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Editorial Results (free)

1. Cash Cow? -

The vicinity of April Fool’s Day is an apt time to reflect on a tale often told to first-year law students. In contracts class, perhaps. It is the story of a man who wrote a check on the side of a cow. The point of the story ultimately would be that a negotiable instrument is judged on the language and intent in the transaction, rather than by the physical means of evincing it. Kinda, sorta.

2. Last Word: Putt and 1969, Fred Smith on Amazon and Ramsey's Departure -

George Howard Putt died in prison sometime last year state prison officials disclosed Wednesday -- far from the brief time he spent in Memphis but never far from the carnage he left behind in the Memphis of 1969.
The bodies of the first two of the five people killed by Putt between Aug. 14 and Sept. 11, 1969 were discovered just days after the murders of actress Sharon Tate and six others in Los Angeles by the Manson family dominated national news coverage. Less than a year earlier the Boston Strangler movie was in theaters, creating a sensation about the murders committed by serial killer Albert DeSalvo in Boston just a few years earlier.
Bernalyn and Roy Dumas were strangled by Putt in their home in Cooper-Young and Putt mutilated her body in a way that police homicide detectives still wouldn’t talk about decades later. The bodies were found in separate rooms.
Even with no details other than the names of the victims, the city was quickly spooked by the double murder. So when the body of Leila Jackson was found short of two weeks later, the city’s reaction was a palpable fear in which anyone unknown was to be avoided. Memphians didn’t tarry after work. They went home and bolted the doors.
It got worse as more victims turned up with little in common other than four of the five were women. They were of varying ages. Some were strangled and some were stabbed.
Just about any magazine rack of the day include true crime magazines that by the late 1960s were beginning to look very dated in their lurid noir-like covers teasing the most sensational crime narratives of the day.
They were an intentional contrast to the cover images of youth in bright colors in natural settings in other magazines heralding a new future and youth culture.
The murders in a Southern city, whose 1969 conservatism is hard to describe nearly 50 years later, quickly grabbed the covers of the true crime magazines. And the images they offered spoke to the scenic reality where Putt roamed even as the murders continued.
Apartment buildings and boarding houses were the settings for some of the murders but not all.
Glenda Sue Harden
was last seen walking to her car parked on the Cobblestones from the insurance office she worked at nearby. Her body was found in Martin Luther King/Riverside Park hidden under a piece of plywood.
At one of the murder scenes, police found an ice pick stuck in the side of the building with a stocking tied around it.
Putt’s last victim, in an apartment building on Bellevue, screamed as she was stabbed repeatedly and others in the building gave chase with police close behind, arresting Putt near the new and unopened section of the interstate that runs west of Bellevue.
Putt tried to force his way into another apartment nearby but the women inside kept him on the other side of the door.
The killer that panicked an entire city was a skinny utterly forgettable guy in his 20s with sideburns and glasses who appeared to have rarely roamed beyond a community of neighborhood bars, boarding houses and old apartment buildings in the Midtown and Medical Center areas.
It turns out he came to Memphis after walking away from a prison farm in Mississippi and into a Memphis that was slowly but surely changing. And the world that Putt encountered would soon vanish in large part.
Overton Square’s incarnation was about a year away. A new bridge was about to be built across the Mississippi River as part of Interstate 40 which was to go through Overton Park just south of the north-south leg of the interstate where Putt was captured.
Originally sentenced to death, Putt’s sentence was commuted when the U.S. Supreme Court banned the death penalty in the early 1970s.
He was serving a 497-year sentence when he died at the Turney Center Wednesday in Only, Tennessee.
Putt never sought parole and never gave any explanation for why he killed five people in less than a month and his apparently random selection of victims.

3. Last Word: Love and Glory and Guitars, New Frost and Scalia's Passing -

To each his or her own on Valentine’s Day observances Sunday that become Valentine’s Day memories with the arrival of Monday.

The Majestic Grille, for instance, had the movies Roman Holiday and Casablanca back to back on the screen of the movie theater turned restaurant.
No sound, but you really don’t need sound for the scene where Audrey Hepburn takes the throne with Gregory Peck and a beatnik Eddie Albert among the press corps at the rope line.
And The Majestic saved The Second Line in Overton Square with a loaner of some champagne after Second Line ran a bit short.
Chef Kelly English thanked the Majestic via Twitter for “saving our sweet Valentine’s Day asses.”

4. Shelby County Home Sales Edge Down in October -

Memphis and Shelby County home sales decreased 9 percent this October compared to the same month last year, but the decline could be related more to a lack of inventory than a lack of interest.

There were 1,344 sales recorded for October, compared with 1,472 recorded for the same time last year, according to data from real estate information company Chandler Reports, chandlerreports.com

5. Hall of Fame Coach LeBeau ‘Another Genius in the Room’ for Titans -

If you want to know about the theory of relativity, who better to ask than Albert Einstein, if only he were still around.

If you want to talk light bulbs, access to Thomas Edison would have been great.

6. Recruiting Wars -

Memphis Grizzlies point guard Mike Conley is in his eighth year in the NBA. But he’s just 27 years old and his 10-year class reunion at Lawrence North High School in Indianapolis is still an event in the future.

7. SEC Media Days Notebook: July 14 -

Editor’s note: Reporter Don Wade is in Hoover, Ala., for SEC Football Media Days. Check The Daily News Online, www.memphisdailynews.com, each afternoon this week for the latest news and notes.

8. New Coupons Aim to Keep People Off Generic Drugs -

TRENTON, N.J. (AP) – If brand-name prescription medicines cost you as little as generic pills, which would you choose? A few drugmakers are betting Americans will stick with the name they know.

9. Glankler’s Hutton Adds Coat of Arms to Resume -

Robert Hutton has argued some remarkable cases as an attorney at Glankler Brown PLLC, including one before the U.S. Supreme Court.

10. Throckmorton Ready For Changing Role at St. Mary’s -

When the announcement was made during a chapel session to the St. Mary’s Episcopal School student body in mid-October that Albert Throckmorton would be the new head of school, applause broke out once the first syllable of his name was announced.

11. Rally Time -

As soon as he heard the Memphis Redbirds were coming to town in 1998, Buddy Young bought season tickets and has renewed them every year since.

From the first two seasons at the old Tim McCarver Stadium to the debut of AutoZone Park in 2000, from Albert Pujols’ walkoff home run that won the Pacific Coast League title the first season at AutoZone to last year’s championship run, Young has been a die-hard Redbirds supporter.

12. Dunn's Book Details GOP Comeback in Tenn. -

Book signings can be similar to political events, with a lot of handshaking, posing for pictures, signing autographs, usually a brief talk - and money is involved.

It's an atmosphere former Tennessee Gov. Winfield Dunn excels at as he promotes his new book about his historic 1970 bid to become governor and his four-year term of office.

13. Big-Ticket Projects Advance For LUCB Consideration -

The developers of the 30-story, $175 million One Beale project have an agreement in place with an upscale but still unnamed hotel partner, which will bolster the office, condominium and residential project they're planning for Downtown Memphis.

14. Months After His Death, LegalWrangling Continues for Logan Young - Logan Young, Jr., the Alabama football booster convicted in 2005 after being indicted for bribery and conspiracy, died at his East Memphis home earlier this year, but almost $100,000 Young forfeited because of the verdict still is the subject of a le

15. Winter Could Tip Scale on Foreclosures -

A New York Times columnist recently wrote about a former neighbor from Russia who was surprised at the amount of wealth people around him had accumulated. How, he wanted to know, were his new neighbors earning their money, since so few of them seemed to be making anything?

16. Archived Article: Gpac St - By SUZANNE THOMPSON City of Germantown funds Iris orchestra By SUZANNE THOMPSON The Daily News The City of Germantown has awarded a $200,000 grant to establish a community-based orchestra. The 38-member Iris orchestra, named after the Tennessee stat...

17. Archived Article: Graphic - Most active commercial plumbers Most active commercial plumbers As the construction industry goes, so do plumbers, electricians and carpenters. Non-residential work for these subcontractors usually means bigger, but fewer jobs over the course of a m...

18. Archived Article: Back-employ - State, local jobless State, local jobless decrease in April Tennessees April unemployment rate dropped to 4.1 percent, down from 4.3 percent in both March and in April 1998. "A 4.1 percent unemployment rate means that 96 percent of the people i...

19. Archived Article: Back - State jobless rate stays State jobless rate stays below 4.5 percent The state unemployment rate in March decreased to 4.3 percent, down one-tenth of a percent over the month. In March, the national rate was 4.2 percent, slightly lower than the state...

20. Archived Article: Santi - Market commentary Market commentary. Last week, interest rates on 30-year, fixed-rate conventional and government loans remained unchanged. Mortgage bond prices remained flat last week tied to an exodus of funds early in the week flowing from the we...

21. Archived Article: Santi (p - Market commentary. Market commentary. Last week, interest rates on 30-year, fixed-rate conventional and government loans decreased by about one-fourth of a discount point, which is 1 percent of the loan amount. Mortgage bond prices continued to trad...

22. Archived Article: Back - States unemployment rate Stateís unemployment rate falls to 4.9 percent in May Tennesseeís unemployment rate fell to 4.9 percent in May, down two-tenths of a percentage point over the month, acting commissioner of Employment Security H...

23. Archived Article: Review - Market commentary Market commentary. Last week, interest rates on 30-year, fixed-rate conventional and government loans rose by about 1 and one-half discount point. Mortgage bond prices fell and interest rates rose last week in response to unexpecte...

24. Archived Article - State unemployment remains below national average State unemployment remains below national average Tennessees unemployment rate of 5.1 percent remained below the national average in November while growth in non-farm jobs slowed. Over the month, the...