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Editorial Results (free)

1. Council Approves Impasse Changes on First Reading -

As opponents of the City Hall escort list protested outside Tuesday, Feb. 21, a different protest was taking place inside the Memphis City Council chambers.

City employees opposed to proposed changes in the city’s impasse ordinance carried signs in the chambers reading “You Think Crime is High Now, Repeal Impasse.”

2. Council Approves First Reading of Impasse Changes -

As opponents of the City Hall escort list protested outside Tuesday, Feb. 21, a different protest was taking place inside the Memphis City Council chambers.

City employees opposed to proposed changes in the city’s impasse ordinance carried signs in the chambers reading “You Think Crime is High Now, Repeal Impasse.”

3. View From the Hill: ‘Moral Mondays’ Draw Crowds, But Are Lawmakers Listening? -

Johnny and Julie Erwin don’t look like typical protesters, but the senior couple joined the “moral Mondays” ruckus recently at the State Capitol, Johnny wearing his Air Force cap and Julie holding a list of social legislation they oppose.

4. Council Waits on Answers About City Hall List -

Memphis City Council members had protesters outside City Hall and in council chambers Tuesday, Feb. 21, on different causes.

City employees opposed to proposed changes in the city’s impasse ordinance carried signs in council chambers reading “You Think Crime Is High Now Repeal Impasse.”

5. Customers Avoid New Wells Fargo Accounts After Sales Scandal -

NEW YORK (AP) – Customers are still turning their backs on Wells Fargo after a scandal over sales practices, with the bank saying Friday the number of new checking accounts people opened was down 31 percent in January from a year earlier.

6. Grizz Hit All-Star Break With Loss, But Their Goals Are Within Reach -

After he had answered the obligatory questions about the Grizzlies’ ugly 95-91 loss to the New Orleans Pelicans in the last game before the All-Star break, coach David Fizdale spoke to the big picture: “We’re in good position.”

7. Last Word: Lovell's Fall, Critical Focus Debut and Super Lice -

That didn’t last long – the political career of state Representative Mark Lovell. About six weeks into a two-year term of office six months after he upset veteran Republican state Rep. Curry Todd, Lovell resigned Tuesday in Nashville. But the Legislature probably isn’t done with him yet. Even if it turns out the Legislature is done in terms of dealing with him directly, it will probably be talking about him for longer than the six weeks he was a legislator.

8. Lovell Resigns Tennessee House Seat, Democrats Seek Probe -

NASHVILLE – House Democrats are calling for a probe into the sudden resignation of first-term Rep. Mark Lovell, who denies being involved in sexual misconduct as he leaves the state Legislature after just one month.

9. Protests Define New Interest In Activism -

Usually when the Shelby County Commission’s committee room is filled, it is with those from various county government divisions making presentations during budget season. Or it might be filled with representatives from several organizations seeking or getting county grants.

10. Fed Leaves Key Rate Unchanged at a Time of Uncertainty -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Federal Reserve has left its key interest rate unchanged at a time of solid economic gains but also heightened uncertainty surrounding the new Trump administration.

11. Governor Defends Big Proposals for Statewide Infrastructure -

NASHVILLE – Protesters overshadowed Republican Gov. Bill Haslam’s State of the State address Monday night, chanting in the Capitol in opposition to a spate of executive orders from President Donald Trump.

12. City Graduates First Companies Through New Business Accelerator -

The city of Memphis’ inaugural minority business accelerator has graduated its first participants – seven companies whose businesses touch everything from event planning to construction – but in some respects the work is only now just beginning.

13. Turning the Page -

When a bookstore decides to close its doors for good, the moment isn't always so immediate or possessive of the clean finality that comes with shutting a book at the end of the story.

In the case of The Booksellers at Laurelwood, it is a long goodbye. These final weeks of a liquidation sale that will stretch into February – the culmination of a decision that the store’s finances have become untenable – have meant the slow unwinding of a 32-year-old bookstore that’s closing up shop the same way you fall asleep, fall in love, get old – gradually, then all of a sudden.

14. Freshman Bone Gives Vols Hope for Quicker Rebuild -

Tennessee coach Rick Barnes isn’t ready to proclaim Jordan Bone a rising star in SEC basketball, but he sure saw promising signs from his freshman point guard last Saturday night in Nashville.

15. Pew Survey: Officers More Reluctant to Use Force, Make Stops -

ATLANTA (AP) – The so-called "Ferguson effect" – officers backing off of policing out of fear that their actions will be questioned after the fact – has been talked about but never really quantified. A new study suggests the effect is a reality, with three-quarters of officers surveyed saying they are hesitant to use force, even when appropriate, and are less willing to stop and question suspicious people.

16. Titaned Up: Success Found In Big Moves, Smallest Details -

Most critics of last year’s Tennessee Titans saw unsettled ownership, a revolving door of coaches and a lack of talent at key positions.

Jon Robinson saw weeds.

17. Arrests, Metal Barriers, Lawsuits All Played Role in Greensward Parking Compromise -

Spring at City Hall is budget season and it can be stormy for a new mayor, not to mention a city council with six new members. But that wasn’t the case in 2016.

The real spring political storm was the Overton Park Greensward – specifically overflow parking from the Memphis Zoo on the greenspace south of the zoo.

18. Empty Seats -

Shelby County Commissioner David Reaves can still see it clearly: “Take the whole map of the county and lay a grid on it. Then I’d like you to say, ‘Where’s the population? Where’s the projection?’ And then let’s strategically place schools all over the county based upon that and make them all of equal offerings.”

19. Growing Pains -

In many ways, Citizens to Preserve Overton Park v. Volpe in 1971 shaped the way Midtown Memphis looks today, so it’s only fitting that the park continues to inspire citizens to fight for what they feel is right.

20. It’s Not All About You On Website -

Today, 97 percent of consumers search for products and services online. However, many companies don’t have a website that keeps the goals of their users in mind. Likewise, many websites are designed without forethought into when users are accessing the site and for what purpose, resulting in a lack of mobile optimization or call-to-action tools, according to the Score Association.

21. Last Word: Football Comes Back, Snuff on Front Street and Pot Is Short of Seven -

I have a question that some of you may not care for? Is football making a comeback in this basketball town for a more prominent place in the conflicted and diverse hothouse that is Memphis culture?

22. Something Missing in Jones’ ‘Infallible’ System -

By now, Tennessee fans have taken enough deep breaths to come to grips with losing to Vanderbilt. They don’t like it, mind you, but they’ve accepted it. As for Butch Jones, what now?

I’ll leave it to others to gauge the heat of Jones’ seat as we weave through the postseason and into next year. Suffice it to say, the honeymoon is over.

23. Distracted To Death -

When the Tennessee Highway Patrol began using a tractor-trailer on the interstate to catch people texting while driving, the troopers knew their view from above would help their cause. From that higher vantage point, they could see drivers holding their phones in their laps and typing.

24. Six-Point Plan to Help Vols Coach Stick Around Longer -

On that day in December 2012 when Butch Jones was introduced as Tennessee’s head football coach, he told Vol Nation that he had a template for fixing everything.

He said: “The plan is infallible if the players buy in.”

25. The Role Of Conscious Corporations -

Denial of a human-centric world and its impact on the planet since the industrial revolution is no longer an acceptable worldview.

In March, we reached the point of no return, the point where most credible international scientists agree that damage will be unprecedented and relentless. As we have surpassed global CO2 concentrations at 400 parts per million (PPM), let’s make this alarm a time for changing the purpose of business.

26. Election Fallout: What a Trump Or Clinton Presidency Means for State -

Donald Trump is going to win easily in Tennessee.

Everyone, most of all the campaigns for both Trump and Hillary Clinton, accept this fact, as evidenced by the lack of campaign time spent in the state – and most of the South, for that matter – during this contentious campaign cycle.

27. Target Plays Up Value for the Holiday Season -

NEW YORK (AP) – From a Broadway-style marketing campaign to more exclusive toys, Target wants to lure shoppers during the final critical months of the year. More importantly, though, it needs to convince shoppers that it's the place for deals.

28. Freedom Awards Explore New History -

In the sanctuary of Mississippi Boulevard Christian Church last week, with former Mississippi Gov. William Winter and some students who racially integrated Memphis public schools in 1961, Swin Cash talked about memories of her last season as a professional athlete.

29. Big River -

Jim Jackson had it planned. At the third annual Arkansas Delta Flatlander bicycle ride, the 100-kilometer bike ride would become what it was intended to be – a ride across the Mississippi River from West Memphis to Memphis across the northern side of the Harahan Bridge.

30. When to Walk Away -

As strange as I know it sounds, I think of looking for a job a little bit like dating. Unless you are a reality TV show contestant, you’ve probably never gone on a first date hoping the other person would marry you. You’re there to get to know them and to decide whether or not to have a second date.

31. Town Hall Meetings Reflect Shift in Protest Discussions -

Almost three months after Black Lives Matter movement protestors shut down the Hernando DeSoto Bridge and as a result, opened talks with the administration of Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland, some of the civic discussion has moved to economic issues.

32. Fed Keeps Key Rate Unchanged But Hints of Coming Hike -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Federal Reserve is keeping its key interest rate unchanged but signaling that it will likely raise rates before year's end.

The Fed said in a statement ending its latest policy meeting Wednesday that the U.S. job market has continued to strengthen and economic activity has picked up. But it noted that business investment remains soft and inflation too low and that it wants to see further improvement in the job market.

33. With Economic Outlook Hazy, Fed Likely to Leave Rates Alone -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Again and again in recent months, the Federal Reserve has signaled that it's edging closer to resuming the interest-rate hikes it began in December.

It just doesn't seem to be there quite yet.

34. Grizzlies and Civil Rights Museum Create ‘A Bridge of Opportunity’ -

Fifteen years ago, the Memphis Grizzlies were about to start their first season as the city’s NBA team. The run-up to the season had been bumpy with next-door neighbors displaying “NBA NOW” and “NBA NO” signs. The latter were first created with a little editing to the “NBA NOW” signs as the “w” was erased or covered over.

35. The Hidden Risk to the Economy in Corporate Balance Sheets -

NEW YORK (AP) – America has a debt problem, but it's not what you think. Yes, the federal government owes trillions of dollars more than it did a few years ago. Yes, Americans are still struggling to pay off mortgages and student loans. But it's the buildup in debt elsewhere that is most worrying some experts, and the big borrower this time may come as a surprise: Corporate America.

36. Police Separate Elvis Fans From Protesters -

The latest Black Lives Matter movement protest included a show of force by Memphis Police that included plenty of questions about how police functioned as gatekeepers for Graceland’s annual candlelight vigil.

37. Animal Shelter Moves Toward Three-Year Action Plan -

The Memphis Animal Shelter should have a three-year action plan by the end of October to end the killing of pets at the shelter for time and space considerations.

“We’re a public safety agency so euthanizing animals that pose a danger to our community is something that is part of our core mission and humanely euthanizing animals that are sick, that are suffering,” said Alexis Pugh, director of Memphis Animal Services on the WKNO/Channel 10 program Behind The Headlines. “What we want to avoid is having to euthanize an animal that is adoptable, that is healthy, that is able to be placed, simply because we don’t have the space in our facility and this animal has been there too long.”

38. 'Student' Credit Cards Aren't for All Students, or Even Most -

As parents prepare their rising freshmen for life at college, many are leaving out a crucial piece of information: how to build credit.

The college years are the best time to begin the process. After graduation, adults with no credit history have a harder time renting apartments, obtaining car loans or, eventually, mortgages.

39. Tamburrino: ‘Have a Strategy Every Year’ -

By 2008, Patrick Tamburrino had put together a respectable corporate career in information technology in Memphis. 

He’d starting out “turning a screwdriver” as a PC tech at law firm Baker Donelson, followed by an exciting six-plus years as the head of IT at Campbell Clinic, helping the large orthopedic practice move from paper charts and X-ray film to an efficient digital operation. 

40. Do Titans Finally Have Their Offensive Line? -

New Tennessee Titans coach Mike Mularkey’s stated desire to play “exotic smashmouth” football – especially on offense – requires a good offensive line. But if there’s one thing the Titans have not had in recent years it’s a good offensive line.

41. Crowded Race in 8th District GOP Primary Tops Thursday's Ballot -

Two days before the Thursday, Aug. 4, election day, state Rep. Curry Todd was arrested by Shelby County Sheriff’s deputies for removing a rival’s campaign signs in Collierville.

The arrest Tuesday on a warrant sworn out against Todd for theft is an indication of just how hard fought some of the races are in what is considered a minor election cycle in the shadow of the November presidential general election.

42. Titans GM Robinson Has Changed The Culture -

Hope is what Tennessee Titans have to offer their fans when training camp officially opens on Saturday.

That hope is not to be confused with Super Bowl expectations. It is an optimism that things are finally headed in the right direction after several years of fluctuating between mediocrity and bottom-of-the-NFL barrel horrible.

43. As Fed Meets, No Rate Hike is Expected Until Late This Year -

WASHINGTON (AP) – On again. Off again. On again?

Anyone trying to peg the likelihood of a Federal Reserve interest rate hike this year has been subject to a topsy-turvy shift of expert opinion the past few months. And when the Fed holds its latest policy meeting this week, few think it will provide much more clarity.

44. Dobbs’ Health is Priority No. 1 on Road to Being No. 1 -

Tennessee’s football team had nine players earn All-SEC preseason honors and got the nod as favorite to win the East Division as SEC Media Days concluded last week in Hoover, Alabama.

All signs point to the Vols making a return to the SEC Championship Game in Atlanta for the first time since 2007, with their two biggest games are at Neyland Stadium this year against Florida on Sept. 24 and Alabama on Oct. 15.

45. Businesses Welcome Elvis Presley Birthplace Trail Completion -

TUPELO, Miss. (AP) – No more orange barrels to drive around, no more lane shifts, no more trouble getting in and out of parking spaces.

"Hallelujah," said Pam Fair, a co-owner of Sparrows on Main, a boutique on East Main Street that opened in May 2014. Four months later, work began on the Elvis Presley Birthplace Trail.

46. Bank of England Mulls Rate Cut to Cushion Brexit Blow -

LONDON (AP) — Britain's vote to leave the European Union is already taking its toll on the British economy, raising speculation that the Bank of England will on Thursday decide to reduce its main interest rate to a record low.

47. Schism Among State Republicans Hits Critical Point With Resignation -

A rift within the Tennessee Republican Party, whether a tempest in a teapot or the early signs of implosion, isn’t likely to hit the big tent party hard at the polls this fall.

But make no mistake, there is some trouble in paradise.

48. Using Technology to Effectively Engage Your Employees -

If you thought we had turned a corner from the days of “Take This Job and Shove It,” think again. According to a recent State of the American Workplace Report, seven in 10 U.S. workers don’t like their job. Even more disturbing, only 13 percent of employees across the globe are engaged at work.

49. Task Force’s New Health Plan Promising -

A 3-Star Healthy Task Force appointed to propose a method for catching Tennesseans in a health care coverage gap is taking a politically safe road to reach the same goal as Insure Tennessee.

Yet the route, a TennCare expansion with “triggers” and “circuit breakers,” holds so much uncertainty it’s hard to figure out if the panel will find its destination.

50. Last Word: Lights, Camera, Demolition, Our Cautious Prosperity and City Hall Redux -

In south Memphis Wednesday, an old house on Mississippi Boulevard was demolished as part of a press conference to tout anti-blight measures in a city that has a lot of blight.

At times it seems like we have a different blight program for just about every blighted property.

51. Yellen Says Uncertainties Justify Cautious Approach -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen said Tuesday that the U.S. economy faces a number of uncertainties that require the Fed to proceed cautiously in raising interest rates.

52. New Elections Administrator Dives Into August Election Mechanics -

The new Shelby County Elections administrator wanted to get an idea about what voter turnout will be like for her first election at the helm.

She wanted to specifically look at active voter percentages by precinct – those who have voted in recent elections as opposed to inactive voters still on the rolls – and get an idea about the early voting turnout by precinct.

53. Last Word: Back On, EDGE and Diversity and Jungle Room Sessions -

Are your lights on yet? How is your air conditioning? First came the rain Wednesday night and then came the power outages that stretched into Thursday.

So the last Twitter update from Memphis Light Gas and Water at 8 p.m. Thursday shows 248 outages in the MLGW service area with 2,746 customers still in the dark and the worst heat of the year so far. Those numbers translate to 95 percent of the customers impacted having their power restored Thursday evening.

54. Fed Leaves Rates Unchanged; No Hint on Timing of Next Hike -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Federal Reserve is keeping interest rates unchanged in light of an uncertain job market and offering no hints of when its next rate hike might occur.

The Fed noted in a statement Wednesday after its latest policy meeting that the pace of hiring has slowed even as the overall economy has improved.

55. With Economic View Hazy, a Wait-and-See Fed Message Expected -

WASHINGTON (AP) – It's all about the data. For months, the Federal Reserve has said that once economic data showed a consistently healthy economy, it would be time to resume raising interest rates. And for almost as long, the data has shown improvement and suggested that a rate hike was likely this summer.

56. Oyler Brings German Efficiency to Memphis Transportation -

Urban planners are born, not made. At least, that’s how it was with Nicholas Oyler. From the time he was in middle school, he couldn’t stop thinking about how cities work.

“I was always doodling skyscrapers,” Oyler recalls. “I remember thinking, ‘Why doesn’t Memphis have more of them? And what can we do to get more?’”

57. Memphis Dentist Pulls Teeth – And Trucks -

Tim Messer is a dentist by profession, a competitive “puller” by avocation. Confused? Don’t be. His first super modified, two-wheel drive truck was called “The Driller.” And he now has one called “Wide Open.”

58. Local Families Provide Loving, Temporary Homes for Children in Crisis -

“There’s no way I can do that. I’m not that kind of hero.” David Jordan often hears that response when he talks to people about the possibility of becoming a foster parent.

59. Analysis: Competition Intensifying, But FedEx Still Protected for Now -

The package shipment startup where Matthew Hertz works as director of operations is perfectly tailored to the digital age.

California-based Shyp was set up to capitalize on the legacy cost structures and operations of traditional logistics companies. Its users snap a photo of the item they want to ship and enter an address, at which point Shyp shows up at their door and takes care of the rest.

60. Poll: Americans More Upbeat About Own Finances Than Economy -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Americans are of two minds about the economy in the midst of an elec-tion race that largely hinges on the issue. They are strikingly pessimistic about the national econ-omy yet comparatively upbeat about their own financial circumstances.

61. Latest 'High Gear' Book Maps Success for College Grads, Millennials -

The 21 million U.S. students enrolled in postsecondary schools grew up with technology and the hourly clock of life ticking ever faster. Yet this has not always translated into a generation of young people ready to attack a world that waits for no one.

62. Tennessee Leads the Nation in Bankruptcies -

Tennessee has a model program for financial literacy in its public schools. All high school students must pass a personal finance course to graduate, and even kindergartners are learning about money under a new initiative to extend the curriculum to primary school.

63. Overton Traffic Plans On Display Saturday -

All roads in Overton Park except the one in front of the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art will be one-way streets Saturday, May 7, as the Overton Park Conservancy tries out some traffic and parking remedies on a busy day in the park.

64. South Front Hits its Stride as Standalone Corridor -

South Front Street, which stretches Downtown from Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard to Central Station, is emerging as its own standalone residential and commercial corridor. What was once a heavy industrial area and warehousing district for South Main’s department stores is undergoing a transformation into Downtown’s most residentially dense neighborhood.

65. Luttrell Wants to Bridge Urban-Rural Divide -

U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen knows the signs of someone making the transition to running for Congress.

So when he and Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell spoke at the March 31 opening of Moore Tech’s new welding school, Cohen watched closely as Luttrell began talking about the lack of workforce training and questioned the old Shelby County Schools slogan of “every child college bound.”

66. Legislators Playing Expensive Game With LGBT Issues -

The silly season is in full swing on Capitol Hill, but the “bathroom bill” and any jokes surrounding it are no laughing matter anymore. It’s getting downright expensive.

Tennessee Attorney General Herbert Slatery said this week the bill dealing with transgender student use of restrooms could cost the state more than $1.2 billion in federal funds for K-12 and higher education.

67. Mental Agility Is No Bad Goal -

“Mental agility” has been defined as “cognitive and psychological adaptability, or the ability to think rapidly and creatively under stress.” A site called “Mind Fitness Training Institute” says that “an agile mind … can anticipate or quickly adapt to uncertain or changing situations. …”

68. Last Word: Lipscomb's Successor, MATA School Buses and Roland's Big Breakfast -

Paul Young gets a lot more attention these days than he did when he was the first director of the city-county Office of Sustainability. The attention comes with being the city director of Housing and Community Development where virtually all of the funding comes from the federal government.
That federal funding has changed the face of public housing in the city in the last 25 years. There is only one large public housing project left in the city as a result of the federal funding and its use by Young’s predecessor, Robert Lipscomb.
And what Lipscomb did with the job combined with being the executive director of the Memphis Housing Authority is why a lot of people want to get to know Paul Young these days.
Our centerpiece story by Madeline Faber in Tuesday’s edition makes clear that Young has no desire to wield that kind of power. And it is unlikely anyone in the near future will have the kind of autonomy Lipscomb did.
But beyond that there is still the flow of a lot of federal dollars and Young has some ideas based on his experience in government and finance prior to coming to HCD – everything in government is initials.
It’s a much different experience than Lipscomb’s. Lipscomb coined the phrase “ending public housing as we know it” and at times that slogan wasn’t followed with a lot of detail about what came after public housing was demolished, especially with the first of the projects to fall.
The last public housing project, Foote Homes, will be demolished on Young’s watch which makes his tenure important if more limited than Lipscomb’s tenure.

69. Lawmakers Lure Us In With Momentary Sanity, And Then... -

Just when it appears the Tennessee Senate is made up of sensible people – as evidenced by the killing of de-annexation legislation – the body is changing course with a Bible-thumping measure.

70. Last Word: A Day In The Park, Fashion Week and the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame -

The skid is over. The Grizzlies beat the Bulls at home and the post-season possibility drama continues in the land of Griss and the one year and done college home of Derrick Rose.

71. The Evolving Role of Design, Part One -

Editor’s note: Part one in a two-part series. The role of design evolves at the speed of innovation, the dizzying, dynamic speed of the market. Design now has a seat at executive and board tables across the globe. More than ever, a holistic sense of design is valued as a legal means of significant competitive advantage.

72. Job-Seekers Return at Fastest Pace Since Before Recession -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Americans are flooding back into the job market at the fastest pace since before the Great Recession, encouraged by steady hiring and some signs of higher pay.

The flow has halted, at least temporarily, one of the economy's more discouraging trends: the sharp decline in the percentage of people either working or looking for work. That figure fell last year to a four-decade low.

73. Sports Notebook: Lynch at Gruden’s QB Camp, Memphis Defense, Cards' Leadoff Hitter -

If you want to see the whole thing, Jon Gruden’s QB Camp with former University of Memphis quarterback Paxton Lynch will air at 11 a.m. on Saturday, April 16, on ESPN. The NFL Draft is April 28-30 in Chicago.

74. My Lucky Break -

During the week of St. Patrick’s Day, luck is on our minds. We may think, “When will I get my lucky break? When will it be my turn?” We may feel overlooked for things like promotions and raises.

75. I Love MEM: Airport teams up with popular local blogger -

Every week, I Love Memphis blogger Holly Whitfield picks five events to include in her blog’s regular feature spotlighting things to do in Memphis during the coming weekend.

76. Ulta to Join Nordstrom Rack in Poplar Commons Retail Center -

Ulta Beauty will be a neighbor of Nordstrom Rack in the upcoming Poplar Commons shopping center, set to open in the fall of 2017.

This will be the third Ulta store in the Memphis market and the first in the East Memphis submarket.

77. What’s Your Exit Strategy? -

With the unusual job market we’ve been experiencing for years now, keeping an exit strategy in mind is a must. Do you have yours nailed down? If your exit strategy is dependent on hope and crossed fingers, it’s time to rethink things.

78. Greensward Dispute Mediation Begins -

The city-backed mediation effort between the Memphis Zoo and the Overton Park Conservancy begins Tuesday, March 8, following a busy weekend in Overton Park that brought out large crowds for the zoo as well as the park in general.

79. Greensward Sees Some Saturday Sit-Ins, No Arrests -

A group of about 100 people, many carrying Save The Greensward signs, turned out in Overton Park Saturday, March 5, during the first Saturday in the park since the Memphis City Council approved giving the zoo control of the northern part of the greensward for overflow parking. There were several sporadic sit-ins but no arrests.

80. Doctors: 'Buyer Beware' as Cosmetic Surgery Grows -

If you often look around and feel older than you used to, it might not be you. It might be that everyone else looks younger.

The face of Tennessee is changing – literally – and as an influx of new residents and a booming economy creates a larger affluent class with more disposable income, the business of cosmetic procedures is on the rise.

81. Tennessee AD Dave Hart: Sexual Assault Unacceptable Act -

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Tennessee athletic director Dave Hart stood by his embattled football coach during a news conference Thursday at the university, two weeks after a federal lawsuit was filed Feb. 9 in Nashville alleging that Tennessee mishandles assault complaints against athletes.

82. Grizzlies Sign KD in Free Agency, Trade Mike Conley? No, Don’t Think So -

So there’s a national report out there saying the Memphis Grizzlies will make a strong play to sign free agent Kevin Durant after the season.

83. Yellen: Too Early to Determine Impact of Global Developments -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen cautioned Thursday that global economic pressures pose risks to the U.S. economy but said it's too soon to know whether those risks are severe enough to alter the Fed's interest-rate policies.

84. Strickland Wants Contract, Pay Boost for Memphis' Next Police Director -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland wants to offer the next Memphis Police Department director a multi-year contract for more than the $150,000 the city is currently paying interim police director Michael Rallings.

85. Last Word: The First Surrogate, Parkside at Shelby Farms and Manilow Memories -

Here they come, fresh from Iowa and New Hampshire – first the surrogates and in the next two weeks the Presidential contenders themselves.

The nation’s “first surrogate” – former President Bill Clinton is at Whitehaven High School Thursday evening to rally early voters in the heart of a large reliably Democratic middle class community.
And it is that voter base that was integral to Barack Obama carrying Shelby County in the 2008 Democratic Presidential primary even as Hillary Clinton carried the state that year.
As mentioned here Tuesday, the local Bernie Sanders campaign opens its Memphis HQ over the weekend.
Hillary Clinton headquarters in Memphis and Nashville are on the way soon with the Nashville HQ opening Thursday as the former President is in Whitehaven and the candidate is preparing for another television debate Thursday in Milwaukee with Sanders.
And early voting opened Downtown Wednesday.
The first day's turnout Wednesday was 177 early and absentee voters. Combined with another 645 absentee votes cast before the early voting period, that makes 822 early or absentee votes.
Another Republican contender on the ballot in Tennessee is out of the race. New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie dropped out the day after his dismal finish in New Hampshire. He did not have a slate of delegates on the ballot here.

86. Cates Wants Detail on Downtown Agreements -

From Mud Island River Park across the Memphis harbor to The Pyramid and further east to St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital – there are a lot of connections as the areas head toward a new incarnation.

87. Last Word: Out of Time, Brian Collins and Fear of Heights & A Different No Gang Zone -

I have a confession. Hillary Clinton is not happy with me.
I’ve seen the signs in recent weeks but didn’t want to accept the truth.
Then Wednesday evening, as I was about to put this column together, I got an email from the former First Lady and Secretary of State and Democratic presidential contender.
The subject line cut to the chase: “We’re running out of time, Bill.”
The message itself, on a backdrop of Blue State blue read:

88. Logistics Startup Exec: Amazon Gunning for FedEx -

The number of voices in the technology world convinced that Amazon has stuck a target on the back of FedEx – as well as its larger competitor, UPS – continues to grow.

The latest is Matthew Hertz, director of operations at package shipment startup Shyp. He took to social networking service LinkedIn in recent days to pen a commentary about why Amazon’s emergence as a significant logistics alternative appears to be a matter of when, not if.

89. Insider Q&A: Allianz Strategist Hooper on Market Turmoil -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Last year was the stock market's first down year since 2008, and this year has opened with a thud. The market is down 8 percent in the first two weeks of trading, the worst start to a year ever.

90. Sea Isle Signs -

By the numbers, Sea Isle Elementary has 36 students out of 517 who are hearing-impaired or deaf. Some are as young as 3 years old. Some are fifth-graders who in August will leave the East Memphis campus and their status as “Islanders” for the new frontier of middle school.

91. Fed Official: Low Oil Prices Affecting Central Bank Action -

A key Fed official assured Memphis business leaders during a breakfast address Thursday, Jan. 14, that interest rates won’t climb dramatically this year.

Jim Bullard, the president and CEO of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, told the Economic Club of Memphis that rates today are “crazy low compared to the historical experience in the U.S.” and will “remain accommodative well into the future.”

92. As Oil Plunges, Energy Companies Cut Jobs, Postpone Projects -

LONDON (AP) — The world's biggest oil companies are slashing jobs and backing off major investments as the price of crude falls to new lows — and there may be more pain to come.

Companies like BP, which said Tuesday it is cutting 4,000 jobs, are slimming down to cope with the slump in oil, whose price has plummeted to its lowest level in 12 years and is not expected to recover significantly for months, possibly years. California-based Chevron said last fall that it would eliminate 7,000 jobs, while rival Shell announced 6,500 layoffs.

93. Graffiti Green Light -

Brandon Marshall is a full-time artist, making a living painting commissioned murals for clients. He’s also well-versed in the graffiti world of Memphis, a small but determined group of artists who tag properties around the city.

94. Memphis Banking Officials Brace for Changes In New Year -

As he chatted about the Memphis banking market with a few guests in a conference room at his bank’s headquarters on Quail Hollow Road back in 2010, Magna Bank chairman, president and CEO Kirk Bailey looked into the future and imagined how local mergers must surely be on the way.

95. US Consumer Confidence Rose in December to 5-Month High -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. consumer sentiment rose in December to its highest level since July, lifted in part by low inflation, which has boosted Americans' purchasing power.

The University of Michigan's consumer sentiment index, released Wednesday, rose to 92.6 from 91.3 in November. That's just below this year's average of 92.9, the highest annual average in 11 years.

96. Interstate Numbers Fuel Mississippi Economic Development -

Highway, routes and interstates can be a numbers game when they show up on maps.

And it is common for the same stretch of road to have several numbers and designations.

But in October, the part of U.S. 78 between New Albany, Miss., and the Alabama state line became Interstate 22.

97. Civil Asset Forfeiture: 'It's a State License to Steal' -

The drugs in Kathy Stiltner’s car were over-the-counter antacids. The $12,000 in cash was from an inheritance. Still, police took the money – quite legally – and are still fighting to keep it, even after the drug charge was dropped.

98. Historic Clayborn Temple to be Restored -

Clayborn Temple, the home base for the sanitation worker strikes of 1968, is on its way to restoration after decades of neglect and four years on the market. Nonprofit Neighborhood Preservation Inc. is taking over what is expected to be a multimillion-dollar project to return the church to religious, educational and community uses.

99. Three Games In, How Much Better are Titans? -

At some point, the Tennessee Titans have to grow up.

After blowing an opportunity to take the early lead in the AFC South by letting it slip away against the Indianapolis Colts last Sunday, the Titans now head into their bye week on a downturn with two consecutive losses.

100. Knoxville Police, Fire Hire Employees Despite Red Flags -

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Records show the Knoxville police and fire departments hired multiple employees over the past decade despite red flags in their applications.

Some of the warning signs included drug use and poor driving records, the Knoxville News Sentinel reports.