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Editorial Results (free)

1. If Only Legislators Could Focus on Important Issues -

A year-old law enabling Tennessee colleges and universities to keep secret the “proprietary” fees they pay money managers for handling risky investments is likely to be reviewed this year.

2. Cellphone Pics Expose New Front in Public-Records Debate -

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Pics or it didn't happen? Good luck with that on the public records trail.

From Mountain City to Memphis and Clarksville to Chattanooga, local government agencies follow conflicting, contradictory – and completely arbitrary – rules on whether residents can take cellphone pictures of the records they helped pay to create.

3. Fall Creek Falls Project Leaves Destructive Trail -

The Fall Creek Falls Inn and Conference Center will soon be in ruins like the livelihoods of the state employees who worked there.

Fewer than half the state employees who worked at the inn found new state jobs after it closed in early April. Some are working for nearly half the pay, and some had to move away from Van Buren County or drive long distances to keep a job with the state.

4. MLK50 Observances Come With Appeals, Memories -

The way National Civil Rights Museum president Terri Lee Freeman described it as the MLK50 commemorations began this week, the church bells would cascade when they rang Wednesday, April 4, starting at 6:01 p.m. – the moment Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was shot 50 years ago.

5. Last Word: MLK50s Big Day, Hotel Changes and Murica on Capitol Hill -

The peak of the MLK50 events came Wednesday with a chill but some sunshine and lots to consider. Understand -- this isn’t over. There are still a few more events to go through the weekend and even into next week. If nothing else, a lot more Memphians and visitors got a good look at most of South Main in the best way possible – on foot. And if the Beale Street District ever expands east to Danny Thomas, the intersection there makes a really good place for a party.

6. Lawmakers OK Bill to Ban State Money to Abortion Providers -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – It's up to Republican Gov. Bill Haslam whether to sign legislation seeking federal approval to ban TennCare payments to abortion providers, including Planned Parenthood, for non-abortion services.

7. Last Word: Opening Day, Slowing the Flow and 30 Years of Shangri-La -

There is something about opening day of the Major League Baseball season – especially when it is opening day for just about every team at the same time. Just seeing the green fields with a solitary outfielder, the low brick walls behind the symmetry of batter, catcher and umpire renews my love for the game. I don’t really pay attention to players – don’t know any of their names. And how and when did the Astros wind up in the American League and the Brewers in the National League? I just like watching the game in a sport where the team and the individual coexist as in no other sport.

8. Football Can’t Arrive Soon Enough for Vols Fans -

Thank goodness Tennessee spring football is here. Vol Nation needs a diversion with all that’s happened the past couple of weeks, like the men’s basketball team losing to Loyola-Chicago in the NCAA Tournament’s second round, and Loyola advancing to the Final Four.

9. Rev. Billy Graham, Known as 'America's Pastor,' Dies at 99 -

MONTREAT, N.C. (AP) – The Rev. Billy Graham, the magnetic, movie-star-handsome preacher who became a singular force in postwar American religious life, a confidant of presidents and the most widely heard Christian evangelist in history, died Wednesday at 99.

10. Last Word: Shutdown Round Two, The Pastner Charges and 1968 Virtual Reality -

The federal government technically shutdown at midnight in Washington, D.C., Friday for the second time in 17 days. But the House and Senate were still going for a vote on a two-year budget compromise before dawn Friday morning as this is posted.

11. Around Memphis | Feb. 5, 2018 -

The Daily News offers a weekly roundup of Memphis-related headlines from around the web, adding context and new perspectives to the original content we produce on a daily basis. Here are some recent featires worth checking out...

12. Bill Would Ban TennCare Pay for Abortion Providers -

A Tennessee Republican lawmaker has proposed a ban on TennCare reimbursements to abortion providers for non-abortion services.

At a news conference Wednesday, Republican Rep. Jimmy Matlock announced legislation seeking a federal waiver to exclude providers from TennCare if “direct or indirect” use of state money will promote or support elective abortions.

13. Digest -

Memphis Toys R Us

To Remain Open

A representative with Toys R Us has confirmed to The Daily News that the retailer’s Memphis location, at 7676 Polo Ground Blvd., won’t close after all.

14. Bill Seeks to Ban TennCare Payments to Abortion Providers -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A Tennessee Republican lawmaker has proposed a ban on TennCare reimbursements to abortion providers for non-abortion services.

At a news conference Wednesday, Republican Rep. Jimmy Matlock announced legislation seeking a federal waiver to exclude providers from TennCare if "direct or indirect" use of state money will promote or support elective abortions.

15. Around Memphis | January 29, 2018 -

The Daily News offers a weekly look at Memphis-related headlines from around the web, adding context and different perspectives to the original content we produce on a daily basis.

In photos: Barber and beauty shops are centers of community in sprawling Whitehaven
High Ground, Brandon Dahlberg

16. The Week Ahead: Jan. 29-Feb. 4 -

Good morning, Memphis! Proceedings related to the city’s removal of Confederate statues from two parks get underway, just one of many events on a busy Monday. Check our rundown of all the happenings you need to know about in The Week Ahead…

17. US Stocks Mount Milestone-Shattering Run in 2017 -

Taken a look at your stock portfolio lately? It's a good bet it's racked up solid gains for the year.

Wall Street has taken stock investors on a mostly smooth, record-shattering ride in 2017. The major stock indexes made double-digit gains for the year, led by Apple, Facebook and other technology stocks.

18. Memphis Sound at 60 -

As Stax Records and Royal Studios both wrap up a year of celebrating their 60th anniversary, The Memphis News looks back at the creators and purveyors of the Memphis sound and its significance, both in its heyday and today.

19. AutoZone Closing Book on Unusual 2017 Performance -

A new Raymond James analyst report covering the auto parts industry suggests a few slightly concerning trends for retailers like AutoZone Inc., including a decrease in the growth rate of vehicle miles driven and an uptick in gas prices.

20. Democrats Hope Bredesen Run Will Reinvigorate Party -

Tennessee Democrats are canvassing the state to find candidates at every political level, but their next star is a well-known veteran who has people of all political stripes holding their breath.

Phil Bredesen, the former mayor of Nashville and a two-term governor, could alter the landscape of Tennessee politics if he enters the race for U.S. Senate to fill the void by departing Republican Sen. Bob Corker in 2018.

21. Tennessee Open Records Advocates Push for Policy Change -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Open records advocates are pushing for Tennessee agencies to allow citizens to take cellphone photographs of public records.

In January, The Tennessee Office of Open Records Counsel issued a model policy that forbade requestors from making copies of records with personal equipment, following the adoption of a state law requiring government offices to establish written public records policies.

22. Statue of Martin Luther King Jr. Unveiled in his Hometown -

ATLANTA (AP) – The daughter of civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. stood beside her father's newly unveiled statue Monday, just a few blocks from where he grew up, handing out hugs and telling each well-wisher: "It's about time."

23. Collierville Frisco Locomotive Bell Restored -

A 265-pound bell that was on Collierville’s Frisco 1351 locomotive has been restored and will be part of an exhibit that opened this week on the city’s railroad history at the Morton Museum of Collierville History, 195 Main St.

24. Collierville Frisco Locomotive Bell Restored -

A 265-pound bell that was on Collierville’s Frisco 1351 locomotive has been restored and will be part of an exhibit that opened this week on the city’s railroad history at the Morton Museum of Collierville History, 195 Main St.

25. Legislature Losing Some Powerful, Familiar Members -

A shakeup in leadership is looming for the state Legislature, though it may portend more of a change in personalities than party strength.

In the House, longtime Rep. Craig Fitzhugh, the affable Democrat from Ripley in West Tennessee, is preparing for a 2018 gubernatorial run, a move that would knock him out of his House seat, at least temporarily, and the position as Democratic Caucus leader.

26. Unwilling Private Sector Gives Park Workers a Victory -

Two state parks are celebrating victories in an atmosphere of uncertainty created by the governor’s penchant for privatizing state functions.

Fall Creek Falls drew no bidders for a $20 million plan to hire a vendor who would tear down its inn, construct a new one and take over operations for 10 years. Henry Horton State Park, meanwhile, is set for $10 million in improvements this coming fiscal year, including upgrades to its hospitality facilities, plus a new visitors center, rather than a proposal to raze its inn and not rebuild.

27. Privatization Opposition Renewed as No Bids Come in for Falls Creek Falls Project -

The lack of bidders for a $20 million inn reconstruction project at Fall Creek Falls could spur legislative hearings this summer on parks funding and privatization amid growing lawmaker concern about the governor’s outsourcing plans.

28. Last Word: BSMF, Budget Books and Milli Vanilli -

Three days of sun and mild temperatures for the Beale Street Music Festival. Not to be all “Dawn Lazarus” about the weather. Of course, it wasn’t just that way over Tom Lee Park. And many of us continue to find there is life outside after you have determined your festival days may be behind you. We were all over the place this weekend including Tom Lee Park and Shelby Farms Park and backyards and trails and on a rising river. Can you still claim you were at BSMF if you were within earshot of it?

29. Resolution Targets California’s Proposed Travel Ban, Discourages Similar ‘Blackmail’ -

Despite a Memphis lawmaker's concerns about a “knee-jerk” reaction, the House passed legislation Monday, May 1, aimed at a California travel ban against states passing anti-gay laws.

Rep. Raumesh Akbari raised questions about the resolution brought by Rep. Tilman Goins, asking him if it would make Tennessee look as “petty” as California if California enacts a prohibition on state-funded travel to Tennessee and several other states that passed laws in 2016 considered unfair to the LGBT community.

30. Last Word: Rain, Rain... Cooper-Young Holding Pattern and Haslam on IMPROVE -

Trees down, power out, Redbirds' Saturday game called early with no fireworks, flooding in some parts of the Mid-South region. So this means Beale Street Music Festival weekend will be clear as a bell, right? Ponchos and boots ready just in case, as well as light sabres.

31. Events -

A strategic management seminar presented by Fisher Phillips, Judy Bell Consulting and HR Professionals magazine will be held Tuesday, April 11, from 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Crescent Club, 6075 Poplar Ave., suite 909. Supervisors, managers and HR professionals will learn about how to prevent sexual harassment lawsuits, hire A-players, handle LGBT issues, be an effective leader, and more. Visit hrprofessionalsmagazine.com to register.

32. Events -

A strategic management seminar presented by Fisher Phillips, Judy Bell Consulting and HR Professionals magazine will be held Tuesday, April 11, from 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Crescent Club, 6075 Poplar Ave., Suite 909. Supervisors, managers and HR professionals will learn about how to prevent sexual harassment lawsuits, hire A-players, handle LGBT issues, be an effective leader, and more. Visit hrprofessionalsmagazine.com to register.

33. Events -

The fourth annual Bringing Out the Leaders Networking Event will be held Thursday, April 13, at 6 p.m. at the University of Memphis University Center, 499 University St. College students from across the Mid-South will have the opportunity to connect with top business, community and political leaders at this program sponsored by the nonprofit Setting the Standard Enterprise. Cost is free; registration required. Visit stsenterprise.org.

34. Tennessee Senate OKs Gun Background Check Exemption Bill -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – The Tennessee Senate has passed a bill eliminating background check requirements when gun dealers occasionally sell from their personal firearm collections.

Senators voted 24-3 Thursday on the legislation by Republican Sen. Mae Beavers of Mt. Juliet. The House passed it Monday. Gov. Bill Haslam will decide to sign or veto the bill.

35. Senate Passes Less Speedy Rural Broadband Bill -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – The Senate on Monday passed a bill that could make it easier for rural areas in Tennessee to get access to high-speed internet. However, a last-minute amendment tacked on to the bill would not require the internet to be so speedy.

36. Inn Construction, Private Management Plan Draw Ire of State Sen. Lee Harris -

State Sen. Lee Harris is criticizing Gov. Bill Haslam’s decision to renew an outsourcing plan for development and operations at Fall Creek Falls State Park, calling it a move to bolster profits for a private company.

37. Last Word: Veep Visit, Women and Baseball and Civil Rights Cold Cases -

Game time at FedExForum for the NCAA South semifinals and Vice President Mike Pence is expected to be here to cheer on the Butler Bulldogs. The Butler mascot – a live bulldog – was already in town Thursday making the rounds. I think March Madness requires that all involved up their mascot game if they get this far. So UCLA, we expect to see a live bear roaming Beale Street. You might be able to work a deal with the zoo on this. But if there’s a cost split make sure you nail down those percentages.

38. Tennessee Senate Passes Bill to Punish Protesters Who Block Streets -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – The Tennessee Senate has passed a bill that would punish protesters who block traffic and obstruct emergency vehicles from responding to an emergency.

Under the bill, protesters who block emergency responders would be charged with a misdemeanor and fined $200. The measure was sponsored by Sen. Mike Bell, a Republican from Riceville.

39. Workers’ Comp Bureau Gets New Memphis Judge -

Jackson, Tennessee, attorney Deana Seymour is the new Memphis trial judge for the state Court of Workers' Compensation Claims.

40. Workers' Comp Bureau Gets New Memphis Judge -

Jackson, Tennessee, attorney Deana Seymour is the new Memphis trial judge for the state Court of Workers' Compensation Claims.

41. Mississippi House to Colleges: Fly Flag or Lose Tax Break -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) – Mississippi universities that refuse to fly the Confederate-themed state flag could lose proposed tax breaks, the latest twist in a long battle over a symbol critics see as racist.

42. View From the Hill: Outsourcing Win More About Turf Than Trends -

As Fall Creek Falls folks celebrate a state decision to postpone park privatization, the question is whether public opposition or failure to follow long-standing state protocol led to the plug-pulling.

43. Fall Creek Falls Park Contract Postponed Indefinitely -

NASHVILLE – The state is putting an indefinite hold on a proposed contract for a private company to redevelop and operate Fall Creek Falls State Park.

The Department of General Services is postponing the request for proposals process from vendors for a contract to oversee construction of a new inn at the park and to run its hospitality services after the $22 million project is complete.

44. Some in GOP Chafe at New Building Named After Cordell Hull -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Tennessee lawmakers are nearing a move into freshly overhauled offices at the state Capitol complex, but some Republicans are chafing at the building being named after Democrat Cordell Hull.

45. Sexual Harassment Takes Stage in State Capitol Again -

NASHVILLE – Saying she was a victim of sexual harassment when she entered the Legislature, state Rep. Barbara Cooper is calling on tougher rules to stop inappropriate behavior toward women.

“When I first got here I was violated and disrespected by one or two of the legislators. And of course I did get an apology, but that’s all that was done. And I feel like if we have some strong measures in place, these kinds of things will not continue,” Cooper says.

46. View From the Hill: Outsourcing, Rates Worry Park Fans -

Dunlap resident Kathy Gilbert opposes privatization of Fall Creek Falls on a number of fronts.

If a vendor comes in to run the state park, as planned by Gov. Bill Haslam’s administration, she’s worried about the possible loss of jobs or pay and benefits by state employees, the funneling of revenue to private investors and the raising of rates at the state park’s lodge when it’s rebuilt, potentially making it less affordable for families to visit.

47. Flurry of Bills Affecting LGBT Community Filed in State Legislature Before Deadline -

NASHVILLE – Tennessee lawmakers met last Thursday’s legislation-filing deadline with a host of social measures one Memphis representative describes as “wedge bills” because they drive people apart.

48. Culinary Medicine Takes Center Stage -

Church Health is ramping up its culinary medicine efforts as it prepares to move to Crosstown Concourse in the coming weeks, efforts that include forming an advisory board to help spread the word about culinary medicine in Memphis.

49. Bills Affecting LGBT Community Filed Before Deadline -

NASHVILLE – Tennessee lawmakers met last Thursday’s legislation-filing deadline with a host of social measures one Memphis representative describes as “wedge bills” because they drive people apart.

50. Last Word: Bell at the Grammys, Old Dominick's Return and Luttrell & Strickland -

Memphis at the Grammys: William Bell was performer, presenter and winner at the Grammys Sunday evening. Gary Clark Jr. joined Bell to perform Bell’s calling card, “Born Under A Bad Sign” and the duo then presented a Grammy to Beyonce. In the non-televised Grammy awards, Bell won for Best Americana album for his Stax effort “This Is Where I Live.”

51. Last Word: Impasse Flashback, Pot Alliances in Nashville and The Age of Etsy -

The late 1970s – bell bottoms, punk rock, disco, that perpetual haze floating over those lucky enough to get the most expensive concert seats for as much as $10 each on the floor of the Mid-South Coliseum… and yes, the impasse ordinance.

52. Final 4 is Proof NFL Teams Must Have Elite QBs -

Now that the NFL playoffs are down to four teams remaining, it is easy to point out the common thread among them: Elite play at the quarterback position.

Whether it is Tom Brady, Ben Roethlisberger, Aaron Rodgers – all of whom have won Super Bowls – or Matt Ryan, who was selected as an All Pro this season and could win the MVP Award, the Patriots, Steelers, Packers and Falcons have a game-changer calling the signals.

53. Tennessee Lawmakers Act on Balanced Budget Convention to Curb ‘Crippling’ National Debt -

Saying they can avoid a “runaway” convention for “crazy or radical ideas,” Republican state legislators are filing legislation calling for a convention of states in Nashville to adopt a balanced budget amendment to the U.S. Constitution.

54. Tennessee Acts on Balanced Budget Convention to Curb ‘Crippling’ National Debt -

Saying they can avoid a “runaway” convention for “crazy or radical ideas,” Republican state legislators are filing legislation calling for a convention of states in Nashville to adopt a balanced budget amendment to the U.S. Constitution.

55. Memphis Branch NAACP Executive Director Retires -

Madeleine Taylor, the executive director of the Memphis Branch NAACP, is retiring after 26 years with the organization, including six in her current position.

Taylor has been integral to the work of the civil rights organization that has been an essential part of the city’s history before, during and after the civil rights movement of the 1950s and 1960s.

56. Memphis Branch NAACP Executive Director Retires -

Madeleine Taylor, the executive director of the Memphis Branch NAACP, is retiring after 26 years with the organization, including six in her current position.

Taylor has been integral to the work of the civil rights organization that has been an essential part of the city’s history before, during and after the civil rights movement of the 1950s and 1960s.

57. Last Word: Collierville Cold Feet, William Bell's Return and SCOTUS Rules -

Grizz beat the 76ers 96-91 Tuesday night at the Forum as Zach Randolph makes an emotional return to the court.after the death of his mother.

Don Wade has an NBA notebook with various stops around the league including the hardship rule that brought Toney Douglas to Beale Street. And Luke Walton came to town last weekend with the Lakers and Walton talked about his time working for Josh Pastner at the U of M.

58. Last Word: The Curses, Early Voting's Last Day and Midtown Kroger's First Day -

The goat, the curse, whatever you choose to call it – it’s over for the Cubs who are baseball’s world champions. And even in this basketball town, there is something about the tradition of baseball that commands attention. But alas October belongs to the political surprise in Presidential races exclusively as once again the World Series is decided in November.

59. Last Word: Democrats Settle, Scotty Moore and the Top Cop Search -

Tennessee Democratic Party Chairman Mary Mancini ordered the Shelby County Democratic Party to settle its differences with former local party chairman Bryan Carson Tuesday and accept his offer to repay the party $6,000 at $100 a month..

60. Tennessee Campus Carry Becomes Law Without Haslam Signature -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A bill allowing staff and faculty at Tennessee's public colleges and universities to be armed on campus became law Monday without the Republican governor's signature.

61. Legislature Votes to Strip Funding From UT Diversity Office -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — State lawmakers voted to send a message that they don't agree with the sexually open and progressive views of the Office for Diversity and Inclusion on the University of Tennessee campus. So the Legislature on Thursday passed a bill stripping it of state funds — a total of nearly $337,000. The money will be used to fund minority scholarships instead.

62. The Opportunity of a Learning Lifetime -

The opportunity of a tuition-free community college education for every Tennessee high school graduate who wants it is one of our state’s boldest initiatives. That’s what the Tennessee Promise program represents.

63. Transgender Bathroom Bill Delayed Amid Financial Questions -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – The sponsor of a Tennessee transgender bathroom bill told a Senate committee Tuesday that he has to consider a state attorney general's opinion before going forward. The White House called the proposal "mean-spirited."

64. Transgender Restroom Bill Advancing in Tennessee Senate -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – The Tennessee Senate is advancing a bill to require transgender students to use bathrooms that match their sex at birth, while House members are seeking to revive the measure that was defeated earlier in the week.

65. Transgender Bathroom Bill Dies in Subcommittee -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A bill that would require transgender students to use bathrooms that match their sex at birth has failed.

The bill died in a House Education Administration and Planning Committee meeting Tuesday that was packed with transgender youth who opposed the measure.

66. Last Word: A Trip to Committee, Minority Business Moves and the Issue With Reissues -

So those who support the general concept of de-annexation in the Tennessee state Senate were the most vocal Monday in sending the proposal back to committee for a more intense examination.

There were plenty of Memphians in the Senate chambers Monday despite the rumors that this was on its way back to committee.
Staying put until the deal is done has been a lesson won through bitter experience for some Memphis leaders.
Despite hearing from legislators in other parts of the state who are uneasy about this, the opposition remains a Memphis thing in Nashville.
But the Senate sponsor, Bo Watson, stumped his toe badly on this when he shut down an amendment Senate Republican Leader Mark Norris of Collierville wanted to allow the voluntarily de-annexation of an area Millington recently took into its city limits.
So when the state and local government committee meets at noon Wednesday, it will be round – frankly, I forget which round it is. Just ring the bell and let’s see what happens.

67. Bill Would Require Students to Use Bathroom of Birth Sex -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A bill that would require transgender students to use bathrooms that match their sex at birth is gaining momentum in the Tennessee legislature after passing in a House subcommittee.

68. Tennessee Lawmakers Vote to Ban Religious Indoctrination -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Tennessee lawmakers have passed legislation aimed at banning religious "indoctrination" at schools.

The bill would require each school board to establish guidelines on how religion is taught in school, and to make teaching plans available to the public.

69. ‘Fearless’ Stewart Embraces Battles With Supermajority -

Democratic state Rep. Mike Stewart lives on the front lines of the Tennessee General Assembly. As chairman of the House Democratic Caucus with 26 members, Stewart could employ a bunker mentality, but instead has chosen to take the fight to the other side of the aisle.

70. Rare Wins for Democrats on Guns, Outsourcing -

Legislative Democrats got a chance to beat their chests a little bit after a proposal to allow guns in the state Capitol and Legislative Plaza failed, and they hope to do the same with outsourcing.

71. Last Word: El Chapo and Memphis, First Filers for August and Origins in Graffiti -

The Mississippi River at Memphis crested and then it rained.
The weekend rain added about two-tenths of an inch by Saturday to Friday’s crest.
But by Sunday, the river had dropped to 39.12 feet, which is still more than five feet above flood stage.

72. No Bids Submitted in Haslam's Parks Privatization Plan -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Republican Gov. Bill Haslam's effort to outsource hospitality operations at 11 state parks has failed to draw any interest from private vendors.

Haslam has long cited the operation of park services like restaurants, golf courses, inns and marinas as prime examples of areas where private vendors could do a better — and cheaper — job than state government.

73. Civil Asset Forfeiture: 'It's a State License to Steal' -

The drugs in Kathy Stiltner’s car were over-the-counter antacids. The $12,000 in cash was from an inheritance. Still, police took the money – quite legally – and are still fighting to keep it, even after the drug charge was dropped.

74. CBU Awards Maurelian Medal To St. Agnes President -

Christian Brothers University will award its Maurelian Medal to Barbara Daush, president of St. Agnes Academy-St. Dominic School.

The medal, which is the institution’s highest honor, will be awarded Saturday, Nov. 14, at the university’s annual CBU Bell Tower Gala.

75. CBU Awards Maurelian Medal To St. Agnes President -

Christian Brothers University will award its Maurelian Medal to Barbara Daush, president of St. Agnes Academy-St. Dominic School.

The medal, which is the institution’s highest honor, will be awarded Saturday, Nov. 14, at the university’s annual CBU Bell Tower Gala.

76. Vols Nearly Set on Offense as Season Approaches -

With Tennessee’s football team three weeks into fall camp, the offensive depth charts are set at some positions, while others remain open.

UT coach Butch Jones enters the 2015 season with no questions at quarterback or running back. His has plenty of receivers and all should get their share of playing time.

77. MIFA’s Feed the Soul Fundraiser Is ‘Memphis At Its Finest' -

Each year after MIFA’s Feed the Soul event, Sally Jones Heinz has the same thought.

“You come to this party and it really is Memphis at its finest,” said Heinz, executive director of the Metropolitan Inter-Faith Association. “It’s such a diverse group of people having a really good time. Every year after the party’s over, I think this is how it needs to be – Memphis all together.”

78. Justice Department: Food Companies Risk Prosecution for Outbreaks -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Following a deadly listeria outbreak in ice cream, the Justice Department is warning food companies that they could face criminal and civil penalties if they poison their customers.

79. Will Tennessee Republicans Ever Be Truly Happy? -

Why aren’t Tennessee Republicans happier?

With the GOP so dominate in the Tennessee General Assembly and losses so rare – on the Hill or in elections – the party’s lawmakers should be jubilant with this year’s session. But it’s never enough.

80. Memphis & The Law -

Before there was Law Week, there was Law Day.

The observance by the Memphis Bar Association as well as bar associations and attorneys across the country was created in the mid-1950s as a way of promoting the legal community and its impact.

81. Senate OKs Ending Motorcycle Helmet Requirement for Parades -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – The Senate has voted to allow Tennessee motorcyclists to ride without helmets in parades or funerals.

The chamber voted 22-8 in favor of the bill sponsored by Republican Sen. Mike Bell of Riceville. Riders would have to be at least 21 years old and traveling at speeds of less than 30 mph.

82. 6 of 7 Who Killed Insure Tennessee are on State Health Plan -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Six of the seven Republican senators who voted to kill Gov. Bill Haslam's proposal to extend health coverage to 280,000 low-income Tennesseans are enrolled in the state government health plan.

83. Vols’ Barnett Faces Nation’s Best in Iowa’s Scherff -

KNOXVILLE – Derek Barnett is spending most of the Christmas holidays away from his Nashville home, and he wouldn’t have it any other way.

84. After-School Programs Give Youth Educational Boost -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – As Tennessee strives to stay at the forefront of student academic improvement, some education advocates say the hours after the last bell rings could be crucial to maintaining that edge.

85. Bill Would Repeal Common Core in Tenn. -

Two Republican state senators filed legislation Monday to repeal the state's Common Core standards even though Gov. Bill Haslam has called for a public review of the higher benchmarks in English and math.

86. Bill Would Repeal Common Core in Tennessee -

Two Republican state senators filed legislation Monday to repeal the state's Common Core standards even though Gov. Bill Haslam has called for a public review of the higher benchmarks in English and math.

87. Recruiter’s Career Twist -

Ask Janet Miller about her remarkable career at the Nashville Area Chamber of Commerce and she’ll likely attribute it to good timing or pass credit onto others.

88. Nashville School News Briefs -

Montgomery Bell Student, Faculty Films Air

Films and videos by Montgomery Bell Academy students and one faculty member will be featured Oct. 23 on the Nashville Education, Community and Arts TV channel’s Artober celebration.

89. Young Volunteers Face Long Odds at Oklahoma -

Two games into the 2014 season, and it’s time for the University of Tennessee to play some big-boy football.

The Vols (2-0) took care of business at Neyland Stadium in the first two games against Utah State and Arkansas State.

90. Vols Among NCAA’s Youngest Headed Into Sunday Opener -

KNOXVILLE – For better or worse, University of Tennessee football coach Butch Jones won’t need to wait long to see the talent level of his highly touted freshman class.

Jones will find out Sunday night at 7 when the Vols play host to Utah State at Neyland Stadium. The Aggies will be an underdog – probably by a touchdown or so – and a trendy pick for some as an upset special.

91. Events -

The Orpheum Theatre will present “The Book of Mormon” Tuesday, June 24, through Sunday, June 29, at the theater, 203 S. Main St. Visit orpheum-memphis.com.

92. Bill to Repeal Tennessee Motorcycle Helmet Law Fails -

NASHVILLE (AP) – The latest effort to get rid of Tennessee's motorcycle helmet requirement has failed in a Senate committee.

The Senate Finance Committee on Tuesday voted 6-5 against the measure sponsored by Republican Sen. Mike Bell of Riceville.

93. Tennessee Senate Passes Switchblade Knife Bill -

The state Senate has passed a bill to legalize switchblades and other knives with blades longer than 4 inches in Tennessee.

The chamber voted 24-1 on Monday to approve the bill sponsored by Republican Sen. Mike Bell of Riceville.

94. Tenn. Bill to Protect Outdoorsmen From Drones -

A proposal that would prohibit the use of drones to conduct video surveillance of outdoorsmen in Tennessee without their permission has passed the Senate.

The measure, sponsored by Republican Sen. Mike Bell of Riceville, was unanimously approved 31-0 on Thursday.

95. Tennessee Bill to Protect Outdoorsmen From Drones -

A proposal that would prohibit the use of drones to conduct video surveillance of outdoorsmen in Tennessee without their permission has passed the Senate.

The measure, sponsored by Republican Sen. Mike Bell of Riceville, was unanimously approved 31-0 on Thursday.

96. Wedding Services Bill Sparks Opposition -

Two Tennessee lawmakers have proposed a bill that would protect wedding-related businesses from lawsuits if they refuse to provide services based on religious beliefs.

Republican Sen. Mike Bell of Riceville and Knoxville Rep. Bill Dunn are sponsoring the proposal.

97. Wedding Services Bill Dead This Session -

NASHVILLE (AP) – A proposal to protect wedding-related businesses from lawsuits if they refuse to provide services to same-sex couples is dead for the session after being withdrawn from a Senate committee on Tuesday.

98. Wedding Services Bill Sparks Opposition -

Two Tennessee lawmakers have proposed a bill that would protect wedding-related businesses from lawsuits if they refuse to provide services based on religious beliefs.

Republican Sen. Mike Bell of Riceville and Knoxville Rep. Bill Dunn are sponsoring the proposal.

99. Study: Pentagon Could Cuts Thousands of Employees -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Defense Department could shed 60,000 more troops than planned and 50,000 civilian employees without hurting U.S. fighting power, four former members of the Pentagon's Joint Chiefs of Staff said in a new report on military strategy and spending.

100. Schools Transportation Director Retires -

Schools Transportation Director Retires

BILL DRIES

bdries@memphisdailynews.com

The director of transportation for the countywide school system, Debbie Rike, resigned Wednesday, Aug. 14, capping a week and a half of significant transportation problems for the new school district.