

77. The Week Ahead: January 31- February 6 -

Good morning, Memphis! It will get up to 49 degrees Saturday, but the Mississippi River water temp will still be frigid when the annual Polar Bear Plunge for Special Olympics splashes off at Mud Island River Park. A busy week starts with Gov. Bill Haslam’s State of the State address today.     

78. Governor Proposes Rural Broadband Expansion for Tennessee -

NASHVILLE – State government will provide private companies with millions of dollars in grants and tax credits to extend broadband internet access while allowing electric co-ops to enter the retail broadband business under legislation Sen. Mark Norris is set to sponsor.

79. Rallings: Valero Protesters ‘Defamed’ King Holiday -

Memphis Police Director Michael Rallings defended the response of police officers and firefighters to a Monday, Jan. 16, protest that shut down access to the Valero refinery in South Memphis for five hours. And he said the action to protest an oil pipeline to the plant that would cross Arkansas defamed the federal holiday Monday honoring civil rights leader Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

80. New Details of St. Jude Expansion Look to Medical Corridors To The East -

The city’s plans for the Pinch District between the Pyramid and St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital are only half of the plan the city will seek expanded uses of the Tourism Development Zone and an expansion of a Tax Increment Financing district for.

81. Rallings: Valero Protesters ‘Defamed’ King Holiday -

Memphis Police Director Michael Rallings defended the response of police officers and firefighters to a Monday, Jan. 16, protest that shut down access to the Valero refinery in South Memphis for five hours. And he said the action to protest an oil pipeline to the plant that would cross Arkansas defamed the federal holiday Monday honoring civil rights leader Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

82. City Offices to Close For King Holiday -

All divisions of city government, except police and fire services, will be closed Monday, Jan. 16, the federal holiday honoring Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. That includes libraries, community centers and aquatic centers. City solid waste collections and Inland Waste garbage and recycling collections for Monday customers will move to Tuesday.

83. Cohen Announces $400,000 Grant for Clayborn Temple -

The National Park Service awarded the city’s Housing and Community Development Division a $400,000 grant Thursday, Jan. 12, for the preservation of Clayborn Temple.

U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen said the grant that the city applied for and he endorsed is one of 39 similar projects to receive the federal funding. The grant comes from the African-American Civil Rights Grant Program of the park service. The grants are to highlight sites from the civil rights movement and the African-American experience.

84. Last Word: Humes Next, Top ZIPs in Residential and Payback in the Legislature -

Add Dave & Buster’s to the list of "it" retail hot spots. The restaurant-arcade has inked a lease in Cordova by Wolfchase Galeria with plans to open later this year, probably fourth quarter.

85. Cohen Announces $400,000 Grant for Clayborn Temple -

The National Park Service awarded the city’s Housing and Community Development Division a $400,000 grant Thursday, Jan. 12, for the preservation of Clayborn Temple.

U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen said the grant that the city applied for and he endorsed is one of 39 similar projects to receive the federal funding. The grant comes from the African-American Civil Rights Grant Program of the park service. The grants are to highlight sites from the civil rights movement and the African-American experience.

86. City Offices to Close For King Holiday -

All divisions of city government, except police and fire services, will be closed Monday, Jan. 16, the federal holiday honoring Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. That includes libraries, community centers and aquatic centers. City solid waste collections and Inland Waste garbage and recycling collections for Monday customers will move to Tuesday.

87. View From the Hill: Taxing Online Sales Not Such an Easy Fix -

Cumberland Transit owner Allen Doty isn’t sure if a rule requiring major out-of-state retailers to collect Tennessee sales taxes will create more equity for his shop.

But Doty, who has been selling everything from bicycles to kayaks and camping gear for 34 years in Nashville, is definitely tired of people shopping in his store for hours, snapping a picture of shoes they like, then going home and buying them online “just to avoid sales tax.”

88. Last Word: The Elvis Tradition, Cordova Brewery and Parkside Path -

For about three decades now, there has been a cultural and political tradition around the birthday of Elvis Presley. It used to be a proclamation by the Shelby County Mayor and the Memphis Mayor on the steps of Graceland with a birthday cake.

89. Dobbs Had a Great Run, But Manning is Still No. 1 -

Tennessee senior Joshua Dobbs has created a quarterback controversy. Dobbs finished his college career Dec. 30 when UT beat Nebraska 38-24 in the Music City Bowl in Nashville. He accounted for 409 total yards – 291 passing and 118 yards rushing – and was chosen the game’s MVP.

90. Final Goodbye: Roll Call of Some of Those Who Died in 2016 -

Death claimed transcendent political figures in 2016, including Cuba's revolutionary leader and Thailand's longtime king, but also took away royals of a different sort: kings of pop music, from Prince and David Bowie to George Michael.

91. Last Word: New Rhodes President, Billy Hyman and the Fast Track -

The biggest political betting pool of the post-election season ends Tuesday as President elect Donald Trump said Monday by Twitter that he would name his nominee for Secretary of State Tuesday morning.

92. Pfizer Fined for Hiking Epilepsy Drug Price 2,600 Pct in UK -

LONDON (AP) – British regulators fined U.S. drugmaker Pfizer and distributor Flynn Pharma a record 89.4 million pounds ($112.7 million) Wednesday for increasing the cost of an epilepsy drug by as much as 2,600 percent.

93. Outsourcing: Savings, But No Specifics -

The Haslam administration is forging ahead with plans to nab a statewide facilities services contractor after an outside analysis backed up a study showing estimated cost savings of more than $35 million a year at Tennessee universities.

94. Haslam to Kick Off Annual Public Budget Hearings Next Week -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Gov. Bill Haslam is kicking off his annual public budget hearings next week as he gets ready to put together his annual spending plan for the state of Tennessee.

95. Tennessee Promise Draws Criticism Amid Rising Tuition -

MTSU student Emily Webb cobbled together enough money to pay for her first year and a half of expenses. 

But in the last year she had to borrow $5,000 to keep alive her dream of earning a degree from Middle Tennessee State University as tuition and living costs have increased each year.

96. Haslam Appoints 8 to New University of Memphis Board -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam has appointed eight business leaders, including a former University of Memphis interim president and the CEO of J.C. Penney Co., to the newly formed governing board of the University of Memphis.

97. Mayor Starts Post-Protest Community Meetings -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland will kick off a series of community meetings Oct. 25 in the wake of the Black Lives Matter protests in July and August.

98. Mayor Starts Post-Protest Community Meetings -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland will kick off a series of community meetings Oct. 25 in the wake of the Black Lives Matter protests in July and August.

99. Civil Rights Milestones Among Tennessee Items Facing Cuts -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Major milestones in the civil rights movements for minorities and women are among a slew of Tennessee historical events, names and places that would no longer be required learning under a proposed overhaul of the social studies curriculum.

100. Last Word: $60 Million, Frozen Graceland and Wreck It Ralph's Return -

The federal government’s problem with a law the Tennessee Legislature passed earlier this year is serious -- $60-million serious.

And Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam, in Hickory Hill Thursday, said he’s working on a compromise that would have the Legislature undo what it did this year when the new legislative session begins in January.